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Found 126 results

  1. Here's one I made earlier........... During a computer cleanout, I 're-discovered' my photos of a scratchbuilt A-90 Ekranoplan that I made some 20 years ago..... so I thought I'd share the build with you.... Excuse the quality of the photos - they are now quite old - and not the best I have ever taken. The build was inspired by the release of the Revell 1/44 scale A-90 - plus some drawings I found in the Russian magazine 'Aerohobby'.... The drawings are excellent - and most importantly - they have cross-sections, so they were scaled up to 1/72, on printed out in A4 and the sheets taped together. The main fuselage section is essentially a rectangular box - with a curved roof (like a railway carriage) and a vee-shaped planing bottom... Here's the inverted 'floor' with plastic card bulkeads attached as per the drawing to form the vee...... Now the right way up, the rectangulay starboard side panel is attached.... .... together with the port panel and rear bulkhead...... The fuselage inverted to show the planing vee... The centre keel of the rear fuselage is added and shaped bulkheads are attached on either side. The curved roof bulkheads are fitted to a centre keel to form the outline shape....... The planing bottom and flat rear side panels are attached........... The fin is made from a plastic card outline shape - with balsa wood stuck to both sides and sanded to aerofoil section....... Checking the fin for fit - and 'planking in' the lower rear fuselage with strips of narrow plastic card........ The port side lower rear fuselage is planked in.... The fin has the rudder separated and is skinned with thin plastic card... More later.... Ken
  2. Greetings All. For those of you who saw my recent Whippet: and I’m pleased to say that your fantastic feedback has urged me to get cracking with the next proper project. So here we go – obscure WWI scratchbuild!!! I’ve selected this… For a number of reasons: 1. It’s got flat armour. 2. It’s got covered wheels (no spokes) 3. It’s got virtually no info about it available (as far as I can tell). I’m new to scratchbuilding; the Whippet was my first and I don’t have a toolshed full of lovely treats like lathes and milling machines – so everything needs to be do-able with just a few simple tools, especially at the moment under re-located lockdown. Scalpel – check. Pin vice – check. Tweezers – check. Glue – check. Right, let’s get cracking! This vehicle makes it as easy as I can get it, and with very little reference material, who’s to say I’m wrong? No worrying about whether I should model the 1916 pattern leather belt flange spronglets, or the 1915 tin and papier-mache versions with overlapping fringe dongles….. nice! First (and possibly the biggest) challenge – wheels. I used Alexandr Bondar’s excellent card model instructions from the landships II website - http://www.landships.info/landships/models.html# Scaling these up in photoshop to an estimated, and as close as I can get by eye, 1/35 (fingers crossed), the wheels scaled out to 21.6mm internal diameter (inside of the rim), and 28mm external outside of the tyre. As luck would have it, a furtle around in my plumbing spares came up with some 22mm plastic speedfit pipe. The bends and connectors unscrewed to reveal a bunch of 28mm diameter O rings. Sheer luck, but I’m taking it as a good omen. I studied the 3 photos and instructions that appear to be all that is known about this vehicle and concluded that as with most other WWI era British armoured cars, double tyres were installed on the rear wheels, with minimal if no tread. The O rings have it! So far, so good, but a tricky bit had to occur somewhere, and in this case it’s the rear wheel itself. The solid centre of the front wheel is clearly flat, but the thicker rear is dished, with a conical plate – hmm. Not so straightforward. I cut a few over-sized circles and sliced them to make cones. A few experiments and a couple were glued together, held in place while the glue set by mounting them within the cut sections of tube that will form the rims. On releasing them, it was clear that the join wasn’t perfect, tending to meet at an angle rather than curve, so a bit of milliput will be smeared in with plenty of water to smooth it. All this wheel work required a few circles to be cut out of 0.5mm and 0.2mm plastic card. Here’s (one of) the way(s) I do it – pin in a pin-vice, scribed repeatedly ‘round a circle template. Snap out the circle and clean up with sandpaper. All ok so far, but don’t hold your breath – this could take a while…. See you next time!
  3. I don't normally cross over to this side of the house much, but I do like the occasional Armour build and I've been planning to do this one for ages. My 1/72 (76) operational WWI tank collection so far. But it's missing one, namely the Schneider CA1 the first operational tank in WWI. (arguably I should have some of the other MKs of Heavy tanks too but they may come later, along with a possible K-wagon (they almost finished two prototypes)) but the lack of a Schneider is really a gaping hole in the set. And yes I know there are resin Schneiders out there, but I enjoy scratch building plus they are hard to get hold of and ferociously expensive. Starting with a wooden core and skinning it with plastic sheet panels. I've the underside and the lower and front panels attached. The pieces are more glued to the core than each other.
  4. SS Xantho, Western Australia's First Steamship. St George's Terrace is the main business thoroughfare of Perth and every 20 metres or so along its length, embedded in the footpath is a plaque similar to the one shown below. Each plaque commemorates a year in the history of Western Australia and the most eminent person in the state that year. There are some names you may have heard of; Allan Bond, Dennis Lillee and Bob Hawke for example - I note that Rolf Harris's one has recently disappeared!? But most of the names are those of administrators, academics or business people whose stories are now forgotten by all except their decedents or the most ardent of local history buffs. In the course of my years of work in this city I must have walked past this rather battered looking plaque hundreds - probably thousands - of times without noticing it or giving it a moment's thought. 1870 - Charles Edward Broadhurst - Pearler... About two year's ago, on a lunch break, I dropped into my favourite bookshop and while perusing the local history section found this recently published book. The nautical cover caught my attention. I wondered if there would be schematic drawings inside. I'm always looking for schematic drawings. There were a few sketches in the book, but none of the four-view technical profiles and cross-sections I was hoping for. There was however this artist's impression of a most fetching looking 19th century steamship; The SS Xantho. I started to read and once I started into her story - and that of her owner Mr Broadhurst - I could not stop. It turns out that this vessel - and a rather extraordinary vessel she was in certain regards - was Western Australia's first ever steamship. I'm not going to try to tell her history to you right now, because that would make for a very long introductory post and I am anticipating that this project could last for some time. We can discuss her history in detail later. Suffice to say that this ship sank in November 1872 at Port Gregory, a tiny, tiny settlement 500 km North of the state capital Perth. (See the map below.) Fortunately no lives were lost. Following her loss she was essentially forgotten and sat undisturbed for more than 100 years and was of no apparent significance beyond being a hazard to navigation. The red arrow shows the position of her wreck, right at the entrance to the harbour and the yellow arrow the site of the only jetty for scores of nautical miles in any direction. But in 1983 Xantho was re-discovered by staff of the Western Australian Maritime museum and, due to a number of extraordinary and completely unforeseen factors she was about to be propelled to global fame - at least within the world's maritime archeology community. In the words of Dr 'Mac' MacCarthy, the world's leading expert on Xantho - 'This ship is world famous - in certain circles'. I think it's a shame so few other people have heard of her. Once the Avro 504 is finished I'm going to build a model! Be warned though Britmodeller maritime folks I have great plans for this one, and I'm going to need all the help and expertise that I can get, because this promises to be a research nightmare! Very Best Regards, Bandsaw Steve.
  5. Rummaging through my attic and found a very old MAP set of Albatros plans, with nothing better to do I went through the whole pack, all the B,C and D series, of all of them I liked the look of the C IX it’s essentially a two seat D series with ( for the time) a very unconventional wing arrangement. The plans. Not having access to a photocopier any more and with time in my hands I decided to draw up some 1/48 sketches my hand, these will be my working drawings.
  6. Panzerhaubitzer 2000 - Pzh 2000 in the 1980s the German, Italian and British governments attempted to develop, in collaboration, the next generation of NATO self-propelled Artillery. For various reasons that project failed. Britain pressed on and successfully developed the AS-90 while the Germans pursued their own project which combined the expertise of leading German companies, Wegmann, Krauss-Maffei and Rheinmetall to produce the truly awesome Panzerhaubitze 2000. In the 1990's this was arguably the best Self Propelled Gun in the world and it remains a cutting-edge weapon to this day. Today it is used by several NATO nations including; Germany, Holland, Italy, Greece, Lithuania, Croatia and Hungary. The Pzh 2000 features an extremely long - 52 calibre - 155mm gun with a largely automated gun-loading mechanism for very high rates of fire to ranges in excess of 40km. The weapon's fire-control is among the most sophisticated in the world, and allows a single gun to be fired in 'multiple round, simultaneous impact' or MRSI mode. In this mode up to five shells can be fired, each with its own charge and trajectory in such a fashion that all five shells hit the same target at the same moment. The gun is also capable of firing GPS-guided precision rounds with a circular impact error of about 1.5m. The Pzh 2000 has seen a significant amount of action in Afghanistan where both Dutch and German examples have been used to provide fire-support to the International Security Assistance Force. This was the first time that the German Army has used artillery in combat since the end of WW2. One day while on my lunch break (long before all this COVID 19 business broke out) I was checking out a little-visited corner of the local gaming / model / bookshop and found this in among a pile of largely neglected publications. Upon opening the book I was greeted with this fold-out (and there are front and rear views on the flip side too). Now this might just be the most exciting centre-fold I've ever seen. In any case, a few minutes later the book was purchased. About a week later I had decided that this project was going ahead but that 1/35 just wasn't big enough. I took the book to my local printing / copying shop and got the drawings enlarged to 1/24 scale and copied 8 times. I got one 'master set' laminated. And now we are off... Let's scratchbuild one of these things! This is going to be an unusual build for me because much of the work will be done in plastic card, but I want a good solid wooden hull to work from so I'm starting with this block of 'Liquid Ambar' - a superb carving wood - which needs to be cut to the correct size. Here's the first cut of the entire project. Here's the interpreted curve on the leading edge of the hull being marked out... and here it is being carved to shape. Then rasped prior to a final filing and sanding smooth. OK - looks about right. Now I use the bandsaw to cut the wood to exactly the correct width for the hull. The bandsaw! Best tool in the shed! And following a bit of research (especially looking at photos) and some ‘interpretive’ carving and cutting at the rear of the hull I have this basic starting point. After two years of slaving away building a WW1 Biplane (an Avro 504 to be precise) I'm dead keen to work on this project which promises a complete change of subject and modelling method. I hope that some of you will follow along and see what comes of this little venture. Bandsaw Steve
  7. Suddenly this afternoon it all came together, so I've taken lots of pictures in the hope that someone out there will like it, and may even be inspired to have a go themselves. The basic fuselage is strips of wood glued rather like a balsa aircraft and covered in plastic card. The nose section was a 1/32nd Puma, first built decades ago. There are original Sternail models out there. probably less than a dozen all scratchbuilt, I did one years ago. This, the Ausf D. would be a development of the original. Scale is 1/35th. It measures out at nearly 70cm. call it 2 feet 3 inches in old money. Nose armament, Laser/plasma? You decide. The wasp decal is from a Messerscmitt Bf110 The yellow/green decal is supposed to be a bit like the WW2 defence of the Reich markings. I used two decals overlaid. To the left of that is the airlock door for the WSO (Weapons systems operator) or GIB (Guy in Back). Lots of other access panels can be seen. The RH comms pod. RH thruster turret. See those silver balls on the blade pitch change arms. What's the name of that game where grown men run around woodland firing these pellets at each other? I'm not entirely happy with the solar panels. Black paint over silver, But they'll have to do until I think of another way to do it. They do look pretty battered and worn though, in typical kreiger fashion. That thruster in the middle is an Aircraft rivet type called a Rivnut, or rather, it was. As seen on Wessex radius arm mounting plates. There's another one under here. And I cut the middles out of 1/25th steering wheels and glued them to the Sherman drive sprockets on the scanner, above right. The left side featuring the pilots airlock door. The docking probe is visible on the right. Meteor sheild (Puma door) and Comms pod (Mascara compact lid & card) LH main horizontal steering thruster turret (King Tiger) LH gun close up. Various Panzer bits. The convoluted jobbie is a Biro spring wrapped in PTFE tape. EDIT - I forgot to show the engines, so here you are.... So, there we go. It's been a fun build and due to being stuck at home it's finished months earlier than expected. I hope you've seen something you like and I welcome your comments and questions. Thanks for looking, Pete
  8. Hogwart's Express - A Baby Bandsaw Build 'A scarlet steam engine was waiting next to a platform packed with people. A sign overhead said Hogwarts Express, 11 o'clock. Harry looked behind him and saw a wrought-iron archway where the ticket box had been, with the words Platform Nine and Three-Quarters on it. He had done it' So wrote J.K. Rowling in chapter six of her 1997 novel Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone - the first in a series of novels that some of you may have heard of. My two daughters have definitely heard of these books - and have seen the films countless times - in fact they are bordering on fanatical about all things Harry Potter. So it wasn't a complete surprise when the younger of them - twelve year old 'Baby Bandsaw'- came to me about two weeks ago and asked if she could have a go at scratch-building a model of the Hogwarts Express. Being a very irresponsible parent I immediately decided that this was a great idea and despite all of the hazards of power-tools and chisels and so-forth, Baby Bandsaw (B,B) should indeed have a crack at this! We agreed that I would give her inexpert guidance, bad advice and, whenever required, inept help. She however would actually do the majority of the work. This will be Baby Bandsaw's Build, not mine, but she agreed that I was allowed to photograph and document her progress right here on Britmodeller and that I would be allowed to publish under my log-on. I looked her straight in the eye and asked her 'if you start this will you finish it?' it was a somber moment - she said 'yes' so we shook hands and the project began. After a brief bit of research and a couple of internet searchs I found this set of plans for a 'Hall Class' locomotive (Olton Hall was used in the film) and re-scaled the plans to 1/48 scale using my work's photocopier. This should be enough to get started. In model railway world I think that 1/48 is called 'O' gauge for some obscure reason. This lump of Huon Pine - the same bit I used to form the vac-form cowling buck on the Avro 504 - was the only bit of decent wood I had that was wide enough to start to form the boiler . Here is the first cut in the entire project. BB cutting off a small surplus lump on one end, squaring up the block in preparation for further work. Here she's cutting out the profile view of the boiler. We have no plan view at this stage but that's not too much of a handicap because the boiler is circular in cross-section and so the side view is identical to the plan. As per my usual 'modus operandi' BB is spraying some cheap photo-fixative glue onto the side of the wood so that... She can stick the paper pattern on and start some bandsaw action! I was sort-of a bit 'parental' here and fussed about making sure those fingers stayed at least a small distance from the blade! A few minutes later she had this. We marked up a 'do not cut into' red line -as you can see below - and a grey 'remove with chisel' area and BB started hacking into the sharp squared off corners with this scoop chisel - nice work! So after about half an hour she was left with this. The very, very early stages of this build. The very first bit of rounding off of that square block that will need be reduced to a full cylinder to represent the boiler. Alas, by now it was bedtime as BB had school the following day. So begins my first post on the 'Civilian Vehicle's forum - a forum I have been hankering to get onto for some time. Some of you may be thinking 'Ere! Isn't there a forum specifically for railway locomotives on Britmodeller?' and there is. However, frankly, it's a bit hidden away and BB and I are hoping for a bit of visibility, interest and banter regarding this project. We think it will do better here in that regard. I did send a Personal Message to @Mike and he has very graciously given us permission to post this here so we aren't trespassing - honest! Anyway - this should be fun, and I hope some of you see fit to follow along and see what comes of this. Best Regards, Baby Bandsaw and Bandsaw Steve!
  9. You know those occasions when you get a crazy idea and just have to give a try? Well this is one of those. There's far from any guarantee of success or completion, but fortune favours the brave and all that..! Having a real soft-spot for the Avro Shackleton I've decided to do something really stupid and have a go at scratch-building one in 1/32nd scale. As I'm sure we're all aware there's kits available in 1/72nd and 1/48th scale, but nothing in 1/32nd so the only option is to start from scratch. I have an old ID Models 1/32nd Lancaster in the stash, and always planned to convert that to a Lincoln. However, when doing some research on the Lincoln I discovered that the wing and centre section (although widened on the Shackleton) were in essence the same airframe. Therefore I thought, making a Shackleton using the Lancaster as a parts donor could be a viable option... The first phase of the project was to find some plans. The Warpaint Series on the Shackleton came up trumps, and although these plans are far from perfect they've given me enough to get started. I duly enlarged them to 1/32nd scale and cobbled together a reasonable outline for a MR2 which is the version I'm hoping to replicate. You can see the size this model will (hopefully) be when finished when you put the Airfix 1/72nd kit on top: With that done it was sourcing the key components of a project like this - various thicknesses of plastic card: And of course the ID Models Lancaster: I then set about building up the centre section from plastic card formers, using the bomb bay roof as the structural centre-point. Wing spars have been made integral to the structure for strength and stability. I'm not going to worry too much about an interior to the fuselage, as it'll all be sprayed black and next to nothing will be visible through the small fuselage windows. The forward flight deck area will be fully replicated, though: The plan is to use the Lancaster fuselage sides for the 'skinning' of the model, and other areas will be 'planked' and blended with filler from thin plastic card strips. With the fuselage centre section progressing well and having cut my teeth on making bulkheads and formers etc., I had the confidence to have a go at making the nose section. This is a lot more tricky as there are many complex shapes and subtle curves to try to replicate, especially around the extreme nose where the bomb aimer/gunner's glazing. Again, the interior won't an accurate structural representation of the real thing, but being black and only the extreme nose interior being visible there shouldn't be too many problems here. As with the fuselage, the basic shape of the formers were made from plastic card and assembled to give a skeleton that'll be skinned in due course: I haven't made the 'roof' to the nose compartment yet as some form of interior needs to be added, as well as the observer/gunner's transparencies and its associated fairings: So this is where we're currently at: And alongside the 1/72nd scale version for a 'size reality check!' As I said at the start, there's no guarantee of success in the long term, but I'm having a blast right now! Tom
  10. Hi folks, I am planning to scratchbuild a Sikorsky S-61N helicopter but am lacking some details. I have plenty of Plan and Profile diagrams but do not have any cross-section views, which would be needed for me to get the contours and dimensions right. Can anyone here help with such information, measurements and frame/cross-section plans please? cheers Mike
  11. A while back whilst building the Jura I started a wee Welsh Models, 1/144 Supermarine Scimitar F. Mk. 1. I really should have posted some pics and the WIP by now so here goes: The "Instructions": The "Kit": Some bits done: Stupidly decided to scratch build the ejection seat. It's not very big... Installed. More to follow soon.
  12. Soooooo... It's been a while since I posted any builds mainly because I seem to have hit a brick wall called "finishing a model". The shelf of shame is really getting very shameful. And so begins a woeful tale of buffoonery. About a month ago I was at a friend's house and whilst chatting to another old friend of theirs he mentioned that he used to work on the Scottish Fishery Protection Agency ships. I mentioned seeing these ships often in Stornoway Harbour, particularly the "Westra", "Jura" and "Minna". We got on really well and to cut all the drivel out of a long story I later casually asked if he had any ship's plans of any of them. He said he did and would I like to see them? About a week later he handed me a thick blue book and sho' nuff, in the back was the plans to the Jura. I got permission to copy them but by now his curiosity was piqued and he asked why I wanted them. Not seeing the huge hole right in front of my two left feet I explained that when the company wasn't running my backside into the ground with work I played Flight Sim (X-Plane 11) and built scale models. I would try and scale the plans down and try to build a scale model of the Jura. Having seen some of the excellent builds on here I thought I'd give it a try. Nowt wrong with that, but this where the two left feet and the big hole came into it... In a sheer attack of Muppetry, Kermit here opened his daft gob and said, "Would you like one too?" His face lit up and he said "I would absolutely love one!" I didn't panic too much then but when I got home and opened them out the plans were A0 size so about 5' x 4'. "Oh", I thought "This could be fun getting to the right scale". I tried photographing the plans but they were very faint. I had another mate who had a mate who managed to get the plans scanned on to PDF format. "Yaaaay!" I thought, "This might actually work". They were almost as faint as the photos and whilst they were a bit straighter than my photo efforts they still had a slight skew to them so it took a bit of time and photo editing to get them straight. As I only have an A4 printer I used Windows Snip tool to cut the scans into bite size chunks and paste them into Word so I could print them of to stick to whatever medium I decided to build the model in. I have scratchbuilt a few items in the past as per below: 1/35 Bristol Bloodhound 1/35 "Whippet with guts". Emhar Whippet with scratchbuilt engine and interior) 1/144 Whaler my Dad worked on back in the 1950s. I built this for him and used the hull from the Revell North Sea Trawler and the boats from 144 HMS Discovery (I think), all the rest was scratchbuilt: And a wee 1/350 scale WW2 HMT minehunter: And this is what the "Jura" looked like: Sorry, it's been so long since I last posted pics I'm having trouble remembering how to get them to the right size. I'm not too worried about scratchbuilding the Jura (although I have serious Muppet issues measuring anything, or cutting anything straight and circles become squares) BUT... It will be for someone that knows the ship intimately and will spot any mistakes instantly. And now, enough waffle - let the "fun" begin...
  13. A build from 11 years ago> While some designers choose to do away with the fuselage and the tail and create a “flying wing”, others choose to eliminate the wings and create a lifting body. That was the choice of William Horton, from California and Vincent Burnelli, both of them shaped the fuselage as a wing section. The Horton design featured large “endplates” –apparently described as “sealers”- along the fuselage/airfoil to improve its efficiency. A number of control surfaces can be seen at its rear end: a central, finned elevator and two surfaces on the sides that look like elevons (elevator+ailerons). Two fins and rudders are integral with the endplates. It is of notice that the concept of lifting body in this case was linked to the “roadable” plane too, since it was suggested to develop such machine later on. The design can be also described as being of “negative aspect ratio”, since its span is less than its length, roughly a 0.5 to 1 ratio. And perhaps we should clear some recurrent confusion: William Horton was an American from California, while the Horten (with “e”) were brothers from the nazi Germany that later got a free-pass to Argentina for a while. The Horten Bros. designed a number of flying wings and William Horton, as said, worked on the concept of lifting bodies, creating first the plane which model is here depicted, and later a more futuristic-looking, twin-engine bigger machine also called the Horton Wingless. William Horton associated with Howard Hughes, a joint-venture that apparently didn’t work out very well due to the iron grip of Mr. Hughes. Unfortunately, Hughes stalled in every possible way the development and sales of the Wingless. Shame on you Howard. Nevertheless the prototype achieved some flight and its beautiful lines were preserved in a few images. Simple lines on a model don’t necessarily translate into simple construction. Once the planning and engineering started, it was obvious that once more simple design didn’t mean simple construction. One or two parts were modified spare bin sleepers, while wheels and prop –Hartzell on the original plane- were modified Aeroclub items. Only a bit of the interior can be seen in the available photos of the real plane, enough to see the bulk of the long Franklin 68A engine in the middle of the cockpit/cabin while the shaft protrudes ahead of the fuselage. The pilot seat seemed to be the located on the left. The part count was about a hundred when I judiciously stopped counting. Although undiscriminating fellow modelers whose visual education and taste leaves much to be desired dared to call this beauty a “flying toaster”, one thing can not be denied: imagination was for sure abundant in the blooming 50’s.
  14. A prototype from 1917 two were built this is the second in its penultimate form. The final machine had staggered wingspans on all four wings. Scratchbuilt in 1/48. The Pup is also a scratch build shown for comparison.
  15. Came across this in one of my aviation books and just couldn’t resist the general oddness. So consider it commenced. I’ve scaled up the sketches and hope to be cutting plastic soon.
  16. And here we go yet again. I built a Sternail about eight or so years ago for a friend in Saudi. As far as I know it's still somewhere in the Middle East. Must be about time to build one for myself. And not just any old Sternail either. This time I'm doing a two seater. BTW, What's a Sternail? I can post this one here because it's the one I built. At rest here in a garden just outside Riyadh. I've been stockpiling kit bits for quite some time, some were earmarked for this build. I did get a Hind off the bay but it turned out to be too small, so I've rethought the nose. Here's a sketch I made eight years ago. It shows how I built the last one and I'll do the same this time. A basic wooden frame covered with plasticard. (And filler!). Not my model but it shows the size of the beast. This is 1/35th scale BTW. You may notice the T-55 tank turrets holding thrusters at the rear. I don't have any this time. But I did have a couple of King Tiger turrets in a spares box. Go with what ya got! I bought some scrap Airfix Steam engines off the bay a while ago. On the far side of the top here is a wheel from a Battle of Britain class while closer to you in the piston assembly? from a Mogul. Other parts are mostly ex tank. Except this bit. The back. It's the tender rear plate upside down. Now if an X wing can have a loco fire box at the back, then I can use this bit! More train and tank bits. This side will be the lower one. This is the front. Tank fender, the rest of the tender rear and half leaf springs from an engine. Another view of the top. I've filled a couple of the holes on that big wheel and still need to rub it down. The brass rod above it isn't yet glued in place. The two turrets/Thruster housings. The side nearest you will be the upper one. Obviously as the turrets were identical the big wheel won't be uppermost on both. Ah well. I said the Hind wasn't going to cut it. (Unless I can find a cheap 1/48th Hind quickly). Back around 1984, when I was in Germany, I built a 1/32nd Puma. Having worked on them at Odiham I put a lot into it. It's been in a box for decades now and time (and my then building skills) haven't been kind to it. So it's being reused on this build as the nose section. It's a bit wide as is so I'll dismantle it further and cut out 10mm or so from the centreline. And, after a very enjoyable Sunday, mostly in the Mancave, this is where I'm at. I've asked in Wanted for a 1/48th F-14 or F-15 fuselage to use in this but no joy so far. I may have a way of getting along without it but it won't be so easy. Next up it's time to look at cutting some wood for the basic framework. As always, Comments, questions and suggestions are welcome. Thanks for looking, Pete
  17. Happy Birthday Royal Air Force Today is the 100th Anniversary of the formation of the Royal Air Force. If you did not know that already you are probably on the wrong website. Some time ago I decided that I wanted to mark this occasion by starting a new project on this date and have of late spent much time thinking about what the subject should be. Naturally enough, Spitfires, Hurricanes, Lancasters and myriad of famous post-war types all came to mind, but these are well-covered subjects and so I dwelled on the matter a bit deeper... What about something that was in service on the day the RAF formed? What about something that had served in both the RFC and the RNAS prior to the formation of the RAF? What about something that was crucially important both to the newly formed air force and essentially all of the commonwealth air arms that were to follow? What about the Avro 504! To me, the Avro 504, more than any other single type, captures the spirit and the essence of the nascent Royal Air Force. This type had seen service as a fighter, a bomber and reconnaissance aircraft prior to being 'relegated' to the training duties at which it excelled. By 1918 this was the most numerous aircraft in the RAF (and probably in the world) with more than 7000 being built during World War One alone. In the new air force almost all aircrew had been trained on this type and I should think most of the ground crew as well. It was the foundation of the skills and professionalism that have been the hallmark of the service ever since. So, foolishly, I'm going to have a crack at building one in 1/32 scale. Here are the plans I will be using...provided most efficiently by Len Whalley at 'aeroplans.co.uk’ (Great service thanks Len). As you can see this is a screen-shot of my electronic copy because my friendly computer draftsman at work is on extended Easter holidays. He'll be back soon! In the meantime I'm going to use these plans as a starting point, they are fine for the general layout and dimensions. And here we go... Start with a good straight, clean bit of wood. In this case I'm using Jarrah - just like I did in my Mig 15 build here... www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235012524-mig-15-scratchbuild I'm using Jarrah mostly because it's the strongest wood I can get hold of. Having studied the plans I can see that there are going to be some challenges with maintaining the structural integrity of this model, especially once the extensive cockpit has been hollowed out - hence structural strength is going to be a major consideration. It's a beautiful bit of wood this - straight close grain almost flawless. The oval below marks the only knot in the entire plank, it's tiny and is fortunately positioned so it can be easily excluded from the fuselage cut-out. Here I'm marking off the first cut for the fuselage. I'm cutting it much longer than it needs to be for reasons you will see later on. And here it is - the first cut - made on 01 April 2018! Hooray... Two lengths have been cut for the fuselage so that I can work to the natural centre-line thus formed... The wings are being cut from some thin slices of sapelli. Another high-quality hard-wood. I've chosen this because I do not want the wings to sag and think that sapelli will be rigid enough to hold it's shape over time. And here's the rough cut-out of the tailplanes. I think that the tail is going to be the only easy part of the build. And so -after 20 minutes of work I have the very, very rough outline of a biplane... No - this is not an April Fools joke, this really is the start of my model! I don't know how long this is going to take but given the slow pace of my previous (still uncompleted) project that you can see here: www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235021633-hmasm-ae2-scratchbuild I would say this will take at least a year and possibly much longer. I've never built a biplane before. Wish me luck... Best Regards, Bandsaw Steve (ex-Reconcilor)
  18. Well kids.... I started all over again... New thread because the old one was just devolving into a endless stream of do overs. THIS THREAD SHALL NOT BE WHAT CAME BEFORE...THIS ONE WILL BE A FINISHED PROTOTYPE MODEL!! So a few months back my good friend Paul Fisher lost his home and wonderful workshop to fire in Paradise, CA. I am so happy he and his family escaped and in that light the mention of what comes next seems so trivial. Paul was in possession of the masters I had completed at the time of the fire so an opportunity to build a better model arose. Considering the magnitude of the work I previously completed, I started thinking about how to speed up the build. As many of you know I have turned to CNC and SLA type 3d printing to augment the hand building of the model. Until recently I had eschewed the use of FDM type printers due to the inaccuracy of the prints, and significant post processing required after printing model parts. Cost also was a factor, nothing was worth the investment versus the risk of poor parts. Enter the Tiertime Cetus MKIII. This little printer was cheap, precise and worth a gamble. The main feature that attracted me to the printer was the linear guide rails and bearing blocks. These almost guarantee accurate movement of the axises of the printer. With a price in the $300 US range it was worth a try. With the printer in hand and after some tweaking with the assembly of the printer I managed to print dimensionally accurate parts. One inch cubes were printed and were measured by digital caliper only a few ten thousands of an inch from true, and square adjacent surfaces measured with a machinist's square. So I ordered up 7,000g of PLA filament and started a-printing. On a similar journey I ordered up an Anycubic Photon MSLA printer, though this journey was much longer because the Photon required much more significant modification to get true parts. Out of the box it made fantastic parts in terms of detail. However, they parts didn't fit with others, they were skewed in the Z or vertical axis. The modification was much too complex to detail in this post, suffice to say the machine was disassembled, parts were machined true, linear rails and bearing blocks added and a new parts were machined to make it all work. Parts that came out of the machine post modification were exceptional! Now that I have three machines working simultaneously part production has definitely accelerated the pace of this build. I have also made some design changes. Outside of getting another chance to improve the model's accuracy, simplifying and streamlining the build has been a chief consideration. So the model will still be "skinned" in aluminum sheet but only where there are removable panels, the remainder of panel detail will be scribed in to a layer of primer paint. PLA is a difficult material to sand and also hygroscopic and needed to be well sealed. I'm using 2 part automotive epoxy paint (paint and hardener) to fill and "glue" the PLA layers together. The result is a surface that is much easier to sand and finish. You can see a few of the PLA parts were the black primer has been applied and finishing has started. Lastly my machining skills have improved to the point where the acrylic parts now have machined in details, rivets and reinforcing layers etc. Here's a shot of the parts so far. These parts represent the main components of the fuselage from the nose to the engine faces. More detailed photos coming as assembly commences. This will be a prototype model, so I will be finishing this one as I go, so you can look forward to finished assemblies going forward. Thanks for checking in! Timmy!
  19. In general I wait until I have some visual material to show before I open a new thread, but in this case the beginning is more like a statement of purpose for the new year and the layout of the type background. The Italian Macchi M.39 was a racing seaplane designed specifically to compete on the Schneider Trophy of 1926, which it won, piloted by Mario de Bernardi. Five similar machines were built, three for racing purposes with a Fiat AS.2 engine (the other two flown by Ferrarin and Bacula), and two for training purposes which had a similar but less powerful Fiat engine. They followed the design lines that were found by almost all competitors to work better, namely twin-float braced monoplanes, of extremely refined streamlining that used surface radiators. As I mentioned in previous threads, before even thinking of building, I dedicate time and effort to research, which invariably pays off big time. And this is no exception. To start with, many photos captioned as a Macchi M.39 are actually of the very similar (but not identical) Macchi M.52 and 52R. Therefore the first task is to sort out the photos, helped by three clues: -The M.52s had a much pronounced arrow angle for the wings -The M.52s had slightly larger wing radiators -The M.52s had different motifs on the fuselage and tail. -The M.52 had a slightly different windshield. (Four, four clues -Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition) After studying from photos you promptly realize: -that representations of the M.39 in drawings and 3views are often inaccurate, since they include the graphic motifs that the M.52 had. As the winner of the Schneider, the M.39 had only the number 5 on the sides, no Italian tricolore on the rudder, and no fascia roundel on the fuselage. -that the machine at the Vigna di Vale museum has a different, much later scheme than that wore at the race, and a wooden prop, used only on the practice machines, and not the Reed metal prop used on the race. -That the windshield of the museum machine is again slightly different than the one seen in photos of the winning machine. As an additional achievement, the Macchi M.39 established soon after the Schneider win a new speed record.
  20. I've been using up my spare time on this weird and wonderful device. I started with the intention of scratchbuilding a 1/20th copy of the Fledermaus, because the kit is a silly price. But this one evolved into a 1/35th unmanned AI equipped aerial reconnaissance platform. I didn't want to slavishly copy the usual Luftwaffe paint, so I took a cue from the colour schemes used on RAF P-40's in the desert. The figure posed with it is from the Bandai Zeon universe and is slightly undersized, but does show the size of the beast. The basic fuselage was a Skycrane Helicopter but now upside down. Wings were B-58. The rounded shape was a spoon and droptanks. Behind that a 1/32nd Bf109 Cowling leading back to an Me262 nose. All these models were originally built in the early seventies. Decals used are from various sources. The tailplane was 1/32nd Bo105 Helicopter. The engines are from the 1/72nd B-58. I didn't even repaint the silver bits at either end. The gear is mounted on Skycrane sponsons and is Panzer bits while the skids were aerials under a Vulcan. Suspension would be by friction washers. The unit badge seen top right is a plain back shield. Two camera windows to the right here and the silver thing is another steering thruster. The thrusters are for use when in Anti gravity 'Hover' mode. What have they been burning in those engines? Not exactly clean and green! On the flaps seen here (and the wing leading edges) I use a thin self adhesive metal tape. On the flaps to deflect the engine blast, leading edges for anti erosion. A close up of the nose camera/sensor. Upside down was the easiest way to get this on film. A pitot probe? Why not? The two lights are ex Panzer, One has a blackout slit and the other a clear 1/25th car lens. And those are flare racks on the sponsons. That 'Sukhoi' tail. The tail light under it is a stick on 'jewel' from a kids craft set. Outside. This shows the desert fading of the paintwork better than the indoor shots. The Airbrakes stand out, but the orange I painted them with has worn/faded away. In the centre fuselage would be a generator engine for powering the anti gravity unit. Hence all those intakes/scoops. Exhaust would be behind the 'hump' Belly of the beast, and its not quite so vivid this time. A cross between Mediterranean blue and PR blue, I hope? The grey ball (ping pong) is an anti gravity unit as seen on the Falke. See the round thruster to the left of the flap? In front of that is an underwing light on both wings. Another kids 'jewel'. The thruster and jewel are in the holes where the outboard engines went. The yellow thing is an aerial/sensor pod. (Okay, it was a drop tank). And that is your lot. I hope there is something you like here. Any comments or questions are always welcome. Yes, I build these things because I can and I enjoy it! answers one FAQ for you. There is a build thread in WIP. Thanks very much for popping by. Pete
  21. I started my first project of 2019...a scale model of the Nostromo Airlock from the 1979 movie Alien. I will be working from this Ron Cobb concept drawing and a handful of photos and frame grabs from the movie. I have recently bought a "Silhouette Portrait" cutting machine and will be using that to do most of the tricky styrene cutting. I'm starting with the outer doors, which I have cut out the various pieces which will be layered and glued together. The machine is amazing. I never could have cut those out by hand in a million years. The doors are cut from .030" styrene. the raise panel details are cut from .020". Things are starting to be glued. I've wrapped the outer edges of the doors with thin strips of styrene. These broke when I bent them and will need a bit of filler, but over all things are off to a good start. Unfortunately, I ran out of my favorite glue (Tamiya Extra Thin) which is worse than running out of beer, because the local shops sell beer. So it will be a week or more till I can do any more assembly. Thanks for looking in.
  22. Hi all, Since I built my Defiant I’m now on a turret roll, so I’m going to drag myself kicking & screaming from my OOB comfort zone and attempt to build Hobby Boss’ “British Fleet Air Arm Avenger MkI” as an FAA Tarpon. From what I can tell, Hobby Boss have taken their “standard” US Avenger kit, sourced a new set of decals, made up a couple of paint schemes and issued it as an FAA version. All of the shortcomings and errors of this version of the kit have been well documented – thanks to @tonyot, @85sqn, @trickyrich and others for easing my journey of discovery with their excellent and insightful information (see below). Armed with that rapidly assimilated wisdom here is the kit box: Shots of the sprues – the detail level and crispness of the parts all bode pretty well: Transparencies – again, very nice: Kit decals – not so nice. Not convinced of the accuracy of these – the red of the national insignia alone is quite hallucinogenic. They’ll go straight into the dodgy pile… I’ve sourced a couple of extras for the build; Eduard instrument panel (which is intended for the Accurate Miniatures kit, so we’ll see how that goes), Eduard masks (a must for all that glazing!) and Eduard harnesses. So Eduard everything, basically. I’ve been hankering after a BPF build, so I’ve decided to model this aircraft; JZ257 of 849 Sqn, HMS Victorious, January 1945. I believe that this aircraft would have taken part in the Operation Meridian raid on the Palembang oil refinery in January 1945 (849 Sqn was certainly involved). Here’s a shot of Tarpons on that raid (albeit from a different squadron flying off HMS Illustrious): From what I can tell, JZ257 was one of the second batch of 200 Avenger MkIs delivered to the FAA. The aircraft would therefore have been equivalent to a Grumman-manufactured TBF-1C. This aircraft would have had the following configuration: - 2 x 0.50” machine guns mounted in the wing roots, as opposed to the single cowling-mounted gun of the earlier batch. The kit has these gun ports - ü. - Observer’s position in the central cockpit, including radar scope and plotting table. The kit as it stands is configured as a ‘standard’ US aircraft with electronics in place of the Observer position, so this is where the major surgery needs to happen. This will be my first real attempt at scratch building, so I’ll give it my best shot! Grumman-built aircraft had the cockpit, Observer’s position and turret interior painted in Bronze-Green. - The remainder of the aircraft interior including the bomb bay was painted Interior Green (with the exception of the cowling interior, which was Light Grey). - I have seen varying claims that the undercarriage and bays were painted Insignia White, the underside colour or even Zinc Chromate Yellow. The colour photo showing the faded paintwork a bit later looks to me like white might be the go – it’s definitely not ZCY (although other Eastern-manufactured aircraft could have had this configuration). - There is varying information around the ventral 0.3” gun (and whether it was replaced with an F24 camera). I’m going to stick with the gun – the decal sheet shows it in place so it must be right, right? - Round blister windows over the original window cavities. These provided significant improvements in visibility – they’re nicely shown in the shot below (forward of the access door): The kit windows are as fitted to the original batch of MkIs so are incorrect. I’m going to try crash-moulding these blisters, which could be interesting (think I’ll leave that til last) In terms of paint finish, from what I can tell the Grumman aircraft would have been finished in ‘standard’ FAA colours i.e. Dark Slate Grey and Extra Dark Sea Grey over Sky – I will be using these colours as opposed to those recommended on the Xtradecals ‘Yanks with Roundels’ sheet (although the decals look to be excellent otherwise). I also see a Corsair and Hellcat somewhere in my future It’s well documented that most BPF aircraft were heavily weathered and faded so I’ll push my weathering skills to the limit. The shot below is a great guide as to the level of fading of the paintwork, as well as being a very evocative shot of the conditions in which the aircraft (and crews) operated from temporary land bases (Ceylon, I’m guessing?). Another one (showing a Hellcat, but you get the general idea). It’s interesting to note that there’s very little bare metal on show, though the paint has worn through to the zinc chromate primer in heavy-wear areas. I might try and replicate that effect. And a couple of nice reference shots: The camo demarcation looks to be pretty hard from the above shot, so no freestylie on the airbrush… The kit contains a number of ordnance options including rockets, torpedo, depth charges and 500lb bombs. I’m guessing the Tarpons on the Palembang raid would have used the latter (and the kit rockets are bobbins), so I intend to do the same as shown above. From what I have read Hellcats & Corsairs took the role of combat air patrol and ground attack on that raid, so it kind of makes sense that the Tarpons would be bombing (along with Barracudas, if memory serves). The raid is detailed in the excellent ‘Carrier Pilot’ by Norman Hanson, which is well worth a read. So with all that under my belt I shall gird my loins and crack on with the build! Thanks for looking – until next time, Roger
  23. Dear forum members, After my first scratchbuilt model (Turbolaser Diorama) I have decided to try it with a second one. A studio scale Snowspeeder 1:10 scale. This project has been a big challange for me as this whole modelling still feels new to me. In advance sorry for not posting the progress of my work for the past 14 month. I wasn't convinced that I could build this model and did not want to post pictures of something what ends in a chaos. The Snowspeeder is one of my favorite models from Star Wars. Another reason for building it was that I thought that I won't need to vacuum form any parts and could build all parts somehow pretty easy. At the end it wasn´t so easy, for me very complicated and much harder than the Turbolaser diorama. The main issue was that the Turbolaser gave me some freedom to build it in scale, the Snowspeeder not. If there is anything out of scale or shape you see it immediately and it doesn't look good. I have bought a Bandai Snowspeeder 1:48 and upscaled it as good as possible. I have also used all pictures which I could find online. I wanted to build a big 1:10 studio scale model, like what they have used in the film. The model is about 55 cm long, completely scratchbuild from styrene parts and building time is 6 month until now. I started it 14 month ago but meanwhile I took an 8 month break from the build as I didn‘t want to see it anymore. Many parts needed to be build twice because I made mistakes. Now as the model is very advanced I wanted to show it here in this forum first. It is still not finished, some things are still to do and it also need to be painted. This will happen during this year I hope. Please find attached some pictures of my model. Almost all parts except the fuselage are not glued yet because I want to paint the fuselage first. All other parts are fixed with tape for the pictures which looks not perfect but good enough to get an impression I think. I hope you like the pictures of my Snowspeeder. Thank you and best regards, Mark
  24. Kick-off Hello, I have spent the last 6 months working on a scratchbuilt Mig 15 and that project is now drawing to a close. http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235012524-mig-15-scratchbuild/& Consequently, I've been thinking a lot about my next project and after much deliberation, including considering a very, very wide range of possible subjects, I have decided to try something completely different to my usual aviation related fare. I am going to try to build His Majesty's Australian Submarine AE2. This is a project that I has been in the back of my mind for over a decade now and when a fellow modeller offered to lend the following set of plans to me, all thoughts of other projects evaporated. In my view Allied submarines in WW1 are under represented in the modelling world, so I'm going to try to do my little bit to correct this. AE2 was an early E-Class submarine operated by the Royal Australian Navy. On the evening of 25 April 1915 (while the Gallipoli landings were underway) she successfully penetrated the extremely formidable Turkish defences in the Dardenelles Straight and proceeded to 'run amok' in the sea of Marmara. During a short-lived but very intensive period of raiding she caused considerable disruption to Turkish attempts to reinforce and supply their defences on the Gallipoli peninsula. On the 30th of April AE2 was damaged by the Turkish torpedo boat Sultanhisar and, unable to dive to safety, her captain decided to scuttle her. All hands survived the scuttling and spent the rest of the war as P.O.W's in Turkey where they suffered terribly. Four of the vessel's compliment of 32 died during their incarceration. In 1998 the wreck of the AE2 was located and found to be in remarkably good condition, mostly due to it's partial immersion in anoxic mud. A thorough campaign to preserve the wreck in-situ continues to this day. The possibility of recovering the wreck has been discussed at length, and although probably technically feasible would be a very high risk and highly expensive project. So - in the meantime a model will have to do! I have not yet started any physical construction - so there's not a lot to see yet but, most unlike me, I have been conducting some additional research. And just as well too because it turns out that the drawings above are for a mid-war configuration E-class submarine which in some significant regards was different to the early war AE2. For example, the mid war submarine had a gun mounted ahead of the conning tower and had two forward torpedo tubes instead of AE2's single tube. There are other differences also. Suffice to say that this set of plans from the RAN's historical page on their website will help me nail down the correct configuration. The model itself will be: 1 / 100 scale Waterline - surface trim Scratchbuilt - although I might resort to some aftermarket details here and there. It will not be a cutaway (despite various people suggesting the idea) Predominantly made from wood, but expect to see some brass and plastic sheeting and a few other bits and pieces as well. I am hoping to have physical construction under-way this week and am aiming to have it finished by the end of 2017 but really don't have any idea how long this will take as I'm completely new to this maritime modelling lark. My plan for this job is basically to 'muddle through' so any encouragement and expert advice from the sidelines will be most appreciated! Best Regards, Reconcilor
  25. Hello All, I've had a set of plans and a hankering to build a Fairey Long Range Monoplane for a long time now (since 1997), and a testing group build on another forum gave me the excuse to get going. There are no injection or resin kits of this, and the only vac-form I know of was produced in 1985. So it's a scratchbuild job! I dug out my balsa stocks and had a look. I didn't want to carve a one-foot-something tapered wing out of half inch balsa, so I started messing around with a composite structure: The idea was to have a curved upper surface of soft 1/16 balsa wood. More support needed! Shaping was done by plane first and then sandpaper. There wasn't too much to take off - mostly shaping the tips, LE and TE. Dihedral was added with a saw cut. I painted the balsa with Ronseal wood hardener (designed for rotting window sills, which is where I know it from) and then sprayed with Halfords filler primer, which is a jaunty shade of orange. Fuselage was six slices of 1/8" balsa, with the beginnings of a cockpit cut out, stuck together into halves which in turn were tacked together (hopefully I will be able to get them apart again) and roughly shaped with a razor plane. When the black line round the middle gets smaller, that tells me I am sanding down near the profile. I made tail surfaces out of 1/8" balsa, and sealed them with superglue. I used a plastic bag over my finger to spread the glue around - it saves a lot of finger scrubbing later! After some sanding and filling, I could put a coat of regular grey primer on the wing. I still need to touch up a few dings before it's ready to detail. So next up is to finish the fuselage, and then the basic shapes are done. Then I can resume regular modelling! Thanks for looking, Adrian
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