Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'T-38'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modeling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
  • General Discussion
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
  • Archive

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 13 results

  1. After its 1/48th T-38A (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234930471-148-northrop-t-38a-talon-by-wolfpack-design-released-new-boxing), Wolfpack Design had the latest in their Talon family on hand at the Shizuoka Hobby Show 2014 , a 1/48th T-38 C. This kit features a number of newly tooled parts - ref. WLF10008. Source: http://www.1999.co.jp/eng/blog/1405192 Sources: http://www.hyperscale.com/2014/reviews/kits/shizuoka2014airreleases_1.htm V.P.
  2. Hi all, The Northrop T-38 Talon has always been a favourite of mine since I glimpsed its sleek, white silhouette on an ITC Models box art back in the early 1960's. Now sixty years on, Wolfpack Design has released what is generally considered as the definitive T-38A model kit. It's the day of reckoning! Here's my build with a few modelling notes that I hope you will find helpful and entertaining. First the kit. The Wolfpack Talons come in several boxings – standard USAF, NASA, ROC AF, ... I chose the limited edition Holloman AFB which has a few extra over the regular ones notably resin detailed seats, a metal pitot tube and a fret of photoetchings. The only aftermarket item I used is the resin FOD intake cover set from Def Model. The subject. It's a USAF training service T-38A in blue and white color scheme as it appeared briefly in 1986-1987. To me it's the most striking livery ever sported by this already elegant jet. You can find some additional info about this particular colour scheme HERE and HERE. Get ready, Cheers, Quang
  3. Hello gents, I’m researching a colour scheme for my next build, a T-38 Talon in 1/48 scale. It’s the white and insignia blue scheme that USAF used on their training a/c in 1986-1987. Photos of this particular scheme are rare on the internet. I’m especially looking for views from above and of the underside. Some sources say the entire underside was blue. Others state that only the fuselage was blue, wings and stabs were left white. Perhaps there were variations on the same scheme. I need your help and expertise in that matter. Thank you in advance, Cheers, Quang
  4. T-38 70-1558, operated by the 6512th Test Squadron, 6510th Test Wing, Air Force Flight Test Center, Edwards AFB. On the Edwards main ramp, March 1981. Formation proficiency mission, July 1984. That's Rogers Dry Lake below. Air Force Systems Command (AFSC) badge added to the tail. On approach to Runway 22. The dashed lines on the lakebed indicate an emergency runway. The solid line is a reference for doing Tower Fly-By passes, a pitot static calibration technique. Thanks for looking, Sven
  5. T-38s from the Naval Weapons Center at NAS China Lake ("It ain't the end of the Earth, but you can see it from here!" QT-38A 59-1603 Edwards AFB transient ramp June 1982. DT-38A 59-1604, NAS China Lake open house, November 1983. DT-38A 59-1604, NAS China Lake open house, October 1984. NT-38A 60-0582 at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards AFB, November 1980. NT-38A 60-0582, Edwards AFB transient ramp, June 1982. Thanks for looking, Sven
  6. In the 1980s, Space Shuttle crews would come to Edwards AFB to practice landing approaches to Runway 22 and Rogers dry lake. They would use modified T-38s and Gulfstreams Its... N946NA with two airfoil panels beneath the mid-fuselage and optics "dog house" in front of the windscreen N947NA with same modifications The airfoils would rotate to provide variable drag increases for 'low L-over-D' flight profiles And the T-38 chase birds with increased area speed brakes. T-38A, USAF s/n 65-10354, NASA N912NA. Note this one still carries the red diamonds tail band from its previous life with the 3246th Test Wing at Eglin AFB. USAF s/n 65-10355, NASA N913NA USAF s/n 65-10351, NASA N909NA, showing the production speed brakes USAF s/n 65-10326, NASA N906NA, in the background shows that it is also an ex-Eglin jet. fundecals makes a NASA T-38 decal sheet in 1/48 scale with these talons, and a bunch of others, including the diagonal striped panels for the speed brakes. Wish they would do the same sheet in 1/72, even though we still don't have a "real" T-38 kit in the gentlemen's scale. Thanks for looking, Sven
  7. After the still to release T-38C kit (link), Wolfpack Design is to release a 1/48th Northrop T-38N Talon NASA kit - ref. Source: https://www.facebook.com/wolfpackd/posts/1488251161268084 V.P.
  8. Announced some time ago the first 1/48th complete kit of the famous Corean craft company Wolfpack Design (http://www.wolfpack-d.com/) is now on approach - release Mid June 2013 -, a brand new Northrop T-38A Talon - ref. WP10002 Another fierce commercial combat in view as Trumpeter has also announced a T-38 Talon kit for 2013 - ref.02852. Source: http://mmzone.co.kr/...view.php?id=326 See also: http://www.wolfpack-d.com/htm/kit.html http://www.1999.co.jp/eng/10152401 V.P.
  9. Hi, some of you may have seen them in Telford, now my new T-38 wheel sets are ready to order through my web shop as well. I've made two separate sets, an early and a late type, the early is applicable for T-38A's (through to the 80's), the late to more recent T-38A's and the newer T-38C's. Both are mainly designed for the Wolfpack kit, but may fit (or adjusted to) other kits. Dimensions true to scale and detail is extremely fine, especially on the brake assemblies. The early type set: The late type set: Both types of nose wheels are included in each set: Many thanks Jeffrey
  10. Trumpeter is to release a 1/48th Northrop T-38A Talon kit in January 2014 - ref.2852. Source: http://www.cybermodeler.com/special/2012_acft_scale.shtml V.P.
  11. The Northrop Grumman prototype for the USAF T-X competition has been spotted preparing for high-speed taxi testing in Mojave, CA. It is reportedly powered by a GE 404 jet engine. The aircraft is being designed by NG's Scaled Composites Division and will be one of the contenders to replace the T-38. To my eyes, there is a bit of F-5, T-38, and F-20 (all Northrop products) in this new design. We'll see! Boeing/Saab will unveil their clean sheet T-X prototype in September. Lockheed will go with the T-50, and Raytheon is teaming with Aermacchi to offer a version of the M-346/T-100. Cheers, Bill
  12. Here are some shots from my 2013 visit to the LA Science Museum. A few more here if you're interested: http://www.hanger51.org/aircraft-museums/us-museums-collections/la-science-museum-2013/ A-12 Blackbird by tony_inkster, on Flickr Douglas DC-8 by tony_inkster, on Flickr Lockheeds finest by tony_inkster, on Flickr Northrop F-20 Tigershark by tony_inkster, on Flickr F-104 Starfighter by tony_inkster, on Flickr Shuttle Endeavour by tony_inkster, on Flickr Shuttle Endeavour by tony_inkster, on Flickr
  13. Russian T-38 Light Tank HobbyBoss 1:35 History The T-38 was derived from the T-37 amphibious tank, itself based on the Vickers amphibious tank purchased from Great Britain in 1930. Perhaps it was also influenced by the French AMR-33. The Vickers was quickly modified into the mass-production T-37A. By 1935 the model had already shown many shortcomings which needed a solution in an improved model. Zavod n°37 in Moscow studied a replacement and eventually a prototype was constructed that year. The range of modifications was rather limited. The turret and driver positions were shifted (from the left side to the right), friction couplings were added to transmit power to the tracks and a new, vibration free, running gear suspension was added and perfected for better driving and crew comfort. Moreover, the T-38 was sightly simplified, lower, lighter, slightly larger and buoyancy characteristics were also better. The Zavod 37 R team choose to not deviate greatly from the original model and only applied a set of modifications to improve, most of all, the handling, driving and mobility characteristics on all terrains. It was thought the firepower could be improved greatly by fitting a 20 mm (0.79 in) SchWAK gun in the drivers compartment, in a fixed position, but the solution proved far too cumbersome and was only briefly tested. The T-38 hull was substantially lowered, with the upper superstructure almost blended with the lower hull and widened at the same time. So were the hollow mudguards to improve buoyancy as well as the handling in water. The double-drive system was unchanged as well as the Ford-derived GAZ engine, transmission, gearbox, drive sprocket and idler configuration, but friction couplings were added. A small three-bladed propeller screw did the job when submerged and, in shallow water, the widened tracks provided more underwater grip and friction surface. On land attention was focused on the sprung bogie suspension, which was substantially reworked to reduce the vibration level at high speed. The larger tracks also lowered the ground pressure. The shifted driver/commander positions improved driving visibility and handling (optimized for right-hand drivers). The hull was made of light rolled steel plates bolted on a frame, specially sealed. Protection was unchanged, as well as the armament, the usual belt-fed DT machine-gun. No provision was made for a radio. Production started at Zavod 37 in 1936 and was discontinued in 1939 when it became apparent that the lack of a radio and the firepower were two major issues, later corrected with the T-40. Numbers built differ greatly from source to source, ranging from 1200 to 1500 units delivered and put into service before the war started. In 1936 a handful of these vehicles were displayed during the May Red Square parade, under the belly of TB-3 bombers. Numerous exercises were performed for deep battle operations and each paratrooper unit was allocated 50 vehicles, and infantry battalions 38 vehicles each. The T-38 entered service in 1937 and showed that, in operations, the lack of radio was a major flaw. Once the radio-equipped vehicle of a platoon was destroyed, the unit had no means to communicate the enemy position, except to physically dispatch a vehicle to the HQ. Plus, the lack of protection and armament meant that in most encounters with an enemy their military value was scarce. Their first mass-engagement came in Finland, especially in the summer because of the swampy and marshy terrain. But they proved that even machine-gun bullets could pierce the armour and these were gradually phased out when the all-out improved T-40 was introduced in 1941. By the time of the German invasion, many seem to have been transformed into dug-out pillboxes in fixed positions on various lines of defence. Large numbers were destroyed, but an equally large numbers were captured, either by the Finns, for their own use, or the Germans which turned them to the Luftwaffe for guarding their advanced airfields. The Model The kit is packaged in the standard Trumpeter style top opening box with an artistic representation of the tank emerging from a river, much like the T-37A kit reviewed HERE. The difference is that this box has to be the absolute minimum size that Hobbyboss could get away with, being about 2/3rds the size of the T-37A box. Inside, there are eight sprues, a separate lower hull and a separate turret, all in a pale beige styrene. There are also seven sprues of brown styrene, one small sheet of etched brass, a length of brass wire and a small decal sheet. As with the previously reviewed kits from Hobbyboss, the mouldings are very well produced, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few moulding pips. The details are pretty much as per the T-37 kit, in that they are well rendered with some very nice rivet detail. It also shares the same track system as the T-37, with the individual track links, which, whilst well moulded are joined to the sprue are three points, so not only will they take quite a bit of careful cleaning up, they will need a lot of patience putting a full run of eighty six links per side together. As with the T-37A kit, construction begins with the assembly of the road wheels and their suspension parts. Each pair of wheels is made up form eight parts and there are two pairs fitted per side. The difference is that with each of the bogies there is a length of brass wire, bent to shape with a mould provided, fitted between each upright. These assemblies are then fitted to the lower hull section, along with two return rollers per side and the idler wheel axle bearings. The sprocket wheel gearbox covers are attached followed by the sprocket wheels themselves. At the rear of the hull the propeller shaft housing and propeller are fitted, as is the propeller guard on the underside of the hull and a towing hook assembly with the rudder fitted between them.. The idler wheels are then attached and the assembled tracks can be fitted. The towing shackles on each side of the rear panel are made by the modeller bending the brass wire to shape, using a suitably shaped mould provided on the sprues. The upper hull is then glued to the lower hull and the separate engine cover, with added PE mesh grille and crew access hatch fitted. The two fenders are attached to the hull, whilst the horn and various brackets are fitted to the upper hull. The tow cable is fitted to the right hand fender and other fittings fitted to the left hand fender. The two, two part headlights are then attached to the front of each fender. With the pioneer tools fitted the two part exhaust is attached to the rear engine deck and a two piece storage box fitted to the right hand fender. The simple machine gun turret, with separate base, is fitted with the single piece machine gun, turret hatch and two PE plates. The external section of the machine guns ball socket is glued into position, meaning that the machine gun cannot be posed in anything other than straight without modification. The completed turret is then slotted into position on the hull, completing the build. Decals The small decal sheet only provides two sets of markings for the two vehicles provided on the colour chart. Both of which are in overall Russian Green, which is a shame, as there are quite a few colour schemes that could have been chosen, including those for the captured Finnish and German vehicles. although the Finnish swastikas are included in a split form. There is quite a lot of information on these schemes on the internet, so it shouldnt take long to find a different scheme for your model. Conclusion Yes, its yet another small Russian tank from Hobbyboss. They must be reaching the limit of production types by now. At least they are different enough to have a small squadron of them in your collection, and they do look rather cute, especially if posed next to a monster T-35. Now theres an idea for a diorama. Highly Recommended Review sample courtesy of
×
×
  • Create New...