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Found 1,565 results

  1. F/A-18 Super Hornet (04994) 1:32 Revell The Boeing F/A-18E Super Hornet is the second generation F/A-18 following on the the F/A-18C. The F/A-18E was developed from the original Hornet and while it may look alike its very much a new aircraft which is 25% bigger. The US Navy managed to keep the F/A-18 designation partly to make the US Congress believe it would be a low risk development from the original aircraft (not the first time in US Aviation this has happened). The new aircraft was ordered in 1992 with a first flight in 1995. The aircraft introduced a new era in electronics including an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, bigger displays and a helmet mounted sighting system. To date the Super Hornet has replaced the legacy Hornet in all US Navy operations apart from the USN Aerobatic Team The Blue Angels, and even they will have transitioned by 2021. As well as the E model there is the two seat F model, and the latest development the G or "Growler" Electronic Warfare Aircraft. The Kit This is a new tool kit from Revell for 2019. It arrives in a rather large box which is packed with mainly rather large sprues. The bigger ones being 60 cms across! The first job on the build is to construct the full length intake and exhaust trunking. Fan fronts and exhaust ends are placed in the trunking and its all buttoned up. The underside of this trunking forms the topside of the main wheels wells and they are built up onto the trunking. The lower main fuselage and lower parts of the intakes are then attached, followed by the fuselage sides (which also contain the top of the intakes). The exhaust nozzles can then be placed on the back of the fuselage, a choice between open and closed nozzles is provided. The lower parts of the main wings (left & right) are then attached to the main fuselage. Once these are on the large single part top wing/body part can be attached but only after first putting in the inserts for the topside airbrakes. We can now move onto the cockpit (normally where we start!) The bottom of the cockpit section forms the roof of the front wheel well and the sides for the well are attached first followed by the front bulkhead. The cockpit tub can then be placed on the top. To this is added the instrument panel and the control column. The ejection seat is then built up and added, The seat is a mulitpart affair, however the belts are moulded in, and in this scale the seat would really benefit PE belts. Once the seat is in the instrument coaming can also be fitted and the cockpit placed into the forward fuselage halves. The nose cone can be fitted and then the forward fuselage joined to the main body. A main top spine part behind the cockpit is then added. The vertical tails with their separate rudders are then made up and added to the main fuselage with a scrap diagram showing the correct angles for these. Once on the arrestor hook parts can be fitted under the main body. We now move to the undercarriage which is quite complex for the Hornet. The front unit and its wheels are built up and fitted to the front bay, the doors and their retraction struts are then fitted. Both sets of main gear get the same treatment. The main gear doors are supplied as one part and must be cut up into their components for the gear down. The outer wings can either be down or folded up as they would be parked. For these the correct hinge assembly needs to be selected. The outer wings can then be built up and added. The main wings are then finished off. While the centre sections are already there the leading edge slats and trailing edge flaps are fitted. The exhaust nozzles are then fitted to the back. Up at the front the glazing is added. For the main canopy the clear parts fit into a normal plastic frame, An integral boarding ladder is provided if wanted in the lowered position. To finish of the tail planes are added along with a few aerials. Revell provide us with a whole host of things to hang under the wings. As well as the pylons a centre line tank, and wing fuel tanks are in the box. Wing tip missile rails are included as well as AIM-9M and AIM-9X missiles for them. AIM-120C missiles are also provided. In term of things which go bang when dropped 2 x GBU-12, 2 x GBU-31-3B, and 2 x GBU-38s are provided. An AN-ASQ-228 ATFLIR sensor pod is also included. Decals The decal sheet provides markings for two aircraft. F/A-18E Bu No.166957 - "Vampires 111" Test & Evaluation Sqn VX-9, NAWS China Lake. F/A-18E Bu No.166651 - "Gunslingers 401" strike Fighter Sqn VFA-105. USS Harry s Truman 2010 Conclusion This should make up to a good looking if rather large model, highly recommended for those who like to go big! Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  2. Hi I’ve never posted in this section before, as all my model are normally of the Sci Fi variety but another passion of mine is the Pirates of the Caribbean films, so when I saw the 1/72 scale Revell model of the Black Pearl, I had to have it. First impressions are that the box is huge and there are tons of individual pieces, all well moulded and crisp. Lots of thread for the rigging (not looking forward to that bit), so far so good, but the quality of the instructions are a let down. Black and white photocopied instruction not even stapled together doesn’t fill me with joy, considering the kit was nearly £90. Oh well on with the build. Airbrushed the big pieces the required Anthracite grey, and the sails a lighter grey. Will hand paint the smaller bits. I did a fair bit before I remembered to take some photos, also I’ve gone cannon crazy having made 32 of them. Each cannon has seven individual sections! p.s. I have never built a ship of any kind before so be gentle with me.
  3. As part of my effort to clear my backlog of started kits I have dug out my Matchbox Spitfire. I started this literaly decades ago, but didn’t get far. I have looked at it occasionally, but no action. Then I bought some Xtradecal decals for it, SAC MkIX undercarriage legs, MasterCasters interior, Master gun barrels. Finally I found out about the Grey Matter correction set for the nose, which of course I immediately ordered on a wim. Having now spent about ten times what the original kit cost, guilt has led me to this, my first WIP. It will not be a tutorial, I am not that good, it will not be a guide to the ultimate accurate Matchbox Spitfire, but posting about it will serve to prod me to get it built. With a little luck, at about the halfway point, somebody will announce a new accurate Mk 22/24 for you guys waiting for one. We will start with the nose, the Grey Matter nose is one seriously large accurate lump of resin. I may scratchbuild the u/c legs out of brass because even the SAC legs might fold under the weight! It also might be the first Spitfire build to need weight in the tail to prevent it becoming a nose sitter. You can see the difference with the kit item. The panel lines look much more to scale than the Matchbox lines-lol.
  4. I built this little kit as a paint test mule for my spraycan of "Rover-Vermilion" from Halford's. I had the 1.32 scale Hawk on the go at the time, and done a scratch built flap makeover on it. So when I looked at building this one, I started wondering what if......? It was a bit more fiddly at this scale, but worth having a go. It's a very noticeable feature of the Hawk that when they're parked the flaps are down, and they don't go up again until the engine is fired up. (BM walkaround pic) It's a feature that is ignored by all the makers, even in the huge 1.32 example by Revell. And looking around on the modelshow tables it doesn't seem to be something that modellers go for very often. Anyhow, I thought I ought to post her on here just to encourage any Hawk builders to reach for the knife and saw! I think it's worth the effort. Thanks for looking
  5. We've got some great new offers on Revell items with up to 50% off RRP on many incoming kits, as well as reductions on existing stock. While stocks last.
  6. I have had this next build in my stash for several years, and am finally getting around to putting the thing together. Chosen out of the stash by my son is Revells 1:72 Halifax Mk.III, this is going to be a straight from the box build with the exception of using Vallejo acrylics in place of the suggested Revell (purely personal preference here). It's a big kit with many sprues, and a choice of 2 colour schemes and decals. The sprues are very clean, no flash to be seen (which is a bonus) and lots of detailing. I am planning on building the aircraft in the scheme of 'Oscar,' No.424 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air force, 1944. Let the fun commence.
  7. Here is my first finished build of 2019 its Revell 1:24 Volkswagen T1 Samba Bus "Flower Power". Actually I built it with my daughter over the Christmas and we just finished it last week. It was a co-production and she actually did a fair amount of building, the airbrushing and the simpler decal work . I have to say she did a good job but I have a new found respect for model car builders ; trying to get a smooth finish on these things is though and I still have a lot to master here. Great kit and colourful result and I would actually build another one ...in a zombie apocalypse theme regards Brian
  8. Hi everybody; here's my new project, the 1/72 Revell Eurofighter Typhoon This type entered into Italian Air Force service (AMI, Aeronautica Militare Italiana) in 2004, and it's currently deployed in three different bases: Grosseto (4° Stormo), Gioia del Colle (36° Stormo) and Trapani Birgi (37° Stormo). The kit supplied decals allow to build six different versions: two Germans, one Austrian, one British, one Spanish and one Italian, which is the one I'm doing. Typical Revell instruction sheet, with basically useless color table - it only refers to Revell paints The airframe I'm going to reproduce and the sprues (there's many of them ) The clear parts: the windshield shows some bubbles While the canopy has an annoying moulding seam going all along mid-line I'm planning to use the AM cockpit set from PAVLA More later, now I need to take care of my lawn. Ciao
  9. Hello guys, as per the title, does anyone have any building tips for Revell's Ju 88A-1 in 1:32? Especially around the cockpit area. My first attempt at this model ended up with horrible gaps around the nose and cockpit area. With the second model, I learnt from my mistakes and managed to evade any issues with the cockpit. Sadly I had to trash the model after a shelf fell over it. Now, this will be my third attempt to build this plane, and I would like to receive some building tips. I plan on finishing this third model as my second one, B3+DR from KG54. Any building tips will be helpful, especially any tips regarding the fit of the cockpit and the sidewalls to the fuselage halves. I already have SAC's white metal landing gear to replace the plastic ones from the kit. Thank you very much, Francisco.
  10. Hello It's really a long time I haven't entered in a group build here. This time I have chosen an early F-4E in Israeli Defense Force in 1973. To build this aircraft I have selected in my stash the Revell F-4F which has nearly everything to make a Kurnass (Sledgehammer). Actually, I had to take from a Fujimi kit the sloted stabilators as the F-4F did not have those. Here is the box art and first pictures of the build will follow soon. Cheers. Patrick
  11. More or less in a month, I´ll be having my Winter recess (after an exam in which I don´t have anything to study from aside for a bunch of schemes thrown out there without any words), and from the seven kits I have on my stash, I picked this one to become sixth build. The model itself is over 40 years old, from the now gone Frog. It doesn´t have much flash, but it does have some moulding defects, and the propeller was designed to turn to the wrong way. The kit comes with only one decal option, Green 9, Willi Reschke´s aircraft. I saw on a video build for this aircraft that the only area with gaps will be the wing/fuselage join, so I may use filler on said gaps (I don´t want to use any, to preserve the panel lines).
  12. Leftenant Aluminium here with my 1/12th scale titanium and chromoly Suzuki motocross bike of 1970. It is seven inches (17 cm) from nose to tail. The result captures the colourful, exciting, and optimistic outlook of the early 1970s, at least as it seems to me. It is basically the Revell kit of 1974, but with rider (two actually) and modern parts from Tamiya Honda and KTM motocross bike kits. See Building Joël Robert’s Suzuki motocross bike in 1/12th scale: Page on my web site See also my next topic on this site: Mr Moto Cross -- Revell 1/12th scale Husqvarna
  13. Well I have not made a model for over 30 years and this is my first attempt. This is my first foray into using an airbrush and acrylics. I used Vallejo model air for this build. I didn’t realise how things have moved on and the detail now included. Any ideas how to add aging to the paint so it doesn’t look like new would be appreciated. I have a 1/48 P-51d tamiya mustang 8th AF or a Messerschmitt Bf109E-4/7 Trop and can’t decide which to do next ?
  14. A question for those more familiar with the various F-16 kits out there, specifically ESCI's F-16A as compared against the Revell kit. I wanted to get a Revell F-16A kit and as the only ones currently available are the MLU versions, I picked up an ESCI F-16A kit. It is very well done with respect to surface details. There are a few areas that I will tweak with some aftermarket bits, but overall a well done kit, especially when you consider how long ago it was when the kit was issued. That brings me to my question. Does the ESCI kit represent a very, very early A? Particularly when it comes to the area that is directly behind the cockpit and including the rear portion of the canopy? I ask as when compared to the Revell kit, ESCI in this area is flat and there is no "step", while Revell (and other kits) has a "step": ESCI Revell If someone could clear this up for me that would be most helpful.
  15. AVRO Shackleton MR.3 (03873) 1:72 Revell The Avro Shackleton was a long-range maritime patrol, Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Airborne Early Warning (AEW) aircraft developed by Avro from the Lincoln (with a few elements borrowed from the Tudor), which in turn was developed from the wartime Lancaster bomber. Powered by four Rolls Royce Griffon engines driving contra-rotating propellers, the Shackleton possessed far greater range than its forebears, enabling it to stay airborne for over 14 hours, despite its higher gross weight. In the Maritime Reconnaissance role it began life as a tail-dragger that bore more of a resemblance to the old Lanc, which morphed from versions 1 to 2 with a longer nose and relocated radome, into the MR.3 that added a nose-wheel that brought it more in-line with the tricycle undercarriage sported by the rest of the fleet as it modernised. The MR.3 was further modified with additional equipment inside both to improve its abilities and enhance crew comfort (a little) on those long sorties, which were further extended by the fitting of wingtip fuel tanks. The twin 20mm cannon in the nose and the complement of stores in the bomb bay were key, and the Phase 3 had two viper turbojet engines added to the rear of the outboard nacelles to improve take-off performance when heavily loaded. The Kit Revell's new tool in 2016 was eagerly awaited by many, as modellers had waited over 40 years for a new kit of the Old Grey Lady, with the AEW.2 the first out of the gate. Now we have an MR.3 with changed parts to depict this quite different version of the much-loved Shack. Inside the large end-opening box are 209 parts spread over twelve sprues in grey styrene, two of clear parts, a decal sheet and instruction booklet with colour painting guide to the rear. The mouldings look excellent, with fine, engraved panel lines, recessed rivets and plenty of crisply rendered detail. A great deal of effort has gone into the tooling of this kit. As usual, construction starts with the cockpit. Whilst it doesn't feature a full interior, Revell have done a good job of representing the inside of the Shackleton. The cockpit itself features nicely detailed seats with separately moulded armrests, decal seatbelts, and control yokes, while the detail on parts such as the instrument panel is exquisite as you can see from the detail photo above. The rear crew stations aft of the bomb bay are also nicely represented. Crew seats are moulded separately and there is plenty of moulded-in detail. You can even finish the model with the rear door open in order to show off a little more of the inside. The fuselage itself is broken down into front and rear sections that we rightly assumed were hinting at further releases, and features a double wing spar fixed to the roof of the bomb bay which, just like the real thing lends a lot of structural strength to the model. Before sealing the fuselage halves together, don't forget to fix the small side windows in the fuselage from the inside beforehand. While we're on the subject of clear parts, those provided with the kit are excellent, being both very clear and nicely moulded. The bomb bay doors are split and can be finished in the open position if required, but Revell provide no stores to put in there. The canopy and top hatch glazing are installed after the seams are dealt with, and here you'll need to be careful to get a good join to minimise clean up, although you have a much better chance of retaining all the rivets as they're recessed. If sanding starts to make them faint, you can always stop and deepen them with a bradawl or pin. The big nose cannon are fitted to the pivot from the inside and attached to the hole in the nose along with the curved canopy on top and a trapezoid bomb-aimer's window below. At the rear there is a clear stinger for observation purposes. The huge wings are split into upper and lower halves, with separately moulded ailerons and landing flaps which once assembled simply slide onto the wing spars to form a nice strong join. The rudders and elevators are all moulded separately too, so bonus marks go to Revell for including this useful extra feature, and the tip-tanks are separate with a clear lens added to the front of each one. The engine nacelles are very finely represented with superb moulded-in detail and separate cooling flaps, with the main landing gear bays sandwiched inside the inner engine pods. The landing gear is absolutely fine, but on the other hand you want to hang your Shackleton from the ceiling, you can close the landing gear bays up completely and save yourself the trouble of painting the wheels. There are also alternative outer nacelles with the exhaust for the Viper turbojets if you choose to model the Phase 3 example, which is good to see. Aside from adding a host of aerials and other small details such as the belly-mounted radome, all that remains to do is assemble and paint the propellers. This is no mean feat due to their sheer numbers – 24 tips in all. That's the bonus of contra-prop models, twice the props, twice the fun! Tackling this sub-assembly first might be wise as it is bound to be quite time consuming and could seem more of a chore if you're approaching burn-out at the end of the project. Markings There are two decal options supplied on the sheet, each one taking up two pages of the booklet, but you'll need to flip pages whilst decaling as they aren't pages that face each other even though there is a blank page at the back. Both options wear the same high demarcation white fuselage over dark grey scheme, and from the box you can build one of the following: Shackleton MR.3 (Phase 2) No.206 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Kinloss, Scotland, 1965 Shackleton MR.3 (Phase 3) No.42 Squadron, Royal Air Force, St Mawgan, Cornwall, 1970 Decals are printed for Revell by Zanetti, which is a guarantee of good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. You can have a look at our Walkarounds by clicking on the buttons below for a bit more incitement if the pictures of crisp plastic detail aren't yet loosening your wallet. MR.3 (Phase 3) WR977 @ Newark Air Museum MR.3 (Phase 3) WR982 @ Gatwick Aviation Museum Conclusion It's hard to believe we've been blessed with two modern toolings of the Shackleton and now four variants are covered, with the Revell kit appearing to be free from what most would consider to be major potential oopsies. surface detail is superb, with its beautifully rendered panel line and rivet detail, making the competitors look a little soft by comparison. Overall a very pleasing effort for this variant from Revell that has tempted this 1:48 modeller. Very highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  16. Hi, getting round to starting the GR4 that's been sitting round for ages. Going to be building Goldstar farewell scheme
  17. Good evening everyone, I thought it might be worth shifting my attempt at the RAF Centenary Groupbuild to the WIP area, seeing as I never had chance of meeting the deadline! (The build can be found by clicking here) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- So, To bring everyone up to speed: -I plan to build a representation of the Panavia Tornado ZA326 in its iconic raspberry ripple colours. I'll be using the 1:32 Tornado GR1 kit from Revell and an abundance of plasticard, to model her with a plethora of panels open (nose, side electronics bays, ground equipment connection points, the spine, and maybe even an open engine bay!) Here are a few select images which visually describe the process so far: (Note that the paintwork on bits and bobs has been tidied up since these images were taken) What's the plan of action going forward, then? -Nose electronics bay -Nose hinge and detailing -Cockpit wiring -Fuselage panels and internal gubbins -Fuselage rescribing (+rivets, should they be required) -Engine bay (there might be a bit of a surprise in that regard, stay tuned!) -Wings -Other (landing gear, etc) It will be a slow (I've got a summer placement in a research lab at my university) but hopefully steady project. As for references that I'll be using: The good General's own Tornado build The Tornado SIG The ZA326 group's Flickr Stay tuned for more! Best wishes, Sam
  18. Hi everyone, More of a 'what might have been' than 'what if'. In the mid 2000’s in the Republic of Ireland, consolidation of aircraft and responsibilities led to a competition to replace the Air Corps’ 40-year-old Alouettes in the Army liaison role with a new, larger utility type helicopter that could also fulfill a Medium lift role. The competing types for the order were the proven Sikorsky Blackhawk, the Eurocopter Cougar and the Agusta-Bell (now Agusta Westland) AB139 which was originally designed as a civilian machine and at that time had no military users. From what I’ve read, the Irish Air Corps and Army’s preference was the Blackhawk - which members of our Forces (particularly our Ranger Spec Ops Wing), were familiar with having being part of the UN operation in East Timor with Australian Blackhawks and also while on training ops in the US. The Blackhawk’s service record worldwide was regarded as being better than the Cougar. There were also reports that Sikorsky offered a very good deal to the Irish Government which would have brought six new a/c and six reconditioned machines for a very competitive price. In the end, the AW139 was selected and the Air Corps became the first military operator of the type. Six aircraft currently serve with No. 3 Operations Wing. For what it's worth, Agusta Westland have now developed a pure military version, the larger AW149. So here it is, Revell's re-box of Italeri's UH-60A in Irish Air Corps markings. If you're interested, the full WIP build is here. This was the first....and last Revell/Italeri Blackhawk I'll build....really poor fit and general detail and it can't really hold it's own against the newer Hobby Boss kits which I'd rate as being far superior. Oh well, you live and learn! Cheers, Dermot
  19. Right, my first WIP topic. Normally I'm only active in the Dutch ModelBrouwers forum, but I was persuaded to post a WIP here as well :). I usually build vintage civil aircraft (i.e. VC-10, Trident, 707, etc.) and I'm especially a fan of Soviet build civil aircraft, but from time to time I build more modern aircraft as well (as stated before, my goal is to have at least one model of every type of civil aircraft that has room for at least 12 passengers and has a closed cockpit). As for the liveries, I try to build them in Dutch colours (KLM, Martinair, Transavia, Air Holland, etc.). If none of the Dutch companies has flown in it I just choose what I like or is available. Since a few years ago I have made a rule for myself to only start a new build when an old one is finished. That has worked very well for me as I now actually finish models! There are still a few unfinished models from a few years ago though and the A330-300 is one of them. As such, I figured it's now time to finished it! I flew in the A330-300 in December 2011 to New York, albeit an A330 operated by Delta. All right, let’s get started! I’m pretty sure the A330 is well known amongst civil aviation enthousiasts, so I’m not going to write too much about the aircraft itself. It has been developed in conjunction with the A340 and in the A330-300 version there is room for 436 passengers. The two main versions are the -200 and -300 and the latest version will be the NEO. KLM operates both the -200 and -300. The kit is from Revell. I'm not going to spend too much time to make it as accurate as possible (its an OK kit alread). I’m aware of the fact that the nose isn’t entirely correct and the winglets are a bit too straight. It doesn’t bother me too much, so I will leave it as it is in this case. The kit comes with PW engines, but KLM uses the GE engines. At first I was contemplating scratch building the GE engines, but luckily 26 decals supplies a resin GE set, so I bought those instead This was the state I left the model in 5 years ago. At the time I always left the windows open. I never leave them open now, so I will close them with putty. Normally I close windows outside in, but obviously that's not possible now anymore :p. The decals that come with the kit are excellent. Designed by Gaston Roca from Nazca Decals and printed by Cartograf. The KLM decals are from DRAW. I have used them before on my MD-11 and they are very good as well. The Corogard is from 8A decs. The window and cockpit decals are from Authentic Airliners The first thing I did was fill up the windows with filler. I used mostly Revell putty for this. I masked it with tape, so you don't get too much putty on the model. I did the same with the rest of the fuselage. The result after the first sanding session. It's been a while since I last did a widebody so my arm is aching from all that sanding! The first round of primer. I used Vallejo primer, which I generally use. As always, there are some seams left, so a second round of putty is necessary. In this case I use filler for cars, as you can sand it really smooth. The result after the second round of sanding.... ...and the result after the second round of primer. I'm happy actually with the result so far, apart from some small seams. That will be corrected in the third round of sanding/priming. And that's where I'm at. Plenty of work ahead of me. To be continued! Regards, Martijn
  20. Hi all, So after my last Revell flying boat adventure, going to take the plunge with this one which I think is a rebox of a Heller kit. Thanks for looking and good luck with your builds. Cheers, Dermot
  21. This is not my usual fayre so please don't expect anything too fancy from this build, which will be made as it comes in the box. All tips for simple improvements I can make along the way will be welcome, and so folks, I give you the box and its contents. by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr
  22. Embraer 190 - Lufthansa New Livery (03883) 1:144 Revell Designed and built in Brazil by Embraer aerospace, the 190 has been in service since 2005. The 190 is a 100 - 124 seat regional airliner with a very successful sales and operation history, with more than 500 having been sold. Its sister, the Embraer 195 features a 2.5 metre fuselage stretch and capacity for more passengers, but a a reduction in range from 3500 km down to 2600 km. The 190/195 was developed from the Embraer 170/175 by stretching the fuselage and adding a new wing, tailplane and engines. The Kit First released around 2015, this re-release adds a new set of decals for the latest Lufthansa livery. I built one of these early releases in 2017 and can confirm that it assembles and fits very well, and will give a good result for all builders from novice to experienced. Comparing this kit with my Aurigny 195 (Boxed as the 'Air Dolomiti version) confirms that the fuselage features the reduced length of the 190, and so is not a simple reissue of exactly the same sprues. Unusual for a 1/144 scale airliner kit, construction begins with the cockpit. A neat little unit is provided, which can actually be seen through the nice clear windshield on the finished model. A small amount of nose weight is required to prevent tail sitting, 20g being suggested in the instructions. Once the fuselage halves are together the main wheel bay is fitted to the under fuselage belly plate, which is then added. The wings are two pieces each, moulded with integral winglets which eliminates the need for getting them aligned properly as on kits where they are separate parts. The wings fit very well to the fuselage, followed by the tailplanes. On my earlier build the fit was so good that they can be added after painting, which makes masking very much simpler. Engines are nicely detailed with a two part core and separate intake fans and exhaust cones. These are fitted inside the two part pylon/cowling units, finished off with a one piece cowling front. The beauty of these is that you don't get an inside joining seam, the inner intake is completely smooth, so full marks to Revell for this. Once the engines and flap tracks are fitted to the wing, a choice can be made with the undercarriage, either up or down. The legs and wheels are so beautifully moulded, it would be a shame not to use them though. The clear sprue holds the cockpit windshield, which fits neatly into the slot in the fuselage. [Edit] Comparison of the Revell Embraer 195 fuselage(Aurigny) with this 190 kit, showing that Revell have correctly shortened it [/Edit] Markings Just one, as it says on the box 'Lufthansa new livery'. It is in overall white with silver leading edges on wings, engines, and tailplanes. The blue tailplane will need to be masked and painted by the modeller. The sheet looks to be high quality, with beautifully sharp and fine printing. Doors, stencils, and vents are well detailed, as are silver window surrounds. The cockpit windows get a very nice white surround, so there is no need to brush paint the frames. Options are given for seven different aircraft from the Lufthansa fleet, the only difference apart from the registration, is the the names that go under the 'Lufthansa CityLine' logo near the front doors. Conclusion This is a very nice kit to modern standards, which are few and far between for us airliner modellers. It is well moulded, builds easily and makes a surprising large model, similar in size to a Boeing 727-200. No glazing is supplied for the cabin windows, but the clear carrier film on the window decals will cover these. Alternatively Microscale Krystal Klear can be used, or you can fill them before closing the fuselage halves and use window decals. The Livery itself may not be to everyone's taste as it is rather plain and lacking in colour. However there is no shortage of aftermarket decals for the 190, including some very colourful options. As I said earlier, everyone from beginner to expert should get a good result from this kit. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  23. Hi there fellow modellers. First time post in ready for inspection. It’s my second build with my new airbrush (Revell’s basic set, single action) and my tenth build overall, so I ‘m still figuring things out. Overall I’m happy with the result but there are things that need improving. First of all when I painted the fuselage paint looked nice, really happy with the result. Then I gloss coated it before putting on the decals (with Vallejo gloss acrylic varnish 26.517). After coating the paint didn’t look that nice/smooth anymore. In hind side I don’t know if the paint never was that smooth to begin with and the gloss coat just accented it or that I simply messed up applying the coating. (perhaps more/less coating?). I do know that after the coating the plane feels a bit sticky, even after 24 hours and is a dust magnet. After coating I did cover the plane with a shoebox to prevent dust falling on to it. Thinking about using another brand of gloss next time. The second thing I struggled with is putting the separately painted small parts on to the fuselage without messing up the paint or leaving glue residue. I know the preferred order is first gluing and then painting but with some parts I just don’t see any other way to pull it off. I guess experience and gaining more modelling skills will lead to improvement in this area. Then there is the fr#@k!ng canopy. For me without a doubt the most difficult part of a build. In videos I see all those people cutting maskingtape like it’s the easiest job in the world, but now, for me free brushpainting and scrapping the excess paint with a toothpick works best. I see a lot of improvement compared with my older builds but still a whole lot to gain. The Corsair purists among you will notice the paint color is a bit of. I think I messed up the color mixing percentages, but considering the points I mentioned above, it doesn’t bother me that much. My last build I started to use Tamiya panel line accent color but the panel lines on this kit are so shallow that I didn’t think the result would justify the work I had to put in. Well, all the disclaimers are in place so plane is ready for inspection!
  24. While the daughter and her boyfriend are up visiting for the next couple of weeks i have been turfed out of my model room but I can still use the old garage but this means that the battle class build will be on hold until then as I do not want to start moving all the stuff around and end up where something goes missing. So to keep my sanity in place i will be doing this quite modern TUG it will be a OOB build no fancy detailing just for a bit of fun and to keep me out of the way with most of my stash. Seem to remember someone else doing this kit with a lot of detail added Side open boxes don't work for me so i cut this one open to have a flap lid Main hull and upper structures go together quite well and a coat of primer normally just use this desk and workbench as a spraying area but back to using it as a build desk again beefy
  25. Hi all, I've been here a few weeks now and though it was about time I showed you what I'm up to. I've very fond memories of watching Star Trek (TOS) as a kid in the 80's with my dad and my brother and it's one of the few things that has really stuck with me through changing times. The Enterprise itself I find mesmerising, it's graceful and each part of the ship has a clear purpose, a design classic and I love it. My favourite itteration has to be the refit, which I hope to build at some point in the future So, I got in to modelling because I wanted a decent model Enterprise, I've had a few very small die-cast models but they are always lacking something. I found the Revell kit online and decided that I'd build my own, LED lights and all. Now I've well and truly got the modelling bug, I've bought the Star Trek Starship Voyager for my next model, I've built a small Star Destroyer and plan to build models from Battlestar and other Star Trek models Here's some photos that I took while building my Enterprise, I wasnt originally planning on posting them online but then I found this place, so here it goes! 1. What a great start, I ruined my first model! I wanted to light my model with LEDs, so it had to be light-proofed. So the insides of the model had a coat of adhesion promoter, followed by black, then a silver or while coat would be painted to make it reflective. I was watching lots of Boyd's Trekworks Youtube videos for info and he used a heat gun on a gentle heat to aid the drying process.... I'll never do that again, my model melted You can see the plastic deformation from the heat in this image. It also shows my initial plan for lighting, which was to cover all windows with grease-proof paper, which diffuses the light, then placing LED's around the ship to light them up. 2. Saucer section interior is about ready So after buys a replacement model I started again, with a few important lessons learned This image shows the insides of the saucer section, painted and with the windows covered. I used 'Revell Contacta Liquid Special' to glue the clear windows in place, and to glue the greese-proof paper in place. The secondary hull, again with the inside prepared for lighting, it's had a black coat followed by a light coat to refelct the light. By this time I'd also started experimenting with LEDs, the breadboard in this photo had a 555 Timer chip and a 4017 Decade counter, they'll be used for the rotating lights of the Warp Nacells and the blinking navigation lights. 4.Let there be light! Not sure of the best positioning and arrangement of LEDs I just dove in with something that looked like it would give good coverage. I know some people use fewer but brighter LEDs, and some use LED tape/strips, which I might look at using in the future. Each LED has a resistor attached, and they're all in parallel, so if one should fail the others will continue to work. 5. Glue. After lighting the secondary hull in a similar way I was ready to glue a few parts together. Which I was pretty worried about as I considered it opportunity to ruin yet another model. I used Revel Contacta Professional glue and found my fears were unfounded, thankfully 6. Circuits To light this model I would need to build some circuits to handle the navigation lights and the rotating buzzard collector effects. So I bought the relevant gear from Maplin (I now use RS instead) and designed a few circuits in Pad2Pad, which is excellent free circuit design software. The first completed circuit was for the navigation lights, I was initially planning to put it inside the model but then decided I would fit it in the stand instead. 7. Warp Nacell Test #1 You saw my breadboard with a few components in an earlier photo. This is basically how the Buzzard Collector effect works on my model, The red, orange and green LEDs are aranged in a circle and give the impression of rotation. 8.Warp Nacell Circuit fitting After designing my Warp Nacell circuit in Pad2Pad, I printed it off, cut it out and placed it in it's intended final position to make sure it would fit. The circular plastic piece has holes drilled in it to receive the LEDs, 12 of them (for a single Nacell). 9. Assembled Warp Nacell Board After building the warp nacell board I fit it in place. Now you can also see how the LEDs sit. It's a pretty tight space so I was pleased that everything went in with no problems In the video below, the middle light isnt connected to any power, it will eventually be 'always-on' to provide a steady red glow. The camera doesnt really do the below any justice. 10. Closed up my first Warp Necell - and made my second big mistake It's amazing isnt it that you can do something, then the instant you finish you realise you've done it wrong. I guess it's not really that big a deal, the model isn't completely accurate anyway and I'd already decided that I would'nt worry about that this time. But this mistake was easily avoidably, yet at the crutial point I... put the wrong circuit in the wrong nacell, so the buzzard collectors now spin in the wrong direction. Only a Trek fan would notice, but it's annoying all the same. Still, after much grumpiness I think I can live with it. 11. Connecting the Pylons and the Seconday Hull. I'd already glued the warp nacells to the support pylons and let those set, I'd also done some work on removing the seams on all the parts glued so far. Now it was time to connect the wiring up and glue them to the secondary hull. With the wiring connected and the pylons glued on to the secondary hull, it looked like the area would be under a fair bit of stress, so I stuck a clamp in place to hold things together while they set. 12. Windows, I hate Windows I bought some masking fluid so that I could mask the windows, but found it to be far to imprecise and the results (of tests I did on my melted saucer section) were pretty messy. So after getting some advice right here on Britmodeller (thanks guys, you know who you are) I settled on masking the windows with masking tape. I used a scalpal to cut small rectangles working on one at a time. It took ages. I have used the masking fluid on a few of the larger clear pieces, but I'm still not impressed with the result, maybe I just need more practice with it! 13. All Masked, Time for the Primer With all the clear parts masked I bought myself a 'lazy suzan' and gave the entire ship a coat of Hycote Adhesion Promoter and then a nice coat of Hycote grey primer. No way was I going anywhere near this thing with a heat gun The wires you see here will eventually be fed through the stand in to the base. I found the Hycote cans give excellent fast coverage, pretty cheep too. 14. Base Color With the primer dry it was time to start mixing colours (as per the model instructions) and giving it some proper color. I used a 'Sparmax Arism Mini' Airbrush to spray the model, with Revel Aqua Color paints. I found that thinning the paint 2-parts paint to 1-part thinner worked pretty well. I'd aslo sprayed the deflector dish, I love that copper colour and started giving the warp nacell and impulse engines some colour. I was having trouble cutting the masking tape perfectly to cover the inside of the impulse engines, so decided to try the masking fluid. The result was not great but I think It'll look fine if I touch it up with a brush. So, that's my model so far. It's the first model I've ever build and while I've found it quite challenging I've really enjoyed it and plan to do many more in the future. I'll post more photos and videos as I make more progress. And thanks to everyone here for accepting me in to the site and giving me some great tips! Cheers
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