Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'truck'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modelling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Manufacturer News
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aerocraft Models
    • Above & Beyond Retail
    • Air-craft.net
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Bearhobbies.com
    • Bernd.M Modellbau
    • BlackMike Models
    • Casemate UK
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • DACO Products
    • Freightdog Models
    • Hannants
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • fantasy Printshop
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • MikroMir
    • Kagero Publishing
    • Kingkit
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • MJW Models
    • NeOmega & Vector Resin
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Pocketbond Limited
    • Precision Ice and Snow
    • Radu Brinzan Productions
    • Red Roo Models
    • RES/KIT
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Scratchaeronautics
    • Shelf Oddity
    • Small Stuff Models
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Starling Models
    • Thunderbird Models
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Tirydium Models
    • Topnotch - Bases and Masks for Models
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • White Ensign Models
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds
  • Brits Abroad GB

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 44 results

  1. 917t Japanese Truck (Yokohama Cab) 1:72 IBG Models (71060) The G917T was a compact truck designed by Ford and manufactured around the world in the 1930s and 40s. The British version was known as the Fordson E88. A version of the truck apparently made its way into production in Japan, albeit with a redesigned cab, where it was known as the Model 81 3 ton truck. The truck was generally powered by a 3.6 litre V8 petrol engine which developed between 75 and 90hp. Four-wheel-drive versions were also developed for military use. IBG Models have built up quite a reputation with their range of excellent kits. The quality of casting and detail easily rivals Revell at their best, but more often than not, extras such as photo etched parts are also included. This new truck is a based on the German 917T truck that I reviewed recently, but it is nevertheless a very welcome addition to the range. It arrives packed into a top-opening box about twice the size it needs to be (I've noticed that IBG Models always us the same sized box regardless of the model) inside which are five frames of crisply moulded grey plastic, a frame of clear parts, a small fret of photo etched details and a small decal sheet. The plastic parts are crisply moulded and well detailed. Construction starts with the engine. This comprises eight parts, including a photo etched brass fan. This is quite something to behold for a kit in this scale and at this price point. The axles, drive shaft and brake assemblies are also assembled and fitted to the ladder chassis at this stage. Photo etched parts are used for some of the finer details such as the tow hooks. The radiator and wheels must be added before work on the body can begin. Both are well-detailed and the tyres are moulded onto the wheel hubs. The cab is nice detailed and includes a two-part bench seat, a steering wheel with separate column, a gear stick and handbrake. A neat little crew figure is also included. Two rifles are provided, and these fit to the rear wall of the cab. The roof and doors are moulded as separate parts and the latter are designed in such a way that they can be fixed in place in either open or closed position. The front part of the body is made up of a bonnet, two sides and the separate front wings. The bonnet is not designed to be finished in the open position. The rear of the truck is a simple wooden-sided flat load area. Unlike the Wehrmacht version of the kit, there is no option for a tarpaulin cover. Finishing touches include a small tool box and a photo etched part that folds up into a box to hold two clear plastic water bottles. If you want to load the truck fully however, you'll need to turn to aftermarket producers for help. The decal sheet provides for a single colour scheme appropriate for trucks based in China between 1940 and 1945. You can change the plate and other identification numbers in order to add a bit of variety, however. Conclusion I really enjoy reviewing IBG's kits and it's great to see them address the paucity of Japanese softskin vehicles with this handy truck. It's curious that IBG Models always include crew figures with their kits of Japanese subjects, but not with any other kits. Presumably this is because of some form of tie-up with a Japanese company and this is an additional requirement. Whatever, it's a nice touch and it very welcome. Overall, this kit can be highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. 917t German Truck 1:72 IBG Models The G917T was a compact truck designed by Ford and manufactured around the world in the 1930s and 40s. The British version was known as the Fordson E88, while German variants included the 987T, 987TG, 917T and 997T. The German variants were manufactured at Ford Cologne until 1942, when production ceased due to the supply of components being cut off following the USA's entry into World War Two. The truck was powered by a 3.6 litre V8 petrol engine which developed between 75 and 90hp. Four-wheel-drive and stretched wheelbase ambulances were also developed for use by the Wehrmacht. IBG Models have built up quite a reputation with their range of excellent kits. The quality of casting and detail easily rivals Revell at their best, but more often than not, extras such as photo etched parts are also included. This new kit of the classic Ford-designed truck is a very welcome addition to the range. It arrives packed into a top-opening box about twice the size it needs to be (I've noticed that IBG Models always us the same sized box regardless of the model) inside which are three frames of crisply moulded grey plastic, a separately moulded tarpaulin cover, a frame of clear parts, a small fret of photo etched details and a small decal sheet. The plastic parts are crisply moulded and well detailed. Construction starts with the engine. This comprises eight parts, including a photo etched brass fan. This is quite something to behold for a kit in this scale and at this price point. The axles, drive shaft and brake assemblies are also assembled and fitted to the ladder chassis at this stage. Photo etched parts are used for some of the finer details such as the tow hooks. The radiator and wheels must be added before work on the body can begin. Both are well-detailed and the tyres are moulded onto the wheel hubs. The cab is nice detailed and includes a two-part bench seat, a steering wheel with separate column, a gear stick and handbrake. The roof and doors are moulded as separate parts. The doors are designed in such a way that they can be fixed in place in either open or closed position. The front part of the body is made up of a bonnet, two sides and the separate front wings. Despite all the detail included in the engine, the bonnet is not designed to be finished in the open position. The load area can be finised with or without tarpaulin. If you choose not to use the part for the tarpaulin cover, then a wooden-sided flat load area can be added in its place. The tarpaulin cover is moulded as a single part, however, which is much easier for the modeller in a hurry! Finishing touches include a spare jerry can and a rack to hold it, as well as some tools. If you want to load the truck up, you'll need to turn to aftermarket producers for help. The decal sheet provides two options: 6th Panzer Division, Eastern Front, 1941; and DAK, North Africa, 1942. Conclusion I really enjoy reviewing IBG's kits and it's great to see them turn out another important softskin vehicle. Detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture looks to be up there with the very best. It's a shame crew figures haven't been included, but this is nevertheless a great little kit that can be highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Soviet AA Type 1.5 ton Railroad Truck MiniArt 1:35 The GAZ AA 1.5 ton truck was a licenced manufactured version of the Ford AA truck for the Soviet Union, where more than 950,000 were built. There were many body styles, but the most recognisable version was the flat bed truck as depicted in this kit, although being slightly different, in that instead of standard wheels with rubber tyres, this on is fitted with rail wagon style wheels. The model is contained within a very attractive, bright and colourful box that MiniArt have started using recently. Inside, there are nineteen sprues in grey styrene, one of clear, and a single sheet of etch brass plus a full decal sheet. Unlike the original kit of this truck, you don’t get any cargo provided, but you do get a nice set of rails for the truck to be displayed on. The build starts with the nicely detailed engine with the block, head and sump being glued together followed by the addition of the starter motor, alternator, water pump, auxiliary drive belt, cooling fan, cooling pipes, oil filler pipe. The gearbox is then assembled from three parts and glued to the engine assembly, along with intake manifold. The two, chassis rails are fitted with an extra beam where the truck bed will sit. These are held on the rails by three “U” bolts and their associated clamps. The rear leaf springs are then attached via their support links. Four cross members are then used to join the rails together, as well as the rear chassis end piece, to which the towing eye spring is attached. There is a three piece box attached to the left hand rail, near the front. The rear axle and differential is made up from six parts, if you include the drive shaft. This assembly is then fitted to the rear leaf springs, while the front suspension is made up on a single leaf spring assembly mounted laterally and fitted with the front axle, steering rack and support arms. The rear differential is then fitted with a triangular support structure which also supports the brake rods. The front and rear brake drums are then attached to the axles, followed by two wheels per side on the rear axle and one per side on the front axle. The wheels are then assembled from the outer hub, to which the inner, flanged ring is attached and the central boss detail. The front wheels are then glued to direct to the brake drums, while the rears are fitted with a small spacer between the drum and the wheel. The front chassis end cap is attached as are the two bumper side arms, while to the rear there is a choice of towing hook styles, one, just a single piece unit, the other is made up from five parts. The engine assembly is then glued into position, followed by the two piece radiator, two piece front bumper and two support brackets on chassis rails. The five piece exhaust is the attached to the right hand side. The two front fenders are each single piece units to which a small hook is attached before being fitted to the chassis, as are two of the lateral truck bed beams. The cab floor is also attached and fitted with the bench seat, gear stick and panel support. The three piece wiper/wiper motor is fitted to the front screen surround, once the clear screen has been fitted. The screen is then fitted with two small arms, these can be glued in either the stowed position for a closed screen, or down, so that the screen can be posed open. The rear of the bonnet section is then glued to the front of the screen support, along with eh two side sections and engine bulkhead which has been detailed with several small parts. Inside the foot pedals are attached lower bulkhead, part of the floor panel fitted earlier, before the front cab assembly is glued into place, along with the steering column and wheel. The three piece rear panel and roof of the cab are then glued into place, as are the two bonnet supports, between the bulkhead and the radiator. Each door is made up from five parts, including clear section, door handles, latches and window winders. The doors are then put to one side. The bonnet halves, split longitudinally are each made from two sections, which can be posed in either the open or closed positions, allowing the modeller to show of the engine should they so choose. The doors are then attached; again, they can be posed open or closed as the modeller wishes. The three piece horn is attached to a rail, which in turn is attached to the front of the vehicle between the fenders. The two, three piece headlights are then fitted, as is the single, two piece wing mirror, on the drivers side. The truck bed is then assembled from five parts, depending on the colour scheme being built you can have either four plank sides, front and rear sections you can use six plank sections. The bed, sides, front and rear sections are glued into place, completing the truck section of the build. The rest of the build concentrates on the tracks. These consists of sleepers, two lengths of rail per side being joined by fishplates, and the individual rail ties. When assembled and painted there will look very realistic, when compared with the Trumpeter style of rail track. Since they are of Russian gauge, you won’t be able to use them with Axis vehicles, but MiniArt do additional sets of track if you wish to build a rail diorama with the Soviet armoured railcars that are on the market. Decals The decal sheet gives the modeller six options. The decals are beautifully printed, are clear and in good register with a slightly matt finish. The different companies Initials are included for two of the options, as well as the other vehicles respective registration plates and insignia. The options are:- An Unidentified Waffen SS unit, presumably the Reichskommissariat, Ostland 1943 – 1944, four plank bed. An Unidentified Soviet unit used between 1941 and 1945, with four plank bed. An Unidentified of the Wehrmacht, on the Eastern Front 1941 – 1943, with a four plank bed. Deutsche Reichsbahn, (Imperial Railway Administration), on the Eastern Front between 1942 and 1943 with a four plank bed. An Unidentified Soviet unit used between 1941 and 1945 with a six plank bed. Deutsche Reichsbahn, (Imperial Railway Administration), Ostland, used between 1943 and 1944 with a six plank bed. Conclusion I just love these trucks from MiniArt, they are so evocative of the period and can be used in so many situations, whether on their own, or an evocative diorama. The oddity that is having a truck on rails will make it stand out in your collection and certainly be a conversation piece. The staff at MiniArt should be commended for giving us modellers such great kits with pretty much everything you need, just let your imagination run wild. Review sample courtesy of Miniart - Distibuted in the UK By Creative Models
  4. Hello Few pictures of my latest project.
  5. Peterbilt 352 'Pacemaker' 1:25 plastic kit from AMT Peterbilt was founded in 1839 in Oakland California making medium to heavy trucks mainly for the US market. If you think of a classic American truck its most likely to be a Peterbilt that you imagine with a big chrome grill and hood before cab layout. Peterbilt have also built cab over trucks but with the liberal rules on truck lengths in America drivers prefer the bonneted trucks, the 352 cab over ‘Pacemaker’ is modelled in 1:25 here by AMT. The 352 was launched in 1959 and was given the nickname ‘Pacemaker’ in 1969 by a contest among the staff at Peterbilt. The cab is made from sheet metal, and came in a variety of cab lengths from short day cab, to a massive 110inch long sleeper cab. The kit is old, so expect some flash and to put in some work on the fit. It is moulded in white plastic mostly with 2 chrome sprues and some clear parts for the windows, and orange and red clear for the lights. I will strip the chrome as it’s a little ‘toy’ like for me. In my haste to get building this I forgot to get pictures of the cab before I sprayed it in primer! The construction starts with the engine and transmission, the engine is a Detroit Diesel V8 and is made up of lots of different parts to give an accurate and detailed part for your model and the instructions name the parts like the valve covers, oil filters, etc, to give some insight into the makeup of the truck. This continues throughout the build. The engine and transmission can be detailed, and painted separately to the rest of the chassis. The chassis is a 157-inch wheel base and is made up of 2 rails, joined by 6 cross members, take care to keep the chassis straight and true or you will end up with a bent model. The front axle sits on metal leaf springs, with the duel drive back axles on air ride with the next 4 stages on the instructions covering the axles and suspension. These are all well detailed and include correct drive hubs, my only criticism is the front axle is fixed straight so you can’t pose the wheels turned. An aftermarket axle could be swapped in you wanted here. Final parts like the diesel tanks, air tanks and other ancillary parts can now be added to the chassis, as normal I would add some wires and cables to simulate the loom and air hoses around the chassis, have a look online and in the walk around section for inspiration here. The instructions give advice on the chassis colours, 2 decal options are included ‘Patriot’ would need painting light blue (to match the decals) or Orange and blue but as most Peterbilt where custom built, or painted during their service lives anything could be used. Check references if copying a real truck here. Now you move onto the cab, the interior, the main floor and lower walls come as a single tub with the centre of the dash board, there isn’t many parts to add as the cabs are simple inside and the instructions give details on the factory interior colours. The cab is the 86-inch mid-range version and is moulded in a single part and has some nice rivet detail on the outside and lots of holes in the roof for the air conditioner, roof lights and horns so if you don’t want these, get the filler out! You can paint and decal the cab shell, before glazing and sliding the interior tub in to make the build go easier. A pair of exhaust stacks are attached to the back of the cab, with some steps under the floor. The cab is attached to the chassis with 2 pins at the front so you can pose the cab tilted to show off the engine. I would probably add some ballast to the back of the chassis, maybe in the tyres to balance the model­­­. There are 10 tyres in the box, made from soft rubber with good tread and side wall detail to fit on the ‘Alcoa’ wheels found on the chrome sprue, each wheel is made from 2 parts sandwiching the tyre. From experience you can slip the tyre over the lip once they are assembled and painted. Trucks in the USA at the time the 352 was in production where not painted in company liveries, they came with a vast array of colourful stripe sets for the cabs, this kit includes a blue and red set, and a special ‘Patriot’ scheme along with some company names for the doors, Peterbilt logos and legal lettering for the cabs. The decal is very colourful and well printed with sharp crisp details and options. Conclusion This is a welcome re-issue from Round2 of a classic American truck with lots of good detail on the parts. It’s an old kit so expect some work on cleaning and fitting the parts. There is aftermarket cab decals and other parts to suit this truck to make it your own and the numerous options on the 352 means you can chop the cab, and chassis to make different versions of the 352. Review sample courtesy of UK distributors for
  6. So while the gloss is drying on build No1, it's time to crack on with the main event. Another 2 x12 hr builds for this as want to give the paint the best chance to dry. Starting shots Time to crack out the Tamiya Pink Primer.
  7. Hi folks. It's been a while since I last posted anything as I have have to concentrate more on my business. This is one of the many kits that I received from good ol' Santa. I decided not to add any lighting or anything and to pretty much build it out-of-the-box with my own colour scheme (Ford Gold). This is the first Ming kit that I've made and, overall, I was quite pleased with everything. The only downside was that no chrome parts were included and as these kits cost that little bit more, I was disappointed as Revell include chrome parts in a lot of their kits for less cost. Anyway, I had an old Routemaster Bus engine going spare so I thought about mounting it on the back of the truck to give it a payload. Also added are chains, rope and wood supports to keep it secure. I have included some section builds in the WIP forum to show some of the details that are hidden when assembled. Thanks for viewing. It's always appreciated.
  8. Hi all. With my keen interest in fire trucks, I couldn't resist this kit. I have seen videos of this kit online showing it with lights and blues and two's, etc, and have been impressed. Usually I download the assembly instructions a month or so before buying any kit that I want to add lights to so that I can work out if it is possible or not. Alas, I just could not find any instructions posted online at all so this will be built with one eye shut and with a lot of luck and hope. One thing that really impressed me was that the main chassis was in one piece, so no worry about getting it dead square, no cross members to fiddle with, etc. Unfortunately this kit is going to take me a long time to do as I have a very busy period coming up at work and may not progress as much as I'd like to. I do not have much patience, so this will be a challenge in itself. So here we go. I thank you for your patience in advance should you wish to follow this build. The impressive box lid. I wonder if mine will look like this? Work station ready to go. Tea, phone and cigs at the ready. All washed and dried and priority items at the top. Everything that is possible to fit to the chassis before spraying. The main powerhouse, assembled, sprayed and ready to place. The chassis, sprayed and the engine fitted........... Thanks for looking.
  9. Hi While renewing all of the pictures of the builds that I have done because of this Photobucket saga, I came across a few pictures of the build in progress for this kit and thought it may be an idea to post them. They may be helpful to others who have this kit and want to do something similar. The link to the finished build can be found in the RFI section or by clicking HERE
  10. Hi everyone. It's been a while since I last posted as I've had to concentrate on getting my new design business going. I have just finished this nice little number from Meng. I haven't done one of their kits before and wanted to see how well they were moulded, etc. I must say the extra cost seems to be worth it as there was no sign of flashing and the plastic compound was nice to work with. Detail was pretty good though some chrome parts would have been appreciated (especially the grill section). For the price this was a disappointment as Revell include it in some of their kits which are cheaper. Anyway, below are some pictures of certain sections created but before fitting. I didn't have time to photograph the build step-by-step but took some to show some of the interior details before they were hid by the assembly. The finished product will soon be on the RFI forum but I have included a taster below. Thanks for looking.
  11. Hi folks I know most people are not so keen on modern vehicles but I managed to get this kit for half price and couldn't resist. My last truck kit was the Iveco Stralis Truck Cab that I added lights to HERE I was interested in adding a trailer to it with connected lighting but I could not justify spending all that money on just a trailer when I could buy a kit with much more work and parts. Anyway, I saw this kit and thought that it would give me the perfect opportunity to add lights to both the cab and trailer. I am making more and more kits by Italeri as the quality is quite good and the prices are reasonable. The plastic seems more brittle than Revell and some of the part connections to the sprues can be tough to cut through but, overall, the quality and detail is good. The connection between the cab and trailer is just a 6 pin connector for when I have to separate them for cleaning, etc. This is the result. I hope it inspires others to have a go. I have posted a video HERE Thanks for looking folks. Any comments welcome. First, the impressive box: Side lights on: Side and brake lights on: Trailer reversing lights: Female driver wearing HV jacket and seat belts: Head, side and high beam/flasher on: Internal lights on: Notice the curtains on the left side of the cab. The top bunk is folded upwards as in the real thing and I have added a folded ladder. I will try to get a picture of this. Preparation of the dash, with Sat Nav, etc. The hose connections:
  12. Hi Everyone. It's good to be back. I wanted to have a break from building something and adding lights and so decided to make something simple and relaxing. If any of you feel like doing the same................do not get this kit!!! Before building this I checked out other members builds and saw how amazing they were. I read about the quality of the plastic and the flaws people found so as to learn any lessons beforehand. Why didn't I take more notice? I've been building kits for over 48 years (all makes) and this must be the worst. The injection mould must have been over 100 years old and the operator must have had to use several cans of releasing spray to stop the plastic from sticking to the mould. Firstly, there was so much flashing on nearly every part and secondry, no matter how much I scrubbed the plastic paint just would not adhere. Even primer caused problems. Many of the parts were bent and the moulding marks were in full view so could not be ingnored. If you like a challenge, get this kit. You will use all of the skills you have learned in building it. Anyway, rant over. It was from a Christmas present list that I received from Santa. The good thing is that it was typical Airfix plastic in that it was quite strong and nice to cut and the decals were first class (one of the best so far). Overall it looks pleasant to look at (not too closely) and will go well with my Routemaster Bus. It is not my best but, under the circumstances, I was just glad to finish it and decided to be brave and put it on the RFI forum. If they ever decided to bring this out with a new mould I would very probably buy it again as it is a nice kit to look at. Hope you like the pictures and I salute those who have built it before me. Thanks for looking folks and look forward to any views, good or bad.
  13. Nacktgeboren

    ZiL-131, 1/35 ICM

    ZiL-131 timber truck, ICM 1/35
  14. Hello This is my first post on this forum. I want to present some pictures of one of my my first models. This is the Freightliner version Dump produced by Italeri 1:24. Model finished in 2015. I added a little more detail to the engine (wires etc.) Enjoy the photos. Cheers Mike
  15. While waiting for the electrical equipment to finish my Schlingmann HLF20 fire truck (here) I have been mulling over and over as to what my next build will be. I like to try new builds that I have not done before which offer a challenge to me and these are getting less and less to choose from (within my budget and available space). I could not find any stockists of any decent buses or fire truck kits so decided to go off the page and look at military again (having built the GTK Boxer here). My lovely daughters offered to put some money towards a new kit as a Fathers Day present and so I opted for this kit. I have not made a Trumpeter kit before but all the parts seem to be in good condition and of good construction. There seems to be a few variations of this build but, not really knowing much about military vehicles, I have decided that I will probably build this kit 'out of the box'. As others may know, this may change as I go along and as for lighting (most of my builds have lighting) I will have to see what is possible. One thing I am already looking at is that the wheels seem to be in a fixed position. I don't like that so.....................................(here I go already). It has photo etched parts so that will be a whole new challenge and I have bought some 'accessories' to create atmosphere for the finished model. I may decide to put the GTK Boxer on the trailor but may opt for buying a modern tank. I hope you find some interest in this build.
  16. This is my finished build of the Faun Tank Transporter and Leopard 2 A5 that many have followed in the WIP section. It is pretty much 'out of the box' with just a few mods to give it some atmosphere. I hope you enjoy and thanks for looking. More photo's available HERE
  17. HAD Models is to release a 1/48th URAL-4320 APA-5D Russian standard modern airfield starter vehicle resin kit - ref. 348002 Source: http://www.hadmodels.com/348002_ural_4320_apa_5d_indito_kocsi_148_elorendelheto_20_os_aron_1481 V.P.
  18. M1078 from Trumpeter, the whole is model out-of-box) Painted with tamiya and lifecolor, weathered with AMMO and AK)
  19. Hi everyone At last I have finished a project that I started in November last year, due to the fact that I broke off to make the Revell Boxer (posted elsewhere). As I mentioned before, I have a new airbrush kit and making this model certainly taught me a lot about going from painting by hand to using an airbrush. The main annoyance is that I actually bought a Revell spray can for the main cab body and then ran out of it half way through, only to have to pay almost £14 to buy another one. The courier charge was more than the can but as there is not a Revell supplier near me, I had little choice. Next time I will try airbrushing the actual model body rather than using a can. Also, there were slight colour differences. Still, I learn......I learn (as Manuel would say). The lights were a bit of a nightmare as there was so little space to work in. I'd like to have added some more but my patience was getting very thin and thought it best to quit while I was ahead. Will anyone notice the actual tea in the cup on the dash? Anyway, I'm taking a chance and posting the results below. I may go back to it at some point to just finish it off to what I think is a more suitable standard or to improve it with any suggestions from any replies. Thanks for looking. I hope it will inspire others to push the boundries a little. More pictures can be found HERE including more pictures of the actual build. The video can be found here
  20. Since I'm waiting for decals to finish off my F-8s, I'm building a truck. I was commissioned by the KW saleman who sold the actual truck, part of a fleet to Morgan Fuels. Morgan hauls bulk fuel for Esso in southern and central Ontario and sometimes Manitoba. The model is a First Gear KW T880. I was lucky and found it on evibay. I say lucky because the truck originally had a lowboy trailer, the seller had two that he kept the trailers from. I also found an International Durastar with the near correct tank. Making one from the two. I hope to sell the IH and the leftover KW parts and get some money back. The pictures ahow the actual truck(will be #49)and the other shows what I am starting with. Had some fun with the lift axle before removing it, ever wonder what a KW would look like with hydraulics? Here's where it is right now. Lots more trimming than I expected. Lengthened the rear of the tank, this covers the hose reels. When I glue the top and bottom of the tank body, I missed seeing that it should have been a bit taller. No way to cut this up so I had to ad frame rails under the original tank frame. Added to the rear bulkhead, made a new end cap. I couldn't decide to move the under body cabinets back or just cut them off and make new ones, well I cut them off. Most of the worst parts done now. The bag of sand was inside the tank, I guess just to weigh it down for the die cast effect? Also shown is the test page for the decals.
  21. dpm1did1

    Hasegawa Toyota Starter Truck

    I discovered one of these in my stash hidden as a freebie inside another kit and thought it might look nice next to my Judy one day. It's all sealed and in good order minus the box so a nice addition to the 'shelf breakers'. Haswgawa Toyota Starter Truck Gb http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MjYzWDUwMA==/z/dqAAAOxy4dNS2TTG/$_35.JPG http://www.hasegawausa.com/product-images/hsgs1817bs01t-lg.jpg (I see once again it's converting pix to urls...pita!) Obviously not a popular subject (only found 1 BM build pic, although hints of at least 2 more) but I am hoping someone can point to pix, plans etc of the originals. Google bought up 2 very poor quality pix but little else. Also see there's a tanker that shows up occasionally. Perhaps a fleabay/market hunt is in order... At least it will be different to the current fad of RAF WW2 vehicles.
  22. The Toyota G series of trucks was built in huge numbers by the Japanese with the GB alone amassing 19870 units between 1938 and 1942. Hasegawa first released this 1/72 version complete with Hucks Starter in 1978. Unfortunately it's noted as 'retired' on their site but it pops up occasionally from the usual 2nd hand suppliers. I was planning on starting it in a week or two but plans change and out it came ahead of schedule. So is it worth building?...lets find out..
  23. nacho bailon

    ZIL-131 UN

    Hi all this is my last creature: ICM 1/35th ZIL-131 truck in the UN version. Scene elements (street lamp, bins, barrels, etc...) from Migproductions. Painted and weathered with Tamiya, AK interacive, Ammo, Vallejo and Model Color. Hope you like it. Cheers Nacho
  24. Zil 131 Heavy Utility Truck Revell 1:35 History The ZiL-131 is a general purpose military truck. It's production commenced in 1966. It replaced the previous ZiL-157. Production ceased in 1994 with nearly 1 000 000 of these military trucks produced. Despite it's age the ZiL-131 is widely used by Russian military, as well as a number of other countries. Vehicle has a conventional layout. The baseline model of the ZiL-131 is a cargo truck. It has a payload capacity of 3 500 kg off-road and 5 000 kg on hard surface roads. It is used to carry troops, cargo and other military equipment. Cargo area is covered with bows and canvas cover. Vehicle can also tow trailers or artillery pieces with a maximum weight of 4 000 kg off-road and 6 500 kg on hard surface roads. An all-metal cab of this truck provides seating for the driver and two passengers. The ZiL-131 is powered by a V8 petrol engine, developing 150 hp. Engine is coupled with a 5-speed manual gearbox. Vehicle has a full-time all-wheel drive; however the front axle can be disconnected on hard surface roads. It is also fitted with a central tyre inflation system. A self-recovery winch was fitted on some models. The Model This is a re-pop of the ICM kit released in 2014 and comes in the rather weak open ended box we’ve come to expect from Revell, but with a nice artists impression of the truck in use. Inside, there are six sprues of dark caramel coloured sprues, a sprue of clear, eight vinyl tyres and a small sheet of decals. The parts are well moulded, with no sign of flash and fewer moulding pips than normally found in these types of kit. While the parts look good, the moulded details appear a little soft and indistinct in places. As with most trucks the build begins with the chassis, but before the work can begin on those there are a number of sub-assemblies required. These include the front, middle and rear cross members, transfer box frame, transfer box and air accumulator tanks. The chassis rails have the front leaf springs and rear suspension mounts pre-moulded into them. With the main chassis structure assembled and the sub-assemblies fitted, the rear corner bumper parts and towing hook are attached along. The fuel tanks are then assembled, each made up of three parts including the fill cap and these are then fitted to their support trays which are in turn attached to the out chassis rails, as are the rear engine mounts. The engine itself is a good balance of detail and ease of build. The gearbox and block are provided in two halves, with the drive shaft moulded onto one half. The single piece cylinder head is fitted, along with the fuel filter, oil filter, oil cooler, alternator and inlet manifolds. The three accessory drive belts are fitted to the front and finished off with the fan. The completed engine is then fitted into the chassis before the large two piece air filter unit is attached. The exhaust system comes as one long part to which the other half of the silence is attached before the system is attached to the chassis. There is an option to fit a large winch to the front of the chassis and this is made up of eight parts, just make sure the winch drive shaft is connected to the transfer box before gluing the unit in place. With the winch in place the radiator is attached, followed by the front bumper which consists of five parts. The rear suspension consists of the two rear axles/differentials which are then joined together with the two leaf springs. Each of the six wheels are single piece units to which an air regulator is fitted, followed by the vinyl tyre. The rear wheels are fitted to the rear suspension after which the two gear housings with drive shafts are attached to the top of the differential. The whole assembly is then attached to the suspension mounts on the chassis followed by the fitting of the suspension arms and a lower cross member. The front differential is assembled from two halves and fitted with the gear housing, drive shaft and steering rack, before being fitted to the front leaf springs along with the wheels, shock absorbers and suspension arms. The spare wheel is fitted with a swing arm style fitting then into the two piece wheel cage which also contains the outer panels of the generator box which is finished off with the fitting of the other panels and the whole assembly fitted to the top of the chassis. Moving onto the cab which is made up of windscreen/front valance, two bonnet sides plus floor pan, and fitted out with the steering column, steering wheel, individual foot pedals, gear sticks, and the seats, which are each made up of the squab, backrest and two armrests/support frames. The rear bulkhead is then fitted with the rear window and attached to the rear of the cab. This is then followed by the windscreen, wiper and roof. The cab doors are separate and poseable whether the modeller wants them opened or closed. They are made up of the door, “glass” and door card, to which the window winder, door handle and grab handle are attached. The doors are then fitted to the cab. The two front wheel arches are fitted with the large headlight cluster into which the clear parts are added, and then attached to the front chassis before the cab sub-assembly is positioned over them. The bonnet and front grille are then fitted, completing the front end of the model. The final few sections in the instructions deal with the assembly of the truck bed. The bed itself is fitted on the underside with the lateral and longitudinal support beams then, on the upperside with the front, side and rear panels, and has the option of having the interior bench seats posed either folded or extended. The underside rear is fitted out with the rear mudflaps, reflectors and the division board. With the bed assembly attached to the chassis it’s only a matter of attaching the wing mirrors, spotlight, exterior door handles and the tilt rails, which unfortunately come moulded together so there isn’t any way of making a tilt other than scratchbuilding one, thereby finishing the build. Decals The small decal sheet contains markings for four vehicles these are:- NVA, (East German Army) 1980 GSTD/GSSD (Soviet Army), East Germany, 1980 Russian Army, 2000 Soviet Army, Afghanistan, 1980 The sheet includes instrument decals, division markings, unit markings and vehicle identification numbers. Conclusion This appears to be a much simpler build than some of the recent truck releases with seen. That said it still looks like a great kit of this rugged looking truck. Whilst not having that much in the way of different paint schemes, it would make a great practice piece for heavy weathering. It’ll also make for a different quick build between making heavy armour. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  25. Shar2

    KRAZ-260 Heavy Utility Truck. 1:35

    KRAZ-260 Heavy Utility Truck Takom 1:35 History Production of the KrAZ-260 began some time during the early 1980s when it replaced the earlier KrAZ-255B on the production lines at the Kremenchug Motor Vehicle Plant. However, the vehicle was not disclosed to the general public until 1985 when examples were displayed towing 152-mm 2A36 nuclear-capable field guns during a Red Square parade - the KrAZ-260 can tow loads of up to 10 tons when fully loaded (30 tons when empty). The Red Square example had an open body equipped with forward-facing bench seats although this had been a parade configuration. The normal body uses a conventional cargo body with tailgate all covered by the usual tilt over bows. A winch is a standard fitting under the cargo body and can be employed for either forward or rearwards recovery, including self-recovery. The overall appearance of the KrAZ-260 is similar to that of the earlier KrAZ-255B but the bonnet is more angular to accommodate the turbocharged diesel engine, and the overall dimensions are slightly larger. As far as can be determined the KrAZ-260 was produced for military service only and as apparently not been delivered to armed forces outside the Soviet Union. The Model The kit comes in a sturdy top opening box with a artistic impression of the vehicle in use in a very snowy environment. Opening the box reveals seven sprues of caramel coloured styrene, one sprue of clear styrene, a small photo etched brass sheet, seven vinyl tyres and a small decal sheet. The mouldings for all the parts are superb, with no sign of flash imperfections and very few moulding pips. As with most truck kits there are a lot of parts that will probably never be seen, particularly the very detailed chassis, suspension and engine, but in my view it’s better to have them than not. The build begins with the assembly of the gearbox, which is provided in two halve, and then finished off with a sump plate; this is followed by the two part engine block to which the gearbox is attached. Since the truck is powered by a V8 diesel there are two cylinder heads to assemble, again each of two halves, to which the injector rails and coils are attached. These are then fitted to the engine block, followed by the alternator, water pump pulley and fuel filter. The exhaust manifolds are next, followed by the CDR valve and oil filter. The turbocharger is assembled from three parts, the turbine housing, compressor housing and attachment plate; the assembly is then fitted with the outlet pipes. The completed sub-assembly is then fitted to the engine with each outlet pipe being attached to the intake manifolds and the turbo intake to the exhaust manifold. The oil cooler is then fitted to the engine block, along with the fan, accessory belt pulley and the exhaust pipe, to which a two part silencer section is fitted to the end, is attached to the turbo. The next part of the build is the assembly of the chassis. This consists of the two long chassis rails, to which the engine assembly is fitted at the front along with the radiator, whilst two thirds to the rear a cross member is attached. The front differential gear housing is assembled from two halves, to which a two part gear cover and universal joint are attached. Each wheel hub is made up of an inner and outer steering ball joint, hub backing plate, inner axle, and brake drum. These are then fitted to the ends of the differential along with the brake accumulators and steering rack. The two leaf spring parts are then fitted via four U bolts and clamps, much like the real parts. The front axle is then fitted to the chassis, as are the shock absorbers, front crossbeam, made up of four parts including the front towing eye, radiator fans housing and grille. There is a cable drum affixed between two crossbeams and fitted with a motor and control lever, this is then fitted to the rear of the chassis along with a curved crossbeam further forward. The transfer box is assembled and fitted just aft of the front axle and connected to the engine and front differential with two drive shafts. The rear suspension is now assembled from two suspension plates, two leaf springs, four U bolts and clamps. To this the two part rear differentials, which are 90o opposed when compared with the front, are fitted, along with their associated gear housings each made up of four parts, drive shafts, with separate universal joints, and suspension bump stops. The rear wheel hubs are much simpler affairs, made up of only an inner and outer brake drum and an internal axle. Once these are fitted to the differentials the completed rear suspension is attached to the rear chassis. The next stage includes the building of a number of sub-assemblies; these include the twelve part spare wheel cage which is attached to the six part generator housing, two seven part accumulator bottles and racks, two five part fuel tanks, six part oil tank and its rack, plus the three part cab foot step and six part tool box. These are then attached to their respective positions on the chassis along with the rear towing hook and end plate, reflectors and their outriggers and the rear lower crossbeam. With the chassis and suspension complete the build moves onto the truck bed. This is made up from the main bed, back panel and two side panels and rear panel completed with two footsteps. On the underside there are seven structural braces fitted, whilst on the back and sides there are twenty four tilt ties. Also on the underside the four mudflaps are attached, two forward of the rear wheels and two aft each with their support rods. The front mudguards are styrene whilst the rears are PE bent to shape. The completed bed is then fitted to the top of the chassis and the spare wheel, made up of a vinyl tyre plus inner and out hubs is slid into its cage on the right hand side. The last major assembly, the cab and bonnet begins with the windscreen frame/front bulkhead is fitted with the two windscreens, air vent panel, washer bulbs and wipers. On the inside of the bulkhead the inner panel/instrument binnacle is attached and fitted with the steering column, steering wheel, and pedal plate. The doors are then assembled from the door frame, “glass” and separate door card, whilst the rear bulkhead is fitted with the rear screen. The front and rear bulkheads plus the doors are then joined together before the roof, with its associated light fittings is attached. The interior floor is then fitted out with the bench like passenger seat, made up of separate squad and back which is then fitted to the base via the seat frame. The drivers seat which consists of the frame, squab, back and adjustment lever is fitted to the floor via a five piece spring like framework. The interior is completed with the fitting of the gearstick and the whole assembly is glued to the to the cab assembly, which is finished off with the addition of the two wing mirrors and there mounting supports. The bonnet wings are provided as slide moulded parts to which the separate front sections which include the light clusters pre-moulded are glued in place. The wings are then attached to the front lower grille before the upper name plate and the side grilles are fitted, after which the bonnet if attached. If you wish to have the bonnet raised to show off the engine you will have to scratchbuild your own hinges and gas struts. The headlight “glass” parts are then fitted before the cab and bonnet assemblies are attached to the chassis and the four part front bumper fitted. The finishing touches are the assembly of the six wheels, each with a vinyl tyre, inner and outer hubs, which are then fitted to the axles. Each of the vinyl tyres is very well moulded and look realistically chunky, but they do have a cross shaped section that needs to be cut away before the hubs can be fitted, but it shouldn’t take too much to clean them up, especially as the hub rims will cover the areas concerned. Decals The small decal sheet provides decals for four different colour schemes, two for the Russian Army, one green overall and one in a white and green camouflage, a Slovak Army example and one for the German Democratic Republic. Whilst there aren’t any external placards the instrument faces are provided. Conclusion Whilst this is quite a complicated kit to build in that there are a lot of detail parts, mainly for the chassis, it looks to have been well thought out and designed. It shouldn’t be too hard for anyone other than a novice modeller to build a great looking model. I imagine some will probably want to replace the vinyl tyres with resin ones, but it really isn’t necessary as the kits items are more than sufficient. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
×