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Found 41 results

  1. Sources: http://karopka.ru/forum/forum185/topic4526/?PAGEN_1=4 http://modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=68170&start=3360 Ark Models is to release very soon a 1/48th Polikarpov I-158 kit - ref.AK48045 More about Ark Models: http://www.war.ee/modelling_area/view_article.php?id=291&lang_id=1 V.P.
  2. I-16 Type 17 WWII Soviet Fighter (32005) ICM 1:32 Design work on the I-16 began during the summer of 1932 at the Central Aero and Hydrodynamic Institute. At this juncture Polikarpov was in the kind of straits that could only happen in the Soviet Union. His career which had entailed a swift ascent to the top post of the OSS (the department for experimental land plane construction), had taken a sudden downward plunge upon the occasion of his arrest during the 1929 purge. Instead of a firing squad or a gulag, however, Polikarpov and his design team were sentenced to an "internal prison," there to continue their work under the close scrutiny of the state. Evidently, his prosecutors judged him too vital to the future of Soviet military prowess to inflict a harsher punishment. When the tiny I-16 flew for the first time in December 1933, it was far ahead of any other fighter design in the world, featuring retractable landing gear, a cantilever wing and variable pitch propeller. At this point the I-16 might well have faded into obscurity, if not for the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in July 1936. This war drew support from all over the world. The Nationalists, supported mainly by German and Italian forces, were the better equipped. Britain, France, the United States, the Netherlands, Czechoslovakia and Turkey all sent an assortment of aircraft to the Republican forces, directly or indirectly. But by far the major supporter of the Republicans was the Soviet Union, which supplied 1,409 of the 1947 aircraft contributed by other countries. 475 of these aircraft were Polikarpov I-16s. They first entered combat in Spain in November 1936. Flown in many cases by Soviet pilots, they proved more than a match for German He 51 fighters and Arado Ar68, but met their equals in the Italian C.R.32 biplanes and were overpowered by Messerschmidt Bf 109s. From March 1937, all remaining I-16s were concentrated into Fighter Group 31, and this was by far the most successful of all Soviet-equipped units. Meanwhile, I-16s were fighting also in China, and in 1939 were operated against the Japanese in Mongolia. Their final fling came during the early part of the Second World War, but by then they were overshadowed by more advanced foreign types. Suffering the brunt of the German invasion, those remaining were replaced by more modern fighters in 1942-1943. The outstanding manoeuvrability, firepower and rate of climb, surprised the enemy leading to the opposition nickname of Rata (Rat) and the friendly name Mosca (Fly). Equipped with the Soviet 20 mm cannon it was the most powerful aircraft weapon in front line service with any nation on the eve of World War II. Another batch of I-16s was purchased by China to fight the Japanese, again surprising the other side with excellent performance. When it first appeared, the I-16 Ishak (Little Donkey) was powered by a radial engine which developed a modest 450 hp. Even with this it achieved a creditable 376 km/h (234 mph) and, as the world's first single-seat fighter to have low monoplane wings, an enclosed cockpit (on some versions) and a retractable undercarriage. It was immediately put into mass production alongside the Polikarpov I-15 biplane fighter. Development led eventually to one version of the I-16 reaching over 520km/h (325 mph), with an engine of about two-and-a-half times the original power. The Model This is the latest kit from ICM of this diminutive fighter. This is the standard I-16 Type 24 Kit with additional sprues for the fuselage and wings of the Type 17 so you could build a type 24 or 10 from this if you wanted. All the parts are superbly moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few noticeable moulding pips. Since the aircraft was mostly wood there are very few panel lines, where fabric was used in the construction, the kit shows the underlying structure, but in a nicely restrained way. There are a fair number of unused parts in this boxing due to the way ICM has moulded the parts for maximum use from all the variants. This boxing comes with an additional sprue for the Ski landing gear used during winter. Construction begins with the wings and the two upper sections being attached to the single piece lower section, after which the port and starboard clear navigation lights are attached. Each aileron is moulded in top and bottom halves, which, once joined together are fitted in the desired poses, along with the lower underside of the nose. The cockpit is assembled next, and is a very nicely detailed area. The rear bulkhead is fitted with the seat backrest and support, while the two piece rudder pedals are assembled. The pedals are fitted to the cockpit floor, along with the rear mounted battery box. The front and rear bulkheads are then glued into the left hand fuselage section along with some sidewall detail. The floor is then slide in through the front bulkhead opening and glued to the rear bulkhead. The two piece throttle is assembled and glued into position, and then the instrument panel, which is moulded in clear plastic is fitted with the instrument decal. The rest of the cockpit is then detailed with the oxygen bottle instrument panel, joystick, a couple of handles, and seat. On the opposite side wall the undercarriage handle and a couple of instrument clusters are attached. The firewall is fitted with the two piece oil tank and two gun troughs, before being fitted to one half of the fuselage. The two piece rudder and three piece elevators are then assembled, as is the two piece upper nose section. The fuselage halves are then joined, and the rudder, horizontal tailplanes and upper nose section attached, as are the two door panels. The fuselage and wing assembly are then glued together. The engine bearers and attached to the engine mounting ring, followed by gearbox case and intake manifold, the two halves that make up the cylinders, each with exquisite fin detail, are joined together, then fitted with the piston rods and individual exhaust pipes, before the gearbox assembly is fitted to the rear. The completed engine is then attached to the fuselage. The engine is cowled with three optionally fitted panels, plus the three piece nose cowl, with optionally positioned vents. The two machine guns fitted to the upper nose are then slid into their associated troughs, followed by the gunsight and windscreen. The build is finished off with the assembly of the two main undercarriage units. Each unit is made up of a two piece wheel, single piece main leg, complete with actuator, two outer doors, with separate hinged lower section, there is a second support rod fitted with another door which is glued to the leg and rear mounting point in the wing. If wanted the ski under carriage can be fitted instead of the wheels. The tail wheel is then attached, as is the tail cone and rear light, wing gun muzzles, side mounted venturi style pitot and what looks like an aerial unit, aft of the cockpit. Decals The decal sheet is printed by ICM themselves. The decals are quite glossy, well printed, in register and nicely opaque, particularly useful for the large white numbers. There are for decal options, 3 in the standard green of blue camouflage, and one in the green & Black over blue scheme. The four aircraft are:- I-16 Type 17 of the 22nd Fighter Regiment, winter 1939, 40 I-16 Type 17 of the 5th Baltic Fleet Regiments, winter 1939, 40 I-16 Type 17 of the 191st Fighter Regiment, 7th Fighter Corps Leningrad Air Defense, 1941 I-16 Type 17 of the 4th Baltic Fleet Fighter Regiment, Spring 1942. Conclusion There’s something about the old I-16, no matter which type. Whether it’s the cute little plane, or the plucky little fighter going up against the odds, with only the skills of the Soviet pilots keeping the aircraft, which was quite difficult to fly and fight with, in the air. Available from their UK importers, H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  3. A usually reliable russian source announces ICM is to release in 2017 a 1/32nd Polikarpov I-16 kit. To be followed. Source: http://scalemodels.ru/news/10678-anons-ICM-1-48-He-111H3.html For the record a 1/48th I-16 type 24 kit is expected by ICM in December 2016 (link). V.P.
  4. I-153 WWII China Guomindang AF Fighter ICM 1:48 (48099) The Polikarpov I-153 was the last of Nikolai Polikarpov's biplane fighter aircraft to enter service and despite being the most advanced entry in the series was already obsolete when it first entered service in 1939. The I-153 was developed as a result of a misreading of the results of the aerial combat during the Spanish Civil War. In July 1937 a meeting chaired by Stalin concluded that the Fiat CR.32 biplane was superior to the Polikarpov I-16 monoplane. The nimble Fiat fighter had achieved impressive results against the Soviet fighter, but partly because the I-16 pilots had attempted to dogfight rather than use their superior speed to break off combat. The successful introduction of the Bf 109 was ignored, and instead of focusing on producing a superior monoplane the Soviet authorities decided to work on an improved biplane. The new aircraft needed to maintain the manoeuvrability of the I-15 and I-152 while also increasing in speed. Work on the I-153 was officially approved on 11 October 1937. Polikarpov's main aim was to reduce drag and weight in an attempt to compensate for the weight of a heavier engine. He did this in two main ways - first by introducing a retractable undercarriage, and second by returning to the 'gull wing' configuration of the I-15, in which the upper wing was linked to the fuselage, eliminating its central section. This had worked on the I-15, but had been unpopular with some pilots and higher authorities, and had been removed from the I-152. As a result that aircraft had been less manoeuvrable than its predecessor. The 'gull wing' on the I-152 was an improved version of that on the I-15, with a bigger gap between the wing roots, which improved the pilot's forward view when landing and taking off. The fuselage and wings of the I-153 were similar to those of the I-15 and I-152, with a steel tube framework, covered by metal at the front of the fuselage and fabric elsewhere. The manually operated retractable undercarriage rotated through 90 degrees before folding backwards into the fuselage. The first prototype was powered by a 750hp M-25V engine. Its maiden flight is variously reported as having taken place in May or August 1938. Tests that began on 27 September are variously described as state acceptance or factory trials. These tests weren't entirely satisfactory and production was delayed while some of the problems were solved. In June-August 1939 state acceptance trials were conducted using an I-153 powered by the new Shvetsov M-62 engine, a version of the M-25V with a two-stage supercharger. These trials were not officially concluded until January 1941, long after the type had been superseded. Next in line was a version powered by the 900hp M-63, and this version passed its trials on 30 September 1939. Only a handful of aircraft were produced with the M-25 engine. The 800hp M-62 was used in the largest number of aircraft, around 3,018 in total. The 1,100hp (at take-off) M-63 was used in 409 aircraft. A total of 3,437 I-153s were produced, beginning in 1938. 1,011 aircraft had been completed by the end of 1939, and a massive 2,362 were built in 1940, at a time when the Soviet Union desperately needed more modern monoplanes. Production came to an end early in 1941 and only 64 aircraft were completed that year. The standard I-153 was armed with four ShKAS machine guns. The four under wing bomb racks could carry up to 441lb of bombs. In 1940 93 of these aircraft were delivered to the Chinese nationalists for their fight against the Japanese. They served until 1943. The Model This is a new boxing of the original kit from 2015, with decals for the Chinese Nationalist Forces and a small extra sprue with a new cowling. All the parts are superbly moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few noticeable moulding pips. Since the aircraft was mostly wood there are very few panel lines, as fabric was used in the construction, the kit shows the underlying structure, but in a nicely restrained way. Both the upper and lower wings are single parts so the thickness looks correct and there is no worrying join lines. Construction begins with the cockpit, the tubular frame is built up, the controls are added into this then it is attached to the cockpit floor and the seat is added. The complete section is then added onto the lower wing. Additional controls and other parts are then added to the inside of the fuselage halves. These can then be closed up and added to the lower wing. A template is provided for the front to drill the mounting holes for the engine. The upper wing and the interplane struts can then be added, followed by the tail planes. Moving on the the front of the aircraft the radial engine is built up. This has separate parts for the control rods, cylinders and exhausts this should build up into a convincing replica of the real thing. The cowling and propeller are then added and the engine mounted into the holes drilled earlier. The three part outer cowling (top & 2 sides) can be fixed or left off as needed. The Small clear canopy is then added. Moving to the underside the landing gear and door are made up and added. If required a number of light bombs can be built up and added. Rigging of the aircraft is fairly simple and an enclosed diagram shows how this can be done. Decals The decal sheet is printed by ICM themselves. The decals are quite glossy, well printed, in register and nicely opaque, particularly useful for the large white numbers. There are four different options for unknown aircraft from the Chinese Nationalist Air Force. Conclusion As with the I-16, this is a very cute and recognisable little aeroplane. The biplane design, whilst out of date, makes this aircraft look a nicer design then the I-16. It’s certainly great that ICM are catering to those aircraft. Available from Importers H G Hannants Ltd. In the UK Review sample courtesy of
  5. I-16 Type 10 WWII Soviet Fighter (32004) ICM 1:32 Design work on the I-16 began during the summer of 1932 at the Central Aero and Hydrodynamic Institute. At this juncture Polikarpov was in the kind of straits that could only happen in the Soviet Union. His career which had entailed a swift ascent to the top post of the OSS (the department for experimental land plane construction), had taken a sudden downward plunge upon the occasion of his arrest during the 1929 purge. Instead of a firing squad or a gulag, however, Polikarpov and his design team were sentenced to an "internal prison," there to continue their work under the close scrutiny of the state. Evidently, his prosecutors judged him too vital to the future of Soviet military prowess to inflict a harsher punishment. When the tiny I-16 flew for the first time in December 1933, it was far ahead of any other fighter design in the world, featuring retractable landing gear, a cantilever wing and variable pitch propeller. At this point the I-16 might well have faded into obscurity, if not for the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in July 1936. This war drew support from all over the world. The Nationalists, supported mainly by German and Italian forces, were the better equipped. Britain, France, the United States, the Netherlands, Czechoslovakia and Turkey all sent an assortment of aircraft to the Republican forces, directly or indirectly. But by far the major supporter of the Republicans was the Soviet Union, which supplied 1,409 of the 1947 aircraft contributed by other countries. 475 of these aircraft were Polikarpov I-16s. They first entered combat in Spain in November 1936. Flown in many cases by Soviet pilots, they proved more than a match for German He 51 fighters and Arado Ar68, but met their equals in the Italian C.R.32 biplanes and were overpowered by Messerschmidt Bf 109s. From March 1937, all remaining I-16s were concentrated into Fighter Group 31, and this was by far the most successful of all Soviet-equipped units. Meanwhile, I-16s were fighting also in China, and in 1939 were operated against the Japanese in Mongolia. Their final fling came during the early part of the Second World War, but by then they were overshadowed by more advanced foreign types. Suffering the brunt of the German invasion, those remaining were replaced by more modern fighters in 1942-1943. The outstanding manoeuvrability, firepower and rate of climb, surprised the enemy leading to the opposition nickname of Rata (Rat) and the friendly name Mosca (Fly). Equipped with the Soviet 20 mm cannon it was the most powerful aircraft weapon in front line service with any nation on the eve of World War II. Another batch of I-16s was purchased by China to fight the Japanese, again surprising the other side with excellent performance. When it first appeared, the I-16 Ishak (Little Donkey) was powered by a radial engine which developed a modest 450 hp. Even with this it achieved a creditable 376 km/h (234 mph) and, as the world's first single-seat fighter to have low monoplane wings, an enclosed cockpit (on some versions) and a retractable undercarriage. It was immediately put into mass production alongside the Polikarpov I-15 biplane fighter. Development led eventually to one version of the I-16 reaching over 520km/h (325 mph), with an engine of about two-and-a-half times the original power. The Model This is the latest kit from ICM of this diminutive fighter. This is the standard I-16 Type 24 Kit with additional sprues for the fuselage and wings of the Type 10 so you could build a type 24 from this if you wanted. All the parts are superbly moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few noticeable moulding pips. Since the aircraft was mostly wood there are very few panel lines, where fabric was used in the construction, the kit shows the underlying structure, but in a nicely restrained way. There are a fair number of unused parts in this boxing due to the way ICM has moulded the parts for maximum use from all the variants. Construction begins with the wings and the two upper sections being attached to the single piece lower section, after which the port and starboard clear navigation lights are attached. Each aileron is moulded in top and bottom halves, which, once joined together are fitted in the desired poses, along with the lower underside of the nose. The cockpit is assembled next, and is a very nicely detailed area. The rear bulkhead is fitted with the seat backrest and support, while the two piece rudder pedals are assembled. The pedals are fitted to the cockpit floor, along with the rear mounted battery box. The front and rear bulkheads are then glued into the left hand fuselage section along with some sidewall detail. The floor is then slide in through the front bulkhead opening and glued to the rear bulkhead. The two piece throttle is assembled and glued into position, and then the instrument panel, which is moulded in clear plastic is fitted with the instrument decal. The rest of the cockpit is then detailed with the oxygen bottle instrument panel, joystick, a couple of handles, and seat. On the opposite side wall the undercarriage handle and a couple of instrument clusters are attached. The firewall is fitted with the two piece oil tank and two gun troughs, before being fitted to one half of the fuselage. The two piece rudder and three piece elevators are then assembled, as is the two piece upper nose section. The fuselage halves are then joined, and the rudder, horizontal tailplanes and upper nose section attached, as are the two door panels. The fuselage and wing assembly are then glued together. The engine bearers and attached to the engine mounting ring, followed by gearbox case and intake manifold, the two halves that make up the cylinders, each with exquisite fin detail, are joined together, then fitted with the piston rods and individual exhaust pipes, before the gearbox assembly is fitted to the rear. The completed engine is then attached to the fuselage. The engine is cowled with three optionally fitted panels, plus the three piece nose cowl, with optionally positioned vents. The two machine guns fitted to the upper nose are then slid into their associated troughs, followed by the gunsight and windscreen. The build is finished off with the assembly of the two main undercarriage units. Each unit is made up of a two piece wheel, single piece main leg, complete with actuator, two outer doors, with separate hinged lower section, there is a second support rod fitted with another door which is glued to the leg and rear mounting point in the wing. The tail wheel is then attached, as is the tail cone and rear light, wing gun muzzles, side mounted venturi style pitot and what looks like an aerial unit, aft of the cockpit. Decals The decal sheet is printed by ICM themselves. The decals are quite glossy, well printed, in register and nicely opaque, particularly useful for the large white numbers. There are for decal options, in the standard green of blue camouflage. The four aircraft are:- I-16 Type 10 of the 70th Fighter Regiment, Khalhin Gol, July 1939 (Pilot LT VG Rakhov. I-16 Type 10 of the 70th Fighter Regiment, Khalhin Gol, July 1939. I-16 Type 10 of the 122nd Fighter Regiment, Weston Front, Summer 1941. I-16 Type 10 of the 145th Fighter Regiment, Mrmansk Region, Summer 1941, Pilot Cpt LA Galchenko. Conclusion There’s something about the old I-16, no matter which type. Whether it’s the cute little plane, or the plucky little fighter going up against the odds, with only the skills of the Soviet pilots keeping the aircraft, which was quite difficult to fly and fight with, in the air. Available from their UK importers, H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  6. I-16 Type 10 Spanish Air Force (after 1939) ICM 1:32 (D3203) ICM have been doing many versions of the I-16 in 1.32 scale now they are bringing us a decal sheet for those used by The Spanish Air Force after the Civil war when ex Republican examples were now in the Spanish Air Force. This sheet follows the one for Civil War machines we reviewed here. The sheet provides markings for 6 aircraft used post Civil War; Conclusion This is a great addition from ICM to an already great kit. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. I-16 Type 29 Update set, Seatbelts & Masks (for ICM) 1:32 Eduard ICM are determined it seams to kit all versions of Polikarpov's diminutive donkey. The kits are very good but still will benefit from a little sprinkling of Eduard updates. Update Set (32935) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. The main thrust of the nickel fret is a new instrument panel in two layers. There is also a few other cockpit fittings on this fret, and a new radio box complete with dials. The brass fret provides new insides for the main gear doors, bomb fins, aerial fittings, a new gunsight, cockpit floor parts, new rudder pedals. There are additional cockpit parts in the form of throttles and the landing gear actuators. Zoom! Set (33208) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts (33209) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. Masks (JX224) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the diminutive canopy, and a set of wheel hub masks.. Review sample courtesy of
  8. I-16 Type 24 with Soviet Pilots (32007) ICM 1:32 Design work on the I-16 began during the summer of 1932 at the Central Aero and Hydrodynamic Institute. At this juncture Polikarpov was in the kind of straits that could only happen in the Soviet Union. His career which had entailed a swift ascent to the top post of the OSS (the department for experimental land plane construction), had taken a sudden downward plunge upon the occasion of his arrest during the 1929 purge. Instead of a firing squad or a gulag, however, Polikarpov and his design team were sentenced to an "internal prison," there to continue their work under the close supervision and scrutiny of the state. Evidently, his prosecutors judged him too vital to the future of Soviet military prowess to inflict the usual penalties of summary execution or slow death in a labour camp. When the tiny I-16 flew for the first time in December 1933, it was far ahead of any other fighter design in the world, featuring retractable landing gear, a cantilever wing and variable pitch propeller. Although not among the best remembered aircraft of the thirties, it was nevertheless a very able and rugged machine and featured prominently in the events of the time. When the Spanish Civil War broke out, almost 500 were put into service with the Republicans. The outstanding manoeuvrability, firepower and rate of climb, surprised the enemy leading to the opposition nickname of Rata (Rat) and the friendly name Mosca (Fly). Equipped with the Soviet 20 mm cannon it was the most powerful aircraft weapon in front line service with any nation on the eve of World War II. It had a very high rate of fire and was extremely reliable. Another batch of I-16s was purchased by China to fight the Japanese, again surprising the other side with excellent performance. When it first appeared, the I-16 Ishak (Little Donkey) was powered by a radial engine which developed a modest 450 hp. Even with this it achieved a creditable 376 km/h (234 mph) and, as the world's first single-seat fighter to have low monoplane wings, an enclosed cockpit (on some versions) and a retractable undercarriage. It was immediately put into mass production alongside the Polikarpov I-15 biplane fighter. Development led eventually to one version of the I-16 reaching over 520km/h (325 mph), with an engine of about two-and-a-half times the original power. At this point the I-16 might well have faded into obscurity, if not for the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in July 1936. This war drew support from all over the world. The Nationalists, supported mainly by German and Italian forces, were the better equipped. Britain, France, the United States, the Netherlands, Czechoslovakia and Turkey all sent an assortment of aircraft to the Republican forces, directly or indirectly. But by far the major supporter of the Republicans was the Soviet Union, which supplied 1,409 of the 1947 aircraft contributed by other countries. 475 of these aircraft were Polikarpov I-16s. They first entered combat in Spain in November 1936. Flown in many cases by Soviet pilots, they proved more than a match for German He 51 fighters and Arado Ar68, but met their equals in the Italian C.R.32 biplanes and were overpowered by Messerschmitt Bf 109s. From March 1937, all remaining I-16s were concentrated into Fighter Group 31, and this was by far the most successful of all Soviet-equipped units. Meanwhile, I-16s were fighting also in China, and in 1939 were operated against the Japanese in Mongolia. Their final fling came during the early part of the Second World War, but by then they were overshadowed by more advanced foreign types. Suffering the brunt of the German invasion, those remaining were replaced by more modern fighters in 1942-1943. The Type 24 entered service in 1939 with the M-62 radial engine, but later versions had a 1,100 hp (820 kw) M-63 radial engine. The wings were strengthened and larger capacity drop tanks could be used. Most aircraft were equipped with either the RSI-1 or RSI-3 radio and oxygen equipment. The Model This is the first 1:32 scale kit from ICM, and having seen what’s in the box, I really hope it’s not their last. Once you take the lid off the box and opened the inner lid, you will find three large sprues of grey styrene, one small clear sprue and a medium sized decal sheet. All the parts are superbly moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few noticeable moulding pips. There are a few swirl marks in the plastic, but nothing to worry about and will easily be covered when the kit is primed and painted. Since the aircraft was mostly wood there are very few panel lines, where fabric was used in the construction, the kit shows the underlying structure, but in a nicely restrained way. Construction begins with the wings and the two upper sections being attached to the single piece lower section, after which the port and starboard clear navigation lights are attached. Each aileron is moulded in top and bottom halves, which, once joined together are fitted in the desired poses, along with the lower underside of the nose. The cockpit is assembled next, and is a very nicely detailed area. The rear bulkhead is fitted with the seat backrest and support, while the two piece rudder pedals are assembled. The pedals are fitted to the cockpit floor, along with the rear mounted battery box. The front and rear bulkheads are then glued into the left hand fuselage section along with some sidewall detail. The floor is then slide in through the front bulkhead opening and glued to the rear bulkhead. The two piece throttle is assembled and glued into position, and then the instrument panel, which is moulded in clear plastic is fitted with the instrument decal. The rest of the cockpit is then detailed with the oxygen bottle instrument panel, joystick, a couple of handles, and seat. On the opposite side wall the undercarriage handle and a couple of instrument clusters are attached. The firewall is fitted with the two piece oil tank and two gun troughs, before being fitted to one half of the fuselage. The two piece rudder and three piece elevators are then assembled, as is the two piece upper nose section. The fuselage halves are then joined, and the rudder, horizontal tailplanes and upper nose section attached, as are the two door panels. The fuselage and wing assembly are then glued together. The engine bearers and attached to the engine mounting ring, followed by gearbox case and intake manifold, the two halves that make up the cylinders, each with exquisite fin detail, are joined together, then fitted with the piston rods and individual exhaust pipes, before the gearbox assembly is fitted to the rear. The completed engine is then attached to the fuselage. The engine is cowled with three optionally fitted panels, plus the three piece nose cowl, with optionally positioned vents. The two machine guns fitted to the upper nose are then slid into their associated troughs, followed by the gunsight and windscreen. The build is finished off with the assembly of the two main undercarriage units. Each unit is made up of a two piece wheel, single piece main leg, complete with actuator, two outer doors, with separate hinged lower section, there is a second support rod fitted with another door which is glued to the leg and rear mounting point in the wing. The tail wheel is then attached, as is the tail cone and rear light, wing gun muzzles, side mounted venturi style pitot and what looks like an aerial unit, aft of the cockpit. Figures This boxing comes with ICM Set 32102 "VVS RKKA Pilots. There are actually 2 pilots, one seated and one standing, plus what looks to be a ground crew member. As with all of all of ICMs figure sets I have seen these are well sculpted and thought out on the sprue. They should work well with the kit. Decals The decal sheet is printed by ICM themselves. The decals are quite glossy, well printed, in register and nicely opaque, particularly useful for the large white numbers and slogans. There are for decal options, three in standard green of blue camouflage and one in overall aluminium. The four aircraft are:- I-16 Type 24 of the 67th Fighter Regiment, South Front, Summer 1941 I-16 Type 24 of the 72nd Mixed Regiment of the Northern Fleet Aviation, Summer 1941 I-16 Type 24 of 4th Guard Fighter Regiment of the Baltic Fleet Aviation, Winter-Spring 1942 I-16 Type 24 of the 254th Fighter Regiment, Leningrad Front, Summer 1943. Conclusion There’s something about the old I-16, no matter which type. Whether it’s the cute little plane, or the plucky little fighter going up against the odds, with only the skills of the Soviet pilots keeping the aircraft, which was quite difficult to fly and fight with, in the air. This first large scale kit from ICM is really very nice and will build up into a great looking model. It is great to see the kit now available with figures. Available from their UK importers, H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  9. I-153 WWII China Guomindang AF Fighter ICM 1:32 (32012) The Polikarpov I-153 was the last of Nikolai Polikarpov's biplane fighter aircraft to enter service and despite being the most advanced entry in the series was already obsolete when it first entered service in 1939. 0The I-153 was developed as a result of a misreading of the results of the aerial combat during the Spanish Civil War. In July 1937 a meeting chaired by Stalin concluded that the Fiat CR.32 biplane was superior to the Polikarpov I-16 monoplane. The nimble Fiat fighter had achieved impressive results against the Soviet fighter, but partly because the I-16 pilots had attempted to dogfight rather than use their superior speed to break off combat. The successful introduction of the Bf 109 was ignored, and instead of focusing on producing a superior monoplane the Soviet authorities decided to work on an improved biplane. The new aircraft needed to maintain the manoeuvrability of the I-15 and I-152 while also increasing in speed. This presented Polikarpov with a problem, for he had already argued that any increase in speed came at the cost of an increase in weight (from the heavier more powerful engine and stronger fuselage needed to support it). The heavier aircraft would then be less manoeuvrable. Work on the I-153 was officially approved on 11 October 1937. Polikarpov's main aim was to reduce drag and weight in an attempt to compensate for the weight of a heavier engine. He did this in two main ways - first by introducing a retractable undercarriage, and second by returning to the 'gull wing' configuration of the I-15, in which the upper wing was linked to the fuselage by diagonal sections, eliminating its central section. This had worked on the I-15, but had been unpopular with some pilots and higher authorities, and had been removed from the I-152. As a result that aircraft had been less manoeuvrable than its precursor. The 'gull wing' on the I-152 was an improved version of that on the I-15, with a bigger gap between the wing roots, which improved the pilot's forward view when landing and taking off. The fuselage and wings of the I-153 were similar to those of the I-15 and I-152, with a steel tube framework, covered by metal at the front of the fuselage and fabric elsewhere. The manually operated retractable undercarriage rotated through 90 degrees before folding backwards into the fuselage. The first prototype was powered by a 750hp M-25V engine. Its maiden flight is variously reported as having taken place in May or August 1938, with A.I. Zhukov at the controls. Tests that began on 27 September are variously described as state acceptance or factory trials. These tests weren't entirely satisfactory and production was delayed while some of the problems were solved. In June-August 1939 state acceptance trials were conducted using an I-153 powered by the new Shvetsov M-62 engine, a version of the M-25V with a two-stage supercharger. These trials were not officially concluded until January 1941, long after the type had been superseded. Next in line was a version powered by the 900hp M-63, and this version passed its trials on 30 September 1939. Only a handful of aircraft were produced with the M-25 engine. The 800hp M-62 was used in the largest number of aircraft, around 3,018 in total. The 1,100hp (at take-off) M-63 was used in 409 aircraft. A total of 3,437 I-153s were produced, beginning in 1938. 1,011 aircraft had been completed by the end of 1939, and a massive 2,362 were built in 1940, at a time when the Soviet Union desperately needed more modern monoplanes. Production came to an end early in 1941 and only 64 aircraft were completed that year. The standard I-153 was armed with four ShKAS machine guns. These replaced the PV-1 guns used on the I-15 and I-152, and had a much higher rate of fire (1,800 compared to 750 rounds per minute) as well as being much lighter. The four under wing bomb racks could carry up to 441lb of bombs. In 1940 93 of these aircraft were delivered to the Chinese nationalists for their fight against the Japanese. They served until 1943. The Model This is a new boxing of the original kit from 2018, this has decals for the Chinese Nationalist Forces and a small extra spure with a cowling. All the parts are superbly moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few noticeable moulding pips. There are a few swirl marks in the plastic, but nothing to worry about and will easily be covered when the kit is primed and painted. Since the aircraft was mostly wood there are very few panel lines, where fabric was used in the construction, the kit shows the underlying structure, but in a nicely restrained way. Construction begins with the lower wing and the two upper sections being attached to the single piece lower section, after which there are two insets that fit into the main undercarriage bay roof. The cockpit is assembled next, and is a very nicely detailed area. The two seat supports are attached to the seat back and glued to the cockpit floor, followed by the seat base. The two piece control column is glued into place along with its separate control rod and rudder pedals. The tubular framework of the cockpit is quite delicate, and care should be taken when removing from the sprues and assembling. Side tubular structures are fitted with ancillary instruments, levers, radio controls, throttle lever and flare pistol. The side sections are then glued to the front and rear sections. The whole assembly is then attached to the cockpit floor assembly and the whole lot glued to the lower wing assembly.The fuselage sides are then detailed with an oxygen bottle, and side access doors before being glued together. The fuselage is then slid over the cockpit structure and glued to the lower wing. The horizontal tailplanes, elevators and rudder all come in two halves. When glued together they are attached to the rear fuselage. The upper wing comes as single piece upper section and two piece lower sections. Once joined, the assembly is attached to the forward fuselage and the two interplane struts glued into position. The engine is quite a simple affair, being moulded in two halves, to which the valve rods are attached, followed by the exhausts. The cooling shutter ring is then fitted to the inside of the nose cowling, followed by the engine assembly, rear bulkhead, and separate exhaust stubs and five piece propeller. The engine/nose cowling assembly is then attached to the front fuselage, followed by the two side panels, top panel, windshield, gunsight and oil cooler duct. Each of the main undercarriage is made from five parts, once assembled they are glued into their respective positions. The tailplane struts are then added, along with the undercarriage bay doors and two piece tail wheel. You then have the option of adding wither eight rockets, each of three pieces, two small bombs, also three parts or four larger bombs also three parts. The bombs have separate crutches while the rockets are fitted to rails. Then it’s just a bit of very light rigging and the model is done. Decals The decal sheet is printed by ICM themselves. The decals are quite glossy, well printed, in register and nicely opaque, particularly useful for the large white numbers. There are three different options for unknown aircraft from the Chinese Nationalist Air Force. Conclusion As with the I-16, this is a very cute and recognisable little aeroplane. The biplane design, whilst out of date, makes this aircraft look a nicer design then the I-16. It’s certainly great that ICM are catering to those of us who like the larger scales and there is still plenty that could be done with the interior should you wish t go to town on it. Review sample courtesy of
  10. U-2/Po-2VS with Soviet Pilots and GP (48254) 1:48 ICM The Polikarpov Po-2 or U-2 in the training role, was a standard training bi-plane developed to replace the U-1 which was a copy of the Avro 504. The prototype first flew in 1928. The aircraft would also later find roles in crop dusting, light attack, reconnaissance, liaison and even psychological warfare, The Russian forces used the aircraft very successfully in the night bomber role where the Germans nicknamed it the Sewing Machine due to the note from its engine. The aircraft would also go on to fire some of the first shots in the Korean War. American forces would nickname the aircraft "Bedcheck Charlie" due to its nocturnal raids. Due to its low radar signature the aircraft was very hard to detect by allied forces in Korea. In what was fast becoming the Jet age the Po-2 was credited with a kill on an F-94 when it stalled trying to shoot down the Po-2, and a USMC would score the Skyraiders only Air-2-Air victory against a Po-2. It is estimated that upto 30,000 aircraft were built and it was in production longer than any other soviet era aircraft. The Albanian Air Force only retired the type in 1985! The Kit This is now the forth boxing since 2014 from ICM of the Po-2VS/U-2. This issue features the same plastic but with the addition of a sprue containing pilot figures and ground personnel. The kit arrives on three main sprues, two smaller sprues of armaments, and a small clear sprue. Construction starts in the fairly basic cockpits. Instrument panels are built up and installed into the fuselage as well a some flight controls. The fuselage is then closed up and the front added on to mount the engine. Once this is finished work can start on the wings. For the lower wing holes are opened up then the seats and their frames can be installed in the centre section which also forms the cockpit floor. one on this can then be added to the main fuselage. Next up the engine is made up and installed on the front of the fuselage. The tail planes and the rudder are then added. Underneath the main wing now the undercarriage is built up and added as are the bomb racks and bombs if using them. The struts are then added and the upper wing can be added. The observers rear mounted machine gun can then be made up and fitted. A basic rigging diagram is provided to rig the bi-plane. Markings There are three decal options included in the box. From the box you can build one of the following: U-2VS from 213rd Night Bomber Air Division, Soviet Air Force Summer 1943. Po-2CV from 46th Tamansky GvNBAP, Spring 1945. Po-2VS from 2nd Polish NBAP, Lubin Area, Summer 1944. Decals are printed by ICM, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Figures The kit comes with a set of 7 figures which are all well moulded. There are two what look like pilots, a senior office figure, 3 ground crew, and female figure. Conclusion It is good to see an important historical aircraft like this kitted, and its good to see the ICM kit on release again. The inclusion of a figure set makes for a ready made airfield diorama. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. I-153 WWII China Guomindang AF Fighter 1:72 ICM The Polikarpov I-153 Chaika (Seagull), was the ultimate incarnation of the Soviet biplane fighter to find its way into service with the VVS (and other airforces). The aircraft was of mixed wood and metal construction, with a gull wing, manually retractable undercarriage and armed with four shKAS machine guns. It entered service in 1939, and was first blooded in the border skirmishes that took place between Soviet and Japanese forces that year. The combination of biplane maneuverability and modern fighter performance made the I-153 a competitive design, albeit hampered by an unreliable supercharger design and the lack of a firewall between the fuel tank and the cockpit. The type soldiered on into the 1940s, mainly due to the lack of modern alternatives in sufficient numbers. Inside ICM's typically robust box is a large sprue of grey plastic which holds all of the main parts of the diminutive fighter, as well as a much smaller sprue which holds the new parts for the engine and cowling used for this version. A tiny clear sprue, instructions and decals complete the package. Moulding is clean and crisp, with plenty of fine detail. There are 85 parts in total, although one or two (wheels) aren't used in this boxing. Construction on the cockpit begins with the internal framework, onto which the instrument panel, four-part seat, control column, rudder pedals and floor all fit. The oveall impression should be reasonably good for the scale, which is just as well as the cockpit is not enclosed by glazing. The whole sub-assembly fits onto the single span of the lower wing, which in turn fits into the two halves of the fuselage. The engine and propellor are comprised six parts, with an optional spinner hub. As with the lower wing, the upper wing is a nicely-moulded solid piece of plastic, onto which the two sturdy struts fit. Alignment shouldn't be a problem, as the gull wing section fits directly onto the front upper fuselage. The horizontal stabilisers are solid parts. The undercarriage legs and skis are accurately represented, with the same excellent level of detail as the rest of the kit. Each assembly is made up from five parts including the landing gear doors. The tail wheel is a single part on its own. A surprisingly good selection of ordnance is included, with a choice of four small bombs or four larger bombs. The supplied rockets are not used with this version of the kit. The rigging is fairly simple and should therefore be within the capabilities of the biplane averse. Decal options are provided for four different aircraft of the Chinese Kuomintang Air Force which are dated to between 1940 and 1971. The schemes are all very similar, with two displaying white codes on the fuselage sides and one without the blue and white markings on the rudder. The decals look nicely printed. Conclusion ICM's I-153 is a well-regarded kit and this Chinese version is a welcome addition to the range. Detail is good and construction is not overly complex. Overall, it looks as though this should be an enjoyable and rewarding build. Review sample courtesy of
  12. Following in the footsteps of the iL-400b is another Soviet corrugated metal fighter, this time, the Tupolev AHT-5, the prototype of the I-4. The kit is originally by Latvian company Nakotne and has since been boxed by Encore, and most recently, by Zvezda. It allows for 3 versions of the I-4 to be built, the AHT-5 Prototype, early type I-4 with full size lower wing, and I-4Z, with reduced span lower wing. Some scratch building could yield the I-4bis, which lacked a lower wing altogether. The kit allows for overwing rockets and underwing bombs to be fitted, but such options would not be appropriate for the AHT-5. Other differences include a flatter or more pointed spinner, and the vertical stabilizer & rudder shape, and engine cylinder covers. Although I have seen the Encore and Zvezda boxings receive some criticisms, the only issue I have had with this original molding is the hardness of the plastic, which makes it difficult to remove and clean parts. Here, some of the engine detail has been added to the left fuselage half. The exhausts still need to be glued in their proper position. The interior is not the most detailed I or you have ever seen of course, but includes a floor, seat, control stick, rudder pedals, and instrument panel. I've yet to paint the seat cushion on. Once that is done, the two halves will be joined. Dry fitting reveals a perfect fit. Hopefully this will remain the case. Thanks for looking, Tweener
  13. ABM is to release a 1/72nd PolikarpovTB-2 resin kit. Source: https://propjet.ucoz.ru/forum/2-74-32692-16-1522582502 Box art V.P.
  14. AirKits is working on a 1/72nd Polikarpov SPB resin kit Source: https://propjet.ucoz.ru/forum/14-268-1 V.P.
  15. Picked up a cheap kit online to verify my Uni address, the ICM 1/72 Polikarpov I-1 in a Maquette Box. For 6$, it looks a treat so far, with the exception of the wings that are far more complicated than need be. For whichever reason, it was decided to split the wing lengthwise, and that means an unfillable line is created. At least it fits well. The plan is to finish it in plain Aluminum - Green over Blue looks nice but I haven't either color on hand. Little has been done so far other than the construction of one wing and the mounting of the top of the engine block to the left fuselage. The interior is simple so it shouldn't take long to close her up. More to come tomorrow. Thanks, Tweener
  16. Small Stuff (http://www.smallstuffmodels.com/) is to release a 1/72nd Polikarpov I-3 resin kit - ref.72003 Source: http://www.smallstuffmodels.com/2016/01/172I3WorkinProgress.html V.P.
  17. In all honesty I bought this kit to optimise the transport costs for my kid's Christmas present - and this one happened to be on sale: Special Hobby 1/72 Polikarpov I-15, 'Red army'. I had never heard of this plane before, but I found it strangely attractive with its gull wings and short fuselage. The only thing that appears full size is the engine. A summary of the history of the airplane can be found for example [url=https://www.militaryfactory.com/aircraft/detail.asp?aircraft_id=631] HERE[/Url]. In 1928 Polikarpov was assigned to develop the I-6 biplane within 2 years. For the heinous crime of not the making the apparently literal deadline, Polikarpov was sentenced to death. Before the sentence was carried out however, it was reduced to a decade of hard labour and he was assigned to work on the I-5 project. After its successful completion, Polikarpov was pardoned and handed the I-15 project, which was developed from the I-5. Production started in 1934 and a total of 671 were built, more than a third license-built in Republican Spain. The airplane saw service in the Spanish Civil War, the Sino-Japanese war and in Khalkin Gol, as well as in the Second World War (if one chooses not the count the previously mentioned conflicts as part of that). Further development led to the I-15bis and I-153, of which about 6000 were produced and saw service in the early war. As for Polikarpov himself, upon returning from ordered trip to Germany in 1939, found his design bureau couped and emptied and his career as designer was over. Here is the scalemates entry on the model - I have no picture of the box: https://www.scalemates.com/kits/112449-special-hobby-sh72085-polikarpov-i-15-red-army Scalemates has it released in "200x" with unknown pedigree, but after opening the contents I suspect the tooling is older than that and is inherited from who knows where (edit: or maybe just shortrun kit - I mean it feels seems either old or unrefined, elaboration later). For about 6 British pounds I'm more than happy though. The kit contains two bags of resin parts for cockpit interiors, skis and engine. Apart from the skis, two more sets of landing gears are included (with and without wheel covers - forgot the technical term). PE details for the cockpit and telescope sight are included. As the kit name suggests, decals for 3 different Soviet airforce planes are included, plus decals for the prototype and an acetate sheet for the instrument board. One rather sprue containing fuselage, winds and odds and ends make up the rest of the plane.
  18. ICM is to release in Q4 2016 a new tool 1/48th Polikarpov I-16 Type 24 kit - ref. 48097 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48097 Box art V.P.
  19. Definitely out of my comfort zone, since I build mostly WWI subjects: it`s Safonov`s number 10. The missing starboard decal was printed and designed by Melius Manu, thanks a lot Kajetan! The model was painted with Hataka Red Line colours (camo) and Gunze, Tamiya. I know it`s far from perfect but still a joy to build. I`m going to build another one in the future and hope to build it with more details and fewer mistakes. This is what I used for reference when it comes to the paint scheme: And the rest of the pictures:
  20. Prop&Jet is to release a 1/72nd Polikarpov TsKB-12 resin kit - ref.7227 Source: http://propjet.ucoz.ru/forum/9-214-1 V.P.
  21. Another one off the production line.... Polikarpov I-16, Type 10, 1. Squadron, Lina Base, Spain, April 1938. The kit is somewhat daunting when you're first presented with the sprues and care will be needed throughout the build, there are no major problems it's just a bit of an old school build, meaning filler on every join and wing roots with a large gap etc. I used super glue as a filler which worked quite well, the few panel lines were then re-scribed and I added a few rivets around the engine cowling. The cockpit is sparse, as the real thing and you can't really see anything other than the chair. Seatbelts are supplied in etch metal and resin exhausts are included. For the silver ring on the cowling I used a thin strip of foil tape which works from stand off scale but would have been better painted. Painting was quite straightforward and done in a day with MRP standard soviet colours from WW2. There are decals for the fin but I chose to paint this instead, the rest of the decals are nice, maybe slightly thick for the scale. For finishing I used a different method by buffing the paint back with a cloth and sanding sticks, then I rubbed pigments lightly all over the airframe to give a dusty look. I'm trying to get a bit of realism from my larger models and I've started experimenting with techniques such as not having dead straight lines on paint finishes, building in imperfections in the finish and trying not to use the conversational gloss coat, matt coat etc. and instead buff the paint back with a cloth and fine sanding sticks. I would have preferred paint masks for the markings on this build so I may move to that for future builds over 1/48. Anyway hope you can see what I'm trying to achieve Kit: Azur Polikarpov I-16, Type 10, Super Mosca Scale: 1/32 Built: OOB Paints used: MRP RLM 62, MRP-024 A II G Light Blue, Xf 7, MRP White, MRP Black, Xf 58 Weathering: Mig pigments European Earth, Desert Sand, Flory Dark Dirt Wash
  22. AirKits is to release a 1/72nd Polikarpov ARK-5/LP-5 resin kit - ref. Sources: http://propjet.ucoz.ru/forum/14-215-30588-16-1490381280 http://www.greenmats.club/topic/3091-airkits-каюк-готовит-смоляной-арк-5-в-72-м-масштабе/ V.P.
  23. i Second I-16 variant done recently by me. It is a two seater, unarmed UTI-4 in Chineese markings (on profile I followed it was said "1938", on second of the same machine it was "1940"). I found photo of her as well... Anyway - she looks like this: Comments welcome Regards J-W
  24. Riich Models is to release a 1/32nd Polikarpov I-16 Type 10 kit - ref. RA32001 Source: http://www.moxingfans.com/new/news/2017/0324/3454.html V.P.
  25. Polikarpov I-16 Type 24 1:48 ICM The I-16 was a Soviet fighter of revolutionary design. It was the worlds first low wing cantilever monoplane fighter with retractable landing gear to achieve operational status. The designer Nikolai Nikoleavich Polikarpov designed the aircraft optimised for speed with a short stubby fuselage similar to the Gee Bee racer. It was to feature cutting edge items such as a fully retractable landing gear and an enclosed cockpit. Work began in June 1933 and full scale production began in November of the same year. The aircraft was designed around the Wright Cyclone SR-1820-F-3 nine cylinder engine. The construction was a mix of wooden monocoque and wings based around chrome-molybdenum steel alloy wing spar. Original armament was a par of 7.62mm machine guns mounted outboard of the main wheels. The Type 24 aircraft featured Four machine guns, two in the original wing positions and two synchronised in the fuselage. Landing flaps replaced the original drooping ailerons, a tail wheel was also added. This variant was powered by a Shvetsov M-63 engine developing 900hp. At the start of WWII Russian had 1635 I-16 variants. During the first 48 hours of Operation Barbarossa Luftwaffe attacks on I-16 bases reduced this to only 937 aircraft. The I-16 was surprisingly good in combat against the Bf 109E with Russian pilots using its superior horizontal manoeuvrability. However later versions of the 109 would prove to be much faster, and more heavily armed. One advantage in the Russian winter was the I-16 had an aircooled engine and were more reliable. In all over half of the produced aircraft were still in service when they were replaced in 1943. The I-16 would also serve overseas with China. Germany, Romania and Finland would operate captured examples. The Spanish Republican Air Force used I-16s supplied by Russia, and after the Civil war these would be used by Spanish State Air Force, amazingly only being retired in 1952. The Kit This new tool kit arrives on two sprues with one small clear sprue containing the front windscreen, in a robust box with a lid under the outer cover. The parts are all very well moulded with nice engraved detail. There is no evidence of flash anywhere on the parts. Construction starts surprisingly enough not in the cockpit but with the wings! The bottom wing is one piece with upper left & right parts being added. The ailerons can then be added to each side. Now construction moves to the cockpit and interior. The rear cockpit bulkhead is attached and is placed inside the left fuselage half along with the front bulkhead. The cockpit floor has the seat base and rudder pedals attached and is slid into the bulkheads. The instrument panel is built up and fitted along with the pilots control column. Other controls and the lower part of the seat are then added. The engine bulkhead is then attached and the main fuselage can be closed up. The front decking with gun troughs is then added in front of the cockpit, and the rudder is now added along with the cockpit side doors. The main fuselage is now mated to the wings. The tailplanes are also added. Construction now moves to the front of the aircraft with the engine being built up. The main bearer has the engine mounting ring attached which is followed by the gear box and intake manifold. The cylinder bank is now added along with the front push rods and exhaust pipes. The engine is then fitted. The propeller then has its boss fitted and is attached to front engine cover through the vents which control cooling air to the engine. This assembly can then be fitted to the front of the fuselage along with ths side and top engine covers (these can be left open if required). The main landing gear struts and doors can now be attached along with the tail wheel . Finally the main wheels are attached. Decals A medium sized decal sheet printed by ICM is supplied with the kit. The decals are in register and appear colour dense. These aircraft did not carry many markings and this is reflected in the kit. There are enough national markings for all 4 decal options provided; 13th Sqn Baltic Fleet Aviaion, Summer 1940. 16th Fighter Regiment, South Front, Summer 1941. 72nd Mixed Regiment Northern Fleet Aviation, Summer 1941. 4th Guard Fighter Regiment, Baltic Fleet Aviation, Winter-Spring 1942. Conclusion There is no doubt this will build up to make a good looking model. I for one am a fan of this stubby looking aircraft. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
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