Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'RAF Ouston'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modelling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Manufacturer News
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aerocraft Models
    • Above & Beyond Retail
    • Air-craft.net
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Bearhobbies.com
    • Bernd.M Modellbau
    • BlackMike Models
    • Casemate UK
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • DACO Products
    • Freightdog Models
    • Hannants
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • fantasy Printshop
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • MikroMir
    • Kagero Publishing
    • Kingkit
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • MJW Models
    • NeOmega & Vector Resin
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Pocketbond Limited
    • Precision Ice and Snow
    • Radu Brinzan Productions
    • Red Roo Models
    • RES/KIT
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Scratchaeronautics
    • Shelf Oddity
    • Small Stuff Models
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Starling Models
    • Thunderbird Models
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Tirydium Models
    • Topnotch - Bases and Masks for Models
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • White Ensign Models
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds
  • Brits Abroad GB

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 8 results

  1. Following on from completion of my Anson airbourne interception trainer, here are photos of the assembled 62 OTU fleet, at RAF Ouston, Northumberland in March 1945. The Anson Mk.1 (A.I.), DJ528 '45', is about to be retired, to be replaced by the Wellington Mk.XVIII (T.18), ND113 '27', with Hurricane IIc, LF363 'F' to act as a target. 62 Operational Training Unit, RAF Ouston, March 1945 by Philip Pain, on Flickr 62 Operational Training Unit, RAF Ouston, March 1945 by Philip Pain, on Flickr 62 OTU had over 50 Ansons, replaced by 29 Wellingtons, and they trained all of Fighter Command's night fighter crews. Non-radar equipped Ansons acted as target aircraft, until replaced by 23 Hurricane IIc aircraft. The OTU was split into 3 squadrons, and 'A' Sqdn had white numeral codes commencing '1' to '18''; 'B' Sqdn had light blue numeral codes commencing '32' to '47'; and 'C' Sqdn (the target aircraft) carried single letters commencing 'A', also possibly painted light blue. Hurrican IIc LF363 still flies with the BBMF at RAF Coningsby, and it is not known what code letter it had at 62 OTU. So 'F' has been applied, this being it's known letter when earlier being with 309 (Polish) Sqdn. By 1947 LF363 is known to have lost its guns, and I suspect that they might have been removed at 62 OTU, as there would have been no requirement for a target aircraft to have them. I'm hoping for some definite confirmation before removing the gun barrels from this model. These models at RAF Ouston are part of my project to model all of the main aircraft types based there from 1941 to 1974. So far 31 models have been completed, and they can be found on my "RAF Ouston Research" website at https://sites.google.com/view/raf-ouston-research/models-of-oustons-aircraft
  2. Following on from my work-in-progress thread for this Airfix Anson, here are the photos of the completed model; Avro Anson Mk.1 (A.I.), DJ528, B Sqdn 62 OTU, Ouston, March 1945 by Philip Pain, on Flickr Avro Anson Mk.1 (A.I.), DJ528, B Sqdn 62 OTU, Ouston, March 1945 by Philip Pain, on Flickr Avro Anson Mk.1 (A.I.), DJ528, B Sqdn 62 OTU, Ouston, March 1945 by Philip Pain, on Flickr Avro Anson Mk.1 (A.I.), DJ528, B Sqdn 62 OTU, Ouston, March 1945 by Philip Pain, on Flickr Avro Anson Mk.1 (A.I.), DJ528, B Sqdn 62 OTU, Ouston, March 1945 by Philip Pain, on Flickr Avro Anson Mk.1 (A.I.), DJ528, B Sqdn 62 OTU, Ouston, March 1945 by Philip Pain, on Flickr Avro Anson Mk.1 (A.I.), DJ528, B Sqdn 62 OTU, Ouston, March 1945 by Philip Pain, on Flickr Avro Anson Mk.1 (A.I.), DJ528, B Sqdn 62 OTU, Ouston, March 1945 by Philip Pain, on Flickr 62 OTU at RAF Ouston in Northumberland was Fighter Command's only Anson equipped OTU, responsible for training all Beaufighter and Mosquito Nav/Observers. The Anson airbourne interception trainer was equipped with A.I.Mk.IV, and based initially at RAF Usworth, Sunderland, before moving to nearby RAF Ouston in 1943. From early 1945 the Anson was replaced by the Wellington Mk.XVIII (T.18). 62 OTU had a complement of over 50 Ansons, and the OTU was split into three squadrons; 'A' Sqdn applied white two digit codes; 'B' Sqdn light blue two digit codes; and 'C' Sqdn supplied the 'target' aircraft (not A.I. equipped) with single white code letters. It was a daily sight over Northumberland to see pairs of Ansons chasing each other around the sky.
  3. For those who may remember my previous attempt to create a Wellington Mk.XVIII (T.18) of 62 OTU at RAF Ouston, 1945, this new build is intended to produce its predecessor the Avro Anson Mk.1 (A.I.), also with 62 OTU at Ouston in Northumberland. The starting point for this new conversion is this excellent booklet; Anson (2) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr The top of the cover shows my chosen subject, complete with radar aerials. Inside the booklet is the following photo of one of these A.I. Ansons; Anson (3) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr And that is it! Unlike the Wellington T.18 where I eventually had six or seven photos to work from, here I have just one post-war photo, and a single side view illustration. The only information in written descriptions is that there were two radar trainees, plus an instructor, and that the A.I. radar installation was similar to that on early Beaufighters and Mosquito night fighters, with an arrow head aerial on the nose, and two vertical aerials near each wing tip. Absolutely no information regarding the internal layout - was there one radar position that the two trainees took turns at using? Or two radar positions, one for each trainee? Where did the Instructor sit? This all matters, because the interior of a Mk.1 Anson is very visible. Were the two clear view escape hatches on top of the fuselage retained? And the bomb-aiming clear view panel in the nose? I've also got the excellent "Anson File" book by Air Britain, but it contains no photos of the A.I. version, and no additional information. The post-war photo (above) gives some clues, and in particular there appear to be one or two additional partitions within the fuselage. So I'm going to opt for two radar positions, unless anyone knows different? The photo also shows that apart from the A.I. aerials, there were other aerials that seem very similar to those on the Wellington T.18. The main aerial mast above the cockpit was removed. The forward sloping aerial under the nose suggests that the bomb aimer's glazed panel would become solid. The photo also appears to show, more clearly in the booklet, that NK291 had a prominent astrodome in place of the forward top fuselage escape hatch. The side view illustration doesn't show an astrodome. My guess is that these Ansons were converted from various Mk.1s, and retained features from their particular donor aircraft. I also think that 'stray daylight' from various windows didn't matter, because these were going to be Mosquito or Beaufighter crew members, and in those aircraft the A.I. operator sat in an open cockpit, with the radar screen encased in light proof rubber cover. 62 OTU had three constituent squadrons, A, B, and C, with a total complement of over 50 Ansons. Apparently 'C' squadron didn't operate the A.I. version. So how many Anson (A.I.) were actually produced? The Air Britain "Anson File" doesn't identify the A.I. aircraft, but does record those that served with 62 OTU. The Wellington T.18 production run was 80 aircraft, and each of those could carry four trainees. So there must have been more than 80 Ansons, perhaps well over 100 aircraft? It was a significant version, and they were the only Ansons to equip a Fighter Command OTU. All of the Beaufighter and Mosquito night fighter squadron radar operators were trained at RAF Ouston, and RAF Usworth (Sunderland) before 1943. This model uses the Airfix Anson Mk.1, not the best choice but it should knock into shape. The initial work being to alter the engines to remove the cylinder helmets; add the lower intake, (fashioned from scrap sprue); and reshape the lower part of the cowlings, including adding a notch for the external exhaust pipe. Anson (1) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr
  4. Following on from the WIP thread for this model, http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235035905-172-raf-walrus-from-matchboxrevell-kit/&tab=comments#comment-3004200, here are the completed photos;Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (38) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrWalrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (41) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrWalrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (50) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrWalrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (56) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrWalrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (59) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrWalrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (61) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrWalrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (68) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrJust a comment about the accuracy of the scheme, as it is based on a partial photo of some erks stood in front of the rear fuselage, and obliterating most of the code letters. The 'FA' and the hyphen are correct, and the colours are red, unlike some RAF Rescue squadrons that used yellow. However, the individual code letter 'B' could be a 'D' or even a 'G' as only a bit of a curved letter can be seen. RAF Rescue squadrons only had a few aircraft each, to include the Walrus and Defiants, later replaced by the Anson. The highest letter known for 281 Squadron is an Anson coded 'F'. As the Walrus came first, early alphabet letters are likely, thus choosing 'B' for this model of Z1768. This kit is the Revell re-issue of the Matchbox kit, and to improve the detail of the kit, some 130 individual additions/corrections were made. It is fully rigged using nylon thread and, as shown in the WIP thread, the rigging was first attached to the inside of the parts, before construction, and then pulled through and secured after gluing parts together. Thanks for looking.
  5. This one has been over three weeks in the making so far, and still far from finished. I decided to adopt a very unusual method of construction, but wasn't sure if it would work or not. So didn't post work-in-progress photos for fear of having to abandon it half way thorough, with much egg on face. I have an original Matchbox 1/72 kit of the Supermarine Walrus, but decided to use the later Revell re-issue of the kit, as it has better plastic, much less shrinkage on the parts, and comes with some of the stencil markings applied to the real Walrus. My chosen subject is an RAF Walrus Mk.II of 281 Squadron, circa 1942-43, based at RAF Ouston in Northumberland, and later at RAF Woolsington (now Newcastle Airport). And then the difficulties started! There are loads of photos and markings for FAA Walrus Mk.1 aircraft, but very little of any quality for the RAF version. The two preserved Walrus Mk.Is at Hendon (an Aussie Seagull) and Yeovilton are both metal hulled ex Navy examples, and seem to differ in many details from the RAF wooden hulled Mk.II. Reliable colour scheme information for the RAF machines is scant, and various 3-view drawings and side view profiles all lack essential detail, or are just wrong. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (1) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Started with the interior, which contained nothing, other than 3 crude seats. Didn't put too much effort in to it, as not much will be visible. The two side window positions were cut out and glazed. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (2) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (3) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr All scratch built, apart from the control column from an Airfix Anson. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (4) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Drilled holes for the rigging wires, and also used putty to create the missing aileron hinges. The Matchboc/Revell kit is reasonably accurate, but almost completely devoid of all the little details. In this photo I've got the inboard hinge in the wrong position, it has since been corrected. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (5) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Also drilled rigging holes in the wing floats. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (6) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr The engine nacelle with some of the 16 holes drilled in it! Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (7) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr The fuselage together, with filler applied and sanded. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (8) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr This is my unusual construction technique for this model - anchoring the rigging inside the parts, before gluing the bits together. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (9) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Same for the engine nacelle and associated struts. The bits of tape are to stop the rigging falling out, and to keep the correct rigging ends together. I did lose the plot several times, it was very complex! Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (10) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (11) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Unusual construction continues, with the floats painted, attached and fully rigged, before the painted lower wing half is glued to the top half. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (12) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr I've never before painted, decaled and varnished a fuselage before attaching anything to it. Also, couldn't find correct sized dull-red code letters, so applied white ones, to be over painted after in dull red. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (13) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr This is the top surface of the lower wing, again fully painted, decaled and varnished, before joining to the lower wing half. Much time also spent agonising over whether or not to apply 'shadow shading' to the lower wing surface (i.e. lighter shades to compensate for the dark shadow created by the upper wing). However, shadow shading was officially discontinued in 1942, so I concluded that new-built RAF Walrus aircraft were unlikely to have it. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (14) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Here is the engines nacelle and struts having the rigging wires glued to the fuselage, before attaching the plastic parts. The rigging would subsequently be pulled tight and glued. I would do this differently next time, and attached the rigging from inside the fuselage for greater strength and less visible super glue. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (15) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Having attached the engine nacelle & struts, the tailplanes were attached next in order to give a 'level datum' for the splayed undercarraige legs. This didn't work as planned and one wheel had to be prised off and re-attached to try and level the model. The u/c legs on the model have very weak attachments, and this didn't seem to make sense for the real aircraft either. It was only after carefully studying photos of the real aircraft that it was discovered that there are in fact two very small struts on the back face of the undercarraige legs, and these lock on to the fuselage when the wheels are down. They are invisible in most photos, and completely absent from all 3-view plans! Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (16) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr The lower surface of the wing centre section was then attached, and the rigging pulled through and super glued. But not before much difficulty in trying to get the centre section 'straight and level'. This involved much bending of the struts which did not align properly, and it was not caused by the 3-degree offset on the engine nacelle. Note also that the front intake on the nacelle has been drilled out. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (17) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Then the top surface of the wing centre section was glued in place. It is perhaps debatable whether or not RAF Walrus had the four-wire sling on this top surface, as there would not normally be any requirement to hoist RAF Walrus back onto ships? Also regarding the top of the canopy, at least one of the preserved museum Walrus aircraft has only two (thicker) frames, rather than the three depicted on the model. Published plans and 3-view drawings are no help in resolving this. Finally, a late 'discovery' was that the kit wrongly has a second bilge pump pipe on the starboard nose, so this was removed and the paint repaired on that side. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (18) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (19) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr The kit's tail feathers are devoid of the various actuating rods, so these were scratch built and added. Walrus II, Z1768, 281 Sqdn, Ouston, 1942-3 (20) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr More missing details include the faired lower front struts, and the prominent blister under the rear of the engine nacelle. This is assumed to be some sort of 'sea spray guard' for the lower engine cylinders? That's all so far, but more to follow .............. Reply Quick Reply
  6. Finished this one two days ago, and here are the photos, followed by an interesting 'back story';Sea Hurricane IIc, NF700, 804 Sqdn, Ouston, January 1943 (1) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrSea Hurricane IIc, NF700, 804 Sqdn, Ouston, January 1943 (6) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrSea Hurricane IIc, NF700, 804 Sqdn, Ouston, January 1943 (9) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrSea Hurricane IIc, NF700, 804 Sqdn, Ouston, January 1943 (10) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrSea Hurricane IIc, NF700, 804 Sqdn, Ouston, January 1943 (22) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrSea Hurricane IIc, NF700, 804 Sqdn, Ouston, January 1943 (24) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrSea Hurricane IIc, NF700, 804 Sqdn, Ouston, January 1943 (27) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrThe kit was built 'out of the box', without modification, but the markings became one of my head banging exercises. I wanted a Sea Hurricane to join my RAF Ouston, Northumberland, collection, because 804 Squadron FAA were based there for a month in January 1943. This was the only time that the Navy ever used Ouston, and possibly they were doing trials or exercises with new built warships off the Tyne. I thought it would be easy to find 804's markings, given that it is well known FAA squadron, and I had a definite date to work with. Wrong!Sea Hurricane NF700 had an interesting history, and was originally built as a Hurricane Mk.IIc for the RAF with the serial number KW921. However it was retained in the factory and together with others was converted to become a Sea Hurricane IIc. Together with its six (later nine) companions NF700 was delivered to 804 Squadron and embarked on the aircraft carrier HMS Dasher. In October 1942 they sailed for the Mediterranean to join the American led invasion of French occupied North Africa. This was "Operation Torch", and to try and disguise the British participation, all aircraft taking part were painted with American 'stars' in place of the British markings. The theory was that the Vichy French defenders were more likely to capitulate to their 'friends' the Americans.HMS Dasher returned to Britain late in 1942 and 804 Squadron disembarked and spent brief periods at two FAA airfields before arriving at RAF Ouston. By then it is assumed that the "Operation Torch" markings would have been removed and replaced with 804's normal codes, as shown on the model above. After spending the month of January 1943 at Ouston, 804 Squadron moved to Northern Ireland at the beginning of February, and handed all their aircraft over to 835 Squadron, including NF700. The story does not end there, because 835 Squadron had the aircraft overpainted in 'Arctic white' and embarked on the aircraft carrier HMS Nairana to join the Arctic convoys to Russia. It was on this voyage in 1943, that NF700 was landing back on the carrier in rough seas, when the pitching ship made it strike the stern, and it ended up crashed on the flight deck with a broken back. It was classed as a write off, and would have been stripped of useable spare parts, and dumped over the side into the sea. Cold and deep Arctic waters have low oxygen levels, so even salt water corrosion is held at bay, and it is quite likely that the remains of NF700 still exist to this day in its watery grave off Norway.The 'white' Sea Hurricanes of 835 Squadron have been much modelled, and therefore serial numbers for NF700 were readily available. So this was the serial I chose for the model. However the individual code letter it wore with 804 Squadron is unknown, so I guessed at 'S7-A' on the thin assumption that 804's Commander would have chosen the new aircraft with the 'best' serial number for himself.Thanks for looking.
  7. Yep, it's the BBMF's famous Hurricane IIc LF363, "but not as we know it Jim";Hurricane IIc, LF363, 62 OTU, Ouston, early 1945 (2) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrHurricane IIc, LF363, 62 OTU, Ouston, early 1945 (6) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrHurricane IIc, LF363, 62 OTU, Ouston, early 1945 (8) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrHurricane IIc, LF363, 62 OTU, Ouston, early 1945 (10) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrHurricane IIc, LF363, 62 OTU, Ouston, early 1945 (16) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrHurricane IIc, LF363, 62 OTU, Ouston, early 1945 (20) w by Philip Pain, on FlickrIt is the Heller 1/72 Hurricane IIc kit, built 'out of the box' and finished as Hawker Hurricane IIc LF363 of 62 OTU at RAF Ouston, Northumberland, in early 1945. The OTU had a complement of 29 Wellington T.18 airbourne radar trainers, and 23 Hurricane IIc to act as targets for the trainee operators. LF363 was just another bog standard Hurricane in those days, and its later history seems to have started in 1947 when it was refurbished by Hawkers, the armament removed, a different Merlin engine installed (with six exhaust stacks each side), and an all silver paint scheme applied with post-war D-type roundels. It then served with some RAF Station Flights until it became the RAF's last airworthy Hurricane, and is now the RAF's oldest aircraft still on charge.There are no known photos of it in 1945, and once again I have had to assume how it might of looked when being chased around the skies of Northumberland by Wellingtons. The camouflage scheme is standard for the period, and by 1945 the upperwing 'C-type' roundels should have been adopted, although I have not been able to find a single Hurricane photo that confirms them, mostly because the camera angles hide them. Neither is it known what code letter was applied to LF363, and 62 OTU used double digits for the Wellingtons, and single letters for the Hurricanes, so it could be any one of 23 letters. However, LF363 is known to have earlier been 'F' of 309 (Polish) Squadron, so I have used that letter as a nod to its earlier history.Thanks for looking.
  8. Following on from the WIP thread for this model, here are the completed photos; Wellington T.18, ND113, 62 OTU, Ouston, April 1945 (13) bw by Philip Pain, on Flickr Wellington T.18, ND113, 62 OTU, Ouston, April 1945 (7) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Wellington T.18, ND113, 62 OTU, Ouston, April 1945 (12) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Wellington T.18, ND113, 62 OTU, Ouston, April 1945 (15) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Wellington T.18, ND113, 62 OTU, Ouston, April 1945 (17) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Wellington T.18, ND113, 62 OTU, Ouston, April 1945 (21) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Wellington T.18, ND113, 62 OTU, Ouston, April 1945 (22) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Wellington T.18, ND113, 62 OTU, Ouston, April 1945 (30) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Wellington T.18, ND113, 62 OTU, Ouston, April 1945 (33) w by Philip Pain, on Flickr Many thanks for looking, and the next part of this 62 OTU project will be to make a Hurricane IIc for the Wellington to play with. This will be none other than the famous BBMF LF363,formerly with 62 OTU at RAF Ouston. These models are all part of my 'RAF Ouston' project, and the models completed so far can be viewed here https://sites.google.com/view/raf-ouston-research/home
×