Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Wood'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modelling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Manufacturer News
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aerocraft Models
    • Above & Beyond Retail
    • Air-craft.net
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Bearhobbies.com
    • Bernd.M Modellbau
    • BlackMike Models
    • Casemate UK
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • DACO Products
    • Freightdog Models
    • Hannants
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • fantasy Printshop
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • MikroMir
    • Kagero Publishing
    • Kingkit
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • MJW Models
    • NeOmega & Vector Resin
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Pocketbond Limited
    • Precision Ice and Snow
    • Radu Brinzan Productions
    • Red Roo Models
    • RES/KIT
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Scratchaeronautics
    • Shelf Oddity
    • Small Stuff Models
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Starling Models
    • Thunderbird Models
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Tirydium Models
    • Topnotch - Bases and Masks for Models
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • White Ensign Models
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds
  • Brits Abroad GB

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 16 results

  1. RMS Carpathia In 1912 Harold Thomas Cottam was the RMS Carpathia's wireless operator. Early in the morning of 15th of April, whilst Carpathia was Eastbound in the North Atlantic, he was about to retire to bed following a long but entirely routine shift. Instead of going to bed however, purely on an impulse, he decided to send a courtesy message to Titanic regarding some undelivered commercial messages that he intended to relay on his next shift. Instead of receiving a polite nod of thanks from Titanic - he received this... 'Come at once. We have struck a berg. It's a CQD OM.' CQD = 'All Stations - Distress!' Carpathia's Captain - Arthur Rostron - was immediately alerted and, despite the extraordinary improbability of the events that were unfolding, he quickly grasped the situation and realised that he was within range to help. He turned Carpathia toward the Titanic's last stated position and ran her at speeds exceeding the ship’s nominal maximum through hazardous waters known - self evidently - to contain dangerous icebergs. Carpathia arrived at the scene of the disaster approximately four hours later - just before sunrise. Heartbreakingly she was too late for the 1503 souls that died that night. She was however able to recover 705 survivors and following a harrowing journey deliver them safely to New York city. Of the several ships associated with the Titanic disaster Carpathia was really the only one with her reputation enhanced in any way. For this reason it is perhaps a little surprising that she is not modelled more frequently. After all she is the hero in the most famous episode in maritime history. Right now however, as some of you will know, I'm in the middle of scratch-building an Avro 504k in 1/32 scale and I'm greatly enjoying the challenge, Here's the WIP if you are interested. So why am I sitting here writing about Carpathia? Well, the Avro project is going well but is progressing very slowly and is about to enter, yet another difficult phase involving cockpits and struts and rigging and what-not... I was hoping to have the Avro ready for the Western Australian Model Expo in May 2019 but, frankly that's looking very unlikely. So I've decided to have a crack at a quicker build that, for the time being, will take priority - RMS Carpathia, Scratch built in 1/500 scale. Here's a book on the subject - just to prove I can read And here are the plans - enlarged from 1/1200 scale from John Bowen's excellent publication 'More Miniature Merchant Ships'. And here is the first cut in the entire project. And the wood selected for the hull - superb stuff this - maybe even as good as bass wood for carving... When doing fuselages and hulls and other symmetrical things I like to temporarily glue two even halves together at the start of the project. This creates a natural centre line to work from but I'm still be able to split the two halves apart later on if need be. For example when it comes to fitting the masts and other centreline accruements. If you follow the thread you'll see what I mean. I've decided to cut the sheer first. The sheer - nautical term that! It means the lovely curve along the top of the hull. I'm using a bench sander for this job as the thickness of the wood is just a whisker too great for my little bandsaw. Besides - belt sanders are fun! It leaves this effect. A nice even curve running the entire length of the hull and a smooth top surface onto which to stick... This! Note how the join in the wood allows us to get the plan's centreline dead in the middle of the job. And now we can cut this... (using a bandsaw of course) and use the bench sander to sand the correct rake on the stem of the ship's bow. Fire up the bandsaw again to start shaping the Carpathia's beautiful 'counter-stern' - which I fear is going to be one of the tricky bits in this build. A bench sander is essential for this kind of work - perhaps even as important as a bandsaw! After about two hours work we have this roughed out initial shape of the Carpathia's hull. Not a bad return on a minimal time investment I reckon. I'm going to try to complete this model quickly. I don't want to mess around too much. 2019 is shaping up to be a hectic year for me so on the brief occasions I'll get out into my 'factory' I'm aiming to get a fair bit done. This is a labour of love - but it's not going to be the work of a perfectionist! Hope to see all my old maritime mates back showing an interest in this one! Very Best Regards, Bandsaw Steve.
  2. Whilst on holiday I thought I'd move completely out of my comfort zone. I've always wanted to build an open launch showing the internal details. Various attempts have come to nought. Looking for something easily transportable this caught my eye Kit sprues? Tis all made from Limewood which means it has minimal straight grain though a trifle soft Firsts up a simple jig to keep it all straight until frames/longitudinals are in place. Commence fitting the frames The idea is the frames are planked and the centre is removed, time will tell . . . Frames in place. Coffee stirrer used to brace frames. The transom look a bit precarious so I'm leaving that until I have the sheer planks in place First sheer plank in place Thanks for looking in, I hope you enjoy something a bit different Kev
  3. Happy Birthday Royal Air Force Today is the 100th Anniversary of the formation of the Royal Air Force. If you did not know that already you are probably on the wrong website. Some time ago I decided that I wanted to mark this occasion by starting a new project on this date and have of late spent much time thinking about what the subject should be. Naturally enough, Spitfires, Hurricanes, Lancasters and myriad of famous post-war types all came to mind, but these are well-covered subjects and so I dwelled on the matter a bit deeper... What about something that was in service on the day the RAF formed? What about something that had served in both the RFC and the RNAS prior to the formation of the RAF? What about something that was crucially important both to the newly formed air force and essentially all of the commonwealth air arms that were to follow? What about the Avro 504! To me, the Avro 504, more than any other single type, captures the spirit and the essence of the nascent Royal Air Force. This type had seen service as a fighter, a bomber and reconnaissance aircraft prior to being 'relegated' to the training duties at which it excelled. By 1918 this was the most numerous aircraft in the RAF (and probably in the world) with more than 7000 being built during World War One alone. In the new air force almost all aircrew had been trained on this type and I should think most of the ground crew as well. It was the foundation of the skills and professionalism that have been the hallmark of the service ever since. So, foolishly, I'm going to have a crack at building one in 1/32 scale. Here are the plans I will be using...provided most efficiently by Len Whalley at 'aeroplans.co.uk’ (Great service thanks Len). As you can see this is a screen-shot of my electronic copy because my friendly computer draftsman at work is on extended Easter holidays. He'll be back soon! In the meantime I'm going to use these plans as a starting point, they are fine for the general layout and dimensions. And here we go... Start with a good straight, clean bit of wood. In this case I'm using Jarrah - just like I did in my Mig 15 build here... www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235012524-mig-15-scratchbuild I'm using Jarrah mostly because it's the strongest wood I can get hold of. Having studied the plans I can see that there are going to be some challenges with maintaining the structural integrity of this model, especially once the extensive cockpit has been hollowed out - hence structural strength is going to be a major consideration. It's a beautiful bit of wood this - straight close grain almost flawless. The oval below marks the only knot in the entire plank, it's tiny and is fortunately positioned so it can be easily excluded from the fuselage cut-out. Here I'm marking off the first cut for the fuselage. I'm cutting it much longer than it needs to be for reasons you will see later on. And here it is - the first cut - made on 01 April 2018! Hooray... Two lengths have been cut for the fuselage so that I can work to the natural centre-line thus formed... The wings are being cut from some thin slices of sapelli. Another high-quality hard-wood. I've chosen this because I do not want the wings to sag and think that sapelli will be rigid enough to hold it's shape over time. And here's the rough cut-out of the tailplanes. I think that the tail is going to be the only easy part of the build. And so -after 20 minutes of work I have the very, very rough outline of a biplane... No - this is not an April Fools joke, this really is the start of my model! I don't know how long this is going to take but given the slow pace of my previous (still uncompleted) project that you can see here: www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235021633-hmasm-ae2-scratchbuild I would say this will take at least a year and possibly much longer. I've never built a biplane before. Wish me luck... Best Regards, Bandsaw Steve (ex-Reconcilor)
  4. Hello you, and a belated welcome to 2019. Here is a quicky I did in the post Christmas blues, a Mozzie carved from wood and camouflaged with wood stain. Its a bit of a mishmash, its supposed to be the cannon armed fighter, but the cockpit and exhaust blisters are from the MkIV bomber and the Brownings are too high in the nose. Still, it kept me out of the wife's way for a couple of weeks so it's all good. Enjoy.
  5. Here is my 1/20(ish) scratchbuilt carving of a 1956 Aston Martin DBR1. Carved from Lime finished with Danish Oil, with a few plastic and metal bits and pieces for the wheels. Took about a month, with a week of that waiting for the oil to dry. Thanks for looking
  6. Hi folks Another day, another model This months exercise in sawdust making is the recreation of the best looking car ever to have been built (you may disagree, but you are wrong*) the Aston Martin DBR1 Le Mans winner from 1956. I remember as a young boy in the 70s being read bedtime stories by my Grandma from a book written in the jingoistic style of the 50s of the exploits of a plucky British driver in a car that was clearly a DBR1 overcoming the dastardly exploits of Baron Otto von Stereotype in a 300SLR and Count Lucio di Spicable in a 250TR, which meant that for me a Le Mans car was an Aston Martin. Anyway, nostalgia aside, I am attempting to recreate the curves of the car by hand from a block of limewood and will be trying to make wire wheels , also by hand, from plastic pipe and guitar strings (the car will have standard British tuning, none of this foreign rubbish). This build was inspired by @albergman's ebony Jaguar, but won't be quite as impressive due to a skills deficit and a simpler choice of wood. *special exemption for anyone saying Lamborghini Miura Starting point Ignore the rough cut lump of pine, that was just practice with my new chisels Templates:
  7. HMAS AE2 - World War One Submarine. About a decade ago I started idly dreaming about scratchbuilding a model of the famous Australian World War One submarine AE2. One year ago, almost to the day, a generous fellow modeller lent me a set of his plans for an E-class submarine. 11 months ago work started. Three days ago I finished the model. After what seems like a very long time and a great deal of fun, here's the result. Please enjoy! Those of you that have been following the WIP thread will know that the last week of this project was essentially a blinding sprint to get this thing completed in time for the Western Australian Scale Model Exposition (WASMEx). So how did I go in the competition? Well have a look at the photo below and have a guess which one won! Hmmmmm.... No real surprise! Yep - My little submarine came second in the maritime scratchbuilt class. This was what I expected all along because there's one guy here in Perth who is an absolute master of maritime scratchbuilding (lets call him GW shall we). I figured all along that he would win - that's his HMS Vanguard in the Perspex case! Scratchbuilt - from balsa of all things! Well - there's nothing wrong with being beaten by a true champion! Congratulations GW, a deserved win! In any case, I can't complain because it was GW that lent me the plans in the first place! So my submarine came second, which is fine by me, especially since there was a field of nine entries in the maritime scratchbuilt category. So it looks like maritime modelling in Western Australia is in good health. If you are interested in how this model was made please have a look at WIP log which can be found here... And if you will allow me to indulge in a small 'plug' - why not check out my next project - a scratchbuilt, 1/32 Avro 504. That WIP can be found here... All comments and critiques most welcome. Warmest Regards - Bandsaw Steve
  8. Hi all Haven't posted much in the way of build photos as this one just didn't seem to appeal to many. It may still be that way but it is what it is and I enjoy doing them. So, this is a hand carved Ferrari (the eighth I've done of this model), but this time I wanted to hack it from nice woods ... mahogany and padauk ... with some light coloured veneer, then give everything a highly polished lacquer finish. Decided to do a matching pattern on the base just for fun. Not highly detailed as I like my wooden models mostly to emphasize and concentrate on the beautiful shapes of these early cars. OK, I'll let the pictures speak for themselves. Enjoy (I hope) Frank Other Scratch builds ... Lancia D50 Sport Fishing Boat Half Hull Boats Flying Scotsman A3 Lola T70 Mk 1 Dragon Sailboat
  9. First time caller, long time listener... Hi all. Here's my first post and first wood build. Log here: https://imgur.com/a/qXTRs TY you for looking.
  10. 1/32 Scratch-built Sopwith Camel in mainly basswood with oak prop, walnut axle, gun barrel cooling jackets and cylinders and bamboo struts plus brass odds 'n' sods, finished with 0.1mm rigging thread. As with my earlier Spitfire the brief from Controller, Home Forces was that it could be a wooden sculpture rather thaan a painted awar machine, so it is left just varnished. About a month start to finish, but actually more like two solid weekends of doing with lots of gaps in between. Not sure what's next!
  11. Redshift

    Sopwith Camel

    Welcome omce again my friends to the show that never ends. This months lesson in wood fondling will be a demo of how to find a camel in a plank. Specifically, uncovering the sopwith camel that is hiding inside the offcuts of my spitfire build. Step 1, plans and bits Part B, Hercule Poirot's moustache: iii, carefully measure the fuselage Four, get distracted during planing and take too much off, plus the top of my finger. Grrrrr More anon when the bleeding stops. Nick
  12. Here's my own interpretation of an early mark spitfire, notionally a mk1 and notionally 1/32 scale hand carved from basswood, walnut and oak and varnish finished. I did it as an experiment to give me something to do in my spare time, and to see if I could make something I'd be happy to put on display. There is rather a lot of artistic license being used e.g. I chickened out of gouging out the wheel wells or cutting control surfaces, so it is more spitfiresque than a finescale reproduction, however it was fun, satisfying and I'm happy with the result. Thank you all for your interest, see you for the next one.
  13. Kick-off Hello, I have spent the last 6 months working on a scratchbuilt Mig 15 and that project is now drawing to a close. http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235012524-mig-15-scratchbuild/& Consequently, I've been thinking a lot about my next project and after much deliberation, including considering a very, very wide range of possible subjects, I have decided to try something completely different to my usual aviation related fare. I am going to try to build His Majesty's Australian Submarine AE2. This is a project that I has been in the back of my mind for over a decade now and when a fellow modeller offered to lend the following set of plans to me, all thoughts of other projects evaporated. In my view Allied submarines in WW1 are under represented in the modelling world, so I'm going to try to do my little bit to correct this. AE2 was an early E-Class submarine operated by the Royal Australian Navy. On the evening of 25 April 1915 (while the Gallipoli landings were underway) she successfully penetrated the extremely formidable Turkish defences in the Dardenelles Straight and proceeded to 'run amok' in the sea of Marmara. During a short-lived but very intensive period of raiding she caused considerable disruption to Turkish attempts to reinforce and supply their defences on the Gallipoli peninsula. On the 30th of April AE2 was damaged by the Turkish torpedo boat Sultanhisar and, unable to dive to safety, her captain decided to scuttle her. All hands survived the scuttling and spent the rest of the war as P.O.W's in Turkey where they suffered terribly. Four of the vessel's compliment of 32 died during their incarceration. In 1998 the wreck of the AE2 was located and found to be in remarkably good condition, mostly due to it's partial immersion in anoxic mud. A thorough campaign to preserve the wreck in-situ continues to this day. The possibility of recovering the wreck has been discussed at length, and although probably technically feasible would be a very high risk and highly expensive project. So - in the meantime a model will have to do! I have not yet started any physical construction - so there's not a lot to see yet but, most unlike me, I have been conducting some additional research. And just as well too because it turns out that the drawings above are for a mid-war configuration E-class submarine which in some significant regards was different to the early war AE2. For example, the mid war submarine had a gun mounted ahead of the conning tower and had two forward torpedo tubes instead of AE2's single tube. There are other differences also. Suffice to say that this set of plans from the RAN's historical page on their website will help me nail down the correct configuration. The model itself will be: 1 / 100 scale Waterline - surface trim Scratchbuilt - although I might resort to some aftermarket details here and there. It will not be a cutaway (despite various people suggesting the idea) Predominantly made from wood, but expect to see some brass and plastic sheeting and a few other bits and pieces as well. I am hoping to have physical construction under-way this week and am aiming to have it finished by the end of 2017 but really don't have any idea how long this will take as I'm completely new to this maritime modelling lark. My plan for this job is basically to 'muddle through' so any encouragement and expert advice from the sidelines will be most appreciated! Best Regards, Reconcilor
  14. Bandsaw Steve

    Mig 15 Scratchbuild

    Hello I am new to this site and this is my first post - so please forgive any technical errors in what may follow... I used to scratchbuild model aeroplanes when I was a kid. After many years of building 1/48 kitsets I decided to have another go a scratchbuilding the old fashioned way, just for fun. I am in the process of building a 1/48 scale Mig 15 bis from scratch (with one or two aftermarket parts to speed things up a bit). I hope you enjoy following along. I'm hoping to have the project finished early 2017. Here are the plans I am using - graciously provided by a well-known aviation modelling magazine. it's a good idea to photocopy the plans several times before you start - you will need plenty of copies. Note that this set of plans also came with an underside view - it's just not in this shot. I also have a few books and articles on this subject - but I'm definitely no 'rivet counter' so I'm not going to allow myself to get bogged down in too much research. If you like laser accurate models - look away now - this one will be 'good enough' and that'll be that! Note the presence of the cross section profiles on the plans- they are very important. I selected a good piece of wood - straight grain no knots - in this case very hard Jarrah from Western Australia, but I daresay any decent strong wood with a straight grain should be fine. I like to use hard wood - never balsa - because hardwoods hold any carved detail better, they provide much needed structural strength and are less susceptible to surface damage such as scratches and dents. Cut out the relevant drawings and stick em on. I used PVA glue; nothing fancy - but if anyone can suggest a better alternative I'm all ears. Carefully Cut around the paper profile using a bandsaw, you could use a fret saw but a bandsaw saves a lot of time. in this shot the side profile is cut but the wood not removed (note the scalpel blade stuck in the cut as a marker for the photograph- I don't remove any wood until both profiles are cut as it's much easier to run the bandsaw against a smooth surface and not the contour left from the first cut. I also leave surplus wood beyond the end of the fuselage (both tail and nose). This excess wood can be used as a handle during some of the subsequent work. After both cuts are made you have the rough shape, in both side view and plan view of a Mig 15 fuselage. It doesn't look like much at this point - but stay tuned - with a bit of luck it will get a bit better over time.
  15. Bandsaw Steve

    Mig15 Scratchbuild

    Hello, I have recently completed my scratchbuild of a 1/48 Korean War era Mig15 bis. The model is mostly constructed from wood and is nearly 100% scratchbuilt with only the cockpit interior and pilot not scratch built. The complete build log is contained in this thread. http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235012524-mig-15-scratchbuild/ I started at the end of November 2016 and have finished in May 2017 so It's been about a six month long project. I am reasonably happy with the outcome, have greatly enjoyed the exercise, and owe much thanks to all of the britmodeller members who have offered advice and encouragement along the way. Here are the photos for your perusal and comment. If you are interested in my next build log, which has already started, it can be found here... http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235021633-hmasm-ae2-scratchbuild/ Best Regards to all, Bandsaw Steve AKA 'The Reconcilor'...
  16. In case anyone has been wondering where I was, I have been trying to fill my workshop to the ceiling with wood shavings, none of yer plastic nonsense. I have also come over a bit nautical after my Arizona exploits. Anyhoo, here's what I've been doing:- Must be going mad.Manual says 3000 hours to build. Reckon I'm half done. Thanks for looking. Nick
×