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Found 31 results

  1. After the recce-bomber MiG-25R/RB family (link & link) and interceptor MiG-25PD (link), ICM is to release in Q4 2019 a 1/48th SEAD MiG-25BM "Foxbat-F" kit - ref. 48905 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48905 V.P.
  2. In the framework of the recent toy tradefair Mir Detstva 2017, held at Moscow, ICM is reported having announced a new tool 1/72nd MiG-25RB/RBT "Foxbat-B" kit for 2018. To be followed. Source AlexGRD: http://master194.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=100171&sid=b7252e4ad3d849de8e26c4c009281a81 V.P.
  3. In the recently released test shot pictures from the future 1/48th Kittyhawk MiG-25PD/PDS "Foxbat-E" - ref.KH80119 - there was also a two-seat MiG-25PU "Foxbat-C" test shot - ref.KH80136. Source: http://www.themodellingnews.com/2013/08/kittyhawks-48th-scale-foxbat1-seater.html V.P.
  4. MiG-25 RBF Soviet Reconnaissance Plane 1:72 ICM In the early part of the Cold War, the strategic bomber was seen as the obvious means by which to deliver a nuclear payload. The interceptor - large, heavy and fast - was seen as the equally obvious countermeasure. The MiG-25 Foxbat was, in many ways, the ultimate embodiment of the latter. It wasn't particularly groundbreaking and nor was it particularly sophisticated, but it was capable of incredible speed and could carry four large missiles to high altitudes very quickly indeed. The MiG-25's shortcomings as a combat aircraft were largely addressed through the MiG-31 Foxhound, but the type achieved considerable longevity as a reconnaissance platform. The RBF was an ELINT variant, converted from the RBK but fitted with updated Shar-25 equipment in place of the old Kub-3K system. Despite the changes, it retained the NATO Foxbat D codename. This kit is the third iteration of ICM's new 1/72 MiG-25 family, following on from the RB and RBT variants. A fourth iteration, in the shape of the MiG-25BM SEAD version, is also planned. The model is pretty much a scaled down version of their 1:48 kit, which is a jolly good thing indeed. Inside the very sturdy top-opening box are seven frames of light grey plastic and one of clear plastic. The kit is almost identical to the previous version, but includes a different sprue for the revised parts for the nose. The airframe is covered in crisp, recessed panel lines which look very good indeed, and the mouldings are crisp and clean. The instructions are an A4 stapled booklet which has been printed in colour and the decal sheet is clear and well printed. The overall impression is of a well-executed, modern kit which looks like it should be thoroughly enjoyable to build. Construction begins with the cockpit and nose gear bay. Some detail is moulded in place on the sidewalls of the cockpit, with extra parts provided to represent additional details. Before the main structure of the cockpit can be completed, however, you have to add the bulkhead that forms the front wall of the cockpit and the rear wall of the nose gear bay. The instructions have you installing the nose gear leg at this stage, but I can't see any logical reason as to why this can't be done at the end. This would, of course, save you from breaking the leg part way through the build. The cockpit itself is nicely detailed, with the ejector seat alone made up of no fewer than five parts. An instrument panel and control column completes this section of the build. Once the forward fuselage halves have been joined together, the whole sub-assembly fits onto a spart that holds the huge engine air intakes. I've noticed that kit manufacturers are moving increasingly toward this style of construction, where certain parts are provided for purely structural purposes instead of the older slot and tab style of construction. I guess the main advantage, other than strength, is that everything can be positioned at exactly the right angle - a helpful feature for kits that feature quit a complex breakdown of parts, such as this one. Each engine intake is full-length, with engine compressor faces provided. What results is a complete forward section of the aircraft up to the wing roots, with the internal structure of the air intakes protruding from the rear. The lower face of the main fuselage can be joined to this structure once the main landing gear bays have been added. ICM suggest that you add the main landing gear legs at this stage. Again, I can't see any reason why they couldn't be fettled into place after the main construction has been completed. Once the lower face of the main fuselage is in place, another structural bulkhead can be added, after which the slab-sides of the fuselage, including the outer faces of the air intakes, can be added. The dustbin-like jet exhausts are added at this stage, and very nicely detailed they are too. Once in place, the upper face of the fuselage can be added. Some modellers have noticed that the central spine has a flattened profile instead of a rounded shape. This is true, but I imagine most modellers will choose to live with this minor flaw. All that remains now is to add the nosecone, flying surfaces and finishing details. Each vertical tail is split vertically, with a seperate rudder. The outer face is moulded with part of the rear fuselage in place, so presumably it will be impossible to fit these parts at the wrong angle. Somewhat surprisingly, the upper wings are not moulded in one part with the upper fuselage. Instead, they are split into separate port and starboard halves, with two seperate flaperons and upper wing fences and fittings for bomb shackles below. The nosecone is simply split vertically, with a separate part for the camera pack and clear parts for the camera lenses. The canopy is nice and clear and can be finished in either open or closed position. Other than that, and a few aerials, lumps and bumps, the huge aircraft is now finished. Three options are provided for on the decal sheet: MiG-25RBF, 47th GRAP, Shatalovo Air Base, Russia, August 2001. This aircraft is finished in a disruptive green/brown/tan scheme; MiG-25RBF, 931st OGRAP, Werneuchen Air Base, Germany, 1991. This aircraft is also finished in a green/tan/brown scheme; and MiG-25RBF, 47th GRAP, Shatalovo Air Base, Russia, 2001. This aircraft is finished in the more commonly seen overall grey scheme. The decals look nicely printed and a full set of stencils is included. Conclusion We've waited a while for a new, more more modern kit of the Foxbat in this scale. ICM's new effort is excellent, with high quality mouldings and plenty of the detail. The surface structures are fine and crisp. Overall this is a well executed and carefully designed kit which is very appealing indeed. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. MiG-25 RBT Photo Etch and Masks for ICM Kit 1:72 Eduard Fans of Soviet military hardware appear to be living through a golden age at present. When I returned to the hobby almost 20 years ago, kits of Soviet subjects were far less common than they are now, and those that were available were almost all either old, inaccurate tools from the west, or limited runs kits of a 'challenging' nature from the east. These days we are far better served by a range of new, state-of-the-art tools from the likes of Eduard, ICM, Trumpeter and Zvezda to name but four. In most cases, Eduard have eagerly supported each new release with a set of photo etched details and masks. This month, ICM's new MiG-25RBT receives the Eduard treatment. MiG-25RBT In the usual Eduard style, this set comprises two frets of parts. The first fret contains pre-painted parts for detailing the cockpit and includes harnesses, cushions, pull handles and other details for the pilot's seat, as well as details for the instrument panels and side consoles. Also included are parts for the rudder pedals. Many of the parts require their plastic equivalent to be scraped away. The second fret is unpainted and contains parts for detailing the landing gear bays and landing gear itself, the canopy and various surface details, particularly relating to the reconnaissance equipment in the nose. Also included are details for the huge jet exhausts such as detailed afterburner flame holders. MiG-25RBT Zoom If you are more concerned about the cockpit than the rest of the airframe, then you can save some shekels by plumping for the Zoom set. If you do, the only other parts that you will be missing out on are some of the extra details for the canopy (although you still get the rear view mirrors, which in my view make a big difference. MiG-25RBT Masks This set provides pre-cut paint masks for the canopy and all of the wheels. If you've used Eduard's pre-cut masks before, you'll know that they are a real time saver. Conclusion These sets are a handy upgrade for the new ICM kit. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. MiG-25 RB Soviet Reconnaissance Plane (72173) 1:72 ICM In the early part of the Cold War, the strategic bomber was seen as the obvious means by which to deliver a nuclear payload. The interceptor - large, heavy and fast - was seen as the equally obvious countermeasure. The MiG-25 Foxbat was, in many ways, the ultimate embodiment of this technology. It wasn't particularly groundbreaking and nor was it particularly sophisticated, but it was capable of incredible speed and could carry four large missiles to high altitudes very quickly indeed. The MiG-25's shortcomings as a combat aircraft were largely addressed through the MiG-31 Foxhound, but the type continued as an effective reconnaissance platform in a variety of guises. The RB was an updated version of the original R reconnaissance variant, fitted with updated reconnaissance equipment as well as a bomb computer and the ability to carry up to eight 500kg bombs. This kit is the second iteration of ICM's new 1/72 MiG-25 family, following on from the later RBT variant. The model is pretty much a scaled down version of their 1:48 kit, which is a jolly good thing indeed. Inside the very sturdy top-opening box are seven frames of light grey plastic and one of clear plastic. The kit is almost identical to the previous iteration, but includes two extra sprues for the bombs and revised parts for the nose. The airframe is covered in crisp, recessed panel lines which look very good indeed, and the mouldings are crisp and clean. The instructions are an A4 stapled booklet which has been printed in colour and the decal sheet is clear and well printed. The overall impression is of a well-executed, modern kit which looks like it should be thoroughly enjoyable to build. Construction begins with the cockpit and nose gear bay. Some detail is moulded in place on the sidewalls of the cockpit, with extra parts provided to represent additional details. Before the main structure of the cockpit can be completed, however, you have to add the bulkhead that forms the front wall of the cockpit and the rear wall of the nose gear bay. The instructions have you installing the nose gear leg at this stage, but I can't see any logical reason as to why this can't be done at the end. This would, of course, save you from breaking the leg part way through the build. The cockpit itself is nicely detailed, with the ejector seat alone made up of no fewer than five parts. An instrument panel and control column completes this section of the build. Once the forward fuselage halves have been joined together, the whole sub-assembly fits onto a spart that holds the huge engine air intakes. I've noticed that kit manufacturers are moving increasingly toward this style of construction, where certain parts are provided for purely structural purposes instead of the older slot and tab style of construction. I guess the main advantage, other than strength, is that everything can be positioned at exactly the right angle - a helpful feature for kits that feature quit a complex breakdown of parts, such as this one. Each engine intake is full-length, with engine compressor faces provided. What results is a complete forward section of the aircraft up to the wing roots, with the internal structure of the air intakes protruding from the rear. The lower face of the main fuselage can be joined to this structure once the main landing gear bays have been added. ICM suggest that you add the main landing gear legs at this stage. Again, I can't see any reason why they couldn't be fettled into place after the main construction has been completed. Once the lower face of the main fuselage is in place, another structural bulkhead can be added, after which the slab-sides of the fuselage, including the outer faces of the air intakes, can be added. The dustbin-like jet exhausts are added at this stage, and very nicely detailed they are too. Once in place, the upper face of the fuselage can be added. Some modellers have noticed that the central spine has a flattened profile instead of a rounded shape. This is true, but I imagine most modellers will choose to live with this flaw. All that remains now is to add the nosecone, flying surfaces and finishing details. Each vertical tail is split vertically, with a seperate rudder. The outer face is moulded with part of the rear fuselage in place, so presumably it will be impossible to fit these parts at the wrong angle. Somewhat surprisingly, the upper wings are not moulded in one part with the upper fuselage. Instead, they are split into separate port and starboard halves, with two seperate flaperons and upper wing fences and fittings for bomb shackles below. The nosecone is simply split vertically, with a separate part for the camera pack and clear parts for the camera lenses. The canopy is nice and clear and can be finished in either open or closed position. Eight 500kg bombs are provided, along with the low profile pylons. Two are carried under each wing, while four are carried in pairs along the fuselage centerline. Other than that, and a few aerials, lumps and bumps, the huge aircraft is now finished. Four options are provided for on the decal sheet: MiG-25RB, 154th Independent Air Detachment, Cairo-West, May 1974; MiG-25RB, Soviet Air Force, late 1970s; MiG-25RB, 63rd Independent Air Detachment, UAR, 1971-1972; and MiG-25RB (Late Production), Iraqi Air Force, 1980. The decals look nicely printed and a full set of stencils are included. Conclusion We've waited a while for a new, more more modern kit of the Foxbat in this scale. ICM's new effort is excellent, with high quality mouldings and plenty of the detail. The surface structures are fine and crisp. Overall this is a well executed and carefully designed kit which is very appealing indeed. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. They 're rumours saying after its 1/48th MiG-25RBT "Foxbat-E", ICM is working on a MiG-25PD "Foxbat-A" kit in the same scale. Wishful thinking of more. Time will tell. Source: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234994939-icm-148-mig-25rbt/&do=findComment&comment=2573774 V.P.
  8. I'll try to do a double build! After lot of failures on the gb, this is my all in! MiG-25 RBT by ICM, i will build it OOB except for the Master probe ciao Ale
  9. Here is my 1:144 Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25RU "Foxbat C" which I built back in 2006. It's a home-made conversion of the Academy/Minicraft kit of the "Foxbat A" into a two-seater "Foxbat C". The second canopy (the front one) came from a scrapped Revell MiG-25. Apart from obviously making the second cockpit, and actually making little cockpits (there is none in the kit), I had to reshape the nose and I was very pleased I got it right. Unfortunately, the Acad./Mini. canopy has the wrong shape being too tall and short. I tried to get it closer to shape by sanding it and polished it afterwards. The Revell canopy was more accurate just being a bit too low. Otherwise, I corrected the wing fences, the inner ones being completely replaced and the outer ones sanded lower. The wingtip pods were also reworked. Other details were also thinned, reworked or added. The kit was fully painted by brush with only varnish being applied by airbrush. The bort number came from my decal spares box with the stars were those of the kit itself. Thank you for looking. All comments are welcome. Miguel
  10. After the the interceptor (MiG-25PD/PDS) and training (two seats MiG-25U/UB) "Foxbat" types, KittyHawk is to release in 2014 (?) a 1/48th kit from the reconnaissance & bomber variant of this Soviet era iconic aircraft: the MiG-25RB "Foxbat-B". My favourite variant. Among the various test shot pictures posted recently on Internet, THE evidence a MiG-25RB test shot with a bomb and a recce nose. But the engine exhausts are wrong for the type... Source: https://www.facebook.com/Kagero.SM/photos_stream The KH MiG-25RB exhausts Source: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.588810247842510.1073741931.224979750892230&type=1 Real MiG-25RB Source: http://scalemodels.ru/modules/photo/viewcat.php?id=913&cid=62&min=60&orderby=dateA&show=12 MiG-25RB walkarounds: http://scalemodels.ru/modules/photo/viewcat_cid_62.html http://scalemodels.ru/modules/photo/viewcat_cid_369.html V.P.
  11. After the recce-bomber MiG-25RB/RBT & RBF (link) ICM is to release in Q4 2019 a 1/72nd SEAD MiG-25BM "Foxbat-F" kit - ref. 72174 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM72174 V.P.
  12. MiG-25 RBT Soviet Reconnaissance Plane 1:72 ICM In the early part of the Cold War, the strategic bomber was seen as the obvious means by which to deliver a nuclear payload. The interceptor - large, heavy and fast - was seen as the equally obvious countermeasure. The MiG-25 Foxbat was, in many ways, the ultimate embodiment of this technology. It wasn't particularly groundbreaking and nor was it particularly sophisticated, but it was capable of incredible speed and could carry four large missiles to high altitudes very quickly indeed. The MiG-25's shortcomings as a combat aircraft were largely addressed through the MiG-31 Foxhound, but the type continued as an effective reconnaissance platform in a variety of guises. The RBT was an updated version of the RB reconnaissance bomber, fitted with Tangaz ELINT equipment and manufactured during the early part of the 1980s. This kit is the first iteration of ICM's new 1/72 MiG-25 family. The model is pretty much a scaled down version of their 1:48 kit, which is a jolly good thing indeed. Inside the very sturdy top-opening box are five frames of light grey plastic and one of clear plastic. The airframe is covered in crisp, recessed panel lines which look very good indeed, and the mouldings are crisp and clean. The instructions are an A4 stapled booklet which has been printed in colour and the decal sheet is clear and well printed. The overall impression is of a well-executed, modern kit which looks like it should be thoroughly enjoyable to build. Construction begins with the cockpit and nose gear bay. Some detail is moulded in place on the sidewalls of the cockpit, while there are extra parts provided to represent additional details. Before the main structure of the cockpit can be completed, however, you have to add the bulkhead that forms the front wall of the cockpit and the rear wall of the nose gear bay. The instructions have you installing the nose gear leg at this stage, but I can't see any logical reason as to why this can't be done at the end. This would, of course, save you from breaking the leg part way through the build. The cockpit itself is nicely detailed, with the ejector seat alone made up of no fewer than five parts. An instrument panel and control column completes this section of the build. Once the forward fuselage halves have been joined together, the whole sub-assembly fits onto a spart that holds the huge engine air intakes. I've noticed that kit manufacturers are moving increasingly toward this style of construction, where certain parts are provided for purely structural purposes instead of the older slot and tab style of construction. I guess the main advantage, other than strength, is that everything can be positioned at exactly the right angle - a helpful feature for kits that feature quit a complex breakdown of parts, such as this one. Each engine intake is full-length, with engine compressor faces provided. What results is a complete forward section of the aircraft up to the wing roots, with the internal structure of the air intakes protruding from the rear. The lower face of the main fuselage can be joined to this structure once the main landing gear bays have been added. ICM suggest that you add the main landing gear legs at this stage. Again, I can't see any reason why they couldn't be fettled into place after the main construction has been completed. Once the lower face of the main fuselage is in place, another structural bulkhead can be added, after which the slab-sides of the fuselage, including the outer faces of the air intakes, can be added. The dustbin-like jet exhausts are added at this stage, and very nicely detailed they are too. Once in place, the upper face of the fuselage can be added. Some modellers have noticed that the central spine has a flattened profile instead of a rounded shape. This is true, but I imagine most modellers will choose to live with this flaw. All that remains now is to add the nosecone, flying surfaces and finishing details. Each vertical tail is split vertically, with a seperate rudder. The outer face is moulded with part of the rear fuselage in place, so presumably it will be impossible to fit these parts at the wrong angle. Somewhat surprisingly, the upper wings are not moulded in one part with the upper fuselage. Instead, they are split into separate port and starboard halves, with two seperate flaperons and upper wing fences and fittings for bomb shackles below. The nosecone is simply split vertically, with a separate part for the camera pack and clear parts for the camera lenses. The canopy is nice and clear and can be finished in either open or closed position. A huge auxiliary fuel tank is provided. Other than that, and a few aerials, lumps and bumps, the huge aircraft is now finished. Four options are provided for on the decal sheet: MiG-25RBT of the Soviet Air Force from the late 1980s; MiG-25RBT of the 47th GRAP, Russian Air Force, May 2001; MiG-25RBT, Iraqi Air Force, late 1980s; and MiG-25RBT, Libyan Air Force, 2000s. The decals look nicely printed and a number of stencils are included. Conclusion We've waited a while for a new, more more modern kit of the Foxbat in this scale. ICM's new effort looks to be slightly ahead of, er... the older ICM kit (which admittedly represents the interceptor version) and of course it is light years ahead of ye olde Hasegawa effort. The the mouldings are high quality, there is plenty of the detail and surface structures are fine and crisp. Overall this is a well executed and carefully designed kit which is very appealing indeed. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Strong rumour: after the MiG-25RB recce and P interceptor variants, ICM is to release in 2019 a 1/48th trainer MiG-25PU "Foxbat-C" kit - ref. V.P.
  14. After the RBT (thread here: link), ICM is to release in Q3 2017 a 1/48th MiG-25RB "Foxbat-B" (new variant - photo reconnaissance and bomber) kit - ref.48902 Sources: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48902 http://scalemodels.ru/news/11036-katalog-ICM-2017-god.html And, for the moment no trace, of future interceptor MiG-25P/PD/PDS variants kit... V.P.
  15. The MiG-25, sheerly a flying steel beast of the cold war. Although build with low-tech, however, it is still one of the fastest and highest-flying military aircraft of history. The shape of pitot tube was wrong, so I removed the "branches".(="=??) Enlengthen the nose cone for about 3mm by plastic sheet according to the blueprint. This kit fitted not well as I expected, massive gap between the fuselage and wing, moreover, terrible step on the nose connection as you can see...... Thankfully, it turned out okay, here is the result: By the way, it was my second military model that I purchased, where did the courage come from? Tremendous nozzles, just ask the hind pilots (it is unfinished, sorry about that)! Such a romantic!!! (to me=..=) Thanks for your watching and see you next time!
  16. Hi, Just starting up on this kit - and I want to get it right. I understand from various links on this Forum and others that there is a fix to be applied to make this into an RBT. Or vice versa - back date the kit to an RB. So let me verify my findings after spending a(n other) day on Google with you: RBT: Shape a bulge under the nose cone (or use an aftermarket part) Omit parts C21 & C22 and fill the recesses. RB: Shorten the upper parts of the air-intakes and cut them flush to the upper end of the intake fairing. Modify the parashut housing. Is this a correct summary? If someone could help with the correct color of the cockpit interior color that would be great as well. I have seen some postings here that are done in a greenish blue / bluish green color that look very close to references found on the web. But the instructions call for Tamiya XF-71. This is cockpit green. My Eduard MiG-21 printed IP has the same color as seen in your threads. My Eduard SU-27 printed IP is pale grey. Your advice would be very much appreciated. Best regards Johan
  17. Here is my MiG-25 that arrived today. It seems quite large.. Struggling with the photo from photo bucket, haven't even opened the box of this and already stalling
  18. For this group build I'll be doing Hasegawa's 1/72 Mig-25 Foxbat. Specifically, the one used by Lt. Belenko to defect to Japan in 1976. .
  19. My first entry into this excellent GB is one from the "other side" of the Iron Curtain and a very iconic Cold War beast it is, ICM's new 1/48 Mig-25 RBT. Now I have been watching a couple of excellent WIP's of this beast and it seems that OOTB it is more akin to the RB version, that suits me fine as both RB's and RBT's were used by GSFG during the 1970's. Equipped for very high speed bombing missions (it's where the "B" comes from in it's version) as well as the usual reconnaissance missions they formed a vital part of the the WARPAC military machine. An excellent overview of their operations can be found here; http://www.16va.be/3.4_la_reco_part4_eng.html . This website is excellent for info and photo's of Soviet aircraft in Germany during the Cold War. Here are the ubiquitous box + contents pictures. The box. It's contents. And the only extras I have for it (so far!), the excellent decal sheets by Begemot. I was very tempted by the Bulgarian option but I don't think they started using them until the 80's, so Soviet it shall be. I'm not sure exactly when I shall start this as I'm in the middle of an F-16 for the STGB at the minute but I can't see me holding off for long. Craig.
  20. Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25RBT Foxbat-B, Pics taken at The Ukraine State Aviation Museum Zhulyany, Kiev. Pics thanks to Dave Haskell.
  21. Hi all here are some pics of my latest project ICM's excellent new Mig-25RBT built as an RB from the 931st OGRAP (Guards Independent Reconnaissance Aviation Regiment) based at Werneuchen East Germany in the 1970's. This model has been built as part of the 1970's NATO/WARPAC GB which is well worth checking out if you haven't had a look already as there are some cracking builds on there. The kit has been built out of the box with the exception of a pitot probe by Master (which is a must have for this kit) and some Eduard seat belts. Despite the size and complexity of the kit (it really is big!) it goes together very well and only needs a small amount of filler in a couple of places and I highly recommend it, anyway here are some pics. I used decals by Begemot which worked very well indeed and I will be using more of theirs in the future, they looked like a better size than the kit decals and they settled down nicely into position. If you want to have a read of the WIP then here is a link; Hope you like it and please feel free to comment and criticise. Thanks for looking in. Craig.
  22. Hi guys, With the recent arrival of the ICM 1/48 Mig-25 RB/RBT I was wondering if this could be built as one of the Soviet/Russian aircraft which wear the wonderful 4 tone camouflage scheme or not, and if not what exactly would need to be done to it to make it into the correct version. Cheers. Craig.
  23. When you have multiple projects in finalization phase, it is best to start a new one This kit is pretty basic (and based on what I gather, shape wise not entirely accurate), so there will be plenty of opportunities for improvement and scratch building. Starting with air intakes which were sanded down a bit: Cockpit will be scratch built, starting with this opening Nose gear bay will be rebuilt: As well as main gear bays: Biggest disappointment were decals, at least with my sample they're full of tiny gaps and will not be used. BTW are there any sets for 1/144 Foxbats?
  24. Source: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234935940-the-kh80119-mig-25pdpds/ CAD drawings from the future 1/48th MiG-25PD/PDS "Foxbat-E" - ref KH80119 Release expected in May 2013. V.P.
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