Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Saturn V'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modeling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Manufacturer News
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aerocraft Models
    • Above & Beyond Retail
    • Air-craft.net
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Bearhobbies.com
    • Bernd.M Modellbau
    • BlackMike Models
    • Casemate UK
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • DACO Products
    • Freightdog Models
    • Hannants
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • fantasy Printshop
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • MikroMir
    • Kagero Publishing
    • Kingkit
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • MJW Models
    • NeOmega & Vector Resin
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Pocketbond Limited
    • Precision Ice and Snow
    • Radu Brinzan Productions
    • Red Roo Models
    • RES/KIT
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Scratchaeronautics
    • Shelf Oddity
    • Small Stuff Models
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Starling Models
    • Thunderbird Models
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Tirydium Models
    • Topnotch - Bases and Masks for Models
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • White Ensign Models
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds
  • Brits Abroad GB

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 7 results

  1. Hello everybody, attention please for all parents and grandads who want to surprise their children and grandchildren. LEGO's countdown for its NASA Apollo Saturn V model set is running ... The most powerful rocket ever flown will go on sale on June 1st, the set is approx. 1:110 and costs 119.99 EUR. Based on a fan submission to LEGO Ideas by Felix Stiessen and Valérie Roche (saabfan and whatsuptoday on the Lego Ideas website) , the 1.969 piece moon rocket stands more than 3 feet tall when assembled and can be separated into its stages. The set also includes microfigures to scale with the Saturn V, a lunar surface and an ocean surface to display liftoff to landing to present. Source: collectspace.com The two LEGO freaks first proposed their Saturn V in 2014. The project received its 10.000th vote in November 2015, qualifying for it for a review by Lego's professional design team. Finally their set was given the "go" to launch as an official product seven months later. After it was approved, the LEGO design team, Michael Psiaki and Carl Thomas Mirriam, took over the project, in order to ensure it lived up to LEGO quality standards. Source: shop.lego.com Source: collectspace.com Although recommended for kids from 14+, I think that my grandson Max with 12 will also create this awesome model, especially since the kit next to the 12 bulging bags also contains a superbly illustrated construction manual (182 pages), Source: brothers-brick.com otherwise the grandpa must help.
  2. Structor

    Saturn V Drawings

    I came across a helpful site. I haven't seen anyone posting about or linking to it, but maybe it is well known to you guys that have been into space modeling for awhile. The site is called Hero Relics. http://heroicrelics.org/index.html There is a vast amount of info and pictures. The Space Race section seems bottomless. I found some very good drawings. This one will print out to over 75" and is over 60MB. It is a SV (AS-503) top to bottom. It might be a nice complement to Davis Weeks drawings or for some might be just the needed additional help. http://heroicrelics.org/info/saturn-v/as-503-inboard-profile.html I have also found many more drawings including a very large S1C drawing and Apollo drawings. And these drawings of the individual stages. http://heroicrelics.org/info/saturn-v/saturn-v-inboard-profiles.html Besides the Space Race section there is the Resources section which contains Space pictures and info and drawings.
  3. Structor

    1/70 Apogee Saturn V

    I have been looking for info on the accuracy of this kit. Does anyone have any thoughts? The pictures I have seen look very good but I don't know how well it dimensions in terms of accuracy. Thanks for any and all input. Greg
  4. SATURN V With Lunar Module AMT 1:200 The Saturn V rocket was the largest in the family of Saturn rockets developed by NASA for its Apollo and Skylab programs. It was a multistage liquid fuelled expendable launcher. NASA launched a total of 13 Saturn V rockets in total and it holds the record for the heaviest payload to low earth orbit of 118,000 Kgs. Even though this is the official record it has been said that weights up to 240,000 Kgs were carried (on Apollo 15). The Saturn rockets were developed under the leadership of Wernher von Braun, and Arthur Rudolph, who the Americans successfully removed from Germany after WWII under Operation Paperclip. Major industrial collaboration was needed on a programme of this scale with Boeing, North American Aviation, and Douglas Aircraft providing the aerospace expertise. IBM was to provide the computing expertise needed. The Saturn V would consist of three main stages, an instrumentation package with the Lunar Module (+adaptor), Service Module, Command module; and launch escape tower on the top. The first stage made by Boeing house 2000 tonnes of rocket fuel and liquid oxygen and generated 7600000 Lbf of thrust on launch via 5 Rocketdyne F-1 engines; stage one would run for 168 seconds getting the Saturn V to an altitude of 67km. Stage 2 built by North American Aviation would then kick in. Using liquid Hydrogen & oxygen through its 5 Rocketdyne J-2 engines 1100000 Lbf of thrust was generated. The last rocket stage 3 was built by the Douglas Aircraft Company and used the same fuel as stage 2. Stage 3 only had one J-2 engine though it burned for 2 ½ minutes to ensure allow for orbital insertion. On top of all three stages sat the instrument package designed by IBM. On top of the three main rocket stages sat the business part of the rocket. The lunar module adaptor covered the lunar module manufactured by Grumman Aircraft Engineering. This would take the astronauts down to the moons surface, and bring them back to the command module later. The service module made by North American Aviation sat above this. The command & service modules would orbit the moon while the lunar module went to the moons surface. This is where the crew would live on their journey to and from the moon. The command module would be the only part of the whole rocket to return intact to the Earth. This was fitted with a heat shield to survive re-entry. Lastly on the very top of the rocket was the Launch Escape Tower. In the event of a catastrophic failure of the rocket on launch the tower would pull the command module away from the explosion and allow it to land with its parachute system. To date the Saturn V is the only rocket to carry humans beyond low earth orbit, A total of 24 astronauts were launched to the moon between 1968 and 1972. Following the Apollo mission NASA created the AAP (Apollo Applications Program) which looked into missions which could be performed using Apollo hardware. Skylab was the only launch not related to the Moon landing program. The Saturn V remains to this day the tallest, heaviest and most powerful operational rocket system. The Kit The kit arrived on five sprues of white plastic. The rocket can be assembled as one part, or it can be made to come apart to revel all the different sections and internal modules. Construction seems fairly similar to how the real rocket was assembled. The first construction step is the rockets first stage. The five main engines are built up and attached to the engine fairing. The two sides of the first stage are joined together at the same time installing the to bulkhead for the Liquid oxygen tank. The interstage fairing is then attached. The next stage is shockingly the second stage of the rocket. The five engines are attached to the second stage engine support; this is then added to the second stage which is assembled from its two parts and the top liquid oxygen bulkhead. The third stage is is then assembled in exactly the same way as stage 2, but there is only one engine to add. None of the first three stages need to be glued together in order that the rocket can come apart to explain how it functioned. On top of the third stage is where it gets interesting. If you wish the rocket to be used for a display then the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM), the LEM housing, and the service module can be assembled at this point. The LEM housing parts should be be glued together if you want to display it open. Finally the Command module and escape tower are constructed and added to the top of the rocket. Decals A small decal sheet provides the National Markings for the rocket. The decal she looks in register and quite matt. There is no mention of the maker. Conclusion This should make upto a nice model of the Saturn V rocket without it being too big to display. If needed it can be made into a good instructional aid of how the rocket worked. Overall recommended if you want a smaller Saturn V in your collection. Review sample courtesy of UK distributors for If you would like more info on the Saturn V then please look at our walkaround
  5. NASA Saturn V Rocket. All pics thanks to Mike Costello. Launch Escape System, primary contractor Lockheed Propulsion Company.
  6. Second part of photos this time covering the Saturn V [/ URL] Enjoy Dan
  7. hi,ive just seen this,looks very comprehensive,with damaged command module,plus splashdown diorama,have a look,dont know the price though? http://www.scalemodelnews.com/2013/04/year-1970-apollo-13-explosion-year-2013.html#more cheers Don
×