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Found 158 results

  1. Hello every body, after my ANR G-14 I want to show you my G-6 from JG3. Its the first generation 109 from eduard (this with some well known failurs) which I corrected.
  2. Brengun has just released a 1/48th Messerschmitt BFW M.23b resin kit - ref. BRS48008 Source: http://www.hauler.cz/cs-cz/e-shop/1-48-stavebnice-30/messerschmitt-b-f-w-m-23-b-1554 V.P.
  3. Messerschmitt Bf109F-2 1:72 Revell The Messerschmitt BF 109 was certainly the most numerous, and probably the best known of all the aircraft used by the Luftwaffe during the Second World War. Almost 34,000 examples were produced between 1937 and 1945, and the type saw active service in every theatre in which German armed forces were engaged. Powered initially by the relatively low powered Junkers Jumo engine and later by various iterations of the more powerful Daimler Benz DB600 series of inverted V-12 engines, the later variants of the BF 109 could achieve speeds of up to 400 mph. In comparison with the E, or ‘Emil’, the F or 'Friedrich' featured a more powerful version of the DB601 engine, as well as a host of aerodynamic improvements such as a more rounded cowling, enlarged spinner, smaller, lightweight propellor and redesigned supercharger intake. The F2 was armed with 1 × 15mm MG 151 cannon and 2 × 7.92mm MG 17 machine guns. Eagle eyed readers will no doubt have already spotted that this is the Zvezda kit of 2012, which was marketed as a snap-fit kit by the Russian firm. Revell make no mention of this in their instructions, instead suggesting that conventional polystyrene cement should be used to fix the parts together. Builders would do well to note the origins of the kit, however, as snap-fit models are not so forgiving when it comes to test fitting the parts together! The parts are cleanly moulded and surface details is fine and crisp. As you might expect, the part count is fairly low, but not as low as one of Hobbyboss's easy build kits. Assembly begins with the wings. The upper wings are moulded as one part, with the floor of the cockpit moulded in place between the upper wing surfaces. The landing gear wheel wells feature basic structural detail. The cockpit is surprisingly well-detailed for a kit of this type, with a control column, rudder pedals (moulded in place) and various other controls moulded separately. The instrument panel is moulded in two parts, while the rear bulkhead/pilot's seat is moulded in three parts. Unusually for a modern kit, a pilot is included. He is moulded in three parts and is rather nicely detailed. With the cockpit and wing finished, attention turns to the fuselage. The supercharger intake and the machine gun fairings are separate parts, which adds to the overall level of detail. The rudder is moulded in place with the port side of the fuselage, while the elevators are solid parts. The propellor is moulded as one part, with a conventional three-part spinner. You won't need to drill out the hole for the 15mm cannon as a rather delicate hole aleady exists. The landing gear is pretty good for the scale, and alternative parts are provided should you wish to build your model in wheels up configuration. The canopy is moulded as a single part, but is otherwise ok. My only real grumble with the kit is the lack of decal options. Just one scheme is catered for on the decal sheet; Bf109 F-2 Stab.II/JG53, Grupperkommander Hptm. H. Brenutz, St. Omer-Arques, May 1941. The decals themselves are nicely printed but include only basic markings. Conclusion This isn't the latest, greatest kit and nor does it pretend to be. What it is, is simple, easy to build and reasonably detailed. It is also good value and perfect for younger modellers or those on a tight budget (or with ambitions to build a lot of F-2s!). Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  4. Modelcollect is to release a 1/48th Messerschmitt P1101-104 Heavy two-seat destroyer kit - ref.UA48004 Sources: http://www.modelcollect.com/wwii-german-messerschmitt-p1101-104-heavy-two-seat-destroyer https://www.facebook.com/Modelcollect/photos/a.153755038112938/1244267079061723/?type=3&theater V.P.
  5. Please note the Finnish Swastika is completely different from the one used by the Third Reich. Another Eduard kit, this time their Profipack G-2. I had to make a fair amount of trimming on the wheel wells to allow for a good fit of the upper wings. I also had to reglue the radiator roof on the right wing because it had gotten loose. I used decals from the Hasegawa "Finnish Air Force" Bf 109G-2, which silvered a bit, something that hadn´t happened on my previous 25 models. The carrier film of the decals was brittle and tore on many places, but it didn't affect the important part of the decal. Comments welcome!
  6. Eduard's Weekend Edition Bf 109F-2 painted as Wolf Dietrich Wilcke's plane when he was Gruppenkommandeur of III/JG 53. I found a pretty good photo of the real plane, and I didn´t know if what I was looking at was a dirty airframe or a mottled one, so I decided to follow the scheme of a similar Bf 109F-2 flown by Heinz Bretnütz of II/JG 53. The aircraft was brushpainted with Revell acrylics.
  7. Hallo again This is my Me-262 B. 1/32 Kit is Trumpeter. All painting and insignia are as explained in: Happy modelling
  8. Hallo again This is my Me-109 E-3. 1/32 Kit is Eduard. All painting, insignia, and stencils are as explained in: Stencils are wet transfer from HGW. Happy modelling
  9. Hallo again This is my Me-109 E-4. 1/32 Kit is Eduard. All painting, insignia, and stencils are as explained in: Stencils are wet transfer from HGW. Happy modelling
  10. Hallo again This is my Me-109 G-10. 1/32 Kit is Revell. All painting, insignia, and stencils are as explained in: Stencils are wet transfer from HGW. Happy modelling
  11. Hallo again This is my Me-109 K-4. 1/32 Kit is Trumpeter. All painting, insignia, and stencils are as explained in: Stencils are wet transfer from HGW. Happy modelling
  12. Hallo again This is my Me-109 G-6. 1/32 Kit is Hasegawa. All painting, insignia, and stencils are as explained in: Stencils are wet transfer from HGW. Happy modelling
  13. Awfulschmitt oneOnine again... Sigh. KA-Models (http://www.ka-models.com/index.php?route=common/home & https://www.facebook.com/KAMODELS2007) is to release (has just released?) two 1/48th Messerschmitt Bf.109 kits. Some people in Hyperscale forum say they've recognized the injected parts from the old Fujimi kits. Time will tell. Source: http://www.themodellingnews.com/2015/01/ka-models-bf-109-g-10-g-6-deadly-new.html ref. KP-48001A - Messerschmitt Bf109 G-6 "Red Tulip" Source: http://www.ka-models.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=643 ref. KP-48002A - Messerschmitt Bf.109 G-10 "Rita" Source: http://www.ka-models.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=644 V.P.
  14. I found this aircraft listed as a future release for October on the Hannants website, and I´m wondering if it´s going to be a reboxing of the Eduard Bf 109F-2. The price is really tempting too. https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/RV3893
  15. After becoming frustrated with ICM/Revell´s Mustang Mk.III in 1:48 (and sending it to my spares box with most pieces on their sprue), I decided to pull this model out of my stash and build it as a relaxing build, which it was! The model offers the flaps and slats in the down position, and you can pose them up by cutting their respective mounting tabs. However, while removing the tab of one slat, I also removed a chunk of it, which was repaired by filling the area with CA. I also feared that, due to how thin the plastic on the slats was, that the plastic would damage if I used regular glue, so I used CA to glue the slats.
  16. We've just got the latest 1/72 Special Hobby kits in stock, discounted prices! https://mjwmodels.co.uk/special-hobby-172--kits-544-c.asp RAF Vampire Mk I Messerschmitt Bf109G-6 'Mersu' Messerschmitt Me209V4 thanks Mike
  17. Formerly on 1/JG 7, yellow 17 was captured by 616 Squadron at Fassberg at wars end. It was ferried to the UK where it was designated Air Min 52 and brefily evaluated until being sold off to Canada. It was scrapped with 300 odd other surplus aircraft in Canada in 1947. The kit is the very nice Tamiya 1/48 offering with Cutting Edge decals.
  18. Bf.109G-10 Mtt Regensburg ProfiPACK (82119) 1:48 Eduard There must have been billions of words written on the Bf.109 over the years, which was the mainstay of the Luftwaffe's fighter arm, despite having been supposedly superseded by the Fw.190 and others during its service life. It kept coming back to prominence due partly to it being a trusted design, the manufacturer's substantial sway with the RLM, and the type's ability to be adapted as technology advanced. The G or Gustav as it was known was one of the later variants, and is widely regarded as one of the more successful, with improved armament that give some variants a distinctive pair of blisters in front of the windscreen, plus mounting points for the 210mm rocket tubes used to disrupt the bomber streams in long range attacks using timed detonation. The other minor changes were targeted at Defense of the Reich, removing the mounting points and hardware for long-range tanks etc. The G-10 was fitted with the new DB605D-2 engine that was later seen on the K, and became the de facto standard Gustav once introduced, often using as-yet unfinished G-14s as the starting point, which has confused some researchers in the past. It was fitted with the sleek Erla-Haube canopy and a deeper oil cooler under the nose that sets it apart from previous issues along with some small blisters just forward and below the exhaust stacks. It also had a swept-forward installation of the radio antenna under the wing leading edge, all of which you can see on the box art. The Kit This boxing depicts airframes that were manufactured at Messerschmitt's own Regensburg factory, and as you can imagine, it shares some sprues with earlier variants from Eduard, most notably the G-14 that came before and overlapped its tenure. With this being a ProfiPACK issue, it arrives in the orange banded box, with four sprues of grey styrene, a clear sprue, two sheets of Photo-Etch (PE), a sheet of yellow kabuki-style masking medium (not pictured), two decal sheets for markings and stencils, and of course the instruction booklet. The build process will of course be familiar to anyone that has either built a 109 before, and/or owns one of Eduard's other Gustav offerings. Where it differs is in the new fuselage halves, which have all the requisite lumps and bumps mentioned above, plus a new lower wing sprue (half) that has a small hole for the clear isolating panel at the base of the antenna. The build of course begins in the cockpit, with PE and styrene parts aplenty, plus a nice transparent fuel feeder pipe, which is clear so that you can mask the vision port and paint the rest. This was a lo-fi way for the pilot to quickly check whether his engine was sucking vapours, or had gone pop for some other reason. PE seatbelts are included, and a choice of PE or styrene rudder pedals, depending on how dexterous you are feeling. The instrument panel is laminated from layers of pre-painted PE, with the new glossy, slightly domed dials already present on the frets, which Eduard have slyly introduced recently with little in the way of fanfare. The sidewalls too are decorated with more painted PE parts, after which you can close up the fuselage unless you're treating yourself to a resin engine or other goodies. Don't forget to trap the tail wheel between the halves, or you'll regret it later. The backplate for the spinner and exhaust stubs are installed, and the top cowling with gun inserts is glued into place along with the intake for the engine's turbocharger, a PE hinge section on the top of the cowling, and a choice of PE flame-hiders for the exhausts, which vary between markings options. The G-10 had an extended fin, which is separate from the fuselage on this boxing, breaking at a convenient panel line to ease the way. The elevator fins are each two parts and fit using pins, with separate elevators and a choice of two rudder types. The wings are only slightly different from the norm, with the usual (but new) full-width lower, main gear sidewalls and split upper wings, plus a gaggle of separate parts for the leading-edge slats (gravity deployed when stopped), ailerons, and the two-layer flaps that butt up to the back of the radiator bays, which have PE skins front and back, as does the extended chin-scoop that identifies it as a G-10. A scrap diagram shows the correct positioning of the flaps when they are deployed. The main gear is the same narrow-track stuff from earlier models, with separate tyres and hubs, plus captive bay doors, socketing into the bay using nice strong parts, and with hub masks for easy painting of the wheels. A tiny square clear part is supplied for the aerial isolator and a mask is on the sheet, with a choice of styrene or PE aerial, and here my review sample had a short-shot of this delicate part, which is the first time ever that I have seen this happen on an Eduard kit. The PE backup is there of course, and as it happens I have a set of the resin FuG16 antennae that we reviewed recently here. You'll want to check part I17 on your sprues however, just in case. Horn-balances are fitted to the ailerons, a small raised panel under the wing trailing edge is added from PE, and a circular panel on the flank of the fuselage needs to be filled for authenticity's sake. As the build draws to a conclusion, the gunsight is added from a partially painted (by you) clear part, and if you add a little translucent green/blue to the edge to simulate the thickness of the glass, it will improve the look of the finished part. The windscreen has a couple of small PE parts added to it before you can glue it to the front of the squared-off cockpit opening, and the uber-sleek Erla-Haube canopy has a windowed head armour part that will need masking from the enclosed sheet and painting before it is fitted. If you have treated yourself to a set of Tface masks that allow painting of both interior and exterior surfaces of the canopy, the additional small parts added will gel nicely with this improvement. A stubby aerial fits to the top rear of the canopy, and you have a choice of PE or styrene DF loop antenna for the spine a little way back. The canopy can be posed open by using the thin PE restraint that's included on the fret, which allows you to set the correct angle when open. The prop is a single part, which has the two-piece spinner fitted around it, after which you can either glue it in place, or leave it loose for travel and impromptu spinning if you like. A trim actuator for the rudder and a tiny aerial under the fuselage are the last parts on the PE fret, which ends the construction phase unless you have chosen markings option C, which has a two-part drop-tank on a four prong mount under the centre of the fuselage. Markings As is usually the case with ProfiPACK editions, there are five marking options included in the box, with a nice broad range of colour options, some of which have interesting and fairly unusual quirks to them. The main sheet contains all the national, unit, and theatre markings, while the smaller sheet is full of stencils, which are detailed on a separate page to avoid cluttering each full page set of profiles. You get spinner decals where appropriate, so you're not left wondering how on earth you're going to do them, so all you have to worry about (if you do) is the various mottle and scribble patterns that are seen on all but one of the aircraft. Option B is perfect for the mottle-phobic, as it is a bare metal Mosquito Hunter from Fassberg, which was stripped and polished to give it the best chance of swatting those superbly swift Mossies. 1./ KG(J) 6, Prague – Kbely, Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, March/April 1945 W. Nr. 130342, 5./ NJG 11, Fassberg, Germany 1945 W. Nr. 130297, flown by Fw. Horst Petzschler, 10./ JG 51, Bulltofta, Sweden, May 1945 13./ JG 27, Schleswig – Holstein, Germany, May 1945 W.Nr. 130282, flown by Hptm. Franz Wienhusen, CO of IV./ JG 4, Frankfurt/Rhein-Main, Germany, November 1944 All the decals are printed in the Czech Republic with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. The black is a little dominant on the instrument panel decals, but as we have a PE panel anyway, it's hardly of great importance! Conclusion Another great 109G kit from Eduard that has plenty of detail out of the box, and can be upgraded even further in the detail department if you're minded to add the extra resin and PE sets that are patterned for the kit and available separately. ProfiPACK Kit EduART As Eduard have such consistently good box art they began offering prints in special editions of their models, but have now modularised the art so that you can buy it separately, or along with your kit. The print arrives in a cardboard folio, the flap of which is taped shut, and has a card flap to lock it closed again once the seal is broken. Inside is the print, safely sandwiched by two pieces of white card to prevent any scuffing of the printed surface during storage or shipping. The print measures 59.5cm x 42cm, and there is a border around the artwork to make framing easier, plus a caption underneath for those that don't immediately know what they're looking at. I have outlined the canvas of the accompanying picture in black to demonstrate the proportions and size of the artwork in relationship to the overall size of the print. The EduART logo is found at the bottom of the caption in the centre. Print quality is impressive, and at this size it makes for an imposing picture, eliciting a "whoa!" from my son when I pulled it from its folio. EduART Print Overtrees (82119X & 82119-LEPT) If you have one of these new kits but wanted to do another decal option in addition, or have an aftermarket decal sheet in mind, you'll be pleased to know that you can get just the sprues from the Eduard site, and if you want to add some detail, you can also get a set of Photo-Etch to go with it. They arrive in a white box with a sticker on the end, with all the styrene in the one bag, and the clear parts bagged inside that for their safety during transport and storage. The Overtrees as they're called can only be bought directly from Eduard, so click on the button below to pick up yours. You can also download the instruction booklet if you don't already have one from the main kit page. Kit Overtrees Photo-Etch Overtrees Review sample courtesy of
  19. Hi all! After really enjoying the Hawker Sydney group build and seeing everyone's builds come together, I thought I'd get involved here too. I've had this Airfix kit hanging around for a while. Looks a basic but good little kit. Not half as nice a the Eduard 109s, but then again, looks a lot simpler and should be a nice quick build. This is the exact aircraft I shall try to reproduce. The main reason I bought this kit is the beautiful scheme! I shall see how I get on with it... Here are the sprue shots: First up is work on getting rid of pesky ejector pins... circled in red Which has been done here: And then I got the cockpit tub together. Detail is ok in here, but nothing too special. She's going to be a quick-ish OOB build so I'll leave it as it is and have the canopy closed. I also got a few other items together: So, time for a quick dry fit. So will need a little filler at the rear wing root, but other than that it looks excellent. Liking this kit! Next stage was to undercoat all the RLM 02 areas in black. And then paint them RLM 02, shading where required. Excellent... But I've now discovered it should be RLM 66 in the cockpit areas of the Bf109E-4! Bit if a problem... I don't actually have any. What I will do is use Tamiya German Grey. I think that will close enough with the cockpit down. We'll see. Ok, more soon! Cheers, Val
  20. Photos of my latest model, a Bf 109G-6 with markings for Erich Hartmann´s aircraft. I used Hasegawa´s painting instructions instead of the kit supplied ones, and a real life photo to prove this aircraft didn´t have the fuel tank, its rack, and the two underwing cannons Hobby Boss tells you to use. Here´s the work in progress thread:
  21. Armory Models Group is to releae soon tiny Bf.109E kits - ref. 14303 - Messerschmitt Bf.109E-3/E-4 "WWII in the beginning" Source: https://www.facebook.com/armorymodelsgroup/photos/a.1641077372783334.1073741850.1402311443326596/2402864286604635/?type=3&theater - ref. 14304 - Messerschmitt Bf.109E-3/E-4 "Battle of Britain aces" Source: https://www.facebook.com/armorymodelsgroup/photos/a.1641077372783334.1073741850.1402311443326596/2402864559937941/?type=3&theater V.P.
  22. Eduard 1/48 Messerschmitt Bf109G-4/Trop. This is one of the options in the Bf109G-4 Profipack edition, which comes with mask and cockpit etch. This kit was a nice one to build with no major fit problems. The etch on the tropical filter was a bit tricky to fit but that's about it! That was only because you had to bend it in a curve to fit, the rest of the etch was easy to use. It's nicely detailed and I even tried a bit of pre-shading on the top but I've tried to keep it subtle. It's painted with Vallejo Model Air and while it won't win any competitions, I'm quite happy with the finished model. If you build in 1/48 and you like Bf109's, you really should build some Eduard kits! thanks Mike
  23. 1/48 Avia S-199 (post war Bf 109) is planed for next two or three years. source: http://modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95280&start=4005#p1897662 downscale to 1/72 is planed too (like all Eduard projects) but more years in future.
  24. It was nice to finally open again Revell Germany´s rectangular blue box. I had built this model twice in the past, both times I ended up with a mess instead of a plastic model (the second time I ended with melted plastic because I used too much glue on my weight in the nose), but this time I got a fully assembled aircraft without much trouble. Time has not been kind to the model, the moulds are worn, resulting in a lot of flash, particularly in the lower nose assembly. Instructions forget to mention to open holes for the lower antennae and the circular one over the fuselage. I was able to open the hole for the circular one, but the lower one won´t be present on this model. Tomorrow I´ll try to begin and finish painting it, so I can decal it the next day.
  25. Bf.109G-14 ProfiPACK (82118) 1:48 Eduard The G variant of the 109, colloquially known as the Gustav was one of the primary fighters available to the Luftwaffe during the closing years of WWII, and saw extensive active service, all the while being upgraded to combat the increasing Allied superiority in the air. Happily for the Allies, the supply of experienced pilots was fast running out, so as good as the upgrades were, they couldn't make an appreciable difference to the outcome. The G-14 was brought into service at a crucial time for the Axis forces, as the Allies pushed inland from the beachhead at Normandy, and it had an improved water injection system that gave the engine extra performance, plus the new clear-vision Erla-Haube canopy as standard. It was also an attempt to standardise the design to ease the job of construction, which had become decentralised due to the ferocity of the bombardment of the industrial areas by the Allied bombers at that stage of the war. As a result, few sub-variants were made of the G-14 even though over 5,000 were built, with command fighters and high-altitude variants the main exceptions, but the U4 had a high powered 30mm MK108 cannon fitted through the engine and firing through the centre of the prop. The Kit The 109G has been fairly comprehensively retooled by Eduard from their original, and while this is a new variant some of the sprues date back to the re-tool after issues with the original kit were found. The five-digit product code is a clue to this do-over. The ProfiPACK offers additional decal options as well as other upgrades to the basic kit, and alongside the four sprues of grey styrene you will find one of clear, a sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted Photo-Etch (PE), a sheet of pre-cut yellow kabuki tape masks, two decal sheets and the usual Eduard colour instruction booklet printed on glossy paper. There are a lot of these new Gs out there amongst everyone's stashes by now, so most of us are familiar with the fine surface detail and dainty riveting on the outer skin, and the level of detail that has been crammed into this excellent tooling. There are also tons of aftermarket parts available from Eduard for those that want to add even more detail to their models, from engine, cockpits, to wheels, bronze gear legs and flying surfaces. The world really is your oyster when it comes to how much you want to throw at your build, but for many the included PE will be more than adequate. It's all up to you! Predictably the build starts with the cockpit, which has a number of PE controls added to the floor, and a full set of PE instruments that are ready to add to the painted cockpit, as well as the fuel line part that is supplied on the clear sprue because it has a glass section as it runs through the cockpit to allow the pilot easy access for checking if there's fuel getting to the engine. A choice of humps between the pilots knees cater for the cannon fitted U4 sub-variants, and a full set of painted crew belts are supplied on the PE fret, plus rudder pedals for good measure. More PE is attached to the cockpit sidewalls, and with all that glued and painted you can close up the fuselage around it, not forgetting the retractable tail wheel used in one of the decal options, with a spinner back-plate fitted to the front of the fuselage, and the exhaust stubs with their slide-moulded hollow tips inserted from inside into their slots. The nose cannon insert, supercharger intake and cannon bulges in front of the windscreen fit into their respective areas, and a set of flame deflectors made from PE are added over the exhaust stacks to prevent blinding the pilot in low light flying. The G-14 had a couple of options for the tail fin, with the increased use of non-strategic wood, so the fin base is moulded to the fuselage, while the tip is one of two separate choices, with a straight rudder hinge, or the more familiar cranked hinge-line. The fixed tail wheel for four of the decal options is fitted to a recess under the tail at this point too. The wings are full span underneath, and depending on your decal choice you may need to open up some holes for a centre-line rack and on the port wing for the forward-raked antenna carried by most decal options. The wheel bay sides are modular and mate with the inner surface of the upper wings to give an excellent level of detail once finished. A small pair of rectangular panel lines are scribed into the fuselage just in front of the windscreen using a PE template that is provided on the sheet, and a pair of teardrop masks are supplied for the wingtip lights, which are moulded into the wing, but can easily be replaced by cutting out the area and fitting some clear acrylic sheet of a suitable thickness, then sanding it to shape and polishing it back to clarity. A depression depicting the bulb can be drilled in the clear part before gluing to further enhance the look if you feel minded. Separate leading-edge slats, ailerons and flaps are supplied, with the latter fitting around the radiator bays under the wing, which have PE grilles front and rear. A scrap diagram shows the correct orientation of the parts to ensure that both layers align correctly as per the real thing. The narrow-track landing gear consists of a single strut with moulded-in oleo scissor, a captive cover that glues against it, and the two-part tyre with separate hubs on each side. A choice of radial or smooth tread is offered with no decal options suggested for each, so check your references, or just make a random choice. The legs fit to scokets in the wheel bays, and horn balances are fitted to the ailerons, the antennae under the wing are added, and a small PE access panel is glued under the fuselage behind the wing trailing edge. Before fitting the canopy, the clear gunsight must be partially painted and fitted to the top of the instrument panel, and a pair of PE grab handles are attached to the inside of the windscreen, which should be partially painted RLM66 inside or outside before the exterior colours. The canopy opener also has PE parts added plus the pilot's head armour and an aerial on the rear, with a PE retaining wire included for posing the canopy open. A manual starter handle is also present in case you wanted to show your G-14 in a more candid pose on the ground. The prop is a single part and is sandwiched by the back plate and spinner before being inserted into the hole in the front of the fuselage. Two styles of additional fuel tank are supplied, one with a flat bottom edge for ground clearance, and the other with a smoother exterior. These fit on a rack that sits on the centreline for two of the markings options, a rudder trim actuator is fitted to three of the options, and a small twig antennae is fitted to all options with a tiny circular base, both of which are made of PE. Markings Decals are printed in Czechia and have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. The main markings are carried on the larger sheet, while the stencils are on the smaller one. Stencils are drawn on a separate page of the instructions to reduce repetition and clutter, and each marking option has a page all to itself to cut down on confusion and give the modeller good sized diagrams to follow. From the box you can build one of these five options: Bf 109G-14/U4, flown by Hptm. E. Hartmann, 4./ JG 52, Csór, Hungary, October 1944 Bf 109G-14/U4, W. Nr. 512382, flown by Lt. H. Schlick, 4./ JG 77, Schönwalde, Germany, November 1944 Bf 109G-14, W. Nr. 464380, flown by Magg. M. Bellagambi, CO of 5 Squadriglia, o2 Gruppo Caccia, Aeronautica Nazionale Repubblicana, Osoppo, Italy, March 1945 Bf109G-14, flown by Oblt. R. Schlegel, CO of 10./ JG 4, Jüterbog – Damm, Germany, March 1945 Bf 109G-14, W. Nr. 464534, EJG 2, Pilsen, Czechoslovakia, May 1945 The masks (not pictured) cover the armoured glass in the pilot's head armour, the wheel hubs and of course the canopy, with the curved part having frame-hugging masks that need filling in the compound curved areas with scrap tape or liquid mask. These are a great time-saver and the fit of them is usually spot-on. Conclusion These are superb kits from Eduard, and they are priced well, considering the detail and markings options included. They don't bother with novelties such as magnets to hold cowlings in place, but if you should perchance want to show off your engine, you can get a superbly detailed resin one separately and those that don't want to show off their engines don't have to pay for parts they aren't going to use. The G is my personal favourite, so I'm more than happy to see another one from Eduard. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
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