Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'md-11'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modeling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
  • General Discussion
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
  • Archive

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 9 results

  1. McDonnell Douglas MD-11, Finnair 'Moomins'. 1:144 MikroMir The MD-11 was a development of the DC-10 with a a 5.6 metre fuselage stretch, redesigned wing & tail, a glass cockpit, and the use of composites in construction, and new fuel efficient engines. The MikroMir kit was developed in partnership with Eastern Express and Reviewed here. in 2017. With so many other projects on the go it has taken me until now to start and complete it. It is a kit that needs 'building' rather than just assembling. It is limited run and requires a little more effort than say a Revell or Zvezda airliner, but is an awful lot simpler than a vac-form. It makes into a large and impressive model, I have built it straight from the box using the supplied decals, which were very impressive and went on beautifully. I rather like the 'Moomin' scheme as my daughter was very keen on them when she was little, and it is very unusual. A few pointers on the construction of the kit. A full cockpit is provided, I enhanced it with some 'N' gauge railway figures painted as aircrew: The engines have a separate intake ring with a moulded ridge on the rear face to locate into a slot on the inner face of the cowling halves, but the fit was excessively tight. I cut the ridge off the intake rings and got a much easier fit. But this left an empty slot inside the cowlings, which I filled with Milliput and sanded down. Much easier to illustrate than to explain! The nose leg is quite a complex and detailed structure that has to be fitted before the fuselage haves are joined. The inevitable happened and knocked mine off. Worse the happened as I tried to drill and pin it. The main leg further broke into 3 pieces, rendering it useless. I decided to make a new leg from brass wire, soldering a simple 'T' piece, and then cyano'ing the plastic detail parts to it. I then fitted a plastic tube inside the nose bay, into which it fitted. The 'belly plate' that goes on the fuselage underside to cover the wing join sat too low. By shimming it at each end with plasticard it sat flush with the rest of the fuselage. The whole plate needed milliput filler all around to blend it in. I also drilled the main gear legs to accept brass wire axles for the wheels, to make a stronger join. Here they are just dry fitted to check. The rear section of the fuselage is separate and MikroMir say to assemble the main and rear parts independently, and then join them. I prefer not to do this, and actually made 2 traditional fuselage halves by joining each side into 1, ensuring that I got as flush a fit as possible on the exterior join. Although I took pictures, I can't find them now! This is what the basic assembly looks like, awiting primer. Vinyl masks are supplied fro the glazing, and worked well, However I later discovered that I needed a silver surround for it, but none is supplied on the decal sheet. I thus had to make new masks, by laying Kabuki tape over the 'holes' in the vinyl sheet where I had removed the original masks, and cut around them. Looking on Airliners.net, the surround is often a weathered pale grey colour, so I sprayed mine in a silver/light grey mix. The blue crescent on the tail has a 'fade' to it that is not represented on the decal sheet, which has it as a solid colour. It is also narrower at the front, and widens out slightly to the rear, while the decal is a constant width. Instead I masked and sprayed mine, and was much happier with the result. Also the silver areas behind the tailplane rubbing plates are not provided. I rubbed a strip of Kabuki tape over them and drew on it following the panel lines. Removal and cutting out gave me a template which I used to cut them out from silver decal sheet. It was not a quick build, but I am very happy with the result as the model has a real 'presence'. It is a large and attractive aircraft, now I just need to build a DC-10 to go alongside it for comparison. Thanks for looking John
  2. This is the Authentic Airliners 1/144 scale MD-11. Anyone who has built an AA model can testify that this is not an average model, nor do they take a routine process to finish. The solid resin casts present unique issues that are challenging in their own right, but with patience and persistence return great reward. This is my first AA build. I’ve wanted to build an MD-11, in particular the AA kit, and thoroughly enjoyed learning a “new” process that took me outside of the usual “box” of model airliner building. I decided before beginning that I would finish her in the early Delta Air Lines “widget” livery, choosing in particular N801DE. This MD-11 began her life with Delta in 1992, outfitted with a cheat line stripe on her #2 tail mounted engine, which stood out as “different” than her sisters in the fleet. I am not aware of any subsequent MD-11s at Delta that carried that cheat line. She led a distinguished life at Delta, flying from Atlanta to Osaka, Brussels, London, Frankfurt, among many others, as well as some domestic routes. At some point, she was painted in the newer Delta “stripe” scheme before she was retired and stored for a while at Montreal. She began flying again for World Airways, Ethiopian Airlines, then again for World, and finally ending up at UPS, where she was outfitted in 2008 as an MD-11F. She STILL flies today as a freighter! In fact, as I write this biography, she is actually (in real time) flying as N294UP (under UPS livery) from Dallas-Ft. Worth to Ontario, California! She's painted with Tamiya TS-26 white, Alclad Chrome and Duraluminum, household enamel that was blended especially for the wings and fuselage fairings. I used 26 laser printed decals for the livery and some of the details, Authentic Airliners 3D windows and details, some Nazca decal details, and .06mm red model train lenses for position and navigation lights. Hope you enjoy the pictures! There is detailed post in WIP of the building process of the model…you can access it here:
  3. Finally took the plunge last fall and spent a small fortune on a 1/144 scale Authentic Airliners MD-11, and I am so glad I did...worth every penny! I began the build soon after arrival, and wanted to bring everyone in on the process. This entire build is being chronicled carefully, as I will eventually write a detailed booklet as to "how I built this." So jump in, and here we go..... Upon opening the box, the kit is carefully packed and separated for easy inventory. Though my kit was packed well, it still had a couple of minor "rashes" that required some small repair, but nothing that was a show stopper. I did contact Kurt at AA with the complaints, and he promptly answered with an offer to replace anything that was defective or not to my satisfaction. Much appreciated, and a true demonstration of the quality that the kit represents. The fuselage is one cast piece, and very heavy, with enough nose weight not to cause worry when it sits on the metal main landing gear. The wings and horizontal stabilizer are also one piece, with acute details that are precisely cast. There are a few small parts, such as flap hinge fairings, the hot and fan sections of the engines, all landing gear struts and actuators, and two small clear nav lights for the wings. Not to worry...they ARE different sizes to match the mismatched cuts in each wing. I did not use these, but rather fashioned my own nav light lenses. There are large flashings on the tail piece and the hot and fan sections that need trimming with a sharp cutting tool. Wear a mask when cutting or trimming or sanding! The dust from the resin can be most irritating. She's being finished in the "widget" livery, as one of the earliest MD-11 deliveries to Delta Air Lines. I'm using Tamiya gray surface primer, Tamiya TS-26 white paint, Alclad black primer, Duraluminum and Chrome finishes, 26 Decals, and Authentic Airliners MD-11 detail, 3D windows, raised detail sheets, and high shine metallic decals. At the completion, she'll be posted in the Ready For Inspection forum, with a detailed history of the real airplane. Hope you enjoy..... I began with the trimming and securing of the tail piece. Really a good fit together, after drilling a small trench to hold the epoxy. Then came putty and sanding to make it all flush..... Next the engine work... During the process of working with the hot sections, one of the small tabs broke off, so I had to fashion a new one. Small and tedious work... Once painted and assembled, I did NOT like the result, so I stripped the engines down, and started over.... And the engines finished.... And assembling the tail.... The winglets, wings, and horizontal stabilizers.... Small parts and gear... Fuselage work... Had to paint the nose because I knew for certain that the decal provided would not fit easily without cutting and coaxing, and would probably end up wrinkled anyway.... This weekend I've spent applying decals. I think she looks pretty good with her "clothes" on.... I'll post more soon...she coming along nicely. All that's left at this point is to attach the wings, horizontal stabilizers, gear, engines, then the photo etched parts. I can see the finish line!
  4. After a break from Sci-Fi and prehistoric builds, I have returned to my preferred subject of Civil Aircraft and have 3 kits in 1/144 scale almost off the end of a 3 month production line in my workshop. All 3 kits are in the final stages of decals, paint and build here. Kits used - Revell Dreamliner 787-8 for the BA livery kit Zvezda Dreamliner 787-9 for the Virgin livery kit Eastern Express MD-11 in American Airliners livery An array of decals have been used from Draw Decals, F-Decal, Nazca and good old 26Decals. The Eastern Express MD-11 kit was a bitch - different width fuselages, poor fitting wing roots, rear bulkhead a different width the forward fuselage - the list is endless. Any - I like how it is turning out despite the many hours of filling Despite quite a bit of research on the correct shade of grey to use on the Virgin 787-9, I followed the advice of one of my friends who is a Virgin engineer at LHR who kindly gave me some touch up fuselage paint - unfortunately despite the colour being 100% correct - it seems that difference between 1/1 scale and 1/144 scales don't work as I am sure the real things that fly past my front door in Iver everyday loo quite a bit lighter in shade - perhaps a trick of the light …. Bye - John
  5. Most of the airliner modellers were thrilled when Mikro-Mir in co-operation with Eastern Express anounced the first injection moulded MD-11 kit in 1/144. First pictures of the sprues looked very promising with great attention to detail and accuracy. I was also looking forward to this release and initially ordered 3 kits with the General electric Engines and placed another order for 3 kits with the Pratt & Whitney engines at my local hobby shop. When I received the call from the hobby-shop that the first batch arrived I was excited...till I saw the price tag Well,I bought them anyway,because the MD-11 is one of my favourite airliners and I started with the first one immediately. I planned to build the first one OOB and also using the kits decals to see how they work,so I could give some feed-back at the model shop for other builders who might be interested in this kit. All the parts looked good at first glance,but I realized that the parts had no locator pins at all.Which is not a big deal but I was surprised. Soon after construction commenced I had to realize that this would not be going to be an easy build as,as good as the parts may look,the fit is not the best and on almost every part filler was needed or some correction work had to be done. The most serious fitting issue is at the wing to fuselage join,were at the top side a quite large gap appears between the wing and fuselage... The construction of this section is actually quite smart by the manufacturer,as they provide a inspar panel (I guess its called that way...?) that will provide a good sit and places the wings at the right angle.But mounting the wings isn't as easy as I thought. I filled the gap with Krystal Klear and painted this section in the respective colours,as I built and painted the parts individually. Another "trap" is the front gear which needs to be installed before glueing the fuselage halves together.That way,as careful as one may be,snipping off the gear leg while handling the model is almost inevitable. I chose to cut off the lower part and put it back on after main assembly was done. I drilled a small hole at both sections and reinforced the leg with a thin wire,then glued the parts back on. After all construction and paintwork was done,it was time for the decals. The decal set looks really impressive and immensely improved compared to earlier Eastern Express sets. It has lots of details and even includes coroguard panels for the wings. The quality of the decals is really superb,but...and thats a real pain...the decals tend to settle almost immediately on the model after sliding them off the backing paper.Decal solutions are not much help,only lots of water can help you placing the decal in the right position. Once the water has been soaked off the decal sticks on the surface. Another issue are the dark blue stripes on the KLM set.They are printed with the front ends looking up.If applied as they are, the stripe will go up to the cockpit window instead of running in a straight line around the nose. I was lucky to have 2 sets, so I cut off the bent part (approx.3cm) and used a straight part to put it around the nose and then cut off the missing stripe from my other set to extend it again to the tail cone. The fit of the decals is otherwise fine and the details and the silver parts are great. For the front edge of the tail fin and the edges of the winglets,I used thin silver decal stripes instead of painting them. The build of this kit is really time,and nerve,consuming but in the end a very nice MD-11 will appear in front of you. But for being a CAD manufactured and very new kit together with the way too high price tag ,its a bit of a disappointment. Bad fit of the parts,and also the arrangement of the parts on the sprues is not very logic.Together with inept construction sheets,one needs to be very careful while building.A few times I used the wrong parts and had to correct the error later by either replacing the whole part with spares form my sparepart box or leave it as is. Those things wont happen on my other 2 kits,thats for sure. I chose to build the MD-11 of KLM who did the final passenger flights and the farewell flights in 2014; PH-KCD "Florence Nightingale. Painted entirely with Revell and Testors enamels using my airbrush. As mentioned before,this kit unfortunately isn't up to the standard in the likes of Zvezda or Revell airliner kits and its also over priced. For this money you may be better off with Kurts (Authentic Airliners) resin kit. Anyway,here she finally is...the Mikro-Mir/Eastern Express MD-11 Cheers,
  6. A journey of one thousand miles begins with a single step... I began modelling airliners back in 2006, and ever since have wanted to build one of my favorite designs: the MD-11. I have seen the Welsh kit, but didn't want to deal with vacuform. I have seen the authentic airliners kit, but didn't want to deal with resin. I have seen the DC-10 conversions, but didn't want to deal with essentially scratch-building the whole model. Today, though, today I received this: You're probably familiar with the kit by now... This is the Eastern Express/MikroMir MD-11 in the "American Airlines" packaging. Feel free to ignore the Atlantis sticker covering the original MikroMir logo. This packaging includes decals and masks for the Varig MD-11 shown on the box art, as well as a TAM and a World Cargo option. I am planning to build the Varig MD-11, though that will depend heavily on the quality of the kit decals. Anyway, on to the build... The fuselage comes in five main pieces with panel lines and no windows: perfect for my style of airliner modelling! The parts had a lot of flash and excess plastic along the edges, and the main components were lacking in locating pins. While locating pins almost always fail to properly align fuselage halves, they do help to at least start the process and hold various pieces in place. On the other hand, I have done enough type conversions before to be comfortable with cutting and re-gluing fuselage components. My preferred method involves applying strips of styrene behind the joint for reinforcement and alignment, and it seemed that same process would work well on this build. A feature on this build is the availability of a flight deck... I love flight decks! They always provide a convenient place to mount my weights: At issue next was the nose wheel bay. The kit instructions call for installing the nose wheel strut prior to closing the fuselage... No, thank you. Instead I decided, after studying the drawings, that I MIGHT be able to get away with simply cutting a notch in the wheel bay and installing the struts later. I don't actually know if this is going to work, but it has worked before and I see no reason why it shouldn't work here. I will let you know once I try it, of course. Also worth noting is that the locating holes for the horizontal stabilizers are covered over... I opened these up prior to closing the fuselage. From here, then, a final dry-fit before taking the plunge and closing the fuselage... One can see that the roof already has very good alignment, so I did not expect any particular difficulties. Having said that, though, I was not surprised to see this misalignment pop up where four of the fuselage parts meet... There are a number of curves on the fuselage that exert force on this particular area of the model, so extra care will be required to get the pieces properly aligned. In my case, I applied solvent glue and then pushed one side, pulled the other side, and squeezed both sides. The resulting joint was, I think, good enough. The bottom of that same area, though, is a tragedy! On the other hand, this area of the fuselage tends to present a problem, for me at least, on most of the airliners I build. The solution is a simple matter of applying elbow grease and reshaping these curves... No worries. Also worth noting is that the cockpit glass is every-so-slightly smaller than the opening in the fuselage, and so pressing the clear plastic down into the slot results in a step along the roof line. Instead, I glued the cockpit part in at its front, aligning it with the nose, and then glued the part at its roof line. This process, I believe, properly aligns the piece along the roof but leaves a small gap at its base. Again, no worries. Filling the base will be significantly easier than reshaping the roof line. And this is where she sits so far! I've heard a lot of moaning and groaning about the quality of this kit, but I am excited to hit it with full-steam. None of the issues I have encountered to this point are particularly unreasonable, in my opinion, and none of the issues that I see coming have concerned me yet. What problems have I not foreseen, though? I guess we'll find out! In the meantime, I have, for the first time in 11 years, an MD-11 fuselage sitting on my table... and we're just getting to the good part! I will work next on the wings and stabilizers, and then will progress to the engines... Until then, comments are welcomed... Thanks for looking!
  7. This particular Hasegawa kit was bought by me as a youngster back in 1995 when I started on building it right away. During these days I still handpainted my models.Sometimes more,sometimes less successful. This kit belonged to the latter,so I stopped working on it and put it back to its box where it stayed ever since. As I really like the MD-11 and these Hasegawa kits became rarer with time,I never managed to bin it.I kept looking on the pre-painted parts and thought of a way to clean them a re-start the whole build. So,earlier this year I took it out of the shelf of doom and gave it a go. First most of the paint was carefully sanded away with a 2000grid sand paper,then all parts where washed with soap and cleaned as good as possible with a sponge. Before reassembly and the first coat of primer was applied,I rescribed the panellines and flaps on the fuselage and wings. When everything looked as desired,the new paint was put on by using Tamyia rattlecans.(Light blue and pure white).Wings were repainted with Revell enamels using my airbrush. The kits decals had yellowed over time,so I decided to buy a new set from draw decal.This also provided all the windows which were an improvement over the kits decals. After everything was put back together and all decals were on,two coats of Testors metallic sealer where sprayed on to give it its final finish. 21 years after its initial start,the MD-11 is finally done and improved. Korean Air's MD-11s didn't last long in passenger service.After roughly 4 years,all 5 aircraft where withdrawn from regular service and converted to freighters. Cheers,
  8. Hello Everyone I was trawling the web and came across this 1/144 resin MD-11. http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/Rev3/2301-2400/rev2383-Airliner-Vieira/00.shtm Has anyone else built this before? What does everyone think of it? Thanks Bradley
×
×
  • Create New...