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Found 308 results

  1. I finished this model some month ago but I haven´t showed it in RFI yet. I waited for new camera equipment, but I am not sure if I am happy with it. The lighting looks a little bit off. The real colour lies between the first pictures an the 2 WIP picutres below I did before. I tried to recreate every tiny scratch and chip from the studio model. I hope you like it. Some pictures from the cockpit while it was in WIP:
  2. My brother is a huge Star Wars fan and quite an accomplished cosplay crafter as well. For his 47th birthday, I'm creating a small First Order Stormtrooper bust for him. Since I'm still learning how to sculpt in Zbrush, I purchased a 3D model online and will be modifying it into a customized 3D printed model. The model I purchased features a classical sculptural base. It looks nice, but I have an idea for a base that features the First Order emblem. First, I created the base in my favorite NURBS modeler and added a 1cm hole in the center. The Aurubesh text is my brother's name and age. Next I turned to customizing the model in Zbrush. First, I trimmed off the original cylindrical base and add a 1cm wide post. The space between the helmet and the torso is pretty tight, so I separated the geometry at the neck and add a mounting post with a matching recess in the helmet. I tried to align the separation between the folds of the neck piece as best I could. Then I imported my custom base and checked the alignment digitally. Next, I sent the geometry to my Form 2 SLA printer and waited for nine hours for the print to complete. After an isopropyl alcohol bath to remove residual resin, the model parts were ready. Here are the parts still attached to their printing supports. I did a little clean up of the parts and put them together for quick test fit. Surfaces that have a gradual slope that ends in a horizontal surface tend to have faint stair step lines from the printing process, in this case they were 0.05mm layers for the model. The sanded portion on the top of the helm is where I lightly sanded the layer lines away. In the photo below, the horizontal lines that are visible are actually completely smooth. I'll be performing additional sanding and clean up in the morning, then onto priming and painting.
  3. Hi all I'm a little late getting organised cos I've got a couple of other builds on the bench... However, I'm sorting myself out a bit now... In 1977, star wars hit the big screens. Obviously I don't remember it first time round but I'm a pretty big fan, as are my boys. All the ships /vehicles are pretty iconic but there's one that stands out... So I'm building Bandai's X-wing. There's hundreds of build threads for this kit or variants of it, in the space/sci-fi section, most of them expertly done, but I've never built any space/sci-fi kits so it's a first for me. I'll do the Skywalker/R2-D2 version 'cos my kids wouldn't forgive me if I don't. Just in case you're from a galaxy far far away, this is it: Th sprues are moulded in multiple colours - which would be good to see from some other companies too. This one has four including clear.. You get your own section of Death Star - 2 in fact - one as part of the stand and the other enables you to do the attack on the thermal exhaust port scene. I'll use the stand but probably not the exhaust port one due to shelf space. The instructions are very... Japanese.. Here we go then.. W-D
  4. Just started out on another model from the Bandai's Resistance Vehicle Set which includes two 1/144 T-70 X-Wings along with this 1/350 Falcon from the Last Jedi. Few parts but great detail. I'm really impressed by the pipes which run from the hull into the maintenance pits. The parts were all very clean except for the radar dish, which had a prominent mold line running down the center. I laid down a base coat of Badger Stynylrez Black Primer followed by random squiggles of Vallejo Model Air 71.119 White Gray to give some modulation to the hull color. I just received a set of Flory Washes in the mail yesterday, so I'm eager to try them out soon.
  5. With the 40th anniversary of Star Wars this year, i'm going to try and build some kits from that series as a kind of a tribute GB. And to mark feeling very old! To ease myself into it, I've pulled this from the stash which I picked up last year at Telford for the princely sum of a penny shy of £2.. Just a small bit of wear and tear on the box! (hence the price) But everything there.... Behold the mighty sprue map...almost 40 parts! None of your fancy-shmancy 900+ parts Master Series nonsense here.... The upper hull/turret bustle had received a fair whack in the box and was cracked from left side to right so that needed fixing...plastic tabs (hidden) to support and lashings of glue.. It's an Easy kit (Snap-Fit to us older folks) but I'm going to glue it together. So out came a persuading tool to snip the lugs for a better fit. And we have a hull! While not as accurate as the AMT kit and smaller in scale (about 1/50 I think), I'm going to try and improve this by repainting in the Phantom Menace scheme and adding some basic detail to it. Yes, I know there are some minor shape/detail differences between these versions but hoping it will still look the part (and not upset the fans ) I'll miss those 'eyeliner' gun stains from the front glacis! Thanks for looking. Cheers, Dermot
  6. Finally I have finished one of my favourite starfighters. Here is the WIP-thread: My goal is always to be as close as I can to the studio model, what is not always easy because this 1/72 model is so much smaller. I hope you like it. Thanks. Green Leader standing by.
  7. I got this the other week - I think it's a limited edition or something, as it comes in an all-black box. It's basically a standard Stormtrooper that's been moulded in shiny black rather than shiny white. No worries - you can't have enough Stormtroopers in the cabinet. I'm not sure where these guys appear in the series, but they'd look good next to the Death Troopers. Anyway, rather than stash it away in my Bandai Star Wars stack, I figured I'd build it straight away. I didn't use paint other than a bit of Molotow Liquid Chrome for the chest-plate lights/buttons (?) and the detail parts on the helmet that don't settle down well as decals. All the rest has just had the sprue gates sanded back, then polished back to a glossy shine with buffer pads, and put together with a little liquid glue in the friction tubes. Totally OOB, and I'm not going to do any weathering on it, as I don't know where they were posted, if at all so far. I thought I'd make a post in here just so I could claim another completed model for 2019 There's not much to tell about construction, as everything goes together awesomely, and I fiddled with it in between extended bouts of during this hot weather. Here it... he? is:
  8. Kylo Ren's Command Shuttle (06746) 1:93 Revell Kylo Ren is Supreme Leader Snokes' young(ish) apprentice and plays a substantial role in both of the episodes of this sequel trilogy so far, with the promise of more in the upcoming Rise of Skywalker that is due (at time of writing) this Christmas, with the hope that it ends the series on a high note. Ben Solo as he was named at birth gets around in a large black Command Shuttle, which bears a familial resemblance to an Imperial Shuttle in the folded configuration, and with the central fin deleted. In flight the wings fold out into a wide V-shape that defies explanation other than looking malevolent. It's screen time is fairly fleeting in The Force Awakens, but it acts as his mobile command centre toward the end of The Last Jedi, hovering menacingly over the under-used AT-M6 Gorilla walkers and taking centre stage during the breaching of the Rebel base's huge armoured shield-door on Crait . The Kit This is a re-release of the snap-together styrene kit as a true model, and is more detailed and larger most of the other kits in the Star Wars range. It arrives in a large end-opening box, and has six sprues in grey black styrene, plus one containing a single clear part. The details aren't painted at the factory like the previous release, and as such it has been re-branded as a kit with the skill level raised from 2 to 3, and Kylo's helmeted head has been removed from the box art to be replaced by his Grandad wielding his light sabre. Now the instructions show glue being used and colours are called out on the way using the more usual alphabetic codes that relate to their paint brand. The first thing of note is how big these wings really are. They're over 30cm long, so when it's built, you're going to need some headroom wherever you want to store/display it. There are detail inserts in the wing edges, and the cannons in the leading wing-root edge are carried over from the old shuttles. The wings fix into the hull at the vertical landing orientation, so if you want to depict it in flight with wings canted to the sides, you'll need to adapt the roots to suit. The partial retraction of the tips of the wings for landing inside hangar bays would make for a more difficult conversion, but there is bound to be some out there willing to give it a go, and some maniac will probably also motorise it! The lower hull has a crew compartment and bulkhead added along with an articulated access-ramp, which is covered by a blank bay to block your view of the interior. The canopy and wing root bulkheads are slotted in place along with a few other smaller parts, and the hull is closed up, with a pair of exhaust nozzles added to the rear. This time around you will need to paint the canopy yourself, which gives you the opportunity to leave it translucent to show the detail in the control room. The wings slot into the hull's bulkheads on long pins for strength, and you then install the landing gear skids in retracted positions by leaving the gear legs off, or in landing pose by adding the legs beforehand. Conclusion This is a now marketed as a model and I feel that it is better suited to this genre as the surface detail is more in line with its new status. It's a big kit and if you take your time to paint and detail it to the best of your ability, the basic detail is strong enough and for the detailers it is a good base on which to go to town, with room inside the hull for a lighting rig if you have that in mind. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  9. Revell/Bandai's 1/72 'Perfect Grade' version of the #MillenniumFalcon will be back in stock this coming week! #starwars #revellmodels #modelkit #hansolo #wookie #chewbacca #bandai https://www.wonderlandmodels.com/blog/article/bandai-perfect-grade-millennium-falcon-jul-2019/
  10. Inner Light Scale Model Lighting Scalectronics Lighting your model has been a growing interest in genres such as Science Fiction for quite a while now and it is slowly spreading to other genres too, as has been evidenced by the companies popping up offering solutions here at Britmodeller and in the wider world of modelling. They're always either custom-made for a particular installation or cobbled together using our electronic skills and generally speaking, once they're done that's it - You have no real way of changing them. You generally need to have at least some ability with coding if you want to depict any kind of lighting effect such as flashing, pulsing or the Knight-Rider/Cylon "wawww-wawww" effect too, and having had a brief go with some simple changes to an existing code snippet, it's not all that easy if you have no experience. What if there was a black box that has the flexibility so that you could hook up to pre-soldered lights, including options for fibre-optic/fibre guides, with a user-friendly interface that you could connect to and control from your desktop PC, tablet, laptop or even your phone? I think you know by now that there is, and that this is the subject of this review. It's called Inner Light, and it does all those things and more, thanks to the massive leaps in System-on-a-Chip (SoC) computers and the general miniaturisation of electronics that we have seen lately, driven heavily by the release of the Raspberry Pi (see the pic below) and various types of Arduino board. At the heart of the system is a Raspberry Pi 3A in a black case, which is a somewhat shrunk-down version of the new(ish) 3B, but still retains most of the power of the B, unlike the much smaller ZeroW, which probably couldn't hack it. In a slot under the board is a tiny MicroSD card with 16gb of storage space, which is pretty generous in size and of a good brand. There is a 5V Power Supply Unit (PSU) with a USB outlet and generous 2m USB extension cord, but you could replace this with a different length if you feel the need as it's a standard cord. The combined power/data cable plugs into the extension and pin 19 of the General Purpose Input/Output (GPIO) header (noted with an arrow on my board in the picture above) that projects through a slot in the case, and your lights plug into the small 3-pin socket at the business end of the power/data cable. In the starter kit you receive two long and two short extension cables, two lengths of LED tape (one with 5 and one with 10 LEDs), five pre-soldered socketed LED units, five unsocketed LED units, five fibre-guide clip-on covers, five 30cm fibre-guides, and finally a quick start guide with a link to the full instructions on their website. That's quite a lot of gear and the fact that most of the LEDs are push-together will save plenty of time in the construction phase of your next project. If your model needs more of anything, there's a full shop on their site with all the items available in quantities of 1 and above for a reasonable price, from fibre-guides to extension cables and LED chips. Once you have your lighting set-up, you then start the process of configuring it, which involves powering up your black box for the first time, and logging in via a browser to the in-built Wi-Fi server that's on the board. Join the new network "Inner Light" from your phone, tablet or other Wi-Fi enabled device - this will cut you off from your home Wi-Fi network, so make sure you remember this when you finish and try to visit Britmodeller or somewhere. Once you've joined you just navigate to http://192.168.1.100 and login using the provided credentials. If you don't want your friends and neighbours hacking your latest creation, you might want to consider changing those details, but that's entirely up to you. If you forget the new login details you can factory reset the device, but that's a pain if you haven't backed up your configuration. You're presented with a nice simple webpage that talks you through configuration of your lights, with colour, intensity, special effects and so forth easily changed at whim, and at any time thereafter. You can also add custom sounds, and make lights and sounds respond to physical buttons too, although you'll have to buy and solder those yourself, but you are shown the correct pin-outs on the GPIO to connect them to. Everything is menu-driven with tickboxes and drop-downs for quick and easy changes to pretty much everything. You can also control the device and its lighting groups (which you set up) by using HTTP command sent over the airwaves directly to your model. If that sounds tricky, it probably would be if you had to do it by typing out the commands yourself, but there are several 3rd party apps available for iOS and Android devices, some of which can be visually customised to match your subject, such as a Star Trek command console seen on their site. That's the theory, but I'm not about to pass judgement on the system without having a go myself, so here there has been a break while I dig into the box, put some lights and cables into a simple set-up and have a play with the system. Now where's my tablet? Following those instructions, I soon realised that I'd forgotten to plug in the MicroSD connector into the black box, which is what supplies the power to the system's processing unit. Once I'd corrected that blunder (it had been a long day), the lights started flashing sporadically as they should and after a few seconds, checking my Tablet's available Wi-Fi SSIDs showed up with the innerlight name, so I logged in using the username and password provided. Navigating to the home page by typing the IP address into your browser's address bar, you're greeted with the main screen, which has a few important settings that must be stored before you can proceed. You choose the number of LEDs (in total) that you have attached to the line, how bright you want them to be as a maximum value (they can be really bright, so they're best toned down), and how they start up when you power on. That's all very simple and hinges upon your ability to count. No worries there then! You can revisit this page if you add or subtract lights later on, so don't worry if you decide to change things, and there's no need to reboot as you can just save the new settings and carry on. The next tab LED Grouping allows you to separate the string of lights into sub-sections and give them names that mean something to you, which will help you out if you decide to switch things up a bit in the future. Allocate the various lights to the groups, and here you don't have to use contiguous blocks, as you can choose a block, a few additional singles, another block and so on, simplifying the process if you want the same effect on opposite sides of your model and have other lights in between. With all your groups set up, you can go off and create some effects in the next tab. Again, everything can be revisited if changes are needed or desired. The Effects tab does just that. You can create the effects that you want to later allocate to your various light Groups by tapping Add New Effect, then renaming it and assigning attributes like flashing, solid colour or chasing, with choice of colour, duration and delays. You can use a colour picker, an RGB slider, or a pick-list from your history to choose your colours, which will be a lot quicker if you're using the same colour in different areas of your lighting design. The final part of the setup is the Scenes tab, which is where you bring the Groups together with their Effects so that you can issue commands to your model from afar. You can connect the Scene to a trigger, which will be a button or switch you add somewhere on your model and wire into the black box using the pins allocated in the instructions. This enables you to be as fancy or simple as you like, providing you've got sufficient lights, enough time and a good memory to keep it in your head as you switch between tabs. In addition to the light effects, you can also add sound effects that will be sent to the 3.5mm audio jack on the RasPi by default, so will require a speaker to be fitted in order to enjoy the sound on the finished model, but can be used with headphones while you are setting it up. While talking to Andy, I sowed the seeds of an idea to allow sound to be sent to a Bluetooth speaker or sound bar, which may appear in future updates of the firmware, taking advantage of the RasPi's built in Bluetooth chip. I've got a terrible memory as most of you will probably know by now, so I kept my test setup pretty simple. I arranged 11 lights comprising the long self-adhesive backed 10 LED strip, plus a singleton with a snap-on fibre-guide cover and a length of fibre slotted through it. The covers have a central hole, and you feed the sharp end through the hole from the inside so that it stops at the flared end, absorbing most of the LED light in the process and transporting it to the other end. You can cut the lengths of guide shorter, or if your installation requires it you can get longer lengths online and create the flattened ends by warming it with a soldering iron or lighter, then smooshing it on a flat surface to create the mushroom head. To prevent light leaks, you'll probably want to paint the exterior of the caps and perhaps wrap them with insulation tape to prevent leaks and secure the caps permanently. Here's a quick demo of my simple setup, which isn't bad considering it was knocked up as I was learning the ropes in a very short period of time with absolutely no forward planning on my part - I've named my technique "winging it". The colour is a little washed out in the video, but as I've not really created any videos in the past I'm using the "newb" excuse. The five lights on the right for example are blue to the naked eye, the centre two are purple, and the three chasing each other on the left are kind of pink. Finally, it's fairly obvious that the single fibre guide is green I hope. I found it pretty easy to get to grips with the interface using my tablet, and the only thing that gave me a moment's pause was initially when I set up a new Group, it didn't immediately occur to me to tap the name of the group to bring up the configuration details. Once that was out of the way it all seems pretty straight forward, but if you ever get stuck there are full detailed instructions on everything you could want from the system, including the different methods of controlling your finished lighting rig either via the built-in Wi-Fi, a third-party app that issues the http commands from a fancy User Interface (UI), or even your Home Automation (HA) device such as Amazon's Alexa or the Google Home devices, by using the IFTT (IF This Then That) app that you can download to your device and configure to work with your HA if you have the technological know-how. You can even operate your Inner-Light from anywhere in the world if you're able to open up the required port on your router and forward it to your device's IP address, but again extra details can be found in the detailed instructions. The system could theoretically support over 1,000 light chips, but with the standard 2 Amp RasPi power supply, up to 100 could be used before you begin to run short of power. Most models won't need anywhere near that amount however, so you should have plenty of power to spare. You can also connect up to eight physical control buttons, each of which will need an additional two wires to be run back to the control box, so placement will be crucial. You'll have to source buttons yourself, and some soldering is likely to be required unless you get the pre-wired for use on the RasPi's GPIO pins. The detailed documentation can be found here, where you'll also be able to find out details of how to update the system's firmware, which is the underlying code needed to make the system function and allows extra features to be added or updated in the future. This adds extra value to your purchase down the line at no extra cost to yourself. Importantly, the system should always be closed down using the app to ensure no damage or corruption occurs to it, and this option along with other useful functions such as data backup, reboot and even factory reset are found in the Options menu, sensibly enough. There is also a help button at the top of every page that directs you to the site to obtain the detailed help files I linked to above, but you'll have to re-connect to your own internet in order to visit if you have a problem. Chances are that you'll be sitting next to a device that's connected however, so it's not a major imposition. My tinkering was all done sat in front of my workshop PC but using my tablet, so anything I needed to know was readily accessible by switching focus to the big screen in front of me. That said, using the configuration system, you can change the Wi-Fi to allow the system to join your existing Wi-Fi network, after which you can access the device by using the IP address assigned by your router (assuming you have DHCP active, which most people do), or by going to http://il.local in any browser on the same subnet. That would have the benefit of being able to access the help files from the same device, and would also open up the HA and remote access options for configuration as discussed above. One improvement that I would like to see would be the option for bundling fibres on one light chip, as the current system only allows one fibre per chip, which could get very busy if you were building a Zvezda Star Wars Star Destroyer for example, which has hundreds of tiny lights in its superstructure that are best suited to fibres. You can of course make your own bundle from some tube and epoxy glue, but the key selling point of the system is its modularity. Maybe Andy could come up with something later on? I've mentioned it to him, and he suggested enlarging the hole in the cap (which hadn't occurred to me), but as modellers we're probably capable of making up a short tube and filling them full of fibres, then attaching it to a LED chip if we need more fibres on one chip. Here's a proper demo from their site, showing what you can do with the system once you're familiar with it and have a specific application in mind. Conclusion This system has the capability of being adapted to many situations, allows alteration of colours, effects etc. after the lights are added to your model, which has previously been very difficult or impossible, and previously required much more technical know-how than Inner-Light requires of you. Adding your own sound, light effects and colour has never been easier and instead of fishing around with wires, resistors, code and burning yourself on a soldering iron, you have a simple almost plug-and-play system that just needs you to answer a few questions and fiddle about with a few settings. Siting the control box will be an important aspect of the installation, but when you're done you can still fine-tune the settings as much as you want. Andy has reminded me that he's got a special offer for Britmodellers which entitles them to a £10 cash-back on their purchase of the Base kit (the subject of this review. Type in Britmodeller in the promo code box, and you'll get a discount, and Britmodeller will also get a small donation as a thank you from Scalectronics too. What on earth are you waiting for???? Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. AT-ST Walker Bandai 1/48 I've just received this in the post, fresh from Japan and although I've got other things on the go I wanted to get stuck in as soon as I'd opened the box and seen the contents. I have to admit when I first heard that the SW licence had switched to Bandai from Finemolds I was expecting a load of pre-painted toy-like models in the Revell mould (no pun intended) but having seen some of the builds others have done of the earlier releases, I think these are probably the best SW models yet produced. They also seem to be great value. This was around £10 + postage from HLJ. As I mentioned above, I've got other builds in progress so work on this one may be a little drawn out but to begin with I thought I'd upload some sprue shots to show what Bandai have managed with this release It all comes in a smallish box (12" x 7") and it's pretty packed with sprue's, 6 in total including one with what seems to be Bandai's trademark with these SW kits, multi-colour moulding The main cockpit is a nice one-piece slide moulding And there's some very fine detail for the interior walls and control panel The seats are moulded integrally with the cockpit floor and have a location block for the drivers which will need removing if you don't use the figures Back wall of the main 'head' Waist pivot section The base is a little basic but with some texture added should look OK The transparent red 'laser blasts' for the main guns You get three figures in the box, two identical pilots and this rather nice Chewie Though I've no idea what happened with the two pilots! The weird thing is, the moulding on them is actually very good, particularly the undercut on the helmet, so why they shaped them in such a bizarre way, only Bandai know. Maybe I'm just reading things into it that aren't there but it almost looks as if they were going for some kind of anime look to the figures. In any case I don't think I'll be using them. The decal sheets, waterslide and stickers And the instruction book which, in keeping with the fine traditions of Finemolds, is all in Japanese So, there you have it. I'll try to get some work started on it in the next day or two and I'll get some shots up when work commences Andy
  12. Boba Fett's Slave 1 Finemolds 1/72 Hi everyone This is Finemolds 1/72 Slave 1, Boba Fett's customised Firespray patrol ship, built August-September 2014. I added some fibre optics to the cockpit instrument panel and backwall along with LED accent lighting and hull lights. The paint chipping was done with masking fluid applied with a sponge. Paints are a combination of Vallejo, Tamiya and Gunze. The long term plan for this is to construct a maintenance bay dio for it to sit in, hence the removed hull panels and port blaster. Hopefully, I'll get a chance to do that this year, time permitting. Hope you enjoy the shots *2019 Update* I was looking over the original shots I took of Slave 1 recently and, to be honest, they were embarrassingly shoddy. On top of that, I've also added a little extra weathering since the build was finished, so overall it seemed like a new set of photos would be a good idea. The extra weathering mainly consisted of some additional brush painted chipping to enhance the existing masking fluid chips and a bit of post shading with some heavily thinned Tamiya dark brown, particularly over and around the glazing which had looked a little too clean and shiny before. I didn't have a battery to hand when taking these shots, so the lighting isn't on. I'll leave one of the original shots at the end so you can still see it lit up Hope you enjoy the new shots Thanks for looking Andy
  13. This is Bandai's new 1/1000 Blockade Runner from their Vehicle Model range. The kit's intended to represent the Tantive IV, the first ship to appear on screen in A New Hope, but I've finished mine as the Liberator, which was the command ship of Phoenix Squadron in the Star Wars Rebels animated show. The kit is well up to Bandai's usual standards, with tons of tiny detail that you'd think would be impossible to mould on a model as small as this. The only downside (apart from wanting the kit to be bigger) is the inclusion of stickers for the markings, meaning you'll either need to paint them on like here, or source some after-market decals. You can find the full build here Thanks for looking Andy
  14. This is Bandai's little 1/144 Striker, from the U-Wing/TIE box set. It's designed along the same lines as their Vehicle Model series, with only a few parts and no clear moulding for the canopy, but it's still highly detailed, being essentially a scaled-down version of the 72nd kit. I finished this one in a scheme heavily influenced by the red TIE Interceptors used by the Royal Guard in various EU comics. Paint was my usual steel-over-black recipe for the panels, while the red was Gunze red over Gunze russet. Thanks for looking Andy
  15. So I actually managed to make a start in my 3D printed lightsaber hilt today Today was spent disassembling, a little filing and dry fitting. Everything does already fit together, but not massively well so I’m cleaning all of the join points. the calculator ‘bubblestrip’ is Especially problematic, I need to lose a good 2mm from the overall width as well as around half a mm from the thickness. The plan is that mask all of he joins and then give it a good couple of coats of high build primer from Halfrauds before an eternity of rubbing down and wet flatting before I really start to do things properly. Still can’t decide if I’m going to build this as a rusty relic, used or mint condition. I think I’m going to settle on it having had some use (because I’m not yet able to do rust effects etc to a level I am happy with).
  16. Ok, so yesterday I was at a toy collectors fayre at the Nec. I usually go for a look around, don't often buy anything but occasionally you can pick up a model or two. As it turns out I was two isles down and I saw this for £10: Not only was it a bargain and saved me three weeks wait while it made it's way from Japan it was also the next kit on my list so very happy days. I already have a project on the go and I fully intended to put this on a shelf until I had cleared the backlog but I got home from work today and opened the box to take a look and the next thing I knew; Damn you Bandai I didn't get too deep in but I already had an idea to create a diorama of an X-Wing in a hangar looking like it's under maintenance so was dry fitting a few bits and seeing how that would work. I have never really tried anything like this before (opening panels that aren't supposed to be opened) but have always wanted to. I have followed many of @AndyRM101's builds and loved the x wing he did with the panels open. So, inspired by this I hope to show this X-Wing with maybe an engine off and some panels open with wires and internals showing. Maybe with a few droids and ground crew knocking about, as if it's booked in for it's MOT. Not sure how long this will take but hoping to get started soon. Will be in need of lots of advice as scratch building is something I really want to get into but have not really done in the past! Cheers Chris!
  17. Hi! This is not the Bandai kit which I find too big for my taste. It's a vinyle toy from Hasbro found on ebay for around 10£ (S&H included!). It's around 12 cm high. The details are pretty decent. Although almost static I decided to cut off all the joints and replace them with sections of plastic tubes. This way I was able to give it the pose I wanted the droid to have. The figure stood in that state for a bunch of months on my bench until recently I decided to start the paint job as I was painting my Death Star. The paint job is almost done. Pictures to come pretty soon. Ciao Iwik
  18. BB-8 Astromech Bandai 1/12 These two turned up today, so I thought I'd get a wip underway, although it'll be a while before plastic gets cut, as I need to finish the BTR first. To get things going, I'll just show a few sprue shots for anyone who may be thinking about ordering one. I'll just be dealing with BB-8 here, as R2 is the same as he was in the previous boxing. There's only two sprues in the box for BB; one in silver and the other with the white and orange panels The white panels are very shiny. It'd be a shame to have to paint them. All the body panels fall along natural panel lines, so shouldn't be a problem. The dome however is split in two, as R2's was. There are panel lines on the dome too, so I'll have to see whether it'll need any filling or not. These are two of his arms, including the one for the scene (which I guess at a push you could light, if you threaded a fibre optic along the arm) The orange panels seem like a pretty good match for the prop colour, but I think I'll paint them anyway These two parts make a box section that all the main body panels then attach to. There's space inside to run fibres and LEDs should you wish The 'silver' parts aren't bad as they are, but I'll be Alclad-ing them (although I have just ordered some of that new Vallejo metal paint, so I might try that) A couple of tinted clear parts for the his sensors And the clear parts for the stand. The idea with this is that an arm holds his head in place, and traps the body between the head and the base of the stand, allowing the body to be rotated. I'll be dispensing with this, pinning the dome to the body, and placing him on a terrain base And lastly, although I said before that R2 was identical to the earlier release, Bandai have changed the colour of the plastic for the silver parts. BB-8's silver is the same as the first R2/R5 release but here R2 has a much paler, less metallic plastic I'm not sure what the change is for, or why they haven't done it with BB-8, but as I'll be repainting it, it doesn't really matter. Just thought I'd point it out. I'll make a start on him as and when Andy
  19. I've had a couple of Bandai's Vehicle Model kits sitting around half finished for much of this year (a state that's been all too common with several of my builds in 2018). I'm currently trying (probably in vain) to get several projects wrapped up before the end of the year and, as these didn't require all that much work, they were the first to get finished. A-Wing Vehicle Model 010 Up first is the little 1/144 A-Wing, finished in the red/white movie scheme. The weathering on this is a little rougher than I'd like, but it is what it is, and at least I've got it done. You do get a pair of these in the box and the second one is built but not painted yet. I've modified the guns, rear fins and engine nozzles slightly, and it'll be finished in a non-movie scheme that's yet to be determined. AT-M6 Vehicle Model 012 The second completed build is the First Order Walker from TLJ. It scales out roughly at 1/550, so it doesn't really fit in with any of the other Bandai releases which is a shame (or not, if you don't like the subject). There's not a lot you can do with something that's entirely grey, especially at this scale, but I've tried to vary the tone a bit and pick out some of the panels. The finish isn't entirely accurate (the grey should be quite a bit darker), but it turned out reasonably well. Thanks for looking Andy
  20. I've just got back from the post office, having paid the usual ransom fee to claim my own property , but it does mean that I've finally got my personal Star Wars holy grail, the B-Wing. I know it's nothing new at this point, having been around in the US for a couple of months due to the SDCC exclusive, but I'll post some sprue shots for those that haven't seen it up close yet. Before I do though, a quick mention of the box art. It's a bit of a 'greatest hits' for Bandai, with X, Y and A-Wings and the Falcon all making an appearance. More importantly, though, lurking in the background you can see Home One, Ackbar's flagship from the battle of Endor. In the past, Bandai has shown subjects in the background of box artwork that have subsequently gone on to be released as kits, so I'm going to call it now. We'll be getting a box scale Mon Cal Cruiser at some point in the future. You heard it here first. Unless I'm wrong... then you definitely heard it somewhere else. I digress though, so back to the sprues. Sprue A The standard Bandai multi-colour sprue. Cockpit parts, visor, engine intake and guns Cockpit detail looks good, with the seat moulded onto the back wall. The big lug that Bandai always add to seats to secure the pilot figure is a bit ugly, but you'll need the figure in place anyway, as there's no landing gear included so no option to have it on the ground. The instrument panel looks nicely busy. As usual, Bandai gives you the option for a glazed canopy or an open frame. The guns aren't hollowed out at the ends so they'll need drilling. Sprue B The main parts for the blade aerofoil and the two smaller S foils. There's nice detailing on all the wing sections. Sprue C Fuselage sections and the cockpit outer shell. The cockpit shell isn't slide moulded, but it is a single piece so no seams to clean up. This sprue is where you'll also find Ten Numb. Nice detailing and he looks a bit better proportioned than some of Bandai's earlier pilots, particularly with the arms/hands. Sprue D (x2) Two small sprues holding the engine nozzles and other detail parts. Sprue FB-1 The clear sprue for the multi-part stand. I'm not quite sure what this is made from. It's slightly softer and more flexible than normal styrene. It could be a hard PVC or just a soft grade styrene. Sprue SWE1 Finally, you get the usual Bandai laser blast sprue that absolutely no one ever uses. Instructions are standard Bandai fare, albeit in a stapled booklet rather than the fold-out sheets they've used in the past. Also standard is the option for waterslides or stickers. I've never been that keen on Bandai's decals as the printing is often a little rough and pixilated, although they generally go down well. These look okay apart from the colour of the Hinomaru markings, which are far too yellow and should be more orange. I've got quite a bit on at the moment, but hopefully the build should begin before too long. Andy
  21. I got this for review and just couldn't resist putting it together in between doing other things, and it did put up a little bit more of a fight than I expected, with a few ripples in the body that needed filling, some confusion in the direction the lower body faces, and some bubbles in the corrugated leg parts. They were easy enough to fix, and I've been priming it on & off for a few days, testing, fettling and so forth in between sessions, finishing off with a coat of black. This morning I squirted some LifeColor panzer grey all over it, and sealed that in with some AK Gauzy before applying a couple of coats of AK Worn Effects Chipping Fluid (ooer!). Then I overcoated that with some more LifeColor, but this time some Anthrazitzgrau, which is slightly lighter than the base shade. I've been harassing it with a stiff paintbrush for a wee while now, and decided to take a few pics to see how it looks, as you get a bit "blind" to it after a while. It's the first time I've used this technique, so I was a little anxious about screwing it up I'm quite pleased with how it has come out so far, but there's still a long way to go with it. I'm basing mine off the look of the Star Wars originals, although every one seems to differ slightly from the last pic. I've since applied a filter for Panzer Grey (an old Mig one) to blend the two shades, and add a bit of tonal variation, but I have a lot more to do to weather it. I've also got to do the detail painting of the feet, the greeblie insert in the front etc., and add a general dust coat to finish. It's about the most beaten up model I've tried to date, so I'll be hoping that Andy gets a wriggle on with his painting, so I can slavishly copy him
  22. So after a very long interlude I have returned to model building; following some great advice from you guys at the forum I have begun my first ever attempt at detail painting and weathering. I decided to start small and build my confidence and techniques on the tools that come with R2 and BB, so I selected R2's Arc Welder for my first 'victim' I'm using Vallejo acrylics and what you see is black base coat, gun metal, silver, blue (mixed to lighten the shade), gold and red from the basic set I bought along with the first layer of black wash. Looking at it I think I should have painted the gun metal sections black and washed with the gun metal or attempted to dry brush it on as I think it looks a little bright, but I aim to tone it all down with a few more dark washes. More WIP to follow as soon as I find the time to do some more painting!
  23. https://www2.deagostini.com/uk/products/build-your-own-x-wing/GI2130000000?gclid=CjwKCAjwlPTmBRBoEiwAHqpvhVitafD95FsoHhMiRrnByrfFGP7lILkE9rgw_zsq_CEOWbO44d5A_hoC1pMQAvD_BwE
  24. Hi all, I thought it was time I tried some of these Bandai Star Wars kits I hear all the kids are going mad for... I'm not sure I'll have much to add to Andy and Adam's efforts, but I'd like to move some of the Star Wars-ey plastic from my stash to the cabinet where I can see it I started by putting the little ISD together, which was a pleasant experience. There are some fiddly seams in the superstructure and I'm not delighted with the fit of the bridge tower, but with some clothes pins and thin glue it seems to have mostly closed up. I managed to get glue to squeeze out of most of the superstructure joins so I could pare it down and sand it, but I haven't tried as hard with the joins on the vertical surfaces. I'm trying to decide whether to rip off Andy's "aztec" panelled finish or not - the movie ships are quite flat looking, after all. If I do try the panels, I might keep them to the recesses rather than the raised stuff, really not sure yet. Perhaps more interestingly, I've built up the contents of the 1/144 U-Wing box. The U-wing itself is in a variety of bits as I need to paint the interior, but the TIE Striker and Occupier tanks can be pretty much fully assembled before paint: Fit on both is the usual mix of perfection and not-quite-perfection - you can see some seams where the end-caps of the TIE Striker cabin attach, for example. I thought about running some CA into them, but I'm wary of cracking the plastic or indeed making a mess of what's currently a very sharp line. The same line appears on the 1/72 so presumably it's a legit panel line? The tanks fit pretty well and the seams are such that you *could* fill them all but maybe don't have to? And the U-Wing seems great from what I can see. There's a join right through the radiator fins at the back, so I opted to assemble these around the rear plates first and clean up the join. That means I'll need to make around it to paint the rest. I'd hoped that I could cut away enough of the pins that I could join the pieces and slide them into place, but some of the interlocking stuff is visible so I gave up. I'll put some more pictures up when it's in primer, as well as finish that Zoid Cheers, Will
  25. Welp, I finally gave in to temptation and started the Bandai 1:144 Millennium Falcon that's been sitting in my closet for quite a while now. I'm going to do a proper as-it-happens WIP thread for this build. I still haven't decided on all the particulars -- whether or not I'm going to light this sucker and how much extra detail I'm going to add. I probably will end up lighting it -- fully lit TFA-style looks *really* good to me. I just put in an order for several Flory washes for weathering -- hopefully they'll arrive well before I get to the weathering stage. I started yesterday with the mandible maintenance wells. Inspired by this build video, and this stunning Bandai build I'm painting a lot of detail in the mechanical bits, like I've done with my Blue Leader build. Definitely not going for screen accuracy here . First a coat of Tamiya Fine Surface Primer. Then a base color coat of Gunship Gray. Then I dry-brushed Vallejo Duraluminum all over, and picked out details using Vallejo Gunmetal Gray, Valljeo Duraluminum, Tamiya X-12 Gold, and Citadel Hashut Copper.
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