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Found 16 results

  1. Recently I had a bit of a splurge on 1/32 kits; one of them being the Special Hobby Yak-3, partly because I like the aircraft and partly because Hannants are currently knocking out the 'low-tech' version of the kit for £24. The earlier 'Normandy-Nieman' boxing included some resin parts, this one doesn't: Here are the instructions, in colour: One of the transfer sheets: ... and the second: ... and the sprues: ... and the clear sprue with optional open or closed canopy: As I had got such a bargain I immediately set about making it less of a bargain by getting the CMK resin wheels, exhausts and radio set which probably brings it both in content and price back to roughly where the Hi-tech version of the kit was ... and in for a penny, in for a pound, I ordered the Eduard mask set and the HGW seat harness set: So that's where I am at present, I'll sort out my paints next and get started... Cheers, Stew
  2. The second completion of the week, and not much bigger than the I-16, and keeping with the Soviet theme, is the Hasegawa 1/72 Yak-3. Note that the antenna wire goes through the cockpit canopy to the radio box underneath. This model and the I-16 were brush painted using AK Interactive acrylics from their WWII Soviet colour set.
  3. Special Hobby working on a new tool Yak-3. It will be their next 1/32 kit after the Tempest.
  4. Hello and thanks for your interest. Here's my 1/72 Zvezda Yak-3, built with the addition of Eduard photo etch, Rob Taurus vacu canopy and Begemot decals. Represents a machine of 303rd Fighter Division, 3rd Belorussian Front, East Prussia, April 1945. Painted with Gunze/Mr.Hobby acrylics. Photographs by Wolfgang Rabel. With kind regards from Vienna, Austria Roman Schilhart
  5. Yakovlev Yak-3 "Onward to Berlin" Special Hobby 1:32 Lighter and smaller than Yak-9 but powered by the same engine, the Yak-3 was a forgiving, easy-to-handle aircraft loved by both novice and experienced pilots and ground crew as well. It was robust, easy to maintain, and a highly successful dog-fighter. It was used mostly as a tactical fighter, flying low over battlefields and engaging in dogfights below 4 km (13,000 ft). The new aircraft began to reach front line units during summer 1944. Yak-3 service tests were conducted by 91st IAP of the 2nd Air Army, commanded by Lt Colonel Kovalyov, in June–July 1944. The regiment had the task of gaining air superiority. During 431 missions, 20 Luftwaffe fighters and three Ju 87s were shot down while Soviet losses amounted to two Yak-3s shot down. A large dogfight developed on 16 June 1944, when 18 Yak-3s clashed with 24 German aircraft. Soviet Yak-3 fighters shot down 15 German aircraft for the loss of one Yak destroyed and one damaged. The following day, Luftwaffe activity over that section of the front had virtually ceased. On 17 July 1944, eight Yaks attacked a formation of 60 German aircraft, including escorting fighters. In the ensuing dogfight, the Luftwaffe lost three Junkers Ju 87s and four Bf 109Gs, for no losses to the Yaks. Consequently, the Luftwaffe issued an order to "avoid combat below five thousand metres with Yakovlev fighters lacking an oil cooler intake beneath the nose!" Luftwaffe fighters in combat with the Yak-3 tried to use surprise tactics, attacking from above. Unresolved wartime problems with the Yak-3 included the plywood surfaces coming unstuck when the aircraft pulled out of a high-speed dive. Other drawbacks of the aircraft were short range and poor engine reliability. The pneumatic system for actuating landing gear, flaps and brakes, typical for all Yakovlev fighters of the time, was problematic. Though less reliable than hydraulic or electrical alternatives, the pneumatic system was preferred owing to significant weight savings. The Model It was quite a surprise when Special Hobby announced a new 1:32 Yak 3 earlier in 2016, we reviewed it in its Hi-Tech form form here. This new boxing "Onward to Berlin" gives us all the original plastic without the Hi-tech parts, and decals three late war aircraft. All the parts are well moulded with no sign of imperfections or flash, just beautiful, yet quite restrained panel lines, rivets and other detail, where it should be. The fuselage and outer wing panels are smooth of these, as they are plywood. Whilst looking quite a simple build, there is a lot of detail included, particularly in the cockpit. The rest of the kit looks to be quite straight forward, with no hidden problems. The build itself begins with the assembly of the cockpit, strangely enough, and the fitting of the side consoles with their additional details to the tubular framework of what would constitute the side walls. The moulded rudder pedals are replaced with resin and PE, whilst the four part instrument panel, is assembled and detailed with decals for the instruments, a drop of Kleer or aqua gloss will help them stay in position and give them a glassy look. The two piece rear shelf is fitted with a radio set, the front bulkhead, with the cannon breech. All the sub-assemblies are then brought together, in addition to another section of tubular frame to build up the cockpit “tub” if you like. The fuselage halves are joined together once the resin exhaust stubs have been fitted and four piece tail wheel assembly, including resin wheel and PE scissor link, has been built up and fitted to the shelf that is attached to one half of the fuselage. The radiator chute is then fitted through the bottom of the fuselage. The tail surfaces are then assembled, each from upper and lower sections and the two piece rudder. The upper wing section is then fitted out with the fuel filler caps which unusually contain decals for what I presume fill levels, I know someone will come to my on these. The lower wing section is fitted with the radiator. The two wing sections are then glued together and the cockpit assembly glued to the centre section of the top wing, then fitted out with the seat, back rest, etc. The wing/cockpit assembly is the slid into the fuselage assembly, followed by the forward cowl deck and resin machine gun muzzles. The instrument panel is further detailed with the gunsight and its associated support rail, the coaming and cocking levers for the machine guns. This is then slide into the cockpit aperture, along with two extra side panels. Each main undercarriage is made from a main leg, resin wheel, PE details, shock strut and actuator, scissor link and two outer gear bay doors, before they are fitted to their respective five piece bays, which in turn are slid into the apertures in the lower wing section. The inner bay doors and their associated retraction actuators are then attached, along with the tail wheel bay doors and up lock fittings. The kit being finished off with the fitting of the three bladed propeller, headrest, three piece, or optional single piece, canopy, and finally the pitot probe. Decals The two decal sheets provide markings for three different aircraft, although they are all in the same camouflage. The decals are excellent as by Cartograf, and look to be in register with good density, important for the white markings and on quite thin carrier film. The markings included are for the following aircraft:- Yak-3, White 15 - 64 Guards Fighter Regiment. 4 Guards Fighter Division, 2nd Baltic Front, Autumn 1944. Yak-3, White 114 - 402 Fighter Regiment, 265 Fighter Division, 1st Belorussian Front, Spring 1945. Yak-3, White 10 - 6 Guards Fighter Division, 2nd Ukrainian Front, Spring 1945. Conclusion Another nice release from Special Hobby, and a better price point than the Hi-tech boxing for those who dont want all the resin & etch. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. My starters for this Group Build will be a pair of Hasegawa Yak-3's in 1/72. I imagine this kit has been comprehensively superceded by the newer Zvezda Yak-3 but I don't have the Zvezda kit and I do have two of these in the stash; we must all work with what we've got: It's quite basic, typical of 90's Hasegawa kits and I hope that it will fit together typically well. Here are one set of sprues: and the rest: Parts are provided for open or closed up canopies but I don't think there will be much to see inside anyway... To lively things up a bit and avoid using the kit's transfers, I will be using the Begemot set which contains markings for 68 different Yaks as I recall - I will be going for something with a white arrow on the fuselage and if possible a bloody great patriotic slogan to boot. I'll have to peruse that at my leisure and decide which I will be doing: ... and finally, I'll be using the new Colourcoats VVS colours for the later war grey fighter scheme: AMT-7 Blue for the undersides, AMT-11 and AMT-12 for the topside greys and Steel Grey for the interiors. I think I've got some Eduard Steel Soviet seatbelts somewhere, I'll have to dig around... Cheers, Stew
  7. Yakovlev Yak-3 Special Hobby 1:32 Lighter and smaller than Yak-9 but powered by the same engine, the Yak-3 was a forgiving, easy-to-handle aircraft loved by both novice and experienced pilots and ground crew as well. It was robust, easy to maintain, and a highly successful dog-fighter. It was used mostly as a tactical fighter, flying low over battlefields and engaging in dogfights below 4 km (13,000 ft). The new aircraft began to reach front line units during summer 1944. Yak-3 service tests were conducted by 91st IAP of the 2nd Air Army, commanded by Lt Colonel Kovalyov, in June–July 1944. The regiment had the task of gaining air superiority. During 431 missions, 20 Luftwaffe fighters and three Ju 87s were shot down while Soviet losses amounted to two Yak-3s shot down. A large dogfight developed on 16 June 1944, when 18 Yak-3s clashed with 24 German aircraft. Soviet Yak-3 fighters shot down 15 German aircraft for the loss of one Yak destroyed and one damaged. The following day, Luftwaffe activity over that section of the front had virtually ceased. On 17 July 1944, eight Yaks attacked a formation of 60 German aircraft, including escorting fighters. In the ensuing dogfight, the Luftwaffe lost three Junkers Ju 87s and four Bf 109Gs, for no losses to the Yaks. Consequently, the Luftwaffe issued an order to "avoid combat below five thousand metres with Yakovlev fighters lacking an oil cooler intake beneath the nose!" Luftwaffe fighters in combat with the Yak-3 tried to use surprise tactics, attacking from above. Unresolved wartime problems with the Yak-3 included the plywood surfaces coming unstuck when the aircraft pulled out of a high-speed dive. Other drawbacks of the aircraft were short range and poor engine reliability. The pneumatic system for actuating landing gear, flaps and brakes, typical for all Yakovlev fighters of the time, was problematic. Though less reliable than hydraulic or electrical alternatives, the pneumatic system was preferred owing to significant weight savings. In 1944, the Normandie-Niemen Group re-equipped with the Yak-3, scoring with it the last 99 of their 273 air victories against the Luftwaffe. The Model It was quite a surprise when Special Hobby announced a new 1:32 Yak 3 earlier in 2016, but here it is, re-released in Hi-Tech form. The colourful boxart, with a representation of two Yaks shooting down a Bf.109 also shows, in wording in the left hand bottom corner, that this is a Hi-Tech kit. This means that in addition to the seven sprues of bluish grey styrene, two sprues of clear styrene, (not sure if there should be two as they appear identical), there are also a sheet of etched brass, paint masks, and a blister pack of resin parts. All the parts are well moulded with no sign of imperfections or flash, just beautiful, yet quite restrained panel lines, rivets and other detail, where it should be. The fuselage and outer wing panels are smooth of these, as they are plywood. Whilst looking quite a simple build, there is a lot of detail included, particularly in the cockpit with a mixture of styrene, resin and etched brass parts. The rest of the kit looks to be quite straight forward, with no hidden problems. The fact that the instruction booklet is one of the clearest and easiest to read, (are you listening Dragon?), helps. The build itself begins with the assembly of the cockpit, strangely enough, and the fitting of the side consoles with their additional details to the tubular framework of what would constitute the side walls. The moulded rudder pedals are replaced with resin and PE, whilst the eight piece instrument panel, (including the smaller levers etc.), is assembled and detailed with decals for the instruments, a drop of Kleer or aqua gloss will help them stay in position and give them a glassy look. The two piece rear shelf is fitted with a resin radio set, the front bulkhead, with the cannon breech, whilst the joystick is fitted with a PE trigger to replace the moulded part. All the sub-assemblies are then brought together, in addition to another section of tubular frame to build up the cockpit “tub” if you like. The fuselage halves are joined together once the resin exhaust stubs have been fitted and four piece tail wheel assembly, including resin wheel and PE scissor link, has been built up and fitted to the shelf that is attached to one half of the fuselage. The radiator chute is then fitted through the bottom of the fuselage. The tail surfaces are then assembled, each from upper and lower sections and the two piece rudder. The upper wing section is then fitted out with the fuel filler caps which unusually contain decals for what I presume fill levels, I know someone will come to my on these. The lower wing section is fitted with the radiator. The two wing sections are then glued together and the cockpit assembly glued to the centre section of the top wing, then fitted out with the seat, back rest, seatbelts etc. The wing/cockpit assembly is the slid into the fuselage assembly, followed by the forward cowl deck and resin machine gun muzzles. The instrument panel is further detailed with the gunsight and its associated support rail, the coaming and cocking levers for the machine guns. This is then slide into the cockpit aperture, along with two extra side panels. Each main undercarriage is made from a main leg, resin wheel, PE details, shock strut and actuator, scissor link and two outer gear bay doors, before they are fitted to their respective five piece bays, which in turn are slid into the apertures in the lower wing section. The inner bay doors and their associated retraction actuators are then attached, along with the tail wheel bay doors and up lock fittings. The kit being finished off with the fitting of the four piece propeller, headrest, three piece, or optional single piece, canopy, and finally the pitot probe. Decals The two decal sheets provide markings for five different aircraft, although they are all in the same camouflage. The decals are well printed, by Eduard, and look to be in register with good density, important for the white markings and on quite thin carrier film. The markings included are for the following aircraft:- Yak-3, White “6”, of 1 Sqn, Normandie-Niemen regiment, Autumn 1944, Sterkl, Lithuania. Yak-3, White “Double Zero”, East Prussia, 1944 to 45 Yak-3, White “24” Roland De Poype, Hero of the Soviet Union, Eastern Prussia, Autumn 1944. Yak-3, White “22” Asp Pierre Douarre, Le Bourget, France, June 1945 Yak-3, White “4” Lt Roger, (Robert), Marchi, Lithuania, Summer 1944 Conclusion This is really a lovely little kit, and looks like it will be a joy to build, although not without its quirks, such as the main undercarriage bays being completely assembled, with the legs and wheels before being fitted to the wing. It might be best to fit the bays to the wing first and do any filling and sanding they may require, before fitting the undercarriage. Other than that, another nice release from Special Hobby. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Yakovlev Yak-3 1:48 Eduard Weekend Edition The YAK-3 had a slightly stop start entry into Russian service. Its origins can be traced back to a 1941 design the I-30. Like the original Yak-1 it was to feature a 20mm cannon firing through the propeller hub and two wing mounted machine guns. The armament was improved by the addition of a pair of wing mounted cannons. The first Yak-3 had a metal wing with slats, and the second a wooden wing to simplify production. The German invasion, and a shortage of aircraft grade alloys lead to the projects cancellation. Jump then to 1943 and Yakolev looked at improvements to the Yak-1 design. To make a lighter aircraft the wing was re-designed and the intakes moved to the wing roots. More use was made of wood in the new design as well. So good was the new aircraft that it was recommended that it replace the original Yak-1 & Yak-7. The new aircraft would be designated the Yak-3. As an addendum to the Yak-3 story in the late 1990s Yakolev would manufacture new build aircraft for the warbird market. These would feature an all metal construction and be powered by an Allison engine. The Kit Eduards YAK-3 has been with us now since 1998 and has seen many re-releases since then. the it arrives on two sprues of grey plastic, a clear sprue and a sheet of decals. The moulding is good and the detail crisp. There is no evidence of any deterioration of the moulds, no flash etc. Construction starts with cockpit. Interior parts are added to both sides and the rear decking behind the cockpit is added. Next the tail wheel part is added, the engine exhausts added and the main fuselage is closed up, adding the engine top cover which houses the guns. The cockpit floor on the kit is moulded onto the top side of the upper wing. Once the main wings are joined together (conventional upper & lower construction) the seat is added with seat belts coming from the decal sheet. The control column and rudder pedals are added. Next up the side consoles are added along with the main instrument panel. Once all the cockpit details are in the wing can be joined to the main fuselage. Next up the landing gear is constructed. The main wheel is two parts and added onto the main gear leg. These are then added to the main gear bay door. There is a scissor link to be added to the main leg. The legs and their retraction struts are then added onto the wing along with the smaller inner gear doors. The tailplanes are added along with the large ventral radiator. The tail wheel and its doors are then also added. Lastly the propeller is made up and added along with the canopy. Remember to add the rear pilots head armour before adding the canopy. Eduard give is a single, and multipart canopy. Decals Decals are provided for two aircraft, as seems to be the Weekend edition norm now. White 15, Lt Semyon Ivanovich Rogovoi, 64th GIAP, 2nd Baltic Front, Autumn 1944. White 6, Capt Marcel Albert, GC 3 Normandies, Niemen 1944/45. Conclusion It is great to see this kit re-released in a weekend edition. While the kit is not upto the latest Eduard standards it is by no means a slouch and certainly will build into a good looking model. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. My other build for the GB is Zvezda's neat little Yak-3 in 1:72. It's a nice kit, but has some prominent sink marks on the wings. I got these puttied up and once dry, should be able to complete the remaining assembly in a few evenings. As a personal challenge, I'm going to see if I can finish this build in a week. ....aaaand go!
  10. Was surprised to see Zvezda recommend "aviation green", translated into Humbrol 226 Interior Green, for the cockpit interior of their Yak-3. I always thought, probably on the basis of the Dako Yak-9 instructions, that Soviet aircraft were a light grey inside. I note that Zvezda do recommend "light grey", translated to Humbrol 129 Gull Grey, for the undercarriage wells, legs and door interiors: the same colour is used as the lighter of the 2 uppersurface greys. So: are Zvezda wrong or am I not up-to-date with the latest research?
  11. Yakovlev Yak-3. This aircraft is not a restored original but one of the new built aircraft from the 1990's which were a co-operation between the Yakovlev Design Bureau, Strela and Flight Magic, Santa Monica, California. Its design is based as closely as possible on the wartime Yak-3, but utilises an all-metal structure. They are powered by powered by an Allison V-1710 engine as there is currently no single working Klimov engine available. Both the Klimov and the Allison V-1710 are liquid cooled piston V-12 engines with very similar dimensions and power. Pics mine.
  12. Hi, usually I do not touch "Snap Fit" kits, since I had some rather disappointing experiences (with tanks) before. Now the new Zvezda model of the Yak-3 is a totally different league. Apart from the fact that you actually can assemble the whole model without a drop of glue, it also provides sufficient detail and good measurement - and there's even aftermarket accessories available from the likes of Eduard, Rob Taurus and CMK. I confess I did use glue on some parts, like the landing gear and some small pieces, just to make sure they don't go astray. The model was painted with Gunze/Mr.Hobby acrylics, the decals are from the box. I had some reservations about their quality, as there was a yellow-ish tone on the carrier film. All of this disappeared when I put the markings on, so no worries here. There seem to be different interpretations of this particular scheme, some sources recommend a red spinner with white tail lines, while Zvezda suggest grey spinner and yellow stripes. I went with their instructions. It represents the plane of Lt. S. I. Rogovoy, of 64th GIAP / 4th GIAD, on the 2nd Baltic Front, autumn 1944. The pitot tube was replaced by a piece of wire. Thanks for your interest. Best wishes from Vienna, Roman
  13. Aeropoxy retooled Yakovlev Yak-3 1/32nd resin kit is available. Sources: https://aeropoxy.wordpress.com/2015/08/28/132-scale-yakovlev-yak-3-retooled/ https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=1011990938832650&id=121276231237463 Available here https://aeropoxy.wordpress.com/where-to-buy/ http://www.ebay.com/sch/supercuber/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_from=&_ipg=25&_trksid=p3692&afsrc=1&rmvSB=true V.P.
  14. Hi all, I originally meant my next WIP to be an IL-2, but changed my mind after I seen a Yak-3 online that I liked the look of and wanted to make. This will be my first kit with aftermarket parts; currently only the decals, but I'm looking into some metal exhausts (with no luck so far). I'll be building a small diorama as well, with Zvezda's Soviet Air Force Ground Crew. I'll be building Lt.Col. A.D. Yakimenko's plane. "Yakimenko entered combat against the Japanese over Khalkhin Gol in summer 1939 [and] was given credit for 3 individual and 4 shared victories. Yakimenko met the requirements for the award of the title of HSU for his outstanding performance in Mongolia on August the 29th, 1939. During his GPW career, he flew 244 combat sorties, reaching 15 individual kills and 29 aerial encounters. His exploits won him the Order of Lenin, the Red Banner, Suvorov 3rd Class, the Patriotic War 1st Class, the Red Star and various medals." At first glance it seems like a nice kit, if quite simple, consisting of only 34 parts across 4 sprues. The decals I've got are from AML and seem quite nice. My only complaint is slightly petty, and it's that the small red rectangles (16) are meant to go on top of the medal shapes (15), rather than just being made as one in the first place. For scale, the squares on the background are 1cmx1cm. Finally, Zvezda's Soviet Air Force Ground Crew. Although not having as many figures as Airfix's ground crews, the Zvezda kit still seems quite nice. Also unlike Airfix, some of the people come in multiple parts. The parts seem very easy to fit together though, and it allows me to paint areas that (if each person came in one piece) may be slightly fiddly to get to. I should also mention that the kit lacks a pilot, and since I couldn't find a seated pilot online and I haven't posted enough on here to post in the buying and selling section, I've instead taken a spare pilot from the RAF ground crew I used in a previous build and, despite not being correct, will be using that in place of it. I could try to make some adjustments to it, though. I'll be starting the build soon. Thanks for looking, Corbin.
  15. These are the first models I bought and finished since I moved to Denmark- the Eastern Express/Dakoplast LaGG-3 series 66 and the Zvezda Yak-3, both 1/72. The Eastern Express kit requires quite a bit of clean-up and filler to get to fit well at the wing-to-fuselage join. I used the kit decals to model it as Yuri Shchipov's mount, but only half of them came off the sheet or worked, with the result that I only decaled one side of the plane (and even then, not fully). The multi-part canopy fit poorly and I broke one of the bits, hence the pose with the open canopy. Next is the 'snap-fit' Yak-3 from Zvezda, done in (what else) the markings of Normandie-Niemen ace Marcel Albert, one of the kit's options. Sadly, the kill markings were off-register. For a snap-fit kit, it's overengineered.Once put together, there were some unsighlty bumps and depressions due to to the snap fit which I tried to smooth out to the best of my abilities. I ended up repainting the spinner decal markings as they did not fit very well. Both kits were painted with what Humbrol and Revell enamels I had at hand. The AMT-12 and AMT-11 were made up of different mixes of Humbrol 106, 230 and 165, though for the Yak-3, I used Humbrol 106 alone for the AMT-12. The underside AMT-7 was a 4:1:1 mix of Humbrol 65:Revell 50:Humbrol 165 and the interior a 3:1 mix of Humbrol 165 and Humbrol 230. This was the first time I used Vallejo Matt Varnish, with the unfortunate side-effect of white streaks or spots. The ones you see are those which would not disappear with re-gloss and matt coating. Last but not least is the Kora 1/72 EKW C-3602, a Swiss multi-purpose combat aircraft whose Wikipedia article rather generously compared it to the Ilyushin Il-2: Yes, it's the odd one out but I had only one good quality picture of this model, so I threw it in here. By the way, the Wikipedia article doesn't contain the line about the Il-2 anymore. As with the other Kora kit I built, it's got a lot detail and a lot of small parts. Besides large pour stubs on the parts, the only serious problem was a warped fuselage. The plane was finished in RLM 70 over RLM 65. Some of the kit decals needed retouching, which I hope is not obvious from the pics. As usual, thanks for looking! Comments are welcome.
  16. A brand new 1/48th Yakovlev Yak-3 is to be released by Zvezda. Sources and pics: http://www.facebook....26613179&type=3 http://scalemodels.r...1-48-jak-3.html V.P.
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