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Found 34 results

  1. IBG Models is to release 1/32nd PZL P.11c kits. Source: https://www.facebook.com/ibgmodels/posts/2274797485975216 3D renders V.P.
  2. IBG Models is to release a family of 1/72nd Państwowe Zakłady Lotnicze - PZL P.11 aircraft kits. - ref. 72517 - PZL P.11a - ref. 72518 - PZL P.11b in Romanian Service - ref. 72519 - PZL P.11c - ref. 72520 - ?? - ref. 72521 - PZL P.11f - ref. 72522 - ?? - ref. 72523 - PZL P.11g Kobuz Sources: http://www.modelarovo.cz/norimberk-2018-jak-jsme-ho-videli-my/ https://nowosci.plastikowe.pl/aktualnosci/zapowiedzi-ibg-models-pzl-p-11a-1-72-pozna-jesien-2018/ V.P.
  3. Grand Models is working on a 1/72nd PZL-Mielec M-18 Dromader resin kit - ref. GM-72008 Source: https://www.facebook.com/grandmodels.gr/photos/a.867064526735791.1073741828.801311263311118/1237657893009784/?type=1&theater V.P.
  4. Hello everyone Some time ago @Mjwomack suggested an ‘Anything but Injection’ group build. This was and is very appealing to me. I love building resin and vac form kits. I haven’t done one for a long time; it was the KPM vac form Lagg-3. A kit that I actually finished, when I returned to the hobby for the second time, around 15 years ago. I didn’t know of any Internet forums, used my supply of 1970’s Airfix and Humbrol enamel paints, paintbrushes from the same, very old, childhood ‘model making’ box. My skills and hand/eye coordination were worse than those I had aged 10 and I bought a selection of very cheap kits. It was simply therapy. Relaxation, a safe place to revisit for reasons mentioned in other of my threads, sadly all unfinished, most with photographs missing. I do hope to rectify both of those issues as health and repatriation of my stash, tools, paints, drawer of doom and so on allows. I feel I owe it to the good people that run this forum, endured my often rather odd burblings and those that followed the builds. Here are some photographs of my chosen subject. More details to follow Best Regards TonyT
  5. The rumour has been confirmed: With real Star and Legendary Man. Mr Andrzej Glass. We are working on PZL.37 Łoś Project. #1_72 #reworkedscaleplans #pzl37 #ibg . Mr Andrzej Glass is just amazing man. It's great honour that I know him. Andrzej Glass is famous and well respected polish aviation historian. Maciej Noszczak is know for his drawigs for Kagero (ie .TopDrawing series) and/or Ian Allan and also from thecooperation with Simon Schatz:)
  6. PZL P.11g 'Kobuz' Polish Fighter 1:72 IBG For its time, the PZL P.11 was one of the most advanced fighter aircraft in the world. While many nations were still using bi-planes, Warsaw-based PZL (Państwowe Zakłady Lotnicze - State Aviation Works) had designed and built an all-metal gull winged monoplane fighter. The high wing provided the pilot with a good field of view and produced less drag that the bi-plane fighters of the time. The type drew orders from overseas as well as Poland. The aircraft was ordered by Romania and was built under licence by IAR. By the time of the German invasion of Poland however, the type was outclassed by the Bf 109. The majority of the Polish Air Force was lost fighting bravely against the invasion. The P.11g variant was a stop gap intended to bridge the gap caused by the delays getting the P.50 into service. It featured a more powerful engine and an airframe that was strengthened accordingly. It also featured an enclosed cockpit and improved armament. The P.11g was unable to enter service however, its development curtailed by the invasion of Poland in September 1939. The PZL 11 is one of a growing number of aircraft kits produced by IBG Models. This kit follows the likes of the RWD-8 and PZL 23A and continues IBG's method of producing numerous versions from a common set of moulds. This boxing is the PZL 11g, but an PZL 11a is also available (reviewed here). Inside the box are eleven frames of light grey plastic, a single frame of clear plastic, a fret of photo etched brass parts, a small sheet of pre-marked clear plastic and decals. The parts are all superbly moulded and I'd go as far as to say they look as good as anything else from central Europe. A quick review of the instructions reveals this to be a well-detailed kit, with fine surface details and high quality mouldings. Constructions starts with the cockpit. Most of the details are moulded in plastic, but the fret of photo etched parts contributes components such as the rudder pedals, throttle and seat harness. Aside from a rather nice cockpit framework, there is also plenty of detail moulded into the fuselage sidewalls, which should make for a rather nice overall effect. The two machine guns also fit into the inside of the fuselage halves before they can be fixed together. Once the fuselage has been assembled, construction turns to the engine and cowling. This multi-part assembly is very nicely detailed and there are individual parts provided on the photo etched fret for the ignition wiring (although this could be omitted if fiddling around with these tiny components is likely to drive you to distraction). Once the engine and cowling have been fitted to the fuselage, the flying surfaces can be assembled. The fit and rudder are separate parts, as are the elevators. This means you can finish the model with these parts in your choice of position (photographs of examples on the ground seem to show the elevators in a lowered position). The ailerons are also moulded separately to the wing. The undercarriage is nicely detailed and there are photo etched parts for the strengthening wires. When it comes to the enclosed canopy, you have two options. The sensible, conventional choice is a two-part canopy nicely moulded in clear plastic. The option for show-offs or lunatics involves hewing a framework from three tiny bits of photo etched brass and then gluing in place no fewer than ten individual pieces of clear plastic film. Surely this has to be the modelling equivalent of a chicken phaal, only taken on by the unaccountably brave or foolhardy. The decal sheet provides three options, all of which are hypothetical 'what it?' markings: PZL P.11g 'Kobuz', September 1939; PZL P.11g 'Kobuz', 111th Fighter Squadron, 1940; PZL P.11g 'Kobuz', Pursuit Brigade, 1940. The decals are nicely printed. A decal for the instrument panel has been included too. Conclusion There appears to have been a resurgence of interest in the early WWII period and this kit adds to the growing number of kits that represent aircraft from that time. Although we've been relatively well served in recent years by Azur Frrom and Arma Hobby and their P.11s, IBG's version includes a number of advantages such as separate control surfaces. Once again the Polish firm have produced a high-quality kit of an important aircraft. The level of detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture is up there with the best. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. September Sky 1939 (72528) 2 in 1: PZL 37 B II and PZL P.11a 1:72 IBG Models In the early hours of 1 September 1939, German forces began the invasion of Poland, triggering a global conflict that would endure for over 2000 days and claim the lives of millions of combatants and civilians. At the time of the outbreak of war, Poland's air force comprised around 800 aircraft. Some types were outdated but many, such as the PZL 37 B were state of the art designs. In this box, IBG Models have packaged two of their kits to represent the Polish Air Force during the early days of the campaign. Included in IBG's package is their PZL P.11a fighter aircraft and PZL 37 B II bomber kits. In usual IBG Models style, there are photo etched parts provided to enhance detail and also marking options appropriate to the period depicted. As we've already review the PZL P.11a here, I will focus on the 37B II bomber for this review. The PZL 37 Łoś (Moose) was a medium bomber designed in-house at the PZL factory in Warsaw. Early 'A' versions were fitted with a single vertical stabilizer, while later 'A' and 'B' version featured an improved twin tail. At the time of its entry into service, the PZL 37 was one of the most advanced bomber aircraft in the world and there was significant interest in both acquisition of export variants and licence production by a number of foreign nations. The PZL 37 was used by the Polish Air Force following the invasion in September 1939. 26 survivors were withdrawn to Romania and were eventually used by the Romanian Air Force. Captured examples were also tested by Germany and the USSR. Of the original production batch, none survive today. Construction of the twin-engined bomber starts with the interior. The internal elements of the bomb bay must be assembled first, as the roof of the bomb bay forms the floor of the cockpit. Four (two small and two large) bombs are provided. The crew area comprises seats for the pilot and bomb aimer, as well as a nicely detailed bomb sight, control column, three 7.92mm machine guns and plenty of sidewall detail. The fret of photo etched parts contributes extra details for the control column, throttle controls and seat harnesses. Aside from the rather nice extra details, there is also plenty of detail moulded into the fuselage sidewalls. Once the interior sub-assembly is complete, the whole lot can be sandwiched between the fuselage halves. The instructions recommend fitting the rather nice transparent parts at this stage. Once in place, it becomes clear just how sleek this aircraft is. As is the norm with IBG Model kits, the control surfaces are all moulded separately and can be posed if desired. Construction then turns to the engines and wings. Two different engine types are provided, each of which comprises a main block, photo etched ignition wiring, a three-part cowling and propeller with two-part spinner. Construction of the wings is more complex that you might think. Each of the main landing gear bays is built up from photo etched parts, while the wing root bomb bays are a plastic frame moulded in just one part. For some reason I would have thought this method of assembly would have been reversed, but the photo etched parts shouldn't be too difficult to fold and glue in place. eight small bombs are provided to fill the wing bomb bays. Again, the flaps and ailerons are separate parts. The decal sheet provides two options for each type: PZL P.11a, 112th Fighter Squadron, Zielonka Airfield, Poland, September 1939; PZL P.11a, 111th Fighter Squadron, Zielonka Airfield, Poland, September 1939; PZL 37 B Łoś, 16th Bomber Squadron, September 1939; and PZL 37 B Łoś, 17th Bomber Squadron, September 1939. The decals are nicely printed and a small selection of stencils has been included too. Conclusion There has been a noticeable resurgence of interest in the early WWII period, with the likes of Airfix and IBG Models releasing a number of types in recent years. It's nice to see IBG Models paying tribute to the brave men of the Polish Air Force with such a high quality set. I've reviewed the PZL P.11 a couple of times before, but this is the first time I've seen their PZL 37B. Happily the kit doesn't disappoint and it displays the characteristic crisp moulding and fine detail we've come to expect from the Polish manufacturer. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. IBG Models is to release in 2018 (?) a 1/72nd Polskie Zakłady Lotnicze / PZL P.24 kit - ref. 72523 Source: http://www.modelarovo.cz/norimberk-2018-jak-jsme-ho-videli-my/ V.P.
  9. PZL P.11A Polish Fighter Plane 1:72 IBG For its time, the PZL P.11 was one of the most advanced fighter aircraft in the world. While many nations were still using bi-planes, Warsaw-based PZL (Państwowe Zakłady Lotnicze - State Aviation Works) had designed and built an all-metal gull winged monoplane fighter. The high wing provided the pilot with a good field of view and produced less drag that the bi-plane fighters of the time. The type drew orders from overseas as well as Poland. The aircraft was ordered by Romania and was built under licence by IAR. By the time of the German invasion of Poland however, the type was outclassed by the Bf 109. The majority of the Polish Air Force was lost fighting bravely against the invasion. The PZL 11 is one of a growing number of aircraft kits produced by IBG Models. This kit follows the likes of the RWD-8 and PZL 23A and continues IBG's method of producing numerous versions from a common set of moulds. This boxing is the PZL 11A, but an PZL 11G is also availble. Inside the box are seven frames of light grey plastic, a single frame of clear plastic, a fret of photo etched brass parts, a small sheet of pre-marked clear plastic and decals. The parts are all superbly moulded and I'd go as far as to say they look as good as anything else from central Europe. A quick review of the instructions reveals this to be a well-detailed kit, comparable to an Eduard product in places, althought without the complex breakdown of parts. Constructions starts with the cockpit. Most of the details are moulded in plastic, but the fret of photo etched parts contributes components such as the rudder pedals, throttle and seat harness. Aside from a rather nice cockpit framework, there is also plenty of detail moulded into the fuselage sidewalls, which should make for a rather nice overall effect. The two machine guns also fit into the inside of the fuselage halves before they can be fixed together. Once the fuselage has been assembled, construction turns to the engine and cowling. This multi-part assembly is very nicely detailed and there are individual parts provided on the photo etched fret for the ignition wiring (although this could be omitted if cutting out and glueing these tiny components is likely to drive you round the bend). Once the engine and cowling have been fitted to the fuselage, the flying surfaces can be assembled. The fit and rudder are separate parts, as are the elevators. This means you can finish the model with these parts in your choice of position (photographs of examples on the ground seem to show the elevators in a lowered position). The ailerons are also moulded separately to the wing. The undercarriage is nicely detailed and there are photo etched parts for the strengthening wires. A choice of parts are provided for the windshield. You can choose the conventional option, which is a straightforward part moulded from clear plastic. If you are feeling brave, you can take the second option. This involves folding the cockpit canopy from photo etched brass and then fixing the pre-marked clear plastic sheet in place. The decal sheet provides three options: PZL P.11a, 112th Fighter Squadron, Zaborow Airfield, Poland, September 1939; PZL P.11a, 114th Fighter Squadron, Poniatow Airfield, Poland, September 1939; PZL P.11a, 113th Fighter Squadron, Warsaw, Poland. The decals are nicely printed. A decal for the instrument panel has been included too. Conclusion There appears to have been a resurgence of interest in the early WWII period and this kit adds to the growing number of kits that represent aircraft from that period. Although we've been relatively well served in recent years by Azur Frrom and Arma Hobby and their P.11s, IBG's version includes a number of advantages such as separate control surfaces. Once again the Polish firm have produced a high-quality kit of an important aircraft. The level of detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture is up there with the best. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Arma Hobby (http://www.armahobbynews.com/) is to release a 1/48th Polskie Zakłady Lotnicze - PZL P.1 resin kit - ref. AH49001 Source: http://www.armahobbynews.com/2013/12/148-scale-pzl-p-1-and-other-2014-news/ V.P.
  11. This is my PZL P.24A in 1/72 scale built in autumn 2018. The model was built from Azur offering - cat. No A102 - PZL 24A/C Turkish Air Force. Aftermarket upgrading: YahuModels instrument panel and Master Model metal gun barrels. I have thoroughly reworked the surface structure and to some degree scratch detailed engine front area. There are quite many pictures here, but I hope you like them. Best from Szczecin, PL:
  12. Hi guys; These are my first two kits finalized in 2019. Excellent kits. Work done in just one week. I used Yahu panels and the Hataka acrylic set. Very good start 2019 with lovely kits. Congratulations Arma Hobby! Cheers!
  13. PZL P.11c (70015 & 70016) 1:72 ARMA HOBBY For its time the PZL P.11 was briefly the most advanced fighter of its type in the world. While many nations were still using bi-planes Warsaw based PZL had designed and built an all metal high gull winged monoplane fighter. The high wing provided the pilot with a good field of view and the single wing less drag that the bi-plane fighters of the time. The type drew orders from overseas as well as Poland. The aircraft was ordered by Roumania with the Romanian IAR building them under license as well. However by the time of the German invasion of Poland the type was outclassed by the Bf 109 and the majority of the Polish Air Force was lost fighting bravely against the invasion; though up to 36 were flown to Roumania. The Kit This is a new tool kit from ARMA Hobby. This is offered in a "Junior Set" comprising the Kit, PE, and 2 decal options; or the "Expert Set" with kit, PE, Masks and 4 decals options. The kit is well moulded with the right level of detail to my eye in this scale. Construction starts in the cockpit area. The floor is matched with the rudder pedals, the seat and control column are then added to this. PE seat belts are provided. Inside the fuselage halves the tubular support structure is then added, once this is in the cockpit section can then be placed in and the fuselage joined together. At the top of the fuselage the pilots head rest is then added. On the underside an insert is added which contains the landing gear struts, This is good engineering as the modeller does not have to worry about getting the angle of the struts right, or waiting for them to set. At the front of the fuselage the engine is placed in its cowl and the whole lot is added. The wheels and tail skid are also added. The windscreen is added along with the two part main wing. The two main struts each side can then be added. A few detail parts then complete the build. Markings There are printed by Techmod so should pose no problems. 2 marking option are provided for the Junior kit 121 Eskadra Myśliwska 2 /39-K 8.63 (Waclaw Szczepan Krol) 122 Eskadra Myśliwska 8 /142-K 8.34 (Cadet Wladyslaw Chciuk) For the Expert kit there are 4 options; 113 Fighter Sqn., Pursuit Brig. 10 / 170-N 8.70 (poruczik Hieronim Dudwal) One of the Sqn.s of the Pursuit Brigade. 3 / 62-W 8.138 131 Fighter Sqn. 4 / 804-P (Lt. Henryk Bibrowicz and 2nd Lt. Lech Grzybowski) 141 Fighter Sqn. 55 / 504-T 8.108 (Cpt. Florian Laskowski) Conclusion It is great to see this important Polish Aircraft being kitted by a Polish company. Highly recommended. Junior Set Expert Set Review samples courtesy of
  14. Dear friends, After the Avro Anson another example of the WWII Greek Airforce. It is the Polish-made PZL P.24G in 1.48 by Mirage Hobby. The kit has some difficulties, namely it is a challenge to fit the engine in the cowling, and get the exhausts right. But in general it went OK. I used Gunze and AKAN colors and Microscale's mat varnish. Sorry for the photo quality, I try my best but... Hope you like it,
  15. This is a TS-11R, pics taken by Richard at the Polish Air Museum in Krakow.
  16. Hi! I made a fast diorama with new PZL P.7a from Arma Hobby. I bought overtrees kit and builded it without any additions except dampers tapes. Support is from wood, cloud is a painted rock, air streaks are from cotton swab soaked with CA glue and number 7 is made from plastic plate. Kit is nice but needs cleaning and puttying some plastic recesses. After that work everthing fits perfectly.
  17. Slingshot Models (http://www.slingshotmodels.com/ & https://www.facebook.com/Slingshot-Models-315973831844221/) is to release a 1/48th PZL-Mielec M-18 Dromader resin kit - ref.? Sources: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009390991913&sk=photos&collection_token=100009390991913%3A2305272732%3A69&set=a.1854060808250268.1073741835.100009390991913&type=3&pnref=story https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=1285300104911584&id=315973831844221 V.P.
  18. Yellow Box has released a 1/72nd Polskie Zakłady Lotnicze / PZL-130T Turbo Orlik resin kit - ref. 72020 Source: http://twoje-modele.pl/product.php?id_product=2151 See also: http://www.72news.eu/2016/11/yellow-box-pzl-130-turbo-orlik-and.html V.P.
  19. Yellow Box has released a 1/48th PZL P.8 II resin kit - ref.48001 Source: http://twoje-modele.pl/product.php?id_product=973&id_lang=1 V.P.
  20. Mirage Hobby 1/48th PZL P.42 Dive Bomber 'ITL 1936 and 1939 ver. kit is reported in progress - ref. 481320 Source: https://www.facebook.com/MirageHobbyOfficial/photos/a.489123771111052.102883.162443477112418/872982402725185/?type=1&theater V.P.
  21. Ardpol is to release a 1/48th PZL Bielsko SZD-39 cobra 17 resin kit - ref. 48-020 Source: http://ardpolmodels.com.pl/produkt/48-020-szd-39-cobra-17-wkrotce/ V.P.
  22. Arma Hobby (http://www.armahobbynews.com/) is to release in March 2014 a 1/48th jet trainer aircraft resin kit. Source: http://www.armahobbynews.com/2013/12/148-scale-pzl-p-1-and-other-2014-news/ Considering the Polish origin from Arma Hobby: a PZL I-22 Iryda or TS-11 Iskra ? All bets are off! Guess the future Attack Squadron 1:48 scale naval fighter: ? V.P.
  23. After the Fokker D.XXI (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234967800-132-fokker-dxxi-resin-kit-by-silver-wings-box-arttest-shot-release-2015/), Silver Wings (http://www.silverwings.pl/) is to release a 1/32nd PZL P.11 resin kit - ref. Source: https://www.facebook.com/SilverWingsAircraftModels/posts/892578647466543 V.P.
  24. Source: http://armahobbynews.pl/en/blog/2015/12/22/arma-hobby-news-2016/ V.P.
  25. Arma Hobby was working on a 1/72nd PZL-130 Orlik and Turbo Orlik resin kits. But legal/licence issues suspend the project... Source: http://armahobbynews.pl/blog/2015/06/11/pzl-130-orlik-z-arma-hobby-dlaczego-nie/ V.P.
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