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Found 77 results

  1. Matchbox 1/72 Supermarine Walrus 23hours 5 minutes. Waterlined and rigged. Spitfire wing section from Matchbox kit. Figures from Matchbox and Airfix. Dinghy Milliput and Plasticard. This was the image that inspired my build
  2. In August 2020, Eduard is to release in August 2020 - just in time for the 80th Anniversary of the BoB - a new tool 1/48th Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I limited kit - ref. Source: https://www.eduard.com/out/media/InfoEduard/archive/2020/info-eduard-2020-01.pdf V.P.
  3. AMP is to release a 1/48th Supermarine S.5 kit - ref. 48009 Source: https://www.facebook.com/mikro.mir.dnepr/posts/1959896374088089 V.P.
  4. Airfix Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I - ref.A05126 Sources: http://www.airfix.com/catalog/product/view/id/8404/category/1213/ http://www.primeportal.net/models/thomas_voigt9/airfix/index.php?Page=3 V.P.
  5. Hello guys, here's my latest model, Airfix's Spitfire Mk.22 in 1:48. The kit had some moulding issues, and the landing gear struts don't have the most positive attachment points, but I got there in the end.
  6. After the 1/48th kit (link), AMP is to release in 2020 a 1/72nd Supermarine S.5 kit - ref. 72009 Source: https://www.facebook.com/mikro.mir.dnepr/photos/a.1416729748404757/2912209615523422 Sprues V.P.
  7. Hello guys, this is my quarentine project number five, the Spitfire 22/24 from Airfix in 1:48. As you can see in the following photos, this kit came with missing plastic in some areas. Nothing some CA can't fix, but still annoying: Here's where I'm now, a fully built airframe:
  8. Spitfire Mk.XIV Bubble Canopy Cockpit (4397 for Airfix) 1:48 CMK by Special Hobby This newly tooled Griffon engined Spit from Airfix is fresh off the blocks and here’s a super-detailed resin cockpit from CMK that will give it a lift in that department. Arriving in their standard bubble-pack with card rear, the set contains 21 resin parts, a small sheet of Photo-Etch (PE) brass, and a slip of printed clear acetate. The instruction sheet is folded up inside and a small rectangle of clear plastic helps to protect the parts from damage. It's a complete drop-in replacement for the kit tub and builds up in a similar manner, but with the benefits of using resin instead of styrene, with its ability to capture more detail. It begins with the cockpit floor, which removes the seam that’s present in the kit version and adds more detail. To that the rudder pedals and their actuators are installed, then three fuselage frames with the rear side walls having grooves to accept them. The front frame has the seat attachment frame added, plus the head armour with more armour sandwiched between the seat and frame in the next step. The kit’s control column is topped with a new grip, and a full set of detailed seatbelts are included on the PE fret, which you’ll have to paint yourself. The seat is quite exposed at this stage, which is rectified by building up the instrument panel and frame complete with film instruments that should be painted white on the rear, the PE panel, and another double layer for the centre panel that stands slightly proud. The compass is installed in the footwell, and then the completed panel is sited on the floor and held in the correct place by the forward side walls, which also have grooves to assist with location. The access door is separate, and a gunsight is glued to the top of the panel, with a front bulkhead closing off the footwell. Providing you have painted it all, you should now be able to slot it into the model with minimal effort, but it’s always worth test fitting these things anyway. Conclusion Highly detailed resin usually beats styrene, and this set is no exception. With the door open you should be able to see your handiwork, making it all worthwhile. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Finished today: And the three Strike Witches themed aircraft. I have a fourth one, and three more should arrive to my stash in the near future.
  10. Hello guys, here is my next project, an anime themed model. It's Lynette Bishop's Spitfire Mk.IX from the Strike Witches anime.
  11. Italeri is to release in 2020 a new tool 1/48th Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I - ref. 2792 Source: https://www.italeri.com/uploads/news/b9oyS352gqHmhEzkjSqwDK80IVvs09sLuqzoPqmR.pdf V.P.
  12. Greetings, During my research for my future Spitfire builds, I decided to compile a chart of all basic, military, 'official' versions from a scale modeler's point of view (based on major external feature differences). main categories are: Merlin ('short-nosed'), Merlin ('long-nosed'), Griffon ('short-nosed') and Griffon ('long-nosed') machines. I would like to hear your opinions if I forgot something, or I have made an error somewhere (e.g. are the Griffon Seafires exactly coupled to their appropriate Spitfire counterparts?) This is far from complete, as the vast Spitfire variants transcend my knowledge, as well as the variant range I intend to build (the reason for making this table in the first place). It will be arranged as an editable open-source, and always available on Google Docs. Edit Oct 2019: I have revised the table, and made it simpler for input (just color the appropriate field green to mark it as a "historically possible". Important notes: This is a simple variants guide, aimed at scale modelers interested at differentiating external features of the Spitfire, or thinking of building some other variant not enclosed in the box without major kit 'surgery'. It is not intended to be THE ultimate chart containing every feature of every Spitfire produced. Performance is also not the part of it, as e.g. You cannot state the power of an engine without specifying the altitude it is recorded, which complicates things immensely... Please refrain from "Oh, this is pointless" type of comments. If You have anything constructive to add, You are more than welcome to do so. And please write Your name in the Contributors section. Please refrain from adding or deleting rows/columns in the table. If You have a suggestion to add a basic, military, 'official' variant, please contact me via PM or e-mail, and I will gladly do so. Please keep it metric to avoid confusion. Any help is more than welcome. Regards, Aleksandar
  13. Hi all here is my Tamiya Spitfire MK1a (61119) I finished this back May/June and only just got round to posting here I decided before starting this kit that I wanted to do something different and try new things I finished it as a 19 Squadron spit serial N3200 code QV using Topnotch Cammo and insignia Masks ( a first for me ) Ive tried to replicate it as close as possible when it was lost on operations on 26th May 1940 having been shot down but not before it brought down a Junkers Ju87 Tamiya paints used throughout the build figures from Tamiya and ICM (another first in doing figures) Thanks for looking and enjoy Happy modelling Photo credit unknown
  14. Spitfire Mk.I Upgrade Sets & Masks (for Tamiya) 1:48 Eduard & Eduard Brassin Tamiya have retooled their Mk.I to modern standards in 1:48, although their old kit wasn't half bad, it just had a few shape issues. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Resin Wheels (648455) Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set includes two resin main wheels with separate front hubs, and a tail wheel on a long leg that slots into the rear of the fuselage. A sheet of wheel masks accompany the set (not pictured) in Eduard's usual yellow kabuki tape, with a pair of additional Pac-Man shaped masks for the tail wheel in case you mess the first application up. Update Set (49960) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side wall equipment are the primary parts on the painted set, with new rudder pedals; seat mounted flare pack; compass; head armour; radiator and oil cooler mesh with cooling flaps; bay door skins, tie-down brackets and hoses for the main gear; a replacement crew access door and rear view mirror inside the hood. Zoom! Set (FE960) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE961) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived depth to the buckles and other furniture by clever shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. You get a full set of four-point crew belts, which thread through the back of the seat and attach to the next frame aft. landing flaps (48987) Eduard landing flaps use an ingenious technique to achieve excellent true-to-scale flaps using few parts, and requiring the modeller to simply remove the retracted flaps from the lower wing, plus scrape the upper wings to accommodate the thickness of the completed bays. Each half of the two flap sections (bay and flap itself) is constructed in the same manner, by twisting and folding over the attached ribs to create a 3D shape, with extra parts added along the way. The bays glue to the inside of the upper wing and the flap attaches to the rear wall of the new bay with a length of 0.3mm wire that you will need to supply. The short inner section also has a deeper bay interior giving the impression of seeing inside the fuselage. Repeat this for the other side, and you're almost done. There are also parts included for the pop-through flap indicator "stalk" that gives the pilot a visual indication he hasn't cleaned up his flying surfaces before parking, thereby saving him an alleged fine of a few of shillings. This needs a small hole cut where the panel line is engraved on the top wing half. Masks (EX643) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub masks for the main wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX644) Supplied on a bigger sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. Review sample courtesy of
  15. To properly make Clostermann's Spitfire, I had to sand down the teardrop shaped bulges on the wings and two fairings. I did it with an Xacto, and made several scratches to the surface that had to be filled with CA. Luckily the plastic was thick enough to resist several sanding sessions. The horizontal stabilizers pushed each other out, and had to be pressed so they could stay in their place. The propeller spins, that's a good feature of the kit. I used Eduard decals for the ID codes. The Hasegawa roundels bulged a bit over the raised detail on the wings, and the underwing roundels had to be broken so they could fit in their place.
  16. It has been in the works long enough. Resin, vacu canopy and decals from Miniwing. Cannon fairings courtesy of Master. Brass by Shelf Oddity, which means it is the test article for the brass parts - an awkward way to promote our product and equally awkward way to excuse imperfections. First two photos with my trusty companion, who did the part chopping: and lent a helping brush: Now, the Attacker himself: "We there yet?" For anyone still awake - few WIP photos, focusing on metal bits, because resin parts came together without any fuss: The one showing dorsal bleed doors and boundary layer vents: The one showing boundary layer ramp inside intake (that no one will ever notice): The one showing ventral boundary layer vents along gear struts locks in u/c bays. And the one showing tremendous effort on my part - making a cut through the middle of the tail wheel to make it a twin tail wheel.
  17. Scratchaeronautics next project is a 1/48th Supermarine Scimitar resin kit. Source: https://www.facebook.com/Scratchaeronautics/posts/1879268225439559 V.P.
  18. Spitfire Mk.22/24 Upgrades (for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard This kit from Airfix may not be the newest on the block, but it's a golden oldie that is generally well-liked by modellers, so much so that it has been re-released by Airfix a number of times over the years. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Detail Set (49924) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. It begins with a re-scribing template for the Mk.22 radio hatch, which was in a different place to the 24, the lines for which will need filling to finish the job. A complete set of new layered instrument panels, placards and sidewall instruments are the primary parts on the painted set, with a new seat with supports; rudder pedals; gun bay internal structure; wing details; radiator skins; roll-over bar behind the pilot's head; access door; main gear and tail-wheel bay detail also supplied. Zoom! Set (FE924) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE925) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new printing method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the crew belts, you also get a bracket on the head armour that holds the tensioning of the shoulder belts, which will require you to remove the moulded-in part. landing flaps (48963) Eduard landing flaps use an ingenious technique to achieve excellent true-to-scale flaps using few parts, and requiring the modeller to simply remove the over-thick ribbing, plus scrape the upper wings to accommodate the thickness of the completed bays, and hollow out a hole in the upper wing for the flap indicator. Each half of the two flap sections (bay and flap itself) is constructed in the same manner, by twisting and folding over the attached ribs to create a 3D shape, plus some 0.6mm rod for the hinges from your own stock. The bays glue to the inside of the upper wing and the flap attaches to the rear wall of the new bay. Repeat this for the other side, and you're almost done. The indicator is placed in the hole opened earlier, and the cover is glued over it, with a scrap diagram showing its correct position. Masks (EX610) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for all the wheels (including the tail-wheel), allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Review sample courtesy of
  19. After the Spiteful F.14 (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234949742-132-supermarine-spiteful-f14-resin-kit-by-iconicair-released/) and the Seafang (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234975303-132-supermarine-seafang-resin-kit-by-iconicair-box-art/), Iconicair (http://www.iconicair.com/) is to release in November 2015 a 1/32nd Supermarine Attacker resin kit - ref. Source: http://www.iconicair.com/attacker/ Box art V.P.
  20. Whirlybird Models is to release at the SMW 2018 a 1/72nd Supermarine 545 kit - ref. Source: https://www.facebook.com/whirlybirdmodels/photos/a.520880691670428/520895088335655/?type=3&theater V.P.
  21. Spitfire Mk.VIII/IX Cockpit Doors (648380 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Cutting out the cockpit door on a Spitfire usually involves taking a saw or knife to the kit fuselage, taking care not to damage the part you cut out. No longer! Now you can cut out the opening and discard the piece, using this highly detailed resin alternative in its place. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. Inside the box are two resin doors on one casting block, one with the controversial crowbar installed, and one without, showing the clips that it normally affixes to. If you're building a post-war bird by all means paint it red, but for a WWII vintage build leave it interior green, otherwise the sticklers will get ya! There are also decals that are placed in vertically between the two internal stiffeners, with a choice of black or red text and the helpful folks at Eduard have split one set of stencils diagonally, to ease putting them in around the crowbar. Review sample courtesy of
  22. I noticed that FlyPast had an interesting article about the Supermarine Scimitar in their last magazine. Sadly there is no available kit in 1/72... Cheers / André
  23. Considering how the Scimitar is a historically important aircraft; being last aircraft produced by Supermarine, how come there's not been an injection plastic kit in 1:48 ? Of course there's the Dynavector kit but that's both vacuumform and starting to become both uncommon and expensive ! Is there a reason as to why a kit was never made by Classic Airframes who appeared to make kits of most other FAA aircraft during the 1950's/1960's ? With the release of other post war FAA subjects within the last 5 years like the Sea Vixen and Sea Hawk surely someone should have made one by now ? Gareth
  24. AMP has 1/48th and 1/72nd Supermarine S.6B kits in project. Source: https://www.facebook.com/mikro.mir.dnepr/photos/a.1416729748404757.1073741828.1416295571781508/1868468463230881/?type=3&theater V.P.
  25. Spitfire HF Mk. VIII ProfiPACK 1:48 Eduard The Spit needs little introduction other than that it helped to save Britain from the Luftwaffe's onslaught during the Battle of Britain, holding off the fighters while the Hurricanes went after the bombers. It was a flexible airframe and was capable of much improvement, which rendered it useful for the full course of WWII, with many changes during service both to the airframe and the Merlin powerplant, which was later replaced by the more powerful and larger Griffon engine. The Mark VIII airframes were all built by Supermarine themselves and saw a lot of use overseas, with the Mk.IX used more in defence of the British Isles and benefitting from the extra power the revised engine gave it. The high altitude HF was equipped with a set of wingtip extensions to improve climb and lift in the thinner atmosphere at height, and ran a Type 70 Merlin that was able to propel it a further 3,500 feet above the standard Mk.VIII, as well as 10mph or so higher top speed. The extended wingtips gave little in the way of assistance, while slowing down the aircraft's roll-rate, and although it was well-liked by pilots (with standard tips), it was eclipsed by the more potent IX. The Kit Eduard's Spitfire range just keeps on growing, and this new boxing uses as much existing tooling as is appropriate, and adds new parts to complete the airframe as its mark requires. Consequently there will be a fair number of parts remaining in the box after completion of your model. The kit arrives in the standard ProfiPACK box with the orange band, with four sprues in dark grey/blue styrene, one in clear, two sheets of decals, a small sheet of pre-painted and nickel-plated Photo-Etch (PE), a sheet of yellow kabuki tape masks, and the glossy colour printed instruction booklet with painting and marking guide to the rear. The sprues are bagged in resealable clear foil bags, while the circular clear sprue is bagged separately in a ziplok type bag for extra protection from chaffing. The PE and masks are in a bag each, with the PE protected by a piece of card, and the decals are in their own bag with paper covering the printing to protect them. Eduard's 1:48 Spitfires are beautiful models that have exquisite surface detail, go together well and look the part. There's not much unusual about this build, and the cockpit goes together as you'd expect, with a small depression to fill on the head of the frame behind the seat, and a choice of two parts either with the head armour moulded in or added as a separate PE part. There are optional styrene or colour PE instrument panels, and a decal on the sheet to overlay the styrene part if you really don't like laminated PE panels. There's also a decal for the compass that sits between the pilot's knees hanging from behind the instrument panel. If you're closing up the canopy you'll need to trim a few sections of the cockpit sill, which are indicated in red on scrap diagrams, and a few holes need drilling in one wing root and in the starboard nose for the later application of a small teardrop fairing peculiar to the HF's engine configuration. The wings are full span underneath as you'd expect, and there are a choice of colours for the underwing recognition lights, which is predicated by your decal choice. The tops glue on after the wheel wells have been constructed from three parts each, and the airframe is brought together by adding the wings, elevators and rudder at the rear. The cowling is a perceived weak-point of the kit due to the fact that it must be moulded as two parts due to its shape and you then have to deal with the seams, which are prominent, and with some fillers have a tendency of coming back both there and over the fuel tank in front of the windscreen. This not limited to Eduard's Spits, as I remember having it with another brand myself. Don’t forget to add the exhaust stacks with their hollow slide-moulded tips, which are closer in look to resin than styrene. At this stage the wings are clipped and have no control surfaces, which are added next, and the former have long tabs that slip inside the slot in the wings, so take care with alignment here and save yourself a lot of heartache later by minimising the seam. Underneath you need to add the chin with prominent scoop plus the radiator housings, all of which have PE mesh intakes and in the case of the latter, exits too. The doors at the rear of the housings can be posed open or closed by fitting a different actuator, the angles and positions of which are shown in scrap diagrams. The Spit's landing gear was notorious for causing many a nose-over due to its narrow track, and this is replicated well by the kit, with each wheel having four parts, the main strut having either styrene or PE scissor links on the oleo, and the bay doors nicely detailed as well a commendably thin. If you are posing your model in flight, leave the tabs at the wing end intact, otherwise they need trimming as instructed. The VIII had a retractable tail-wheel in the search for speed, and this is well depicted with a two-part yoke around the tyre, and two clamshell doors that have the correct position pointed out in another scrap diagram. Pitot probe, aerial and two metal hooks are fitted on the underside, and then it's just a case of choosing whether to leave your canopy open or closed and fitting the prop. A rear view mirror and closure mechanism is provided in PE, and if you are closing the canopy, you have a single part for the opener and the fixed rear part, while the open canopy has two sections that fit one over the other. Choose your cockpit door position, then fix the single part prop to the back plate and top it off with the spinner, locating it on the front (shocker!) with its spindle through the thoughtfully provided hole. A fuel filler cap, aerial post behind the cockpit and a pair of cannon barrels with domed over outer positions finishes things off nicely. Markings This is a ProfiPACK kit, and you have your usual five markings options spread between two sheets. The main sheet contains the machine specific decals, while the smaller sheet is full of stencils for the airframe that are common between them. These are called out on a separate page of the instructions. Decals are by Eduard, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, and a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. From the box you can build one of the following: JF364, No. 32 Squadron, Foggia, Italy, early 1944 JF476, No. 92 Squadron, Triolo, Sicily, November 1943 JF519, No. 1 Squadron SAAF , Trigno, Italy, February 1944 JF630, flown by F/O L. Cronin, No. 81 Squadron, Palel, India, March 1944 308th Fighter Squadron, 31st Fighter Group, Castel Volturno, Italy, 1944 Yes, those roundels on the right are a bit bright, but they're supposed to be like that. Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, the masks provide you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a small number of masks for the wing and fuselage lights where needed. Conclusion One of the less famous Spitfire marks with a quirky set of wingtips gets a thoroughly modern, well-detailed rendition with a nice selection of decal options that should please most folks. If you're hungry for more detail, just check out the back page of the instructions, which has an advert extolling the benefits of the resin wheels, engine, cockpit, gun bays, exhausts and various PE sets that you can add. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
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