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Found 12 results

  1. Hello, Building my BOAC 707 I noticed that the BOAC decals for the engine pylons didn't fit wery well. I had to cut the white away from the Engines and use the supplied trimfilm on the decal sheet to fix the gaps on top of the pylons. Now I wonder if I have to expect the same thing with the long four-parts BOAC dark blue fuselage decals as well? What can be done to avoid any problems during decalling? Build thread at IPMS Stockholm... https://www.ipmsstockholm.se/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=10504&start=50 Cheers / André
  2. A long time ago on a modelling forum far, far away I started a project I am determined to finish and due to me having trouble posting pictures on said forum I decided to bring this project across to where all my other crazy ideas (they just might work!) are. so to begin the 747-600 if built would have been the longest 747 ever at 279 feet long with a wingspan of 250 feet. This means stretching the fuselage by 100mm with a 40/22/38mm split and the wings by 48mm each. As you can see I have elected to keep the stretch to a minimum by removing as little as possible from the SUD and upper section while still achieving the same stretch as the first time below hopefully I will start assembling the two sides of the fuselage and get some pics with my standard 747-400 for reference. A long time ago I decided to build a 747-700 as well but I must admit (defeat) that I have come to my senses as that is not going to happen (unfortunately). But i am now building a (poss. Thai Air) 747-8i and a Cargolux 747-8F to go with my old school Thai Air 747-400 and Gulf Air 747-600.
  3. One of the great things about Britmodeller is learning from and being inspired by other modellers’ work. Some time ago @Turbofan posted a wonderful BOAC Super VC-10 in RFI and that was the push I needed to do one of my own, despite knowing I could never match Ian’s standards! My model was actually completed several months ago but I didn’t post it at the time because I wasn’t happy with some aspects, particularly the finishing. Unlike Ian who sensibly painted his cheatlines and fin, I used Two Six Decals. The cheatlines proved to be thick and intransigent and the less said about the fin decals the better. In fairness to Ray these problems are not typical. It was an old sheet which had been in my stash for some time and I see he is now using BOA for his printing so hopefully more recent issues will be better. I was also unhappy with the over-scale pitots and some of the other smaller details so I didn’t really feel the model was up to RFI standards. In the early summer my wife decided we were going to redecorate our shared office-cum-hobbies-room which meant a massive (and much-needed) clear-out during which I found the remains of an old Two Six Models photo-etch fret intended for the Airfix VC10. There were a couple of pitots and some other small parts left. That prompted me to revisit G-ASGD and after a bit of smartening up here she finally is. The kit is, of course, by Roden. As I’ve mentioned, decals are by Two Six. I supplemented them with Authentic Airliners BAC1-11 cabin windows, another idea pinched from Turbofan, and BM member @Malair provided the excellent windscreen decal - thanks Martijn! Although finishing was a bit of an issue, building the kit itself was easy and straightforward. I have a second one laid aside for conversion to a Standard, again borrowing ideas from other Britmodellers. No timescale for that just now but hopefully it will appear in the next couple of years. Thanks for looking and as always constructive criticism is welcome. Dave G
  4. A month of hard work and 'Foxtrot Oscar' is ready. OOB Airfix build with Authentic Airliners decals. The usual old Airfix woes, but a satisfying result after all.
  5. Well I finally finished her... I have to say a big thank you to BM member sailorboy61 for kindly sending me a replacement BOAC decal after I managed to rip off the original removing some masking tape! Cheers Iain
  6. Roden have released two gorgeous kits of the Vickers Super VC10 in 1/144 scale. This iconic aircraft is available in two different versions, with either the distinctive BOAC livery or East African livery.
  7. Gentlemen & Fellow Modellers, I am pleased to announce that the Roden Bristol Britannia in Monarch Airlines livery has now been released. for illustrations of this super model please go to http://www.frogmodelaircraft.co.uk/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=305 I can also confirm that the VC10 will be released before Christmas. The first version will have decals for a East African & BOAC aircraft with a Tanker version to follow. Roden do listen to the modeller and I can assure you all that some very exciting releases are in the pipe line, please keep your suggestions coming and I will pass them on. Please also visit the Frog site at www.frogmodelaircraft.co.uk for other news including a new shop. The Frog Forum always needs new members so please consider joining. I hope by now some you you will have built the Roden Britannia and I as well as Roden would be pleased to have your comments. Thank You and happy Modelling, Martin
  8. New Airfix 707-436 in BOAC colours. Nice build excpet a lot of trimming needed of excess plastic. Also a word of warning- DO NOT use old spray varnish if it starts coming out like syrup! it makes a mess had to redo the white cos of it.
  9. Bristol 175 Britannia Roden 1:144 The Bristol Type 175 project, the initial programme name which eventually matured into the famous Bristol Britannia, came about from two different post-war requirements: first, an earlier design specification from the Brabazon Committee, which embodied lessons learned from the Brabazon project; second, an urgent need from BOAC in 1946 for a Medium Range Empire (MRE) passenger transport aircraft. BOAC had been looking at purchasing the new and very efficient Lockheed Constellation however, in the austere immediate post-war period, the government refused such large expenditure on foreign purchases. The Bristol Aeroplane Company, based at Filton, was one of four aircraft building companies that tendered eight designs for this prospective order. None were initially accepted on their original design specifications but the nearest design that looked as if it could possibly match expectations was the Bristol Type 175 design To follow this up, further meetings took place with working groups established from October 1947 onwards between BOAC and the Bristol company; their remit to settle on size, weight, capacity and range etc., before the final specification could be agreed and certified. Three prototypes were initially ordered by the Ministry of Supply (MoS) in July 1948; all were to be Centaurus powered however, the second and third prototypes would be built so that they could easily be converted to the, fairly new and unproven at that time, Proteus units. BOAC, who were expected to order at least 25 production aircraft, kept holding off the contract signing, presumable to await results of the first prototype flights but also starting to look at a Proteus powered version over the Centaurus. As such the working groups restarted design meetings to ascertain optimum parameters for a larger and more versatile aircraft based around the Proteus power plant. The contracts, to order 25 of the new designs was finally signed in July 1949 and comprised the following specifications: Wing span of 140ft, Wing area of 2,055ibs, an all-up-weight of 119,000lbs with Proteus (118,000 if Centaurus fitted); and with accommodation for 42, 50 or 64 day passengers, or 38 sleeping berths. After completion of the test flights programme of the prototypes, which lasted from 1952 to 1955, the first production aircraft of two Bristol Type 175-101 Britannia's; codes G-ANBC & G-ANBD were formally handed over to BOAC on 30 December 1955. The Kit Starting with the box art, with a view of Britannia G-ANBE in full BOAC livery high over the clouds in 1964, is quite an evocative scene and could be inspiring enough to ensure sales without even opening the box! The box itself is of very sturdy top and bottom style packaging. On opening up the box we are presented with nine sprue's of medium grey plastic, one sprue of clear parts, two sheets of decals (BOAC), an 8-page instruction booklet and finally a single card colour markings and decal placement sheet. The grey sprue's are slightly grainy to the touch, which I imagine will be good the adhesion of primers and paints to take hold. Looking at the sprue runners, these give an impression of being short-run moulds; something to consider as these kits might not be available long term. The first sprue holds the two fuselage halves, in vertical sided-fitting format, plus the nose gear strut and holding plate. The fuselage has window openings to take the clear windows, but a point to note here is that the cockpit area is not fully open, it is blanked off horizontally where the clear canopy would sit. This means that one either paints that area a dark colour and then fits the canopy; or the area has to be opened up with a knife/saw and an 'office' scratchbuilt to fit inside. Personally I am going to open it up and detail the area with mine, although there probably not be much to see when assembled and painted. The kit fuselage length is 10.35 inches (262.5mm) which is 124 feet in 1:144 scale and that equates to the longer bodied 200 and 300 series aircraft. As can be seen on these images, the panel lines are recessed and very nicely defined. On the other sides, there are tiny locating pins for correct alignment but care needs to be taken as they are so small they may miss the location. Having said that, I have just done a dry-fit of of the fuselage and it went together really well and fit is nice and tight. The wing undersides are equally as well produced however, the wheel well/bay is a fairly nondescript affair. There are two sets of identical sprue's for the tailplane and mainwheel assemblies. Each tailplane has a top and bottom element requiring glueing together. Four sprue's make up the cowling and prop assemblies, plus main wheels. There is an element of flash on the props but I found these to be quite easy to remove by filing with a light-grade sanding stick. The clear sprue has the main canopy plus various pieces for the cabin windows. Having checked the instruction sheets, the sets of linear windows are for the main fuselage body area and the individual pieces are for the fore and aft sections; the reasons for single units due to the curving of the fuselage in those areas. INSTRUCTIONS AND COLOUR DETAILS An 8-page A5 sized booklet of illustrated assembly details comes with the kit; the first illustration comprising of a parts breakdown shown on their associated sprues. The is following by illustrated exploded views of each area of assembly, with part number identified matching placements on the sprues A single sheet is also supplied, with colour details for the BOAC livery and the decal placements DECALS A set of decals for a full liveried BOAC aircraft, coded G-ANBE are supplied on two sheets; however, I have learned whilst producing this review that this kit is the long bodied, 124ft long 200 or 300 series, whereas G-ANBE was the shorter 114ft long 102 series aircraft. Normally that wouldn't be a problem as we could perhaps move the letters around to a matching set for a 312; unfortunately here though, the code is also embedded in the tail pieces and as such the whole tail decal would need to be re-done. I understand that Pocketbond, the supplier of this kit for review, has contacted Roden about the problem and (at the time of writing this) is waiting on a response as to whether there is a possibility of a reprint or reissue. Please see post #5 of this thread for details of the corrected decals, plus a revised picture. CONCLUSION The possibility of these sprue's only being from short-run moulds would perhaps suggest getting these kits when and where you see them available, as the moulds might not sustain large volume production as with some of the major producers. Notwithstanding the decal element, this looks to be a very nice and accurate model of a Bristol Type 175 200 or 300 series Britannia aircraft. On further research I also understand that Royal Air Force versions of the Bristol Type 175 were 200 series, namely 252 and 253 series. A very nice kit which I like very much, and will certainly get at least one more to build in a different livery. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  10. De Havilland Comet 1A G-ANAV – BOAC South African Airways Charter – 1953 FRsin (injected plastic) kit. A fairly rough kit but it turned out OK. The decals were excellent. Undercarriage was replaced because the kit items were too small. Finish is Halfords Appliance White on top with Halfords Nissan Silver below, coated with Rub N Buff, polished and sealed with Klear. Commission build for a Comet enthusiast.
  11. Hello Everyone I have the Minicraft Boeing 707-320 in the TWA boxing, im just looking at it and it appears to have rolls royce engines. i want to do a BOAC 707-320 Cargo plane, but im not sure if ot has the right tngines, i need JT4's, but they look more like rollers. Thank Bradley
  12. Hello Everyone i just got an Airfix 747, the series 8 British Airways adition. id lke to do a Highland Express Airways 747 using the kit, but im not sure if it has the correct engines, so can some onetell me does the Airfix 747 have the correct engines for this airliner? http://www.planespotters.net/Aviation_Photos/photo.show?id=169415 Also i have the old Revell 747sca, it doesnt have a shuttle or any shuttle parts, so im going to do it as a boeing 747-100, so does this one have the right engines for the BOAC Airliners? Any one know? Thanks Bradley
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