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Found 27 results

  1. This is my first go in the comprehensive italeri truck kits! Colour is tamiya TS58,pearl light blue. I like the scale,things aren't too small!,plus my hands aren't as steady as they once were! Good detail,some flash on some of the parts. Ive lost a few parts,by accident, and my workstation isn't the tidyist!,so finding them,a bit tricky!. I used tamiya aerosols,and some airbrushing, mainly the cab interior. I used AK pigments and washes, i did like the engine,came up quite good. One thing,quite a few parts were a tight fit,especially if been painted, so i was doing a lot of scalpel work!,the cab roof especially...theres a gap on the passenger side where the roof meets the top of the door section. I didn't want too squeeze parts together too hard,....its plastic after all! Lol! Currently searching for the sun visor!,yet to fit small lights on the roof section, a square part on the bottom rear drivers side and some clear parts,painted clear orange,which im going to use for the indicator repeaters.(i lost one!) Bit of glue on the a pillar,and the air snorkel on the cab doesn't line up! ( the instructions didn't really give you a reference when you fitted the air filter assembly,where it sould be to line up with the snorkel assembly!)..maybe sort those later!
  2. Benz Patent-Motorwagen 1886 (24040) 1:24 ICM via Hannants We’ve been addicted to petroleum for over a century now, but in the late 1800s the predominant power source was still steam, although that just used another form of fossil fuel. When Karl Benz applied for a patent for his Motorwagen in 1885, it became the first petrol-powered production vehicle that was designed from the outset to use this method of propulsion. When you look at its three-wheel design it appears to have been the product of the mating between a horse carriage, a bicycle and a grandfather clock, with a little bit of chaise longue thrown in for good measure. A rear-mounted engine with a solitary cylinder, two seats without any weather protection and a kind of tiller for steering doesn’t really gel with our understanding of what represents a car now, but they had to start somewhere. There were only 25 made, but the precedent had been set and travelling at 16kmh was found to be quite fun and started us down the long road to becoming petrol-heads, much to our environment’s distress. The Kit This is a brand-new tooling of this important vehicle, and although it’s way out of my usual wheel-house I’m quite taken with it, especially when I opened the white-themed box to reveal the contents. There is one main sprue for the majority of the parts, with three smaller sprues in the same grey styrene for the wheels and a jig to complete the spokes on a Photo-Etched fret, which is secreted within a thick card envelope. The instruction booklet has been printed in an olde-worldy style, and a replica of the patent application is also included on thick card in case you wanted to use it as a base or backdrop. The bicycle car has spoked wheels that would normally give most modellers conniptions, but ICM have really pushed the boat out in terms of the engineering that should allow you to create a model that looks pretty realistic if you follow the instructions carefully. The supplied jig is mind-blowing both in its simplicity and cleverness that every time I examine it I end up smiling. Construction begins with the subframe and suspension, which looks more like a carriage than a chassis. Leaf-springs support the main axle beneath the slatted foot well, and an additional frame is applied to the rear with a set of three small pulley-wheel parts fit on a bar and form a transfer point for the drive-belt that’s added later, with a choice of two styles for the centre section. At the very rear of the chassis is a stub-axle that mounts a huge flywheel made up from two parts to create a rim, then the single-cylindered engine is built, bearing more than a passing resemblance to an air compressor that you might have under your desk somewhere. There are a few colour choices called out along the way, and the finished assembly is then mounted on the cross-rail, overhanging the flywheel. Various small ancillary parts are added to the engine “compartment”, another drive pulley is mounted perpendicular to the large flywheel, then the two are joined by the drive band, which you can make up from the two straps on the sprue, or by creating your own that fully wraps around the pulleys for a more realistic look. A toolbox is added next to the engine, then fuel and radiator tanks are built and installed along with their hosing. There is a surrounding frame for the seat added to the small upstands on the chassis, which holds the moulded upholstered cushions to which the framed back and side-rests are fixed, with extra padding attached to the back and arms before it is inserted and glued in place. Now the PE fun begins! The power that has been transferred to an axle under the foot well is sent to the wheels by a bike-style chain, which is layered up from three PE parts that form the rings as well as the links, with one assembly per side. Now comes the really clever part. Each of the pneumatic tyres are moulded within a circular sprue runner, which has four towers hanging down. These towers fit into corresponding holes in the jig, with a small one for the front wheel and larger one for the outside, all on the same jig. This allows the modeller to keep the tyre stationary while locating the little eyes on the ends of the spokes into the pips on the inside rim of the tyre. It also sets the correct dish to the wheels when you add the temporary centre boss during construction. You create two of these assemblies per tyre, cut them from their sprues once complete, then glue them together with a hub sandwiched between them just like a modern bike wheel. You carry out that task thrice, two large, one small and it would be well worth painting the spokes beforehand. The main wheels slot straight onto the axle, while the front wheel is clamped in place by a two-part yoke, much like a set of forks on a bike. In order to steer the vehicle, the tiller is made up from a few parts and slots into the footwell floor, with a small step added to the right front corner of the well to ease access. A steering linkage joins the fork and tiller together, a small wheel pokes out of the footwell, possibly a fuel valve? I don’t know, as I’m not quite that knowledgeable on the subject. The final part is a long brake lever, which is probably intended to make up for the lack of servo assistance by using leverage. Markings There are no decals in the box, as there isn’t enough of a vehicle for anything other than paint. The colours for each part are called out in boxed letters as the build progresses, and that’s a very good idea for such a stripped-down framework with parts strapped to it. The codes refer back to a chart on the front of the booklet that gives Revell and Tamiya codes plus the colour names in English and Ukrainian. Conclusion A totally left-field hit from my point of view, as it’s detailed, very cool and quite endearing. If you’d asked me if I would ever build a car from 1886 I’d have said no way. Now I am seriously considering it, although if you gave me a full size one to drive I’d need a few beers to drive anything that doesn’t float but is steered with a tiller. Extremely highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Typ 170V Lieferwagen (38040) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd The Mercedes 170 was based upon their W15 chassis, which was their first with all-round independent suspension, and was available as a bare chassis for coachbuilders, as a saloon, cabriolet or as a light van, debuting in the early 30s with sales affected by the worldwide depression that started in Wall Street. Sales picked up after the recession eased, and later versions had internal boot/trunk-space and sleeker lines, moving with the times. As well as sharing a chassis with the saloon, the van was essentially identical in the forward section and inside the crew cab. The bodywork from the doors backward were designed with the same ethos but different due to the boxy load area behind the drivers. The Kit This is a partial re-tool of the original 2012 saloon and subsequent Beer Delivery vehicle (reviewed here), with the same new sprues and parts added to create the necessary changes for the wagon. The original kit is highly detailed, and this one is no different, showing just how far MiniArt have come in their design and moulding technology. There is superb detail throughout, with slender racks, realistic-looking fabric door pockets as well as a full engine and interior to the cab. Inside the shrink-wrapped box are twelve sprues of grey styrene, one in clear, a decal sheet and a small fret of Photo-Etch (PE) brass for finer details, protected in a card envelope. Construction begins with the 1700cc engine and transmission, which is made up from a substantial number of parts that just need a little wiring to do it full justice, and in fact the brake hoses are shown in diagrams to ensure that you obtain the correct bends, but you’ll need to find your own 0.2mm wire to begin with. The X-shaped chassis is prepped with a few mounts and a PE brackets, then the rear axle, differential and driveshafts are fitted on a pair of very realistic styrene springs that have hollow centres and individual coils thanks to some clever sliding moulds. Drum brakes, straps and brackets finish off the rear axle assembly, then the completed engine and drive-shaft are installed in the front to be joined by a pair of full-width leaf-springs from above and below with a stub-axle and drum brake at each end. The exhaust is made up with an impressively neatly designed four-part muffler, a pair of PE mounts, straight exit pipe and a curved length leading forward to the engine. With the addition of the bumper-irons at the front, the lower body can be fixed to the chassis after drilling a single hole in one of the front wings. The front firewall is next to be made up, and the pedal box is installed one side, with a set of tools and another neatly designed cylinder, this time the fuel tank, which is curiously situated in the rear of the engine bay. This fits over the transmission tunnel that is moulded into the floor, with more driver controls such as the gear lever, hand brake and steering column with PE horn-ring added at this time. The dashboard is integrated into the windscreen frame after being fitted with decals within the instrument housings, then covered over with clear faces for realism. There is also a nicely clear curved windscreen inserted before this is dropped over the firewall, joined by a rear cab panel that has a small rear window and the back of the bench seat applied before fitting. The base of the bench seat is also fitted on a riser moulded into the floor. Vehicles need wheels, and this one runs on four with a spare one lurking under a false floor in the back. Each wheel is made up from a layer-cake of three central sections to create the tread around the circumference, and two outer faces that depict the sidewalls of the tyres, with maker’s mark and data panel moulded into the sides. The hubs are inserted into the centres of the tyres, with a cap finishing off the assemblies. They are built up in handed pairs, and the spare has a different hub and no cap to differentiate it. The flat floor for the load area is a single piece with the pocket for the spare tyre to fit inside, and this sits over the rear arches and is supported at the front by a lip on the rear of the cab. The load area is then finished by adding the slab-sides and roof to the body, with a few ejector-pin marks that will need filling if you plan on leaving the door open. Speaking of doors, there are two options for open and closed, with moulded-in hinges and separate door handle, plus the number-plate holder above the door in the centre. The front doors are handed of course, and have separate door cards with handle and window winders added, and a piece of clear styrene playing the part of the window, which is first fitted to the door card before it is added to the door skin. Both doors can be posed open or closed as you wish, and are of the rearward opening "suicide door" type. At this stage the front of the van needs finishing, a job that begins with the radiator with a PE grille and three-pointed star added to a surround, then the radiator core and rear slam-panel with filler cap at the rear. This is put in place at the front of the body at an angle, with two cross-braces reducing body flex along with a central rod that forms the hinge-point for the side folding hood. Small PE fittings are fixed first on the louvered side panels, then added to the top parts in either the open or closed position. A pair of PE and styrene windscreen wipers are added to the windscreen sweeping from the top, a pair of clear-lensed headlamps, wing mirrors and indicator stalks on the A-pillars finish off the build of the van. To differentiate this from the previous kit, MiniArt have included a PE roof rack that is folded up and fitted to the exterior drip-rails around the roof, with a whole page of the instructions devoted to a set of card boxes that are folded up and glued together to give the truck something to carry. In addition, there is also a sack-truck on a separate sprue with a choice of short or long scoop-rail at the front, a pair of small wheels and rests near the top handles. This too can be loaded with boxes if you are planning a delivery diorama. Markings Get your sunglasses out again folks! These were commercial vehicles during peacetime, so they were designed to attract attention. There are three options depicted in the instructions, with plenty of decals devoted to the branding on the sides. From the box you can build one of the following: Chocolate delivery, Berlin 30-40s Delivery of ink & poster paints Food delivery, Westphalia, Germany 30-40s Deutsche Post, German 50s Decals are by DecoGraph, which is a guarantee of good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion This is another well-detailed kit of an old Merc van, and even if you’re not a vehicle modeller it would make for great background fodder for a diorama, either intact or in a semi-demolished state thanks to urban combat. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Hi all, I just got across the finish line with the Stirling Moss build, who was unbeaten after 10 hours, 7 minutes and 47 seconds of racing and the only British driver to win the event. Fit issues aside, I think it looks the part. I thought the pin badge sat nicely on the rear of the car. The Revell kit did not come with the union jack decals, but I got them from a set of flags for a ship model kit I had in my stash, they were the perfect scale for the car. This is an out of the box build, I substituted some clunky kit parts such as the side trims for silver solder and short lengths of cut up old airbrush needle. Also the front air vent was very poorly reproduced, I replaced it with some mesh from a paper paint strainer. I used a 2K clearcoat finish with a silver fox ford finish which matched the paint of the Mercedes, finished with a detailed up engine bay.
  5. After hearing about the sad passing of the great Stirling Moss, I had to bring this kit out of hibernation; it’s been in my stash for the past 5 years, looks a superb kit, one of Revells better offering I think. I will try and make a start on it later this week.
  6. Here's the CLK GTR completed. One of the best cars ever, in my opinion. The kit is hard but rewarding in the long run.
  7. Cabriolet B German Car Typ 170V (38018) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd The Mercedes 170 was based upon their W15 chassis, which was their first with all-round independent suspension, and was available as a bare chassis for coachbuilders, as a saloon, cabriolet or as a light van, debuting in the early 30s with sales affected by the worldwide depression that started in Wall Street. Sales picked up after the recession eased, and later versions had internal boot/trunk-space and sleeker lines, moving with the times. The cabriolet option was sporty and offered the well-to-do buyer luxury and wind-in-hair fun on dry days, and a slightly less windy experience with the fabric roof deployed. It shares many of the panels of the saloon version, although with no pillars behind the windscreen for a sleek look. The Kit This is a partial re-tool of the original 2012 saloon (35095), with new sprues and parts added to create the necessary changes. The original kit is highly detailed, and this one is no different, showing just how far MiniArt have come in their design and moulding technology. There is superb detail throughout, with slender racks, realistic-looking fabric door pockets as well as a full engine and interior to the cab. This boxing has 14 sprues in grey styrene plus a bodyshell part in a protective box, clear parts, a small fret of Photo-Etch (PE), and decal sheet. The instruction booklet completes the package and the cover is printed in colour and covered in profiles to assist with painting. Construction begins with the 1700cc engine and transmission, which is made up from a substantial number of parts that just need a little wiring to do it full justice, and in fact the brake hoses are shown in diagrams to ensure that you obtain the correct bends, but you’ll need to find your own 0.2mm wire to begin with. The X-shaped chassis is prepped with a few mounts and a PE brackets, then the rear axle differential and driveshafts are fitted on a pair of very realistic styrene springs that have hollow centres and individual coils thanks to some clever sliding moulds. Drum brakes, straps and brackets finish off the rear axle assembly, then the completed engine and drive-shaft are installed in the front to be joined by a pair of full-width leaf-springs from above and below with a stub-axle and drum brake at each end. The exhaust is made up with an impressively neatly designed four-part muffler, a pair of PE mounts, straight exit pipe and a curved length leading forward to the engine. With the addition of the bumper-irons at the front, the lower body can be fixed to the chassis after drilling a single hole in one of the front wings. The front firewall is next to be made up, and the pedal box is installed one side, with a set of tools and another neatly designed cylinder, this time the fuel tank, which is curiously situated in the rear of the engine bay. This fits over the transmission tunnel that is moulded into the floor, with more driver controls such as the gear lever, hand brake and steering column added at this time. The dashboard is put together with decals within the instrument housings, then covered over with clear faces for realism and put to one side while the twin font seats with PE fittings and the simpler rear bench seats are installed onto their supports in the cab area. The exquisite little rear bodyshell is retrieved from its protective box, and it is immediately evident that it would never survive shipping without this, so it’s a godsend. The rear sides of the cab are fitted with interior and windows on each side, indicators on the A-pillar, the dashboard, rear lights and bumpers/fenders, while the wheels are made up. Each wheel is made up from a layer-cake of three middle parts to create the tread around the circumference, and two outer faces that depict the sidewalls of the tyres, with marker’s mark and data panel moulded into the sides. The hubs are inserted into the centres of the tyres, with a cap finishing off the assemblies. They are built up in handed pairs, and the spare has a different hub to differentiate it, and it fits on a boss at the centre of a recess on the boot/trunk later on. The main wheels are added to the corners, and the radiator with a PE grille and three-pointed star added to a surround is assembled, then the radiator core and rear slam-panel with filler cap are added at the rear. This is put in place at the front of the body at an angle, with two cross-braces reducing body flex along with a central bracket that forms the hinge-point for the folding hood. Small PE fittings are fixed first on the louvered side panels, then added to the top parts in either the open or closed position. The new bodyshell is lowered into place, the steering wheel and PE horn ring are installed, and the windscreen is assembled from frame, PE wipers, clear glazing and other small parts inside the frame, then slid down between the two arms moulded into the bodyshell. The suicide doors are made up from outer skin, door card and clear window, with an optional window stub if you are posing them wound down. Handles and winders finish them off, and you can install them closed or any angle to allow egress. If you are leaving the hood down, the folded hood is provided as a single part that has the mechanism added to each side. In the up position the complete hood is one piece, with the mechanism applied to the sides and an ovalized window filling up the hole in the rear. The main headlights have clear lenses, a wing mirror is attached to the left wing, and an optional luggage rack is provided for the rear, made up from two layers of boxes, a delicate frame and PE straps to give it extra realism. The final parts to be used are the figures with a young lady driving, and a gentleman in a suit and hat (homberg?) standing beside the car in the same pose as depicted on the box top. Markings The decals extend to number-plates, and six examples of colour schemes are printed in the instructions for your convenience. You can of course paint them any colour you like, or follow the guide, which gives you these options of which you can build one: Belgium, 1940s France, early 1940s Berlin, German. Early 1940s Silesia, Germany. First half of the 40s Anhalt, Germany. First half of the 40s Kyiv, Ukraine. 1948 Decals are by DecoGraph, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion It’s a highly detailed rendition of a rather slick cabriolet from the pre-war era, with the figures adding a little class to an already great kit. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Lieferwagen Typ 170V German Beer Delivery Car (38035) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd The Mercedes 170 was based upon their W15 chassis, which was their first with all-round independent suspension, and was available as a bare chassis for coachbuilders, as a saloon, cabriolet or as a light van, debuting in the early 30s with sales affected by the worldwide depression that started in Wall Street. Sales picked up after the recession eased, and later versions had internal boot/trunk-space and sleeker lines, moving with the times. As well as sharing a chassis with the saloon, the van was essentially identical in the forward section and inside the crew cab. The bodywork from the doors backward were designed with the same ethos but different due to the boxy load area behind the drivers. The Kit This is a partial re-tool of the original 2012 saloon (35095), with new sprues and parts added to create the necessary changes. The original kit is highly detailed, and this one is no different, showing just how far MiniArt have come in their design and moulding technology. There is superb detail throughout, with slender racks, realistic-looking fabric door pockets as well as a full engine and interior to the cab. Inside the shrink-wrapped box are six sprues of grey styrene, four in a deep yellow colour, two clear brown and two clear green. There is also a decal sheet and a small sheet of Photo-Etch (PE) brass for finer details, protected in a card envelope. Construction begins with the 1700cc engine and transmission, which is made up from a substantial number of parts that just need a little wiring to do it full justice, and in fact the brake hoses are shown in diagrams to ensure that you obtain the correct bends, but you’ll need to find your own 0.2mm wire to begin with. The X-shaped chassis is prepped with a few mounts and a PE brackets, then the rear axle, differential and driveshafts are fitted on a pair of very realistic styrene springs that have hollow centres and individual coils thanks to some clever sliding moulds. Drum brakes, straps and brackets finish off the rear axle assembly, then the completed engine and drive-shaft are installed in the front to be joined by a pair of full-width leaf-springs from above and below with a stub-axle and drum brake at each end. The exhaust is made up with an impressively neatly designed four-part muffler, a pair of PE mounts, straight exit pipe and a curved length leading forward to the engine. With the addition of the bumper-irons at the front, the lower body can be fixed to the chassis after drilling a single hole in one of the front wings. The front firewall is next to be made up, and the pedal box is installed one side, with a set of tools and another neatly designed cylinder, this time the fuel tank, which is curiously situated in the rear of the engine bay. This fits over the transmission tunnel that is moulded into the floor, with more driver controls such as the gear lever, hand brake and steering column added at this time. The dashboard is integrated into the windscreen frame after being fitted with decals within the instrument housings, then covered over with clear faces for realism. There is also a nicely clear curved windscreen inserted before this is dropped over the firewall, joined by a rear cab panel that has a small rear window and the back of the bench seat applied before fitting. The base of the bench seat is also fitted on a riser moulded into the floor, with the steering wheel and PE horn ring added late on. Vehicles need wheels, and this one runs on four with a spare one lurking under a false floor in the back. Each wheels is made up from a layer-cake of three middle parts to create the tread around the circumference, and two outer faces that depict the sidewalls of the tyres, with maker’s mark and data panel moulded into the sides. The hubs are inserted into the centres of the tyres, with a cap finishing off the assemblies. They are built up in handed pairs, and the spare has a different hub and no cap to differentiate it. The flat floor for the load area is a single piece with the pocket for the spare tyre to fit inside, and this sits over the rear arches and is supported at the front by a lip on the rear of the cab. The load area is then finished by adding the slab-sides and roof to the body, with a few ejector pin marks that will need filling if you plan on leaving the door open. Speaking of doors, there are two options for open and closed, with moulded-in hinges and separate door handle, with the number-plate holder above the door in the centre. The front doors are handed of course, and have separate door cards with handle and window winders added, and a piece of clear styrene playing the part of the window, which is first fitted to the door card before it is added to the door skin. Both doors can be posed open or closed as you wish, and are of the reaward opening "suicide door" type. At this stage the front of the van needs finishing, a job that begins with the radiator with a PE grille and three-pointed star added to a surround, then the radiator core and rear slam-panel with filler cap at the rear. This is put in place at the front of the body at an angle, with two cross-braces reducing body flex along with a central rod that forms the hinge-point for the side folding hood. Small PE fittings are fixed first on the louvered side panels, then added to the top parts in either the open or closed position. A pair of PE and styrene windscreen wipers are added to the windscreen sweeping from the top, a pair of clear-lensed headlamps, wing mirrors and indicator stalks on the A-pillars finish off the build of the van. The dark yellow sprues are there to give you some cargo to fill the doorway, and each one has the parts to make up one beer crate with dividers inside to reduce clinking as it was moved around. These are then filled up with the 80 bottles in brown or green that are found on the transparent sprues. You’re even treated to set of decals to add as labels. Markings Get your sunglasses out folks! These were commercial vehicles during peacetime, so they were designed to attract attention. There are three options depicted in the instructions, with plenty of decals devoted to the branding on the sides. From the box you can build one of the following: IIC-406396 Winkler Brau, Mainburg, Germany, 30/40s IM-83369 Zwickauer Vereins-Weißbier, Zwickau, Germany, 30/40s VH-59610 Lauterbacher Biere Spezialität: Weizenbier, Lauterbach, Germany, 40s Decals are by DecoGraph, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion This is such a well-detailed kit of an old Merc van, and even if you’re not a vehicle modeller normally it would make for great background fodder for a diorama, either intact or in a semi-demolished state thanks to urban combat. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. I know I really shouldn't be starting another build, but with a major relocation looming I don't want to be adding masking which may stay in place for over 3 months. Since my other builds have mostly reached the stage of masking, and having just picked this up on evil bay, I couldn't resist opening it up to see what was needed. This will NOT be a quick build, as it will take a backseat to all other builds I have in progress. However, I always enjoyed these Matchbox kits as a kid and I love the subjects (I also just got hold of the Auto Union!) so time to take a look.... that was expected...... this wasn't... What?? Looks like the Chinese are reproducing these! Oh well, the result should be the same. First items on the agenda then are the chassis frames, Pretty basic, and in need of some TLC. The flash was cleaned off and mould lines removed, then it was time to start looking into what was needed to bring them up to scratch. First, the gap between the springs and chassis rails was corrected, as seen on the left. Then the connecting arm for the friction damper was removed, and the lightening holes were drilled out. That was the easy part. Now the wheels! This is what came in the box Not pretty. A bath in bleach helped, and at least shows that the moulding is not too bad, it's just that chrome that filled the gaps! The rear wheels are going to be a bigger problem, as the brake drum is moulded as part of the wheel. That will have to be removed, and of course all the spokes will need replacing. I'm now trying to figure out the best way of going about that. The plan at the moment is to drill through the rims from the outside to give me a starting point, then remove the spokes and file a groove into the hub to take the "wires", which will be either invisible thread or fishing line. Any tips are more than welcome! Thanks for looking in! Ian
  10. Hi all! It's been a while, but I'm back with a little fun! I recently bought a couple of old Airfix 1/32 carkits, among those were this 1/32 1904 Mercedes. The kit had already been started and there were glue smears and the build wasn't that good, but it was cheap, so I thought 'why not'! Now I've hatched a plan and I put this to you - what if - just with a stretch of imagination - Chitty Chitty Bang Bang wasn't a fantasy, but reality! This is then set a couple of years after Chitty Chitty Bang Bang where the sight of flying cars isn't a novelty anymore! So here we go (just for the fun of it!) The start: The status quo: Soeh! - let's see how this turns out - shall we? Cheers Hans J
  11. Here's the Tamiya kit with Studio27 detail up and composite sheet. Any comment is welcome
  12. Well that took a while, about 15 years to be exact! I started this model when I was in my teens and finished it tonight aged 30. It’s been done in stages with varying equipment and skill levels. From what I can remember… Sorry photos haven't turned out the best, the "soft focus" hides some of my blunders I did all the chassis stuff years ago, it’s all brush painted. To be honest I don’t think I did that bad a job of the engine and suspension components. The larger areas that I have brushed are a bit pants but overall its not bad. Worth saying at this point is that my biggest gripe with the model is the colour I have painted the rear brake ducts and inside of the body (not that you see that). It’s the mix stated on the Tamiya instructions which turns out a yucky sick colour, it’s meant to be carbon fibre colour... I painted the body TS-17 rattle can, quite pleased with it. The paint came up ok, can’t remember if I wet sanded any of it, think I just used the Tamiya finishing compounds on it. Couple of blemishes but nothing major, the TS silver colours are quite hard to get a consistent finish on in my experience. I tried to carve out the panel lines a bit and my hand slipped in a couple of places . I filled in the panel lines today using the 0.05mm Stadler pen technique, excellent and so easy. There’s no clear on any of it. I did consider giving the whole thing a whiff but I applied the decals probably about 8 years ago and don’t want to risk it. At some point a few years ago I invested in an airbrush. It’s the cheap unbranded set you get on ebay. Compressor is excellent, the 2 airbrushes in the kit are ok (don’t have anything to compare them too) they do the job but I don’t doubt a more premium one would give better results. My airbrushing skills are still at the level where it is more likely to be me that’s wrong than the tools though. I airbrushed the rear wing and wheels X-18, might have been a TS-29 can though. The airbrush has got more use in my subsequent model. I made a pretty good job with the decals if I say so myself. I use the microscale solutions. One bad bit is the large black decal below the windscreen, the microsol solution makes the decal shrivel up then dries out flat, well it should, this one dried down with a couple of very thin creases, didn’t look too bad at the time but as time has passed and the model handled the high bit has worn away in places so you see silver paint shining through. Its not quite perfectly aligned either but it was an absolute nightmare to put on, I didn't want to tear the very thin end bits, looks worse in the photo than it does in real life actually. Bits that annoy me. The aforementioned sick colour of the brake ducts The aforementioned below the windscreen decal My painting of the windows, I don’t think this kit came with a set of masks for the windows, I either didn’t paint a wide enough bit black or should have painted the body under it black too, you can see an outline of silver. N.B. I absolutely hate painting window outlines, I seem to get paint bleed no matter what I do! Any tips? Hopefully some light coats with the airbrush will give better results than brushing. The front brake ducts, the instructions say paint them white, all the pictures I have seen of the car in real life they are silver. I’m not really a detail freak, you won’t catch me scratch building anything any time soon, but this annoys me! I had painted them and glued them on before I really thought about it unfortunately. Glue marks! What do people use to stick their beautifully painted models together? I use the Revel stuff and it just seems to melt everything! I put all the old ones down to my youthful self being a bit rough but even when I stuck the body onto the chassis today I managed to make a mess being (what I thought to be) sparing with the glue, melted a bit of the silver paint along the bottom of the body but it’s not that noticeable. Its a kit issue but the front panel on the real car is all part of the body so there's no panel line, it also sits a bit to prominently and is straight whereas the real car has a slight curve. Could get rid of the panel line with some filler but that would be a difficult job. Guess I am more of a detail freak than I admit Any feedback or tips very welcome. I concentrated on the bad bits as one tends to but overall I am pretty happy with the model, as long as you don’t look too closely . For my next one, I am building the Revel Jagermeister 956 kit. It’s a kerbside so no engine. I'm using it really as a training model for my airbrush, will try and get round to posting it up. Going ok so far, having lots of fun with masking tape!
  13. German Staff Car "G4" 1:72 Revell The Mercedes Benz W31 type G4 was a large, three-axle car designed specifically for use as a staff car by the Wehrmacht. Powered by an eight-cylinder inline engine, the cars weight an impressive 3.7 tonnes. Maximum speed was limited to 42mph as a result of the chunky all-terrain tyres. Just 57 cars of the seven-seater cars were produced, of which at least three exist in their original state. One is located in Hollywood and is regularly used for war films. The vehcle is, of course, most famous for being used by Adolf Hilter during parades and inspections. The front passenger seat could be folded in order to allow the front passenger to stand during such events. Inside the surprisingly large end-opening box is one large frame of grey plastic, a much smaller frame of the same, a small clear frame, three steel rods which are used as axles and a set of soft rubber tyres. A small decal sheet is also included. I had wondered whether this was a brand new kit from Revell, but on closer inspection it's clear that this is the ICM kit which was released in 2015 and marketed as a snap-fit model. This is no bad thing however, as the ICM kit is well-regarded and nicely detailed. Surface detail is clean and crisp, and first impressions are very favourable. The instruction omit any mention of snap-fit assembly, so presumably you need to crack open the glue before carrying on. Assembly begins with the interior and body. The rear seat and door trim is painted gloss black to represent a leather finish, and the reat seat itself, as well as the wind screen, are integral parts that join the sides of the body together. Once the body has been joined to the floorpan, the bonnet, instrument panel and radiator cover can be fitted in place. At this point the model can be flipped over and all of the mechanical detail can be added. The eight-cylinder engine is pretty good, although not the most detailed I've seen in this scale. The ladder chassis is moulded with the front wings in place, and the engine mounts into this part from the top. After this, the chassis can be glued to the body, with the engine sandwiched between the two. Now that the substantive part of the car is complete, the exhaust and the wheels can be added. As mentioned above, the axles are made from steel rod and will allow free movement of the wheels if fitted correctly. Presumably the tolerances will be tight enough to make supergluing these parts superfluous. If you're wondering why Revell supply eight tyres with the kit, it's because two of them are for the spare wheels that fit either side of the bonnet. finishing details include fitted luggage and the folding roof (in folded position; ICM released a separate version of the kit with the roof up). Small flag poles and nicely detailed headlights are also included. Two different options are provides for on the decal sheet. The first is for a Wehrmacht staff car based in Berlin in 1942. It is finished in the light grey and black scheme featured on the box artwork. The second option is for a vehicle located in France in 1941. As you might expect for a vehicle used in occupied territory, it is finished in a more sombre dark grey finish. The decal sheet is small but nicely printed, however the swastikas have been omitted from the flags for the usual legal reasons. Conclusion This was a great kit when it was first released and nothing much has changed since. It's strange that Revell don't mention the snap-fit origins of this kit as kits of this nature can be virtually impossible to test fit prior to assembly (at least without a high risk of breaking the parts when trying to separate them again) but overall this should be a nice kit to build. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  14. Just finished this. This is the first car of a clients father.
  15. Hi guys, got this preordered and arrived yesterday, so just GOT TO build it!! LOL!
  16. Hi guys, this is the final reveal of the Mercedes AMG GT3 race car. This was a challenging kit to build for me, the kit decals were very thick, I had to use Tamiya X20A thinner to soften the decals on the rear wing and the carbon decals to get them to settle down, also I found the rear lights tricky to install. In order to preserve the matt finish on the body, I used Deluxe Materials Glue and Glaze to attach all of the lights and the windows etc, including the door handles and the mirrors to avoid marking the matt finish. Overall, for my first performance race car that I've ever built, I am happy with how it turned out. Enjoy the ride guys! Finally, you can see my work in progress of this build below.
  17. Finally got this built. Here it is in all its glory: On the whole, an enjoyable building experience. Tamiya kits are really at the top of the tree for quality. The only issue I had was with the number plate decals. As soon as they hit the (painted) plastic, they stuck right where they were placed. Didn't happen with any of the other decals from the same sheet. Weird. Hope you enjoy it. The build can be seen here: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235007398-tamiya-124-mercedes-benz-amg-500sl/ All the best, Alan.
  18. Hi All, I seem to have got a bit of enthuisam back for modelling again! This has been on and off my bench for a considerable while. I'm not sure how long I have had this beast. Several years at the least... Cover picure: I think that this muscular beast will look good with my Mazda Mx-5. Two totally different cars, both with the idea that driving can be fun... Anyway the obligatory sprue shot: As you can see, there are a number of bits removed from the sprues, that's because I started on this model a fair while ago, then for lack of enthusiasm, I packed it all up, and more-or-less forgot about it. By the way, the clear parts were missed out in the photo, but I still have them... I re-discovered it while waiting for some paint (or cement, I can't remember to be honest) to set on the Revell Ferrari 308. I thought that I would get it out and have a look. The main body parts were all primed ready for a top coat, So I sanded the primer coat with some recently bought Tamiya 'Lapping Film'. This is a very fine abrasive that can be used to smooth paint or plastic surfaces prior to painting. It's pretty amazing stuff. The finish I got was pretty good, so I decided to have a go at painting it. I sprayed it with Humbrol Gunmetal acrylic using my trusty Badger air-brush (Must be nearly 30 years old, and still going strong). I thinned it using a 50:50 mix of Johnson's Klear and distilled water, So the final mix was about 35% paint to 65% thinner. I then hooked up my new Tamiya air-flow regulator to the compressor and set the flow rate to quite low. The regulator has no pressure gauge, so it's a bit of guess-work to establish the correct air-flow, but with a bit of practice, you get a really fine flow, but you do have to thin the paint quite a lot, or it won't crawl out of the bottle The Tamiya regulator is a really nifty piece of kit and not terribly expensive, about 8 quid from HLJ. This is where the various parts are now: Finally the bonnet (Hood): Once the paint was dry on the various body parts, it was a lovely matte shade (I think Humbrol gun-metal is matte anyway). It needed some 'shiney-ness'. I had some Halford's clear lacquer left over from other jobs, and tried it on the bonnet. After a few mist-coats followed by a couple of heavier wet-coats, it was glossy but a little orange-peely. So, after some elbow-grease with 2000 grit wet 'n' dry, the Tamiya lapping film and finally, Halford's rubbing compound, I got a pretty good high shine on the bonnet. The next stage is to get some more Halfords clear laquer, and finish the job on the body and fenders. Once that is done, I can get on with the interior, and final assembly. It's still a long way from being finished, but I feel that I have made some good progress. More to come. Cheers, Alan.
  19. Started this one last week. The Revell Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG. Something different then a Ferrari or a muscle car! It's going to be a pearl white car. I was going to use HobbyDesign SMG wheels, but the kit wheels look better with different tyres. The box and the wheels: Instructions, decals and body: All the parts: Quick setup of the car: Primed all the parts: And it will be a pearl white SLS AMG. So I painted the body parts with 1 grey coat of primer and 2 white coats. Got some bad experience with using white primer only... Tomorrow I'll try to put some colour on it! Thanks for watching! Mike
  20. Mercedes CLK GTR, pictures thanks to Rick.
  21. For my Dornier-diorama (see here for the build report of the Dornier) I recently purchased a number of vehicles. Yesterday I started work on the first, the Mercedes-Benz L1500 fire truck by Fan Kit Models. No instructions were provided, but fortunately on the kit maker's website there are several pictures of the model (otherwise I wouldn't have known how to build it). Yesterday I found out that this is a pre-1940 model (very rare) so that the diorama can be set in 1939 after all. Impressive box art: 1. 'Pushing-cutting' the resin can be done the standard way, with a knife... 2. ... but as soon as filing or sanding has to be performed, the toxicity of resin must be taken into account. The dust particles must not be breathed in, resin is one of the most dangerous substances a modeller may have to deal with. Usually, the following solutions are mentioned: wear a dust mask (which can't prevent the dust particles from flying around in the room), working on the resin underneath the water tap or in another room, or to work in the open air. I'd like to add the so-called steel saucepan-technique to those: fill a saucepan with water and work on the model underwater. Not too hot, otherwise the resin may warp. The pan handle can be used to put knife, saw and file on. 3. Filing the windows straight and neat takes quite a bit of time, but I happily give that for a nice result. 4. After careful filing, the undersides of the windows now run straight. 5. Resin casting blocks are often easily breakable from the model; this typically provides a nicer result than cutting and sanding. However, it is also sometimes risky... But reparation will fortunately be quite simple. 6. What an amazing model! Perfectly straight, something that cannot be said of all resin kits. Dryfit: 7. Inside the hangar. Totally spent time thus far: 2 hours.
  22. Hi Everyone, Here is my completed build of the Revell 1/24 scale Mercedes GP Petronas MGP W01 in Michael Schumacher's decal scheme for the German Grand Prix. This kit was painted entirely in Revell acrylic paints after being hit with a coat of Humbrol grey primer. Except for a minor problem with the fit of the rear wing section (which doesn't look too bad), this kit was an enjoyable build. Anyway onto the photos. Thanks as always for looking. Comments welcome. Rick
  23. Hi Everyone, I have a pair of Formula 1 cars in my stash which I intend to paint and build at the same time. I have the Revell 1/24 Red Bull Racing RB8 with decals for Mark Webber's version and a Revell 1/24 Mercedes GP Petronas MGP W01 which has decals for Rosberg and Schumacher (I will be building this one with Schumacher's decals). Here are the pictures of the box art as I haven't taken pictures of the sprues yet as these kits were washed at the same time as the F-14A. Redbull RB8 : Mercedes Petronas: Once finished, these 2 builds will join my McLaren F1 car which I finished last year in my display cabinet. I will update with sprue pictures later on. Rick
  24. Revell Mercedes 1628s Truck 1:25 The Mercedes 1628s is a 22ton tractor unit manufactured between 1973 and 1988 and was a popular truck worldwide, the Revell kit is a day cab 2 axle tractor unit, with the Mercedes 280bhp V8 engine. The 1628 was available as a tractor or a rigid truck so there are lots of options to convert the base kit. The kit comes over 4 main sprues cast in a light grey. Being an older kit there is some flash on the parts but nothing that needs more than a quick pass with a knife and a sanding stick. The parts are well done, and have some very nice detail on them. Construction kicks off with the multi part chassis, the 2 rails are joined with a large casting that has 4 cross members cast in place, take care when removing this from the sprue, and cleaning this up as it will help keep your chassis straight and true. 3 more cross members are also added before you can add the springs and the 2 axles to your chassis. Extra parts like the anti-roll bars and shock absorbers are also glued into place. The front axle is a fixed part so the wheels can’t be displaced turned without some work but it does give a stronger part. The engine is made up from multiple parts and gives a well detailed engine block, of course you can add some wiring and pipes as the cab can be tilted to show it off. Looking at the instructions you should be able to build and paint the chassis and engine separately adding it late in the build. The wheels look like nice casting, copying the real parts nicely, whereas other kits have a generic wheel, looking at the parts there is a hole in the rear hubs that may need filling but I will see when I build this shortly. There are 6 nice rubber tyres with good sidewall and tread details, some of the nicest truck tyres I have seen. Once you have a rolling chassis you can move onto the cab, the interior is made from multiple parts and they are well detailed. Paining instructions are referenced back to the Revell paint codes with the colours being very 80’swith various browns over more modern greys. There are decals to give the checked effect on the seats and door cards. The truck is of course Left hand Drive but it would be a simple conversion to swap the parts over both in the cab and on the chassis. The cab shell come as a single part and captures the shapes of the cab very well, with the various pressings and panel lines being in scale. There is again a little flash but nothing that will cause a headache to even the most novice modeller. There is a clear sprue that includes most of the cab glazing, only missing the door windows but it wouldn’t take much to create these from some clear plastic sheet. Lenses are included for the lights and some clear red and orange will be needed, the lenses are detailed with engraved lined to separate the red and amber areas. Check you references for the exact layout as it could vary. There is a decal sheet that contains the seat and door card pattern I mentioned earlier in the build, also included are a set of Mercedes cab stripes as applied in the factory and some model badges for the exterior of the cab. Some decals are also included for the clocks on the dashboard and they look well detailed. A variety of registration plates are also included, the UK ones give a late 1980, early 1981 vehicle that would fit with the era (a Leicester registered truck) the decals are as expected from Revell, well printed with good fine decals. Conclusion A welcome re-issue of an older Revell kit. It will be a popular kit as a basis for conversions. Lets hope Revell re-issue some more versions of this (Race Truck PLEASE!!!!!!!!) A build review will follow shortly as I already have a build in mind! Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit
  25. Anyone looking for this one? models for sale have it for 30 quid http://www.modelsforsale.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=694879-Gakken-1/16-1936-Mercedes-540K-Date:-80%27s- And you were trying so hard not to buy any more... Sorry And a Pocher 1/8th Alfa 8C - But that is 400 quid! http://www.modelsforsale.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=692823-Pocher-Alfa-Romeo-8C-2300-Monza-1931-1/8-Date:-1970%27s-
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