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Found 52 results

  1. Special Hobby is to release a family of Allison engined 1/72nd Curtiss P-40 Warhawk kits from P-40E to N. Source: http://www.specialhobby.net/2017/02/info-z-norimberku-no2.html V.P.
  2. Kittyhawk Mk.IA 1:72 Special Hobby The P-40 was based on the earlier P-36 but adapted and improved to give a good turn of speed, a stable gun platform and the agility to allow it to enter into service with the US Army Air Force. Improvements continued until the E-model entered service with a more powerful Allinson engine, extra guns and bomb shackles under the wings. It saw action mostly in the desert and Far East where the more delicate thoroughbreds at the leading edge of technology might have stumbled due to the conditions. The K was a similar aircraft with a more advanced Allinson engine and a curved fin fillet to stabilise the aircraft due to the additional torque of the engine. The E was known as the Kittyhawk Mk.IA, while the K was the Kittyhawk Mk.III in foreign service, with many Allied air forces, including Britain, the Soviet Union, Canada and China. Over 13,000 of all variants were built, and the aircraft served until the end of the war. This is the second boxing of Special Hobby's new kit, with a number of revisions to enable the Kittyhawk Mk.IA to be built. It is unrelated to the P-40F released in 2008. Inside the top-opening box are two sprues of grey plastic, a small clear sprue and a sheet of decals. There are no resin or photo etched parts, indicating Special Hobby's continued progress towards the mainstream. The parts are all well detailed and crisply moulded, although the panel lines are a little heavy here and there, particularly on the fuselage sides and lower wing surface. Altogether there are over 70 parts. Cockpit detail is very good indeed. The cockpit sidewalls are moulded separately to the fuselage and feature crisp, clear details. The pilot's seat, armour and bulkhead are all moulded separately, as is the instrument panel and control column. The floor of the cockpit is moulded in place on the part that joins the upper wing halves, but this does not particularly compromise detail, particularly in this scale. Aside from the cockpit, the only other item that has to be assembled before the fuselage halves can be joined is the radiator, which is made up from three different parts. The lower wing, just like the upper wing, is moulded in one piece. The main landing gear bays are made up of a plastic square part which sandwiches between the wing halves to give convincing depth and detail. The tail wheel is moulded in one piece. Once the wing has been joined to the fuselage, you can add the remaining control surfaces. The horizontal tail planes are solid parts, while the rudder is moulded separately to the vertical tail. The engine exhaust pipes are moulded separately to the fuselage and can be added from the outside of the fuselage, which is a major plus when it comes to the painting stage. Two sets of cooling gills are provided; one open and one closed. The propellor is moulded with all three blades as one part which, once painted, can be sandwiches between the front and rear parts of the spinner. A choice of two different drop tanks are provided, along with a bomb for the centerline pylon. The transparent parts are beautifully thin and clear and the sliding part of the canopy is moulded separately to the windscreen. Two different parts are provided depending on whether you wish to finish the canopy in the open or closed positions. The decal sheet provides for three options: ⦁ Kittyhawk Mk.IA AK772 GA-Y (no sniggering) 'London Pride', No. 112 Squadron RAF, Libya, 1942. This aircraft is finished in Middle Stone and Dark Earth over Dark Mediterranean Blue; ⦁ Kittyhawk Mk.IA A29-153 O 'Orace', No. 75 Squadron, RAAF, Milne Bay, New Guinea, March 1943. This aircraft is finished in the Dupont equivalent of Dark Earth and Dark Green over Sky Blue; and ⦁ Kittyhawk Mk.IA AK905 LZ-D, No. 111(F) Squadron RCAF, Anchorage, Alaska, 1942. This aircraft is finished in the Dupont equivalent of Dark Earth and Dark Green over Sky Grey. The decals themselves are nicely printed and look glossy and opaque. Conclusion It's great that Special Hobby have released a kit of the Kittyhawk to complement Airfix's early Warhawk. This kit is both more detailed and more complex than the Airfix kit, and it's all the better for it. It should build up into a pleasing model, particularly if you acquire some of the not-inconsiderable resin sets that CMK have released alongside the kit. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. BigED Set Tomahawk Mk.II (for Airfix BIG49189) 1:48 Eduard In case you're unaware, Eduard's Big ED sets are a great way to purchase all the sets you want for your model whilst availing yourself of a bulk purchase discount that can be quite tempting. The set arrives in a large cardboard envelope with the Big ED branding and a sticker in the top left that details what's inside. Within the envelope the sets are all still individually packaged to protect the frets from shuffling past each other and getting damaged until you're ready to use them. This set is for the new Airfix Tomahawk Mk.II, which is a reboxing of the P-40B in RAF Service. In the set you get the following: landing flaps (48941) Eduard landing flaps use an ingenious technique to achieve excellent true-to-scale flaps using few parts, and requiring the modeller to simply remove the retracted flaps from the lower wing, plus scrape the upper wings to accommodate the thickness of the completed bays. The two flap sections (bay and flap itself) are constructed in the same manner, by twisting and folding over the attached ribs to create a 3D shape, with extra parts added along the way. The bays glue to the inside of the upper wing with the flap attached to the rear wall of the new bay via a fold. Repeat this for the other side, and you're almost done. The bays have a rod running along the bay, which is 0.5mm thick and isn't included in the set, so you'll need to make sure you have some in stock, and a set of jacks are fitted later to obtain the correct angle once deployed. A small cover panel fits toward the middle, which is folded gently twice to match the profile of the bay ribs before it is installed. I've built a set of these for the previous P-40B boxing, and you can see how they look below. Detail Set (49875) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels that fit over the existing panel and sidewall details, are the primary parts on the painted set, with new seat in scale-representative PE; radio hatch interior detail; six mesh inserts for the intakes in the nose; cooling doors to the aft of the chin scoop; gear bay inserts; gear bay covers and brake hose parts as well as tie-down points for main and tail; access panels; ring & bead sights on the nose, and rudder actuator are also supplied. Seatbelts STEEL (FE874) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. Masks (EX570) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the tail wheel, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Conclusion Your one-stop shop for Tomahawk Mk.II bits to go on your Airfix kit. Review sample courtesy of
  4. P-40 Mainwheels 1:72 CMK for Special Hobby Kit Here there are three different types of main wheel provided, Block tread, Cross tread & Diamond tread; These are just a drop in replacement for the kit wheels. The resin allows much greater detail including the tread. Conclusion These will enhance the already great little model from Special Hobby. Recommended. Block Tread Diamond Tread Cross Tread Review sample courtesy of
  5. Matchbox kit PK-31, Curtiss P-40N Warhawk, re-issued by Revell in the Matchbox boxing, A Burma Banshee of 85th Fighter Squadron, AAF 10th Airforce CBI in Assam, India 1944, Fantastically enjoyable build and a very interesting subject, Build thread is here: I finished this (so i thought) for the recent Matchbox GB but I was unhappy with the provided transfers/decals (badly printed) and the fact that I hadn't completed the Mini Paint Plan with regards to the wing walks and the undersides of the gun bays. I 'borrowed' some more stars'n'bars from a Frog Mustang kit and duly painted in the wing walks (using masking) and undersides of the gun bays (no masking, just a very small brush and a magnifying stand). Now I'm reasonably happy to call this P-40 complete, droopy aerial wire not withstanding, and move on - i'm really pleased with how the 'Olive Drab' colour came out as it seems to be a very good match to the images of Burmese Jungle that I printed off as a backdrop. Thanks for your inspiration and support, BM Modellers!
  6. During the course of the Matchbox GB, I got so excited that I started to pick up other kits. Still a week to go before this GB finishes so there is time to squeeze in one of the kits not covered yet - a favourite aircraft of mine, the Curtiss P-40. Such a pugnacious-looking piece of US heavy metal and much has been written about the instant appeal of painting shark's teeth on the big jawline! Matchbox offered the P-40N Warhawk version with a skull motif so here we go.... Surprise...when I bought the 'unstarted' kit, I noticed that someone had already applied some paint to the spinner. Got going on the first few stages of the build - as usual, a very good fit of parts and next to no flash (just a little at the rear of the fuselage pieces). I'll leave the pilot out for now until he is painted but cracking on with assembling the fuselage and the prop.
  7. MikeR

    Gun camera on P-40 - how common?

    The new 1/72 Special Hobby P-40 kits include the gun camera fairing as part B10 and, for the N at least, it's isn't grayed out as not for use. However, the instructions don't tell you where to put it, but a quick Google search showed that below the wing outboard of the starboard undercarriage fairing was the usual location. The photographic record seems to indicate that the gun camera wasn't fitted that often, but was there a set reason as to which aircraft may have had one? Like flight leaders, for example? Thanks in advance, Mike.
  8. Marco1965

    P-40 AVG 1/72

    This was a short project to relax for a while! I finished the 1/72 Airfix Curtiss Hawk 81-A-2 as a P-40B AVG machine, basically out of the box. I only added break lines, PE iron sights, simulated the canvas interior of the wheel wells and opened the cockpit. Nice that the kit provides the correct pitot tube. I had some fitting issues around the cowl, but nothing really serious. I used the kit decals, correcting only the colors ans corners of the sharkmouth. I issued the camo patron on Tamiya masking tape from the excellent Osprey AVG publication. Hard camo edges make this task easier. The pilot figure comes from the Hasegawa WWII pilots set. Hope that you like it. Marco
  9. Hi Guys, today, I would like to show you a recent build. This Bird is mostly ooB, The Bomb is Revell, the Bomb-carriage is from Academy, Stencils and Roundels are from the "Spare-Department" out of the deep of my Stash. Paints are Agama, done by Brush. It represents a Plane from the 250th Squadron, Italy, 1944. This Squadron uses not repainted Birds, that's why this Plane carries US Camouflage and no British Camouflage. The Kit could not hide his age, so please be patient. But it has two-coloured plastics......... Best Regards Stefan
  10. Evening gents, few pics of my finished Airfix P-40B, enjoyed the build, rushed the canopy slightly but overall I'm happy with how she turned out. Last one of her in the display cabinet with her counterpart an AMT P-40N.
  11. Hello everybody. I wish everyone a Merry Christmas (my apologies for being late, I couldn't access the site for 2 days). My first RFI ever. It's the new Airfix 1/48 P-40, my first fully completed build since.....1982. My sincere thanks to all the people here who share their experience(s). It helped me to get back into saddle. I did it strictly OOB but scribing the missing rudder tab and removing the right hinge off the rudder. I also had to rebuild the pitot tube from scratch (broken 5 times!). I tried Eduard mask for the cockpit. Very happy with it and I shall make further use of this stuff. I'd say it was my most enjoyable build ever. Great fit, simple and good looking kit. I'm not knowledgeable enough to comment about accuracy but IMHO it more than fits the bill. Some minor things id'like to mention: the cockpit interior frame should be removed from the sprue with a cutter, using side cutters I bent it. The fairings of the gear wells were the only part that needed some trimming/sanding for perfect fit. I'd have liked attachment points to help with the gear doors placement. It was airbrushed with a H&S Evolution Silverline (0.2 needle). Only acrylics (Gunze and Tamiya) were used (a first for me). Primer: Stynylrez grey Camo: Gunze H302 (green FS 34092), H310 (brown FS 30219); underside: H311 (gray FS 36622) Cockpit: Gunze H58 (interior green) Tamiya XF 4, 11, 16 and X18 for the interior details and weathering. Hope you'll enjoy it. All mishaps and mistakes are mine. Comments are welcome.
  12. This is Academy's 1/72 P-40M/-N done up as the well-known NZ3148 G/"Gloria Lyons" on the strength of No. 4 Servicing Unit of the Royal New Zealand Air Force's Fighter Wing, operating through the Solomon Islands from October 1943. Gloria Lyons was a 19-year old spinal tuberculosis patient in hospital in Christchurch who had become a pen-pal of several members of the squadron, and was 'adopted' as a mascot by the unit as a whole. This was the first of four aircraft that would be named in honor of Miss Lyons---(3) P-40s and an F4U Corsair---each earlier aircraft crashing, lost in action or otherwise being taken out of sevice. NZ3148 was damaged in crash landing at Torokina on Bougainville island on 09 February 1944; the engine failed just prior to landing and the aircraft missed the runway, hitting a mound of earth and somersaulting. Sergeant Pilot Charles Woods of No. 18 Squadron was unhurt. The airframe was written off the books in March of that year. [For those who are curious...Miss Lyons herself eventually recovered, married, and moved to Australia; she had a long life, passing away in 1998.] NZ3148 was a P-40N-1, similar to the earlier -M model, still with older-style canopy and six wing guns. Scheme was the factory-applied standard OD & neutral gray with Medium-green 'blotch' pattern on wing leading and trailing edges; white spinner, tail surfaces and fuselage bands were theater and unit markings. The Academy kit itself is basic but cleanly-molded, and comes with the option for the older style canopy with quarterlights aft (which I used) or the cut-down aft fuselage with 'greenhouse' style canopy. Kit isn't 100% perfect---a few gaps and some shape issues here and there---but went together well with overall great fit. I used bits of both Eduard and Part etch sets, mainly to amp-up the simple kit cockpit (most of which is barely visible), and as a more-articulated option to the single-piece cowling flap assembly beneath. Decals came from the excellent AeroMaster RNZAF set (SP72-10), and---as per my previous experience---were utterly trouble-free. These birds were hard-used and at the end of a long and iffy supply chain, and photos show them heavily-weathered. I used a combination of washes, dry-brushing and pastel highlighting to try to make it look suitably 'bitty.' I've always found the long-tail P-40 marks the most elegant-looking of the lot, and few were more attractively-marked than the Kiwi birds of the RNZAF. Hope you enjoy!
  13. December the 7th. With 1/72 Tamiya's Zero and Airfix P-40 available (plus Starfighter "Pearl Harbor Defenders" decals), I decided to assemble the most known fighter types during the attack (still waiting for a suitable P-36 in this scale), and as they are quite small, thought that they would look better if shown together on a single base. Tamiya's A6M-2b was assembled out of the box, using the kit decals and paint instructions. It represents E11-137, Liut. Masao Sato, Carrier Division 5 Air Superiority Force, 2nd Strike Unit, aircraft carrier Zuikaku. The Airfix P-40 (I used the Curtiss Hawk 81-A2 kit, same thing) got the benefit of a small PE fret, and represents Liut. George Welch's fighter, 47th PS, 15th PG, buzz number 160, as far as information is available. Bot kits received some additional detail like brake lines and the correction of the wheel wells with simulated canvas in the case of the P-40. A map of Pearl Harbor was painted on a wooden base, a simulatedJapaneseaircraft carrier deck was built for the Zero and a dirt strip for the P-40. both pilot figures came from the Hasegawa WWII Pilots kits, and I guess that tuxedo pants and shoes color for Liut. Welch is ok. Marco
  14. Airfix is to release in September 2016 a 1/48th Curtiss P-40B Warhawk kit - ref. A05130 Sources: http://www.airfix.com/uk-en/curtiss-p-40b-1-48.html http://www.airfix.com/uk-en/news/workbench/p40b_and_b5n1_Meteor V.P.
  15. I suppose just in order to annoy the soon to release Special Hobby kits, Legato is to release a serie of 1/72nd - Curtiss P-40E Warhawk / Kittyhawk Mk.Ia kits. These will be repop of the old AZmodel kit with new decals, masks etc.. Source: http://www.modelarovo.cz/velky-doprodej-info-z-kpaz/ V.P.
  16. Eduard next limited edition kit will a 1/32nd Curtiss P-40N Warhawk - ref. 11104 Source: https://www.eduard.com/store/out/media/distributors/leaflet/leaflet2017-07.pdf V.P.
  17. Curtiss P-40N Warhawk 1:32 Eduard History By the summer of 1943, the performance of the P-40 Warhawk was leaving much to be desired, especially in comparison to the later types such as the P-38, P-47, and P-51 which were beginning to come into service. The P-40N version (company designation Model 87V, 87W) was introduced at this time in an effort to improve the capabilities of the basic design and thus avoid interrupting Curtiss production lines by having the company introduce an entirely new type. The first 1500 examples of this new Warhawk line were to have been delivered as P-40Ps powered by Merlin engines, but shortages of the Packard-built Merlin caused this order to be cancelled and the P-40N with the 1200 hp Allison V-1710-81 engine to be substituted in its place. A new lightweight structure was introduced, two of the six wing-mounted guns were removed, smaller and lighter undercarriage wheels were installed, head armor was reintroduced, and aluminium radiators and oil coolers were installed. The resulting reduction in the weight, along with the use of the same V-1710-81 engine as used in the P-40M, made the P-40N the fastest of the P-40 series, reaching a speed of 378 mph at 10,500 feet. Even though by 1943 standards the Warhawk was rapidly becoming obsolescent, the P-40N became the version that was most widely built--5220 examples rolling off the Curtiss lines before production finally ceased. The first production block was the P-40N-1-CU. It appeared in March of 1943, still powered by the Allison V-1710-81 engine, but with 122 gallons of internal fuel and a generally lighter structure than its predecessors. With weight reduced to 6000 pounds empty, 7400 pounds gross, and 8850 pounds maximum, the N-1 was the fastest P-40 service variant and was intended for high altitude combat. Maximum speed was 378 mph at 10,500 feet and service ceiling was 38,000 feet. An altitude of 15,000 feet could be attained in 6.7 minutes. Armament consisted of four 0.50-inch machine guns in the wings. Four hundred P-40N-1-CUs were built. The P-40N-5-CU variant introduced a modified cockpit canopy with a frameless sliding hood and a deeper, squared-off rectangular aft transparent section to improve the rearward view. This cockpit canopy was retained for all the rest of the production blocks of the N version. The N-5 version restored the full six-gun wing armament, since pilots had complained that four guns were insufficient. Underwing racks were fitted for bombs or drop tanks, increasing external stores capacity to 1500 pounds. The new heavier gross weight of 8350 pounds limited the top speed to 350 mph at 16,400 feet and service ceiling to 31,000 feet. An altitude of 14,000 feet could be attained in 7.3 minutes. Range was 340 miles with a 500-pound bomb underneath the fuselage. Three drop tanks promised a ferry range of up to 3100 miles at 198 mph. The Model In this, their fifth release in their EduArt series, and second in 1:32 scale, Eduard have taken a Hasegawa P-40 and given it some extra styrene parts, namely the P-40N tail parts, cut down rear cockpit area and new clear canopy parts associated with the type. They have also of their lovely etched sheets and a selection of resin parts. In the quite large and beautifully adorned box, with a painting by Romain Hugault, who was renowned for painting artworks inspired, and including women. Inside the box there are two more pieces of the boxart, one, an A2 poster, which is nicely rolled up, and the second, a large and quite heavy metal plaque which is pre drilled with holes at each corner for either screws, or, if you desire to attach it to a metal object, pop rivets. The actual kit comes on seventeen sprues of grey styrene, two of clear, two etched sheets, four poly caps, thirteen resin parts and a set of paint masks. Whichever version you chose to build you will have quite a few parts left over for the spares box. All the parts are beautifully moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and there aren’t too many moulding pips to clean up either. The instructions are well printed, very clear and easy to read, but be aware that you will have to choose which variant/scheme you are building as the parts are quite different and the build sequence can get a bit muddled. The build begins with the cockpit and depending on which scheme you choose will decide which type of seat, rear bulkhead and gun sight you need to use. The cockpit is made up of the seat, etched belts, cockpit floor, joystick, multi-part compass, and a very complete instrument panel, which takes the form of a plastic panel onto which the two etched parts are glued, the sandwiched part being the pre printed instruments and the outer part the pre-printed panel. The rest of the panel is made up of other painted parts, levers and the different styles of gun sights. To the rear of the panel the rudder pedals are attached, along with the coaming. Each sidewall is a mass of etched and plastic parts making up very detailed and busy areas. The sidewalls, instrument panel, rear bulkhead and cockpit floor are then joined together to build the cockpit tub. The internals of the chin intake are made up from four plastic parts, onto which the three etched intake and exhaust grilles are added. The intake and cockpit assemblies are then fitted to one half of the fuselage and closed up with the other. The two halves of the tail section are then joined together and glued to the front section. The insert behind the cockpit is then fitted, along with the two scalloped sections. Around the nose, the two exhaust inserts are attached, as are the chin intake panel and cheek grilles. PE parts are then added to the front and sides of the fin and the PE canopy slides are added to the rear canopy rails. Depending on what stores you intend to add will dictate which holes you need to open up in the single piece lower wing. The wheel wells are made up from the roof and two side walls. Each of the wells are then joined to the front spar section and glued into place. The two upper wing sections are then attached to the lower wing section and fitted out with a selection of PE panels and light fittings. Each of the rudder and horizontal tail surfaces come in two halves, once glued together they are fitted into their respective positions. The moulded actuator rods for the elevators are removed and replaced with PE parts. The propeller is then assembled from the single piece, three bladed propeller, backplate, poly cap and spinner. The respective clear parts for the rear canopy are then attached depending on which scheme has been chosen. The wing assembly is then fitted with the machine gun muzzle inserts and fitted to the fuselage, followed by the two resin exhaust stacks. Turning the model upside down, the intake cowl flaps are fitted with their actuators and glued to the rear of the chin intake fairing. The rear wing fairing is then attached, along with the internal undercarriage bay longitudinal spars, id light, landing lights lenses, and PE vent surrounds. Keeping the model upside down the ventral drop tanks or 500lb bomb and their respective fittings and fixtures are attached to the holes drilled earlier. The wing pylons are made completely out of PE parts are will need to be carefully assembled before being attached to the wings. The main undercarriage is then assembled, each unit being made up of the three part resin wheels, single piece oleo to which the PE scissor links and other parts are attached. Once glued into position the bay doors are attached and the tail wheel doors are fitted, along with the door links, tail wheel oleo and one of the three options of wheels. The build is finished off with the addition of the optional canopy, and windscreen, DF loop, aerial masts, pitot probe and propeller assembly. Decals The large decal sheet has been printed by Cartograf for Eduard and is beautifully printed, in perfect register, good opacity and quite glossy. There is a choice of five aircraft, three American and two form the New Zealand Air Force. There are also a full airframes worth of stencils included The scheme choices are:- P-40N-5, S/n 42-105123 flown by Lt P.S. Adair, 89th FS, 80th FG, Nagaghuli, India, February 1944 Kittyhawk IV, (P-40N-1), NZ3148, No.19 Squadron RNZAF, Ondonga, New Georgia, November 1943 P-40N-1 flown by Lt. G. L. Walston, 16th FS, 51st FG, Kumming, China, 1944 P-40N, 7th FS, 49th FG, Cyclops Airfield, Hollandia, New Guinea, May 1944 Kittyhawk IV, (P-40N-20), NZ3220, No.18 Squadron RNZAF, Bougainville 1944. Conclusion This is a fabulous looking package, with some nice goodies included with a very nice looking kit. It looks like it should build into a very attractive looking model with a great level of detail. You shouldn’t need to buy any other additional parts, but knowing Eduard, I bet they will release some other bits and bobs for it as they did for the last EduArt release. Buy it while you can. Review sample courtesy of
  18. HansReggelsen

    P-40 = Tomahawk/Kittyhawk?

    Hi all! I have figured out which P-40 type is called what in RAF service: P-40 B/C = Tomahawk P-40E (4 guns) = Kittyhawk Mk. I P-40E (6 guns) = Kittyhawk Mk. IA P-40F (shorttailed/Merlin-engined) = Kittyhawk II P-40L (longtailed/Merlin-engined) = Kittyhawk II P-40K = Kittyhawk III P-40M = Kittyhawk III P-40N = Kittyhawk IV So far - so good. I also understand that there weren't many Kittyhawk II (P-40F/L) delivered to th RAF. Now here's my question: Would a P-40F/L delivered to the RAAF be called a Kittyhawk II? Or was it still a P-40F/L Cheers Hans J
  19. Bronco Models is to release in April 2016 a 1/48th Curtiss-Wright P-40C Hawk 81-A2 AVG "Flying Tigers" kit - Ref.FB4006 Sources: http://www.themodellingnews.com/2016/03/bronco-models-five-featured-new-kits.html#more http://www.aeroscale.co.uk/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=22028 V.P.
  20. FloydWerner

    Neville Dukes' AK578- P-40B or P-40E?

    I'm trying to do Neville Duke's airplane AK578 as depicted on the Xtradecal sheet, Early P-40-Part 2. The problem comes in when I did some research that apparently AK578 is a Kittyhawk and not a Tomahawk. Is Xtradecals wrong? There is conflicting information on the 112 page. One place has it as a Tomahawk with the picture of only the front end. The picture is difficult to make out if it is a Dark Earth/Middlestone/Azure or TLS scheme. Then in the serial number portion of the page it describes AK578 as a Kittyhawk Mk.I. Another of my trusted sources, Roy Sutherland at Barracudacals, has GA D as a Kittyhawk as well. I'm so confused. Can any of you shed light on this subject aircraft? Is it a TLS "D" or a DE/MS/AZ GA D? I want to do this right. Or do I need to pick another aircraft. I really want to do a sharkmouthed desert scheme 112 aircraft. I'm trying to use the Xtracals as I never have and they were given to me for this build. Thanks Floyd
  21. Hi! Here's my first for 2017. The new Airfix kit was a joy to build. I modified the pilot in the kit to a more natural pose. The prop blur was simulated by brushing pastel on the spinner. The model was painted using Vallejo Air colors. Hope you enjoy. Any comments appreciated Best regards Rune
  22. Hi folk's last build I'm starting for 2016,Airfix's new P-40 which I plan to finish in the box art scheme in time for December 7th which will be the 75th anniversary of the Pearl Harbour attack.IMHO this looks like the best molded kit Airfix have produced to date and following Jonner's thread it seems as if it builds beautifully,It's produced here in the UK in a darker smoother plastic than recent kit's very similar to Eduard and Tamiya and let me say every bit as good as those two revered companies. A quick look at the fuselage sprue. And first stage done. Thanks for looking in.
  23. Burma Banshees 1:72 Rising Decals The P-40s flown by the 80th Fighter Group are immediately noticeable by the skulls on the nose. This new sheet from Rising Decals brings us decals for 7 different aircraft. In addition to the aircraft markings you get national insignia for all the aircraft and the serial numbers. The printing looks great everything is in register, there is virtually no carrier film and the white looks dense enough that there should be no colour bleed through. The kill markings are split between white backings and the markings to obtain the best results Aircraft provided on the sheet are; P-40N-5 "White 1", s/n 42-2105264, Col. Ivan E. McElroy, the 80th Fighter Group commander (from July 1943 to April 1944) P-40N-1 "White 15", s/n unknown, 1st Lt. Robert Gale, 88th FS, 80th FG, Nagaghuli, Assam, India, Spring 1944 P-40N-1 "White 44", s/n 42104590, "Lulu Belle", 2nd Lt. Philip R. Adair, 89th FS, 80th FG, Nagaghuli, Assam, India, Spring 1944 P-40N-1 "White 55", s/n unknown (210xxx2), 2nd Lt. Herbert H. Doughty, 89th FS, 80th FG, Sadiya, Assam, India, Spring 1944 P-40N-1 "White 60", s/n unknown, "The Rough Cobb", 2nd Lt. Philip R. Adair, 89th FS, 80th FG, Assam, India, 1944 P-40N-5 "White 65", s/n 42105233, "Butter Bean II", Maj. A. L. Evans, 89th FS, 80th FG, Nagaghuli, Assam, India, 1944 P-40N-1 "White 76", s/n unknown, "Shag", 90th FS, 80th FG, Moran, Assam, India, Spring 1944 Conclusion This is a great sheet for the P-40s flown by the 80th Fighter Group. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Hi everyone, What a great amount of participation this group build has drawn! Because of that, I decided to do another build myself. I'm still busy with the Maryland, but will start with this one in a couple of weeks. And this is what I will be building. Coincidently I have two decals sheets for this subject, and will see which one looks the best. And sprue shots Decals Instructions I'm planning to do it 100% OOB, and not any detail in order for it to be a quicker build than the Maryland. Like I said, I'll start in a few weeks, probably when I'm at the main painting stage of the Maryland which will leave some spare time for this. Cheers Jimmy
  25. Hasegawa Curtiss Kittyhawk Mk IV (P-40N), Sqd Leader Geoffrey Atherton, RAAF. The kit is Hasegawa's P-40N, finished with Academy decals. The kit's a bit basic but not bad, it's OOB except for the seatbelts and ariel Wire. Painted with Lifecolor RAAF colours. It might seem crazy to use Academy decals (not much good in this case either!) but I love the RAAF aircraft with the white tails and leading wing edges and it means I can do the Academy kit as a P-40M. thanks Mike
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