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Found 110 results

  1. Happy Birthday Royal Air Force Today is the 100th Anniversary of the formation of the Royal Air Force. If you did not know that already you are probably on the wrong website. Some time ago I decided that I wanted to mark this occasion by starting a new project on this date and have of late spent much time thinking about what the subject should be. Naturally enough, Spitfires, Hurricanes, Lancasters and myriad of famous post-war types all came to mind, but these are well-covered subjects and so I dwelled on the matter a bit deeper... What about something that was in service on the day the RAF formed? What about something that had served in both the RFC and the RNAS prior to the formation of the RAF? What about something that was crucially important both to the newly formed air force and essentially all of the commonwealth air arms that were to follow? What about the Avro 504! To me, the Avro 504, more than any other single type, captures the spirit and the essence of the nascent Royal Air Force. This type had seen service as a fighter, a bomber and reconnaissance aircraft prior to being 'relegated' to the training duties at which it excelled. By 1918 this was the most numerous aircraft in the RAF (and probably in the world) with more than 7000 being built during World War One alone. In the new air force almost all aircrew had been trained on this type and I should think most of the ground crew as well. It was the foundation of the skills and professionalism that have been the hallmark of the service ever since. So, foolishly, I'm going to have a crack at building one in 1/32 scale. Here are the plans I will be using...provided most efficiently by Len Whalley at 'aeroplans.co.uk’ (Great service thanks Len). As you can see this is a screen-shot of my electronic copy because my friendly computer draftsman at work is on extended Easter holidays. He'll be back soon! In the meantime I'm going to use these plans as a starting point, they are fine for the general layout and dimensions. And here we go... Start with a good straight, clean bit of wood. In this case I'm using Jarrah - just like I did in my Mig 15 build here... www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235012524-mig-15-scratchbuild I'm using Jarrah mostly because it's the strongest wood I can get hold of. Having studied the plans I can see that there are going to be some challenges with maintaining the structural integrity of this model, especially once the extensive cockpit has been hollowed out - hence structural strength is going to be a major consideration. It's a beautiful bit of wood this - straight close grain almost flawless. The oval below marks the only knot in the entire plank, it's tiny and is fortunately positioned so it can be easily excluded from the fuselage cut-out. Here I'm marking off the first cut for the fuselage. I'm cutting it much longer than it needs to be for reasons you will see later on. And here it is - the first cut - made on 01 April 2018! Hooray... Two lengths have been cut for the fuselage so that I can work to the natural centre-line thus formed... The wings are being cut from some thin slices of sapelli. Another high-quality hard-wood. I've chosen this because I do not want the wings to sag and think that sapelli will be rigid enough to hold it's shape over time. And here's the rough cut-out of the tailplanes. I think that the tail is going to be the only easy part of the build. And so -after 20 minutes of work I have the very, very rough outline of a biplane... No - this is not an April Fools joke, this really is the start of my model! I don't know how long this is going to take but given the slow pace of my previous (still uncompleted) project that you can see here: www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235021633-hmasm-ae2-scratchbuild I would say this will take at least a year and possibly much longer. I've never built a biplane before. Wish me luck... Best Regards, Bandsaw Steve (ex-Reconcilor)
  2. Now, I wanted to build a Maschinen Kreiger Fledermaus. But you can't get them for love nor money, and I refuse to pay silly prices anyway. https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1GGRV_enGB757GB758&q=maschinen+krieger+fledermaus&tbm=isch&source=univ&safe=strict&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiWuufBqL_kAhXWilwKHfu2AQMQsAR6BAgJEAE So after a good think, it's back once more to the rapidly depleting spares boxes. (All donations gratefully received and postage etc refunded) (If I mention models used I'll add a date when they were first built, it may help. Or not) What I want is a 1/20th VTOL flier which looks like it flew out of a scrapyard. Let's see what happens then. Take a Revell 1/32nd Phantom (1977), an Italeri SR 71 Blackhawk (1970), an Airfix Heinkel He177 (1980), various other bits and pieces and a metric flowerpot full of Milliput. (Lots of pictures now follow, some of the parts used have since been replaced). 1/20th Tamiya driver figure. This will be the jockey. The fuselage as shown will change slightly as we progress. An overall view. I since cut down the wings and the winglets will change too. But it gives a general idea of what I propose. Underside view. Again, it's since changed a bit. The wheel wells were faired in with scrap plastic and Milliput added. An updated view from today. The (A-10) canopy is on an Me262 engine cowling. Cut down wing and the winglet. This will be angled down by about twenty degrees for additional lift. Here we are underneath again. From right we have He177 lower tail end, Phantom intakes and SR71 engine cowls. Something missing here I feel. How about a bit of Airfix 1/24th Typhoon (wing fairing?) to act as an intake and above it part of an Airfix Spitfire engine cowling for another intake. The original Fledermaus has a spindly fixed undercarriage. I saw one on line built with Harrier type tandem gear and will copy that, because I like it. These are Airfix C-130 wheels (I've had these since about 1968!) No hubs, what to do? Would you believe Airfix Stalin tank wheels fit perfectly? The undercarriage leg is silver plastic and is probably older than those wheels! The nose leg is 1/32nd Phantom. I'm opting for fixed landing gear. I'll need to make some outriggers later. Later today I started sticking the forward fuselage together as I'm fairly happy with the configuration now. I've also added some Milliput where required. That will need rubbing down tomorrow (if I get a chance) along with the wheel bays in the wings. As always, questions, comments etc are welcome. Thanks for looking, Pete
  3. And welcome to another of my finished scratchbuilds. This one based on the upper half of a Star Wars Slave One. (The lower half became a Hover Tank). It seems that I only started this one last month. So for me that's pretty fast work. Wurger was applied to the Fw190, the Butcher bird. This one would be lunar based and piggyback to Earth orbit on a Sternail. There it would disable enemy craft and satellites and tow the remains back for salvage. Link to a Sternail picture. I built this one probably ten years ago. http://i1373.photobucket.com/albums/ag398/petergsoden/Sternail05_zpse8dd4b0d.jpg?t=1406042025 There is a build thread for the Wurger here https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235058298-orbital-hunter-killer/ Weapons and meteorite shields in place and ready for action. I added a small calibre solid shot gun to the nose piece. I had the idea to use a white paper background to see if that made things clearer for you. Scale is 1/32nd BTW, the pilot is ex Airfix Porsche 917. I only have a small simple camera so close up shots can be a problem. Rocket tubes from a 1/32nd MBB Bo105. Rear end steering thrusters. They probably rotate. That shield is a rubdown from an ancient Do17 kit. If you look carefully to the right you may see an Easter egg. There's a tiny Panzer in there. The missile tube mountings are mostly made up from bits of Aircraft undercarriage. The business end of the salvage crane/grabber (Think Ripley's power loader in Aliens) The brown pads are magnetic (but were F-18 brake units) The rounded bits were ancient B-17 ball turret, they now hold Zeon lander struts. I'm still not sure why but I like them there. The thruster bell was part of a ball point pen. Orbital debris can ruin your paint job, and extra shields will help to protect you. Bits of self adhesive silver tape in use here. On the P-38 nose here we have more steering thrusters. Decals are mostly Tamiya P-47. I couldn't resist using the silhouette and script. I think the word Republic fits in with Kreiger and Star Wars? The comms dish was a Slave One piece. Now (modified) it sits underneath mounted on an Airfix Bloodhound cradle. And here we are deployed. The other side of the crane. Slightly out of focus. Sorry. I bought a couple of cheap built Kibri crane model kits online and dismantled them. The other jib will be used later. I nearly forgot this bit. A radar bar? These are seen on lots of kreiger stuff. I used part of an ancient Airfix Hercules Aileron, a bit of sprue and some filler. And finally, The two models and what they came from. The Slave One kit was bought online part built so no great loss. I saved all the bits of it I didn't use, then found another part built one so I've combined what I have to make up a complete kit. To sum up, I started the tank in early May, I finished the Orbiter today, So that's four Months of fun modelling for just over twenty quid! And I still have a complete Slave One to sell. Win win I think. Next up is yet another scratchbuild, A Kreiger Fledermaus this time. If anyone has one and can send pictures/measurements etc I would be very grateful. Any questions, comments etc are very welcome. Thanks for looking, Pete
  4. Well kids.... I started all over again... New thread because the old one was just devolving into a endless stream of do overs. THIS THREAD SHALL NOT BE WHAT CAME BEFORE...THIS ONE WILL BE A FINISHED PROTOTYPE MODEL!! So a few months back my good friend Paul Fisher lost his home and wonderful workshop to fire in Paradise, CA. I am so happy he and his family escaped and in that light the mention of what comes next seems so trivial. Paul was in possession of the masters I had completed at the time of the fire so an opportunity to build a better model arose. Considering the magnitude of the work I previously completed, I started thinking about how to speed up the build. As many of you know I have turned to CNC and SLA type 3d printing to augment the hand building of the model. Until recently I had eschewed the use of FDM type printers due to the inaccuracy of the prints, and significant post processing required after printing model parts. Cost also was a factor, nothing was worth the investment versus the risk of poor parts. Enter the Tiertime Cetus MKIII. This little printer was cheap, precise and worth a gamble. The main feature that attracted me to the printer was the linear guide rails and bearing blocks. These almost guarantee accurate movement of the axises of the printer. With a price in the $300 US range it was worth a try. With the printer in hand and after some tweaking with the assembly of the printer I managed to print dimensionally accurate parts. One inch cubes were printed and were measured by digital caliper only a few ten thousands of an inch from true, and square adjacent surfaces measured with a machinist's square. So I ordered up 7,000g of PLA filament and started a-printing. On a similar journey I ordered up an Anycubic Photon MSLA printer, though this journey was much longer because the Photon required much more significant modification to get true parts. Out of the box it made fantastic parts in terms of detail. However, they parts didn't fit with others, they were skewed in the Z or vertical axis. The modification was much too complex to detail in this post, suffice to say the machine was disassembled, parts were machined true, linear rails and bearing blocks added and a new parts were machined to make it all work. Parts that came out of the machine post modification were exceptional! Now that I have three machines working simultaneously part production has definitely accelerated the pace of this build. I have also made some design changes. Outside of getting another chance to improve the model's accuracy, simplifying and streamlining the build has been a chief consideration. So the model will still be "skinned" in aluminum sheet but only where there are removable panels, the remainder of panel detail will be scribed in to a layer of primer paint. PLA is a difficult material to sand and also hygroscopic and needed to be well sealed. I'm using 2 part automotive epoxy paint (paint and hardener) to fill and "glue" the PLA layers together. The result is a surface that is much easier to sand and finish. You can see a few of the PLA parts were the black primer has been applied and finishing has started. Lastly my machining skills have improved to the point where the acrylic parts now have machined in details, rivets and reinforcing layers etc. Here's a shot of the parts so far. These parts represent the main components of the fuselage from the nose to the engine faces. More detailed photos coming as assembly commences. This will be a prototype model, so I will be finishing this one as I go, so you can look forward to finished assemblies going forward. Thanks for checking in! Timmy!
  5. Hogwart's Express - A Baby Bandsaw Build 'A scarlet steam engine was waiting next to a platform packed with people. A sign overhead said Hogwarts Express, 11 o'clock. Harry looked behind him and saw a wrought-iron archway where the ticket box had been, with the words Platform Nine and Three-Quarters on it. He had done it' So wrote J.K. Rowling in chapter six of her 1997 novel Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone - the first in a series of novels that some of you may have heard of. My two daughters have definitely heard of these books - and have seen the films countless times - in fact they are bordering on fanatical about all things Harry Potter. So it wasn't a complete surprise when the younger of them - twelve year old 'Baby Bandsaw'- came to me about two weeks ago and asked if she could have a go at scratch-building a model of the Hogwarts Express. Being a very irresponsible parent I immediately decided that this was a great idea and despite all of the hazards of power-tools and chisels and so-forth, Baby Bandsaw (B,B) should indeed have a crack at this! We agreed that I would give her inexpert guidance, bad advice and, whenever required, inept help. She however would actually do the majority of the work. This will be Baby Bandsaw's Build, not mine, but she agreed that I was allowed to photograph and document her progress right here on Britmodeller and that I would be allowed to publish under my log-on. I looked her straight in the eye and asked her 'if you start this will you finish it?' it was a somber moment - she said 'yes' so we shook hands and the project began. After a brief bit of research and a couple of internet searchs I found this set of plans for a 'Hall Class' locomotive (Olton Hall was used in the film) and re-scaled the plans to 1/48 scale using my work's photocopier. This should be enough to get started. In model railway world I think that 1/48 is called 'O' gauge for some obscure reason. This lump of Huon Pine - the same bit I used to form the vac-form cowling buck on the Avro 504 - was the only bit of decent wood I had that was wide enough to start to form the boiler . Here is the first cut in the entire project. BB cutting off a small surplus lump on one end, squaring up the block in preparation for further work. Here she's cutting out the profile view of the boiler. We have no plan view at this stage but that's not too much of a handicap because the boiler is circular in cross-section and so the side view is identical to the plan. As per my usual 'modus operandi' BB is spraying some cheap photo-fixative glue onto the side of the wood so that... She can stick the paper pattern on and start some bandsaw action! I was sort-of a bit 'parental' here and fussed about making sure those fingers stayed at least a small distance from the blade! A few minutes later she had this. We marked up a 'do not cut into' red line -as you can see below - and a grey 'remove with chisel' area and BB started hacking into the sharp squared off corners with this scoop chisel - nice work! So after about half an hour she was left with this. The very, very early stages of this build. The very first bit of rounding off of that square block that will need be reduced to a full cylinder to represent the boiler. Alas, by now it was bedtime as BB had school the following day. So begins my first post on the 'Civilian Vehicle's forum - a forum I have been hankering to get onto for some time. Some of you may be thinking 'Ere! Isn't there a forum specifically for railway locomotives on Britmodeller?' and there is. However, frankly, it's a bit hidden away and BB and I are hoping for a bit of visibility, interest and banter regarding this project. We think it will do better here in that regard. I did send a Personal Message to @Mike and he has very graciously given us permission to post this here so we aren't trespassing - honest! Anyway - this should be fun, and I hope some of you see fit to follow along and see what comes of this. Best Regards, Baby Bandsaw and Bandsaw Steve!
  6. Soooooo... It's been a while since I posted any builds mainly because I seem to have hit a brick wall called "finishing a model". The shelf of shame is really getting very shameful. And so begins a woeful tale of buffoonery. About a month ago I was at a friend's house and whilst chatting to another old friend of theirs he mentioned that he used to work on the Scottish Fishery Protection Agency ships. I mentioned seeing these ships often in Stornoway Harbour, particularly the "Westra", "Jura" and "Minna". We got on really well and to cut all the drivel out of a long story I later casually asked if he had any ship's plans of any of them. He said he did and would I like to see them? About a week later he handed me a thick blue book and sho' nuff, in the back was the plans to the Jura. I got permission to copy them but by now his curiosity was piqued and he asked why I wanted them. Not seeing the huge hole right in front of my two left feet I explained that when the company wasn't running my backside into the ground with work I played Flight Sim (X-Plane 11) and built scale models. I would try and scale the plans down and try to build a scale model of the Jura. Having seen some of the excellent builds on here I thought I'd give it a try. Nowt wrong with that, but this where the two left feet and the big hole came into it... In a sheer attack of Muppetry, Kermit here opened his daft gob and said, "Would you like one too?" His face lit up and he said "I would absolutely love one!" I didn't panic too much then but when I got home and opened them out the plans were A0 size so about 5' x 4'. "Oh", I thought "This could be fun getting to the right scale". I tried photographing the plans but they were very faint. I had another mate who had a mate who managed to get the plans scanned on to PDF format. "Yaaaay!" I thought, "This might actually work". They were almost as faint as the photos and whilst they were a bit straighter than my photo efforts they still had a slight skew to them so it took a bit of time and photo editing to get them straight. As I only have an A4 printer I used Windows Snip tool to cut the scans into bite size chunks and paste them into Word so I could print them of to stick to whatever medium I decided to build the model in. I have scratchbuilt a few items in the past as per below: 1/35 Bristol Bloodhound 1/35 "Whippet with guts". Emhar Whippet with scratchbuilt engine and interior) 1/144 Whaler my Dad worked on back in the 1950s. I built this for him and used the hull from the Revell North Sea Trawler and the boats from 144 HMS Discovery (I think), all the rest was scratchbuilt: And a wee 1/350 scale WW2 HMT minehunter: And this is what the "Jura" looked like: Sorry, it's been so long since I last posted pics I'm having trouble remembering how to get them to the right size. I'm not too worried about scratchbuilding the Jura (although I have serious Muppet issues measuring anything, or cutting anything straight and circles become squares) BUT... It will be for someone that knows the ship intimately and will spot any mistakes instantly. And now, enough waffle - let the "fun" begin...
  7. Where have all the Aliens gone? Scratching my SHADO. I'm not into sci-fi models and I can't remember watching 'UFO' when it was on the telly, but I was sort of press-ganged into a groupbuild on another site and had to choose something. For various reasons, rather than the full three months, I only had six weeks to build it. I managed it in five weeks and enjoyed it enormously. It is entirely scratch-built in 1/48. This is the build log: I hope you like it. (Incidentally, aliens dress in orange and white jumpsuits apparently). Thanks for having a look.
  8. I started my first project of 2019...a scale model of the Nostromo Airlock from the 1979 movie Alien. I will be working from this Ron Cobb concept drawing and a handful of photos and frame grabs from the movie. I have recently bought a "Silhouette Portrait" cutting machine and will be using that to do most of the tricky styrene cutting. I'm starting with the outer doors, which I have cut out the various pieces which will be layered and glued together. The machine is amazing. I never could have cut those out by hand in a million years. The doors are cut from .030" styrene. the raise panel details are cut from .020". Things are starting to be glued. I've wrapped the outer edges of the doors with thin strips of styrene. These broke when I bent them and will need a bit of filler, but over all things are off to a good start. Unfortunately, I ran out of my favorite glue (Tamiya Extra Thin) which is worse than running out of beer, because the local shops sell beer. So it will be a week or more till I can do any more assembly. Thanks for looking in.
  9. A model from 5 years ago, with the original text: To boldly avion where somebody has gone before: Flying wings are a particularly attractive subject among modelers of a certain breed. There were also test beds and midway concepts, like the Junkers G-38 and the Northrop first "flying wing", that were not pure flying wings (had tailbooms and tail surfaces) but a cautious approach to the concept. Although Jack Northrop is erroneously credited by some for having either invented or developed the concept (he did neither), the history of the flying wing stretches far beyond. Interestingly enough, the particular stressed-skin, all-metal flying wing depicted here (the "Northrop" Avion 1) started as a concept pioneered by one of Northrop's associates and later employee, Tony Stadlman. It was him that started Northrop on the thread, although Jack later appropriated his work and even had the face to get mad at Stadlman. Northrop was a great contributor to aviation development on his own right, but the flying wing was not his idea, not even "his" flying wing was his idea. Stadlman was an immigrant from Czechoslovakia that also contributed to the engineering and construction (he was a co-filer of the patent) of Lockheed's monocoque structures. Be this then an homage not to Northrop (by the way, once more, it is not "Northrup" as erroneously and extensively written in many places), but to Stadlman, the original thinker behind this particular concept. On the Net you may find photos of him holding a model of his flying wing, if you see a remarkable similarity between his and Jack's flying wing, it is NOT a coincidence. The Avion went, as many prototypes do, through a number of modifications. The horizontal stabilizer is seen in a few images with a portion outside the vertical stabilizer, more according to patent drawings, but was later trimmed back. Extra portions of surface were added to the vertical stabilizers and ailerons, and also to the stab leading edge, which is seen passing beyond the fins' leading edges; the engine was installed as a pusher (prop behind) and a tractor (prop in front), the taildragger tricycle landing gear started as a retractable unit but very soon adopted the simplicity of a fixed one, and therefore the landing gear legs and struts were changed. The Avion could fly two, but the right position was faired over. Photos show also the minor changes introduced to accommodate the aft or front prop. A windshield can be seen too in some images. Bear all this in mind if you decide to build one, and use photos as references. As it is almost always the case with these oddballs no plans whatsoever or not good ones at any rate could be found, so I modified a plan from the Net using photos and the given measures. The construction techniques are more or less the same ones generally used on the models I posted, although the unusual shape called for a slightly different approach engineering-wise this time. The Avion is a relatively small model in 1/72nd scale. Home-made decals were produced (this time around fortunately only simple registrations) and Aeroclub after-market wheels and prop used. Strange shape, perky stance, shinny surface, historical significance, all make for a nice model if you have the will to go a bit further into the magic lands of scratchbuilding. See you there.
  10. And here we go again. Some of you may have seen my last scratchbuild, a Hover tank from the Airfix Star Wars Slave 1 kit. I just used the lower hull for the tank. So what of the rest of it? I'm going to use it on this thread to build an orbital hunter/killer ship which would damage and salvage enemy spacecraft. I'm fairly well hooked into building Maschinen kreiger stuff so this will be another one from that universe, albeit not an 'official' craft. (Unless of course, Kow Yokoyama San happens by, and gives it his blessing). Here are the main parts taped together to give you a feel of the thing. In the foreground is a pencil sharpener. You'll find out why later. Oh look, a box of bits. Some of which may or may not be used here. Ah, proper Slave 1 kit bits to fill the 'wheel arches' (well, what else would you call them? I've cut down the lower sections. They'll be trimmed to fit better later. ) And, a pencil sharpener in bits, along with an engine cowling from (I think) an old Matchbox kit? So, glue the cowling to the 'wheel arch' filler after fitting the (ex Wessex) nut & bolt plus washer and spacer. Now we have a swiveling thruster pod. Told you! The rocket nozzle is what you get when your Biro runs out and you save the shiny bit on the end. Good aren't they? (cheap too, no one else saves them) The thrusters remind me of bits on Russian helicopters, notably Kamovs). It's the ribbing you know. Time for cockpit checks. I took the Slave 1 cockpit, slotted in an old 1/32nd Revell bf109 cockpit, added an Airfix Porsche 917 driver (built about 45+ years ago) and a load of greeblies for you to try to identify. Though even I don't know where some of them came from! Here's the cockpit slotted into place (it really isn't an impressive fit) to show what's going on. I also push fitted a thruster together to show how that bit works. I painted/repainted the cockpit as required and gave the pilot a lick of IJN grey with added green tape belts. And finally this afternoon I started to block in the underside with plastic card. I'm out all day tomorrow (Airshow at North Coates) and working on Monday (Hinckley area). But then I'm off for the rest of the week, so hopefully I may get more done then. Thanks, as always, for looking and bearing with me while I try to work out where the build is going. Usually it's controlled by whatever flits through my head at the time and what I can find in the spares boxes. Comments and gifts of curry* are gratefully accepted. Cheers, Pete *(Though I just had a very nice chicken one along with a bottle of Wold Top Scarborough Fair. Yum).
  11. A bit of a change for me as this doesn't have tracks or a big stick out in front that goes BANG! I've been toying with the idea of getting one of these for some time now, so while I was at Telford this year, I decided to buy one. It's an excellent kit with some very delicate parts. Built straight from the box, it makes up into a nice little model, but I don't do OOTB, so the knives, razor saws, files and drill bits were got out. One thing that does let it down a bit are the wheels, or to be more accurate, the tyres. The tread pattern is very poor, so I have ordered a new set from Hussar. There are many detailing sets available for the Tilly, some to me, a waste of money as it's fairly easy to scratch build some of those parts. Archer decals do a set of decals for the dash board, but Tamiya already include these in the kit. So why pay twice? But one part that none of them do are the three vents on each side of the bonnet. Tamiya mould them as solid items and it looks to be difficult to hollow them out without doing some damage to the rest of the bonnet, so they may end up just being painted black. Right, so it's straight into it without the preamble of photos of sprues (basically because I forgot to take any before I started removing parts). I made a start on the chassis. The front and rear bumpers mountings are quite delicate. The engine is a little gem, needing only a few extra bits and pieces such as piping and wiring. This kit lends itself well to being built in sections. This is the cargo section. I've removed the tie down hooks from the side with a chisel blade. The part that received the largest amount of work was the tilt. First job was to cut out the forward part and clean it up. Then I added three frame hoops which I bent to shape using brass rod, making sure that they were trimmed to the correct length so that the tilt would sit correctly on top of the cargo section. I shaved off the moulded on tie downs and drilled five holes ready to add some string later on in the build. Thanks for looking. John.
  12. Dear forum members, After my first scratchbuilt model (Turbolaser Diorama) I have decided to try it with a second one. A studio scale Snowspeeder 1:10 scale. This project has been a big challange for me as this whole modelling still feels new to me. In advance sorry for not posting the progress of my work for the past 14 month. I wasn't convinced that I could build this model and did not want to post pictures of something what ends in a chaos. The Snowspeeder is one of my favorite models from Star Wars. Another reason for building it was that I thought that I won't need to vacuum form any parts and could build all parts somehow pretty easy. At the end it wasn´t so easy, for me very complicated and much harder than the Turbolaser diorama. The main issue was that the Turbolaser gave me some freedom to build it in scale, the Snowspeeder not. If there is anything out of scale or shape you see it immediately and it doesn't look good. I have bought a Bandai Snowspeeder 1:48 and upscaled it as good as possible. I have also used all pictures which I could find online. I wanted to build a big 1:10 studio scale model, like what they have used in the film. The model is about 55 cm long, completely scratchbuild from styrene parts and building time is 6 month until now. I started it 14 month ago but meanwhile I took an 8 month break from the build as I didn‘t want to see it anymore. Many parts needed to be build twice because I made mistakes. Now as the model is very advanced I wanted to show it here in this forum first. It is still not finished, some things are still to do and it also need to be painted. This will happen during this year I hope. Please find attached some pictures of my model. Almost all parts except the fuselage are not glued yet because I want to paint the fuselage first. All other parts are fixed with tape for the pictures which looks not perfect but good enough to get an impression I think. I hope you like the pictures of my Snowspeeder. Thank you and best regards, Mark
  13. A build from 10 years ago: For earlier airplane designers to think that the shape of their machines should resemble that of a bird seemed natural, in the true sense of the word. Among many others following this trend you may visualize the Etrich Taube. It is a known fact that some of these pioneers even glued feathers to their structures to confer to them flying abilities. Mr. Gnosspelius, following the bird-like path, created a remarkable plane that was able to perform efficiently with the only help of the 16 hp provided by a twin-cylinder Blackburne Tomtit. Although the Gnosspelius name may conjure images of an alchemist from the Middle Ages, the fact is that he was a civil engineer that collaborated in a number of Short Bros. projects. The Gull was a sound design that falls in the category of what we would call today a motorglider. The engine was semi-enclosed on the wing and transferred power via chains to two shafts with pusher propellers, a bit like the Wright’s Flyer. Given the date, we may consider the Gull a “modern” design, with features like a monocoque fuselage, control wires and torque rods running inside the structure, and a very interesting feature regarding the airfoil: it had a “step” about the CG area on top of the wing -supposedly proven in the wind tunnel- that acted more or less as a turbulator, attaching the boundary layer to the airfoil. Two machines were built, one registered as G-EBGN and other that remained unregistered. In some images they can be seen with the #2 and #19 “contest” numbers respectively. The front tip of the fuselage, or “beak” was an aluminum cone. The second machine (#19) had a slightly larger fin that met the rudder at the apex. The very small wheels of the original where soon changed for slightly bigger ones to improve ground clearance and increase alpha on take off, but the track remained narrow. Since there is no color description, color is speculative. The second machine -depicted here- seems to have a white rudder with black numbers and a color that is uniform through the whole plane (whatever it is on a wood surface or a fabric-covered one), hence the assumption that it was indeed painted. While in some photos that color appears light, in some others is darker, perhaps as a result of a change of film type (Panchro or Ortho). The colors that vary in that way are most noticeably light blue and yellow; therefore I picked light blue as the likely one to have been applied to the second machine, since a few machines of the time were that color, and seems more consistent with the “gull” theme. The bird-like shape of the Gosspelius makes for a more normal appearance than my usual oddballs; that should give you readers a –perhaps welcome- break from the bizarre scarecrows that normally populate my posts.
  14. We're doing a Market garden 75th group build and after long deliberation I've decided to do a Horsa. I toyed with doing one on my new scale of 1/48, but it's a big beast compared to my usual fare so 1/144 trims it down to a manageable size for building it and for available shelf space. So off we go. first order of business (after acquiring reasonable plan) is to make some fuselage and wing blanks for molding. Laminated paper for the form and basswood for the main infill, it carves really well and I want a good finish on the mold, also as the plane ism't huge it won't make too big a dent on my stock of wood.
  15. So i have finally bit the bullet, as a prelude to Telford this year where the 100th anniversary of the end of WW1 is being celebrated. I have noted a distinct lack of WW1 submarines, yet the Royal Navy was very active during this conflict fielding many classes of submarines. Having read "The story of our submarines" on kindle, a collection of stories from WW1, a model of the C class seemed very apt. These older boats were tethered to armed trawlers awaiting German u-boats to surface and attack them, which when they did, they slipped their tether and attacked the u-boat, much to the Germans surprise. The most famous being HMS C3, which was packed full of explosives for her last mission to destroy a viaduct connecting the mole to the shore during the Zeebrugge Raid on 23 April 1918. Her commander, Richard Douglas Sandford, received the Victoria Cross for the successful action. So heres the start a set of blown up plans to 1/144 scale, ive acquired a circle cutter for building frames around a central acrylic rod. This is not going to be a quick build as a lot of the details i have to gleen from photos in my possession. The numbers indicate were i intend to put frames for the build to suit the submarines profile. The end result will be 303mm (12" approx) long. All the best Chris
  16. Work in progress on this unusual 1960's New Zealand topdresser - the PL.11 Bennett Airtruck (this one technically the Waitomo Airtruck ZK-CKE). Scratchbuild. 1:48. Cowl, windscreen and tail just tacked on for the photo. Designer was Luigi Pellarini who also penned the PL.11 Transavia Airtruk
  17. Hello All, I've had a set of plans and a hankering to build a Fairey Long Range Monoplane for a long time now (since 1997), and a testing group build on another forum gave me the excuse to get going. There are no injection or resin kits of this, and the only vac-form I know of was produced in 1985. So it's a scratchbuild job! I dug out my balsa stocks and had a look. I didn't want to carve a one-foot-something tapered wing out of half inch balsa, so I started messing around with a composite structure: The idea was to have a curved upper surface of soft 1/16 balsa wood. More support needed! Shaping was done by plane first and then sandpaper. There wasn't too much to take off - mostly shaping the tips, LE and TE. Dihedral was added with a saw cut. I painted the balsa with Ronseal wood hardener (designed for rotting window sills, which is where I know it from) and then sprayed with Halfords filler primer, which is a jaunty shade of orange. Fuselage was six slices of 1/8" balsa, with the beginnings of a cockpit cut out, stuck together into halves which in turn were tacked together (hopefully I will be able to get them apart again) and roughly shaped with a razor plane. When the black line round the middle gets smaller, that tells me I am sanding down near the profile. I made tail surfaces out of 1/8" balsa, and sealed them with superglue. I used a plastic bag over my finger to spread the glue around - it saves a lot of finger scrubbing later! After some sanding and filling, I could put a coat of regular grey primer on the wing. I still need to touch up a few dings before it's ready to detail. So next up is to finish the fuselage, and then the basic shapes are done. Then I can resume regular modelling! Thanks for looking, Adrian
  18. This is a first for me, a scratchbuild, so let me tell you the reason why. The intention is to build a Japanese Steamer, the Fushimi Maru and that will be a scratchbuild. So before I start on that build, I thought I better 'cut my teeth' on something less demanding, like a tug: to learn some new skills. The deck plan, side profile and the build process of the subject was acquired via @ShipbuilderMN but this is in wood, I don't do wood, so plastic is going to be used. A quick search of 'tug line drawing' revealed these free plans: Although these are not of SA Everard, they are of a very similar tug and good enough for this exercise of boat building. The plans were scaled so as I can use a standard size sheet of plasticard and copies printed. It's going to be waterline, so we have a 'waterline' base cut to shape, marked with the frame locations and a spine fitted. A few frames fitted. Comments welcome Stuart
  19. After building several 1/48 jets, many RAF, I really fancied adding a different jet to the range. After thinking about it for a bit I settled on an HS-125 Dominie. Trouble is no one does a 1/48 Dominie kit. There are a few desk models about but not a lot more. So I should have given up there really. Then I got a 1/72 plan and copied it up in size, and put it away for a year or so. Then dug it out again & worked out the central fuselage would be about the size of a plastic waste pipe. and I started wondering what it would look like. So what size would it be built up? Some cardboard and some messing about came up with this: Then started on the back end in plasticard. I am planning to put circular formers in and overlay strips of plasticard. Then build it up with some P38 car filler to try to make the shape So one quarter of a back bit started. No idea if this will really work or if I have the skills to do it. All advice and tips gratefully received as I clearly don't know what I am doing or am taking on! Oh, and if you know a Dominie well, please look away now. I don't wish to cause offence.
  20. Hello All, I have been permitted to bring my long-running scratch-build of the Fairey Long Range Monoplane across from the WIP section, here. I have reached the point where I almost have a set of basic parts. This has been a long time in the making - I first acquired a pile of reference material in 1997 for a flying version (didn't happen), and I've been working/stalling on this project for over two years. Hopefully being part of a GB will keep my posterior in gear so I can finish it! The Fairey Long Range Monoplane was built to capture the world distance record, powered by a single Napier Lion engine. Two were built - the first one crashed in an attempt, but the second one succeeded, setting a record of 5,309mi/8,544km from Cranwell, UK to Walvis Bay, South Africa in February 1933. The UK for two months held all three of the speed (Supermarine S6B), distance (Fairey) and altitude (Vickers Vespa) records. So it's got to here: I built the wing and tail surfaces out of balsa - the wing is OK as far as it goes, but needs cutting up to free the control sections and detailing to add the fabric wing effect. The tail fin and rudder need separating and fabric effects, and the tailplanes need to be started again because they should be about three times thicker than the ones I have made! The latest fuselage is made from a plastic card profile with card formers, filled in with scrap balsa and Milliput. The Milliput has been sanded away until you can just see the edges of the formers. This is my third attempt: The first two fuselages ended up being too small, so I have used one of them for experiments on simulating fabric covering, using fishing line and filler. Although I had some success with that I think scored plastic card (as seen in the picture) will be neater and easier. I'm back at home next week so I hope to be back at the bench then! Thanks for looking, Adrian
  21. I've had a few setbacks over the last few weeks which has affected my modelling mojo considerably, in fact I haven't done any modelling since early June: -a flood, back in June, meant I had to box up all my ongoing builds and store them whilst repairs were done. -my laptop went belly-up, which meant an unexpected and expensive new purchase, so couldn't afford to go to Telford -our TV had a fault and it had to go away for repair. None of these issues were insurmountable but I've been struggling to raise any enthusiasm to dig out my kits again and continue with the builds. I am trying to get back into it but just don't seem to have any interest in my previous work and so I have been looking to do something different, which might kickstart the mojo somewhat. I was impressed by Kevin Aris' large-scale SD-14 card model and thought perhaps I could have a go at something like that. The SD-14 kit is too expensive for me though, so I am going to attempt doing something of my own. The plan will hopefully to build an aircraft carrier. Initial drawings have been done and the first frames have been cut out. These frames are for the bow section and in this area the gap between each frame is 3 feet. At this scale that works out at 6.35mm betwen each frame. This means I need to put spacers in between each frame and the best way (I think) is to separator strips to each piece. This should also help to strengthen each frame piece, which is only 0.5mm thick. The plastic strips have been cut and then glued around the edge of each frame section, plus a strengthener piece down the centre. The first frame has been glued into place. It is not the front frame, but No.8 frame and I placed this one first as it gave me room to place a try square either side to ensure the piece was vertical. All the other frames can be formed around this one. These strips are 5.75mm wide which, when added to the 0.5mm frame piece, gives a frame gap of 6.25mm which is near enough for me. So far so good, the tops of the frames are all to a uniform height, it is just the positions of the separator strips that make it all look uneven. I've just made some more calculations and realise that this is going to take a lot of plastic, which invariably is going to work out quite expensive............. However, I have found an alternative which is to use card from cereal boxes rather than plastic. I know where I can get an endless supply of card like this! All I then need is to strenghten the edges with thin strips of plastic and this will reduce the amount of plastic I need to buy for this project. It doesn't look much at the moment, and working with white plastic is not the best for photographing progress however, this is just a start, and is really just an experiment but, hopefully, it will give me the incentive to get back into building again. cheers Mike
  22. Hello All, I'm going to build a big one
  23. A build from 2017: The De Havilland D.H.53 Humming-bird represents the concept of light plane. It was contemporary to the Parnall Pixie and a small number of them were sold to particulars and the RAF. Power plants varied, and the first model had a Douglas of 750cc. According to information found on the Net, one plane ended up in Chile, two in Australia and one in Canada. The plane had a span of 30"1' (9.17 meters) with almost constant chord, but differential airfoil, which varied in thickness along the span. The usual scratchbuilding techniques you may have seen in my posts were employed, to ensure a satisfying measure of accuracy and a bonafide reproduction. A resin prop cast by Matías Hagen (thanks Matías!) from Argentina was used, with resin wheels from the spares bin and adapted resin cylinders again from Matías. Care must be exercised in replicating the particular change in airfoil section, thin at the root and wingtip and thick in the middle, a detail often obviated by modelers. A model of the Parnall Pixie, a plane -as said above- designed under the same concept and flown contemporarily to the D.H.53, is being built in parallel. Originally it even had the same Douglas 750cc engine. A number of different decorations can be seen in photos, many of them most likely in aluminium dope, sometimes with the fuselage in a darker color, and in some photos it's shown with what seems wings of clear doped linen, with certain translucency. I selected a subject (G-EBHZ) based on a very good photo I found on the Net, that had the same scheme as the restored machine that used to fly in England (G-EBHX), until unfortunately had a fatal crash in 2012. The machine chosen, G-EBHZ, changed schemes, and I was fortunate enough to find on the Net photos of them. One is an all-aluminium scheme with the logo of the Seven Aeroplane Club, an AC with seven feathers (thanks, Sönke). Another is blue and silver, like as said the machine restored. Be sure that you get the position of the inverted wing struts and the ailerons right. The ailerons started inside of where the struts attach (i.e. closer to the wing root). Also pay attention to the wing struts, configured as a V, and wrongly depicted in some plans as the aft member being parallel to the TE, when in reality both struts converge at an angle (look at photos on the Net, easily found). I commissioned the decals from Arctic Decals (thanks, Mika!) Bibliography: DeHavilland Aircraft since 1909 (A.J. Jackson) N.A.C.A. Technical Memorandum No. 261 The Light Plane since 1909 - J. Underwood The Light Plane Meeting at Lympne, Flight Magazine, Oct 18th 1923
  24. A build from 12 years ago: Beauty is sometimes a hidden quality that only needs just the right eyes to be discovered. Motive, on the other hand, may remain forever hidden when you think about the rationales that supported the creation of certain flying things. In any case, how can anybody resist the charm and flair of winged wonders like this one. The more you enter into the strange lands of esoteric designs, the less information is likely to easily appear. In this particular case there were no plans or three views, just a very few images available upon which you should muster enough building steam to arrive to a safe landing, which, be it said, wasn’t the case with the real plane. The Arctic Tern was a special-purpose plane created in 1932 to provide a photo platform to survey Alaskan regions, intended to be used by Shell in its explorations. As far as we know, it was really used to scare the pilot, passengers and bystanders, not to mention the occasional real arctic tern. Besides the pilot, cruelly semi-exposed to the elements, two enclosed positions were provided on top of the floats, with forward-leaping windscreens a la Fokker F.10s or earlier Boeing 247s. The real plane’s original wing was donated by a Lockheed Sirius, the tail by a Vega, being the engine a Wasp of imprecise denomination. The design unavoidably evokes the Savoia Marchetti S.55 and specially the Bleriot 125, among various other beautiful flying creatures. The model at a glance: Starting from the photos a drawing was sketched as a truly optimistic base for the ensuing construction. The floats came from a Sword Beech Staggerwing, which were slightly broadened with a sandwiched styrene sheet and later re-contoured. The front of the structures on top of the floats came from modified left over pants of the Matchbox Heyford. The engine, prop, main wheels and struts are from Aeroclub. Everything else was pretty much squeezed-out from the Fifth Dimension, including the Sculpey-made “upper” fuselage. I really do enjoy making these strange creatures of wonder, it feels like touching the unknown.
  25. A build from 10 years ago: (May be of interest to Aussie members and those inclined to a country life, that is bon sauvages) Agricultural planes constitute a special chapter of civil aviation that is in general not well explored in modeling, in spite the appeal and usefulness of the many subjects that were created for that purpose. These beaten-up work horses are exposed to stressful tasks and hostile environments with the only purpose of helping us. The Bauhaus school of design popularized in the 20’s the “form follows function” motto, and this is especially applicable in the case of the Ag plane. Surely with a taste for the unorthodox, Mr. Luigi Pellarini designed the PL-7 cropduster around the product tank located in the center of the fuselage. To this element the engine support members were bolted as well as the remaining after part of the fuselage. An array of struts transmitted the loads from the diverse parts of the airplane to the same central element, the tank. The lower wing had straight leading edges while the upper wing leading edges were a bit angled back. The result of such elaborate load distribution was a very attractive machine that was ready to fly in 1955, a bit out of my usual subjects’ time envelope but nevertheless strange enough to merit some extension of boundaries. Mr. Pellarini continued to surprise and amuse the aeronautic world with other creations, like the Waitomo / Bennett PL-11 and the Transavia PL-12 Airtruk, which no doubt I want to model too. I had the PL-7 project in the back burner for a time; nevertheless its appearance had me looking at the references I could gather mainly on the Net and some material sent by the late Jon Noble. His help was instrumental in materializing many projects. Wherever you are now Jon, thanks. The model started as a plug that was used to vacuform the fuselage sides and the canopy transparency. Some internal structure and details were fabricated before closing the pod. A cowl was made to lodge the Armstrong Siddeley Cheetah aftermarket resin engine while wheels were from Aeroclub. A styrene lamination was made to replicate the Fairey-Reed propeller, which has a particular twist to it (pun intended) being almost a warped chunk of flat metal. As the parts were being produced a put-together strategy had to be devised, a must when the dreaded strut forest is present as in this case, and even more so given the pod-and-booms configuration. So once the flying surfaces were made some sub-assemblies were created as per photos to make the final put-together more manageable. As with almost all front tricycle landing gear arrangements there is a potential for tail-sitting, so a disk of metal was added to the firewall just in case. Isn’t it an interesting twist of faith that a machine conceived to fight bugs ends up resembling a bug itself? Mr. Pellarini, what a beautiful and strange thing you created.
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