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Found 1,493 results

  1. Hi everybody; here's my new project, the 1/72 Revell Eurofighter Typhoon This type entered into Italian Air Force service (AMI, Aeronautica Militare Italiana) in 2004, and it's currently deployed in three different bases: Grosseto (4° Stormo), Gioia del Colla (36° Stormo) and Trapani Birgi (37° Stormo). The kit supplied decals allow to build six different versions: two Germans, one Austrian, one British, one Spanish and one Italian, which is the one I'm doing. Typical Revell instruction sheet, with basically useless color table - it only refers to Revell paints The airframe I'm going to reproduce and the sprues (there's many of them ) The clear parts: the windshield shows some bubbles While the canopy has an annoying moulding seam going all along mid-line I'm planning to use the AM cockpit set from PAVLA More later, now I need to take care of my lawn. Ciao
  2. This is not my usual fayre so please don't expect anything too fancy from this build, which will be made as it comes in the box. All tips for simple improvements I can make along the way will be welcome, and so folks, I give you the box and its contents. by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr
  3. I didn't realise until late last night that the build threads were getting going. So if I may just 'lay down a marker' for these bad boys... They have been sat in the cupboard stash for a few months - waiting for this GB to 'kick off'. I'll get some sprue shots before the weekend, but the vague idea is to do them as a 'matching' set. They will be strictly OOB and a 'just for fun' project - as my mojo has been a little lacking of late. Hopefully the 'team spirit' of a GB will give me the KUTA I need at the moment. See you at the weekend and good luck everyone, Steve
  4. Hot off the bench and finished just yesterday! This is a commission build for a friend, OOB except for the aftermarket seat belts from Eduard. Revell's 1/32 P-51D kit, whilst affordable, was not quite what I expect of a modern, new-tool kit in this day and age. Some notable issues around fit include: Just about EVERYWHERE! All major joins required filling and sanding, reminiscent (to me) of the very old Hobbycraft kits I'd built in the past. Details were soft and sprue gates were massive! Honestly, I switched to my more heavy duty cutters rather than risk my good nippers to get parts off before cleaning up the flash and burr lines. In short, I would not look to build another of this kit. I am so looking forward to going back to 1/72 after this! But... she's finished nonetheless, and I'm hoping her new owner will be satisfied with the results. Once again, thanks for looking
  5. Under the ship killer category - He 177A-5 with Fritz X guided missiles. In 1943 Fritz X missiles sunk the battleship Roma. I hope to do a couple more in the GB time allowing, but i will see how i get on with this one first. TFL Cheers Greg
  6. RoG's McLaren 570S all done, finished in Tamiya TS21 Gold, with Semi Gloss Black and Alclad Dark Aluminium details. Interior is my own 'cream' and 'light black' acrylic mixes. The CF decals are from Ka Models of Korea (highly recommended). Not a great kit and fought me all the way to the very end - the final assembly is a proper PitA. I knew to attach the dash onto the lip BEFORE adding the interior because I'd read and seen so many build reviews. Even so, the final fit is truly dreadful... All that said, like the Ferrari 458, the finished car is truly a thing of beauty to my eye. Please feel free to make any comments or ask any questions (yes I know the exhausts aren't on yet). Best from NZ. Ian.
  7. This is my entry. I thought about Burma Banshee P40 but decided to safe it for a P-40 STGB. So it will be stang. ~Hope it could be as good as Warhawk 8-) And some work I've done yesterday evening....
  8. Well after nearly as much indecision and prevaricating as the Brexit debate (no I'm NOT getting involved!) I have finally decided to join in with a subject which is very much in the spotlight at the moment, albeit for the worst possible reason (it's retirement) I have decided to go with a Panavia Tornado using the recent 1/48 Revell IDS kit, so here are the usual pics of the box and it's contents starting with the box top of Revell's God awful end opening effort; Nice box art, now for the actual plastic showing that all the parts are neatly wrapped in their original packaging; Revell's decal sheet is very well printed and looks to be of excellent quality but I really wish they would stop with the special schemes and give us some good old fashioned politically incorrect front line aircraft in their proper warpaint. When I opened the box I got a nice surprise in the form of a separate plastic bag put into the box (no doubt by it's original owner as I bought it second hand) which contained these resin goodies which should help with the build; All very nice I hear you say but how does this tie in with the criteria of this GB? Well maybe these next pictures will help alleviate your fears..... Nice decals you say, I hope so as some of them are nearly as old as me but hopefully work better, but your'e still not completely convinced, well how about these whizz bangs to hang under the Tonka? Getting better? And yes they are a set of wing seals by one of our very clever members, but if you still haven't pieced everything together yet then here she comes!!!!! Oh Yes!! Isn't she a thing of beauty! A Marineflieger IDS of MFG 1 in the original delivery scheme, stick a couple of Kormorans under the belly of the beast and you have the best Baltic Bolshevik botherer ever! Well that's my opinion any way. And just in case my MFG 1 decals go terribly wrong then I have some slightly more modern ones for MFG 2 in the 3 colour scheme that they wore and carried HARM missiles for killing radars making them SEAD aircraft, as is this Italian ECR which I also have decals for; Well hopefully she meets with the approval of our glorious leader @trickyrich and I shall make a start later this week. Thanks for looking in and all comments and criticisms are gratefully received. Craig.
  9. I have had this kit for sometime and then I spotted 3D lightboats that were designed after the Titanic .Britannic and Titanic were closer in appearance than their sister ship Olympic which had the long career into the 1930,s.All I had to do is add an extra deck on the quarter deck,reposition the life boats and add a few small extra accommodation blocks on the deck.Gone mad with extra parts.Always start going to build for the box,never turns out like that. List so far Kit Revell RMS Titanic 1/700 Wooden deck for Titanic by Hunter Master Models 1/700 RMS Titanic (Olympic, Britannic) Masts set,Must get. P.E. set for the Academy Model kit 1/700 RMS Titanic,I can't use the bridge part,however the davits and windows and other part will get used. Green strips for the hull. 3D lifeboats which start this build,should have seen the size of the box,they came in. and you get the Red Cross signs between the funnels.
  10. With the 40th anniversary of Star Wars this year, i'm going to try and build some kits from that series as a kind of a tribute GB. And to mark feeling very old! To ease myself into it, I've pulled this from the stash which I picked up last year at Telford for the princely sum of a penny shy of £2.. Just a small bit of wear and tear on the box! (hence the price) But everything there.... Behold the mighty sprue map...almost 40 parts! None of your fancy-shmancy 900+ parts Master Series nonsense here.... The upper hull/turret bustle had received a fair whack in the box and was cracked from left side to right so that needed fixing...plastic tabs (hidden) to support and lashings of glue.. It's an Easy kit (Snap-Fit to us older folks) but I'm going to glue it together. So out came a persuading tool to snip the lugs for a better fit. And we have a hull! While not as accurate as the AMT kit and smaller in scale (about 1/50 I think), I'm going to try and improve this by repainting in the Phantom Menace scheme and adding some basic detail to it. Yes, I know there are some minor shape/detail differences between these versions but hoping it will still look the part (and not upset the fans ) I'll miss those 'eyeliner' gun stains from the front glacis! Thanks for looking. Cheers, Dermot
  11. Revell is to release 1/144th new tool Airbus kits - ref. 03942 - Airbus A320 neo Lufthansa New Livery - ref. 04952 - Airbus A321 neo Sprues on display at Shizuoka 2019 Sources: https://www.facebook.com/tetramodel/photos/a.2474802349220072/2475722535794720/?type=3&theater https://www.facebook.com/hobbyland.osaka/photos/a.2253464838073537/2253472751406079/?type=3&theater V.P.
  12. PBY-5A Catalina 1:72 Revell The Consolidated Catalina was one of the most widely used amphibious aircraft of World War II. First flown in 1935, the Catalina proved to be remarkably long-lived. It was so well suited to its role that it not only served throughout the War, but remained in service with its primary user, the US Navy, until 1957 and with the Brazilian Air Force until 1979. There are many surviving Catalinas around the world, including a significant number of airworthy examples. Powered by two Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp engines, the Catalina had a range of over 2,500 miles. Eagle eyed readers will no doubt have already spotted that this is not (thankfully) ye olde Revell kit from the late 1960s. Instead, it's the more modern Academy kit, originally released in 1993 and now repackaged in one of Revell's familiar large-but-flimsy boxvelopes. The kit features clean, crisp mouldings, fully engraved surface details and a respectable level of detail. All together there are around 140 parts spread across six frames of grey plastic and a single frame of clear plastic. Two decal options are included. Assembly begins with a series of sub-assemblies that fit inside the fuselage halves. The main landing gear bays are first and these can be built in wheels up or wheels down configuration. Wheels down will require the main landing gear legs to be assembled from four parts, and care will be required in order to ensure that the parts all align correctly. The wheel wells themselves fit into the inside of the fuselage, so make sure they are firmly glued in places just in case they pop out halfway through the build and rattle around inside the fuselage. There waist and nose gunner stations are present but fairly basic, as is the cockpit. Decals are provided for the instrument panel and sear harnesses. Aftermarket parts will definitely be required if you want to build the model to a modern standard of detail. Once the fuselage halves have been joined (remembering to add 40g of nose weight, which seems a lot) the slab-like wing is next. The wing is moulded in separate sections for the port, starboard and centre parts. The centre section holds the engine pods, to which the basic-but-good-enough engines and cowlings can be added. The outer wing sections hold the retractable floats, and as with the landing gear, these can be finished in retracted or deployed positions. The ailerons and elevators are moulded in place, as is the rudder. A number of details, such as exhausts and DF loop, are provided in different forms for both the early and late variants depicted on the decal sheet. Four bombs are provided to hang under the wings, but these could be swapped for aftermarket depth charges if so desired. The clear parts are nicely moulded. Two different options are provides for on the decal sheet. The first is for a PBY-5A Catalina of the US Naval Aviation Reserve, NAS Glenview, Illinois, 1947. The second is a wartime-ara Catalina PBY-5A of Patrol Squadron 61, US Navy, Umnak Island, Alaska, 1943. The decals are fairly basic but appear to be high quality. Conclusion Academy's Catalina is a solid kit, and although it is starting to show its age, it is still capable of being built into a faithful and convincing replica. It's not as detailed as many of the modern kits we are used to today, but it has recessed panel lines and just about enough detail to pass muster where it counts. Overall this should be a straightforward kit to build. Recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  13. U Boat Type VII C/41 Platinum Edition 1:72 Revell The Type VII submarine was based on earlier German designs. This type would go onto become the most used German submarines of WWII with over 700 being built. As with anything there would be many modifications along the way. The type started as the V11A with an initial 10 being built. The type VIIC would become the main boat of the German Navy with 568 being built between 1940 and 1945. With a range of 8500 nautical miles. The boats had 4 forward, and one stern tube in general (there were a few exceptions) with 14 torpedoes being carried. For surface running and battery charging a pair of supercharged 6 cylinder 4 stroke diesel engines were used which gave a top speed of 17.7 knots. A maximum submerged speed of 7.6 knots was possible with a new fully charged battery. The submarines generally carried a crew of 44 to 52 men in what can best be described as "cramped" conditions. For anyone familiar with the original "Das Boot" mini series U-96 was a Type VIIC. The Kit This boxing is a re-release of Revell's new tooling from 2003 which was released again in 2006. This new boxing is a Platinum edition, It contains all of the original plastic, two large sheets of photo etch, self adhesive wooden decks; and metal parts for the Periscopes (extended & retracted), snorkel mast, radar mast, nav lights, ensign staff, boom support, & gun barrels. such is the large number of these additional parts that a complete separate instruction book is provided for them. Construction begins with the torpedo tube, the modeller must decide whether to have them open or shut and then fit the respective parts into the hull sections. Once this is don't two internal bulkheads for strength are added in and the left/right hull sections can be joined. The stand can then be made up and the hull placed on it. Construction now moves to the stern and the details for the propeller shafts, propellers and supporting structure are added. Once these are on the stern planes and twin rudders can be added. Switching back to the bow, the bow planes are added along with the anchor and protective guides for the bow planes. Next the snorkel is made up, This part is moveable so care must be taken to follow the instructions if you want it to work. The snorkel is fitted into the appropriate deck section, and all the main deck sections can be added to the hull. Work now switches to the conning tower of the sub. The search and attack periscopes are made up installed into the decking along with the tower hatch, The upper tower deck and the lower one are then added into the tower superstructure. Radio masts and other item are then added in also. The deck extension for the anti aircraft gun is then added as well. The single 3.7cm flack gun can then be built up and added. Two additional twin barrelled 20mm Zwilling Anti aircraft guns are then made up and fitted to the tower decking as well. Once these are on various deck fittings, ladders and the railings are added. Finally the ensign staff can be added. The coning tower can then be added to the main hull. Thread is provided for the one forward and to aft wires from the conning tower along with the blocks for securing it. The hull is then finished of with a variety of smaller fittings. Platinum Edition As mentioned this is Revell's Platinum Edition which features two large sheets of photo etch, self adhesive wooden decks; and metal parts for the Periscopes (extended & retracted), snorkel mast, radar mast, nav lights, ensign staff, boom support, & gun barrels. such is the large number of these additional parts that a complete separate instruction book is provided for them and this must be read in conjunction with the main booklet. As expected there are many parts here and I suspect not for the beginner. The many fittings which will replace moulded on detail will look good on the model. The guns also benefit from many detail parts and metal barrels. All the railing will look much better in etch rather than plastic. Markings There are decals for U 997, U 995, U 295, U 324, U 307, U 1023, U 1002, U 1105 included on the sheet with diagrams to show the different paint schemes on individual boats as well as small histories of them. Conclusion It's good to see this kit re-issued as it makes up into an impressive model. The addition of the platinum parts should make a big difference over the kit plastic. Very highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  14. "Wittgenstein here, clear off!" Second nightfighter in my collection, and probably the last one I make in 1:72, installing those antennas was a nightmare. Some pieces also didn´t fit, others were too long, the instructions tell you to install the exhausts without mentioning you won´t be able to fit the flame dampers if you do so, the rudder pedals supporters won't let you fit the nose unless you trim them, etc... Pay close attention, if you build this kit, when making the antenna array: the support struts are of different lengths, something Revell misses to point out. Brushpainted with Revell acrylics.
  15. Revell is to release in November 2016 a new tool 1/32nd Boeing F/A-18E Super Hornet kit - ref.04994 What's wrong with the Trumpeter's 1/32nd Super Hornet? Followed or not in 2017-2018 by two seats 1/32nd Boeing F/A-18F Super Hornet and EA-18G Growler? Source: http://www.plastik-modellbau.org/blog/revell-neuheiten-2016/2016/ V.P.
  16. My entry for this GB will be Dragons Ju 88C-6 in 1:48 scale which came in a large Revell box. A while ago i have purchased the very nice AIMS decal set 4804 with six marking options for three C-6 dayfighters and Fitting for this group build three nightfighters. Also helpful for this project are two Eduard sets. One photo etched set intended for the A-4 bomber but most will fit in a C-6 cockpit as well. The second one is a masking sheet designed for the early C-6 cabin with two bulged B Mounts and the early windscreen. fits the black NJG 2 aircraft. Boxart. The two marking options are interesting as well. 2./NJG 2 with RLM 79 sandy Brown on the two tone standart scheme of RLM 70/71 and FuG 202 Lichtenstein BC radar 4./NJG 2 with a non standart scheme and the same radar. The AIMS set. D5+AV was the mount of Staffelkapitän Oblt. Günther Koberich with the FuG 202 Lichtenstein BC Radar and a slight mottling with RLM 75 over 76 and low vis markings. R4+BH of 1./NJG 2 in North Afrika. Black with a White fuselage band 4R+AS flown ( and wrecked ) by the Staffelkapitän of 8./NJG 2 Hptm. Friedrich Tober with a more intense mottling, FuG 220 Radar and two upward firing 20mm guns known as "Schräge Musik" Also on the decal sheet is a Ju 88G-1 3C+MP of 6./NJG 4 with a scheme for die hard airbrush guys. Enough for a start. Cheers Bernd
  17. Apollo 11 Spacecraft with Interior (03703) 1:32 Revell There can't be many people that don't know about the Moon landings in the late 60s and early 70s, and the Saturn V rocket and its cargo the Apollo spacecraft are instantly recognised by most with even a shallow grasp of history. It was an incredible feat of engineering, providing you don't believe that millions of people have all kept quiet about a conspiracy to fake it all for 50 years, achieved with such a tiny amount of computing power that you probably carry around many times more in your hip pocket these days. Driven in part by Werner Von Braun, who had dreamt about flying to the moon since his childhood, NASA was given the go ahead by JFK in a rousing speech "to go to the moon and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard". Incredibly, they were ready to fly men around the moon seven years after the start of the programme in 1968, after a false start due to the loss of the crew of Apollo 1 on the Launchpad in a horrific fire during training. Apollo 7 to 10 were manned, and pushed the envelope incrementally each time, until Apollo 11, which was the first to attempt a moon landing, with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin scheduled to make the descent, and the lesser known Michael Collins waiting for their return in the Command Module (CM), fully aware that he may have to make the return on his own if things went wrong. They didn't, and on 20th July 1969 they touched down on the moon with many millions watching on TV, when Neil uttered those immortal words "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind". When they lifted off from the moon after a walk on the surface and a brief rest period, they had to rendezvous with the CM, dock and transfer back to the cramped module, discard the Lunar Lander, and then make the journey back to Earth. Upon reaching home, the cylindrical Service Module (SM) section was also discarded, leaving the Command Module the only part to return back to earth, safely splashing down in the Pacific Ocean after re-entry and a thorough roasting. Following this mission were six more successful moon landings in various areas, until funding and public interest dried up, leaving Apollo 17 the last time man went to the moon. There are currently plans to go back in the next several years, but we've been absent now for a lot longer than we were there. The Kit This is a special re-release of Revell's 1970s kit to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing, and includes a set of four acrylic paints in little plastic pots, a small bottle of Revell Contacta Professional glue, and a #2 paintbrush, which had become a little dishevelled during transport due to the bag it was in. Inside the top-opening box are five sprues of silver(ish) styrene, four in white styrene, and one in crystal clear plastic. The paints and instructions are accompanied by a set of decals on a medium sized sheet. First impressions are that this is a product of the times, but time has been good to the moulds, and because it is a full interior kit, the various internal parts of the model are all there, obviously in a somewhat simplified way, but certainly a good starting point if you're a detailer that is looking to build an accurate model. New Ware have a number of sets that you would probably find very useful, but of course that increases the overall price, and that's entirely up to you and your wallet. For the younger modeller that isn't so much bothered with painting, the colour of the parts is roughly broken down into their final colours, so it could be built that way, and for the folks in the middle that want to build what's in the box, there's enough to do a decent job, as can be seen by the picture on the front of the instruction booklet. Construction begins with the aft bulkhead of the crew compartment, which has a number of parts added around its perimeter, and some detail painting done before a rear panel is fitted to its underside and surrounded by a number of strengthening webs. Then the cockpit panels are made up, with decals supplied for many of the faces, although there is no raised detail moulded in, so the decals are all the detail you have. The three crew seats are mounted into a framework that suspends them out in front of the main instrument panels, and there are three crew figures, each a single part with different hand positioning to add a little variety. Their heads are moulded as the glass domes they wore during the ascent stage, but as this is white plastic, the simple option is to paint them a light blue unless you want to go crazy and find some resin heads and vacform some clear domes for each one (New Ware also have a set for this). The instructions would have you painting a black aperture as if they were wearing helmets, but that's not the case if you watch the videos of the real thing. The crew seats and main IP are then fixed to the aft bulkhead in three places, and the docking ring assembly is built up from a partial ring (only part will be seen), plus the pointed docking mechanism, which is made up from seven parts plus an external ring. This sits on top of the opaque section of the Command Module's conical skin, with the clear part added in, exposing the docking ring, and the rest of the crew compartment once it is added over the internals. Moving onto the tubular body of the Service Module (SM), the segment that will be seen through the clear part is built up, comprising various tanks, bottles and equipment, with more detail painting to give it some life. The top bulkhead where the conical CM attaches is a single part, as is the aft bulkhead, which has a small tapering tube attached inside before it is glued in place. Now the external details can be added, starting with the communications array, which has four dishes on a mast, with receivers in the centre of each one. Other small details are added around the exterior, including the four manoeuvring thruster packs, which have four individual bells and are mounted at 90o around the circumference. The crew compartment also has some grab handles added, and the big engine bell is a single part that keys into the aft bulkhead at the rear of the SM, with the comms gear fitted nearby. The CM fits to the SM with three conical pins and can be left unglued if you want to separate them later. The final parts are a stand, which has a small silver-grey part that fits onto join between the CM and SM, and two large curved white parts to hold the model off the ground. There is also a decal provided on the sheet that you fix to the large flat front. Markings Each Apollo mission had subtle differences, so Apollo 11 was unique from the others, with the decals called out on a five-view diagram on the back of the instruction booklet. The decals were printed for Revell by Zannetti, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. While the interior decals add a little detail to the blank instrument panel areas, they're no substitute for raised or engraved detail, and are fairly simply printed, which may put off a few potential purchasers. The exterior decals have the correct weirdly spaced A in the United States, plus a few of the stencils that are found around the spaceframe (?), with some large and small flags, and even a few tiny NASA meatballs for the crew's suits. Conclusion It's a welcome re-release, and although time has moved along, there's definitely still a market for it amongst those that want a nice desktop model, as well as anyone that will use it as a jumping-off point for a highly accurate model. When you see what can be done with it, and its finished size, it becomes quite tempting. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  18. As culled from the Hannants future release list. I took screen shots before anybody could decide this was a mistake:
  19. OK, we've got an Airfix Hunter currently on its way to Chez FC courtesy of eBay, however as I'm chomping at the bit to start another build now that my Blenheim WIP is coming to an end, my thoughts have turned to it's immediate predecessor, the Canadair Sabre Mk F.4, which served with the RAF as an interim solution until the Hunter entered service. Let's have a look at what we've got then. Here are the box and sprue shots: ....... and as a teaser was showing in the first photo here's the full package showing most of what we are going to add to Revell's offering (I say most as I have also used my eBay Plane TokensTM - AKA my wages! - to buy a couple of Quickboost resin seats which should arrive in the next couple of days) The Red Roo early slatted wings is a drop in replacement for the kit parts so shouldn't offer up too many difficulties, and are needed as all the three options in the EagleStrike decals sheet have these wings specified rather than the 6-3 wing that was later fitted to the RAF machines (see note below re the 4 Sqn option as it may be that Eagle Strike made a boo boo with that one, but I'm no expert so can't say for 100% either way). Small moan, I bought them from an Australian eBay trader (international Plane Tokens needed for that one) and I got nabbed by the Royal Thieving Mail with their wonderful silver card that informed me that I was to be extorted £8.00 for them to be able to collect the £3.57 of tax/duty on my behalf. I believe a de-minimis limit should apply of at least a 50-50 split between charges and duty before collection is enforced as charging someone the best part of three times what is collected does lead to a fair bit of resentment to our lovely posties. The plan is to make the middle option, a 93 Squadron machine serialled XB829 'D', based at RAFG Jever in 1955 for no other reason than I like the arrow Squadron bars, and that I can find a photo of this airframe that supports it having the slatted wings, unlike the other option I fancied doing, the 4 Sqn one! The RAF Jever website for 4 Sqn says that 4 Sqn only flew the Hard Edged version (in keeping with their reputation) and there is a photo of XB931 in a slightly different marking scheme that appears to have the 6-3 wing as evidenced by the wing fence. I quite like the way they referred to other units using the biplane version when referring to their slatted-wing airframes. Perhaps I will build one of my Academy or Italeri 6-3 Sabres as this one. Having previously built the Hasegawa RAF Sabre boxing I can confirm that all the sprues bar the wings are the same as that boxing. The Revell boxing has the longer span 6-3 slatted wings which is no good for our chosen airframe, or any other RAF scheme as far as I know. The Hasegawa boxing had the unslatted 6-3 wing suited to the modified RAF machines. Onto the build. Well since opening the box I have had the Rocky Horror's "Let's do the Time Warp" ear-worming its merry way across my consciousness, as the metallic silver styrene is like a step back in time to the 70's as it looks just like the Airfix plastic of that era that I cut my modelling teeth on. Luckilly under a coat of Halford's primer it looks OK, I've checked that as a matter of utmost importance! First step was to glue the airbrakes in the closed position. One side fitted perfectly and the other, shall we just say, didn't. As I'm doing a camouflaged rather than natural metal finish I think we'll get away with only a bit of remedial action and still look OK. Found a couple of small sub assemblies to be going on with, i.e. the fuel tanks and main wheels, and although unphotographed I gave all the cockpit and engine parts a coat of Halford's finest. I mentioned the earlier Hasegawa RAF build. That has been sitting on my Shelf of Doom for quite a few years now as the "Muck Up Fairies" managed to pull off sizeable chunks of the decals when removing some Tamiya Masking Tape whilst doing some touch ups, so if anyone has a spare set of decals from this kit (even just the 112 Sqn sharkmouth scheme decals) I would happilly relieve your spares box of their burden in return for the odd beer token or two. I will put a proper request for this in the Wanted section at some point in the build now that my memory has been jogged. OK so until the next one.... Chris
  20. Hi.. This year mark Phantom's 60th Anniversary, a local modelling group here organize a Phantom Group Build. And since I have several in my stash, and this GB start right in my off-shore work schedule, obviously I'm obliged to join up. I start with these two 1/72 Phantom; Fujimi (Fgr.1, with Raspberry Ripple Scheme and 25th Anniversary marking) and Revell (JG.71 "Richtofen" Anniversary marking). The build started as soon I arrived and set in my usual "off shore work bench", with the F-4F got the first cut, filled the injection marks. I learned that one of the (apparently, many) flaws of the Revell was in the cockpit area. The Ejection seat mas set too low, I add several stack of evergreen strips I have with me. This made the instrument panel seated lower, So I hack out the kit's, made a new one using the strips, and glued the kit's instrument panel to keep with the original detail. Added some tiny detail to the other parts of the cockpit (wiring from the WSO's instrument panel, circuit breaker panel on the WSO's cockpit) I really not much of a Phantom Phreaks like many of you guys, and I don't have many references lying around here so.. any comments / reference are welcome.. Cheers, Mario
  21. Hi guys and gals, Can you believe this is my first Messerschmitt 109? I've been modelling for years and never got round to making one of these seminal aircraft! Well, I've now broken my duck so here's the very nice Revell G-6 Late kit in a dramatic nightfighter scheme (Red 2, 1. NJG) from an AIMS decal sheet. There are seven more versions on the sheet so it was great value. The aircraft was painted in Colourcoats enamels (still the best model paint I've ever used, and shall continue to do so!) I used RLM 74/75/76 and RLM 02 with an overspray of Night Black. I thought this was a really cool looking scheme and makes the clean lines of the aircraft look even more menacing! I don't know much about these aircraft or modelling them, so there are probably a few howlers - I just enjoyed it for the easy-to-build kit and cool paintjob! All the best, Alan
  22. Greetings Been waiting to see one pop up on here but it hasn't happened yet - So here's mine. I'd made a start on it a long while back but only got as far as taking the main pieces off the trees and infilling the windows to do the "MATS" version before I put it back in the box and back on the shelf... Trust this is within the 25% rule? Hopefully get on with further work soon. KR's IanJ
  23. This is the older Revell kit, but despite it's age, it still builds into a nice model. The fit is generally pretty good and you do have the option to fold the wings. This is built straight from the box, with the roundels masked and painted on. The aircraft is one used in the 100 Hours, or more commonly known as the Soccer War between Honduras and El Salvador in 1969. It was the last air war fought with piston engined aircraft, Honduras flying Corsairs and El Salvador flying a mix of Mustangs and Corsairs. Surviving fighters on both sides continued to serve into the 1970's.
  24. Sometimes older kits showes up as old friends. And some times as not so good friends. When it comes to 1/72 scale P-51D Mustang's the Revell kit must have an record in availability. Albeit not as an good kit. We also have older kits from Airfix, Matchbox, Heller and Hasegawa. But one of the oldest P-51's must be the Lindberg "Bomber Escort". Anyone seen it? Built it? https://www.oldmodelkits.com/index.php?detail=23976&page=1&manu=lindberg Cheers / André
  25. After a long time, I return this scale model of Avro Lancaster to 1/72 scale.
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