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Mike

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Here you can offer tips and ask questions about how to get the most out of your camera and associated equipment.

dear deadrie

i have an olympus camedia c-370, people larf at my small lens (oeer missus) an orl my pictures look the same....blurred....should i hold it different, do you have to vaseline the lens? should i take the cling film off it....

oh help me mr bailey

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Would my pictures be better if I bought a camera?

Probably. :mellow:

dear deadrie

i have an olympus camedia c-370, people larf at my small lens (oeer missus) an orl my pictures look the same....blurred....should i hold it different, do you have to vaseline the lens? should i take the cling film off it....

oh help me mr bailey

You're a big man, so a small lens may look silly. May I suggest that you stop pulling your focus back and forth too much, as there are tales of it ruining your eyesight, which might explain the blurred vision. Definitely take the cling film off.... you freak! :sick:

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Hmm Photography and models :bouncy:

Am I still in the Britmodeller forum? I swear this site never asked for credit card details before :whistle:

Seriously - Jons top tip for model photos - get a tripod.

Then set your camera ( digital, one would hope in the 21st century) to manual, and bracket your pics - its never been easier to do this as you can 'waste' as many shots as you like, and get a good pic or two out of the results.

Just in case 'bracketing' is a foreign term - a bit like Blitzkreig, Drole de Guerre, Lardy cake or Canstkickaboginawallannoditwiyored, then heres the gen :pipe:

With your camera set to manual or M you control both exposure and aperture. So if you set aperture to say f8, then your camera will tell you the best exposure time for this setting - lets say 1/60 second. So take the shot, then to bracket - alter the exposure to be /30 and then 1/120 second ie the 2 exposure times either side of the recommended shot. In a similar vein keep the exposure fixed and alter the aperture setting 1 stop either way.

Why do this? well other than allow you to be a camera bore :) it will mean you have a better chance of capturing details on your model pics.

Quite often your cameras on-board sensors will try and focus (literally) on a certain area of your subject - so the exposure it advises is based on this area. Bracketing your shot gives you the chance to capture the details your camera might not be too interested in - a longer exposure will allow more light in so giving more detail in shadowy areas; changing the aperture alters the depth of field - which controls how much of your subject is at the centre of the camera's focus - hence a smaller aperture will give greater focus to a deeper image, and a bigger aperture will make everything thats not being focused on more blurry.

Digi camers let you try this technique without wasting loads of film and prints. Just try it and then delete what you don't like on screen or on your PC. Keep a methodical record of what you did too - so you know what works and what doesnt. As an example - I will shoot 30-40 pics of a model using this technique, and end up with 6-10 good ones.

So wheres Michelle Marsh then?

Cheers

JonKT

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John T,

What would be a basic setting for shotting in macro mode?

I have a Nikon D70 with a 18~70m lens.

Cheers,

Bob

Hi Bob - in truth - no idea - I would guess that you need to refer to your cameras manual.

As a general rule of thumb - when I shoot in macro in my camera I find that I need a wider ( ie larger) aperture setting than when shooting in normal mode, and a longer exposure ( I guess its because at this close range you need a lot of light to pick up the details close in). As I also shoot pics on a tripod - this isnt a problem.

Sorry - not much help I know.

Cheers

jonKT

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Oi, you lot. This is a welcome thread... start your own threads in this section if you've got any questions! :doh:

I dunno... :rolleyes:

Sorry Mike, but hey - think of it as a poplee-ar idea !! :)

please feel free to move this to a new thread on the section.

So anyway - where is Michelle Marsh? :coat:

Cheers

JonKT

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Sorry Mike, but hey - think of it as a poplee-ar idea !! :)

please feel free to move this to a new thread on the section.

I'll be happy if you all just shurrup talking cameras on this thread ;)

So anyway - where is Michelle Marsh? :coat:

Up me bum :P

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Here you can offer tips and ask questions about how to get the most out of your camera and associated equipment.

See right there it says "here" and then you chastise us for doing exactly wot you told us to do "here" and told us "not here"

You sure you aren't a woman?

Up me bum :P

Is this a new photography technique? and can we have pictures?

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Well then, now all I need to do is figure out how to set the aperture and exposure on my camera! :)

Apparently I haven't reached that part of the instruction manual yet...

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Probably. :mellow:

You're a big man, so a small lens may look silly. May I suggest that you stop pulling your focus back and forth too much, as there are tales of it ruining your eyesight, which might explain the blurred vision. Definitely take the cling film off.... you freak! :sick:

thank you dierdre on removing the cling film my sight came back "its a miracle" the hairy focus palms are receding .....YOU ARE WONDERFUL :analintruder: ....WHERE DO I SEND THE CHEQUE :evil_laugh:

your adoring servant ian

ps my photos are still blurred, maybe i'm shaking so much in happiness :suicide:

Edited by iant
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  • 8 months later...
dear deadrie

i have an olympus camedia c-370, people larf at my small lens (oeer missus) an orl my pictures look the same....blurred....should i hold it different, do you have to vaseline the lens? should i take the cling film off it....

oh help me mr bailey

by the look of yor avatar i'd say your tits were getting in the way :bouncy:

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Hi Bob - in truth - no idea - I would guess that you need to refer to your cameras manual.

As a general rule of thumb - when I shoot in macro in my camera I find that I need a wider ( ie larger) aperture setting than when shooting in normal mode, and a longer exposure ( I guess its because at this close range you need a lot of light to pick up the details close in). As I also shoot pics on a tripod - this isnt a problem.

Sorry - not much help I know.

Cheers

jonKT

incorrect when shooting macro all the same rules apply as normal photography except , as like if you were using a large telephoto lens your depth of field ( area objects are in focus in ) gets a lot smaller , therefore focusing becomes more critical ( a tripod is a must ) to get your largest depth of field you need to use your smallest apperture going up the appertures gradualy to a narrower d.o.f. depending how much you want to blur the background out of focus ..

point to remember the larger the number of the apperture the smaller the apperture is opened

this is where i feel you have become confused and dont forget

when you shut the apperture down one stop if on manual you also have to take the shutter speed down a stop too eg if on 250th sec take down to 125th sec because you have lost that equivalent of time on your exposure

also if setting up a studio and you are on a tripod for best quality use a low iso so pictures are clearer

and last but not least if you use a compact or bridge camera dont instantly assume you have to be close in macro sometimes if you use macro at a distance and zoom in it gives better results ..........

Edited by tornado64
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