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Found 11 results

  1. Having made a complete hash of my first Blitzbuild, I thought that I would dig this little Mossie out of the stash and have another crack at one. I will be going for the two 12 hour sessions option and I hope to complete it this time around. by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr
  2. Zeppelin LZ127 1:720 Mark I Models The LX127 Graf Zeppelin was a German passenger airship designed, built and operated in the interwar period. At the time of its completion, it was the longest airship in the world at 236 metres and was surpassed only by the USS Akron in 1931. The Graf Zeppelin enjoyed a relatively successful commercial career, flying over 1 million miles prior to its retirement in 1937. Most of its commercial flights took place between Germany and South America, as the development of fixed wing passenger aircraft made it too slow and small (in terms of passenger carrying capacity) for regular operation between Germany and the USA. The Graf Zeppelin was retired following the Hindenburg disaster in 1937. Attempts were made to secure a supply of Helium - a much safer lifting gas - from the USA, but the annexation of Austria in 1938 put an end to this, and with it the German airship programme. Mark I announced their intention to produce a series of 1:720 scale airships some time ago. They have covered the WWI era P and Q class airships via several different boxings, making this the second all-new kit in the range. Inside the box is a single frame of grey plastic, with the two halves of the hull seperated from the frame, presumably in order to fit them inside the box. The kit is limited run in nature, with the moulds manufactred from hardened resin. The plastic parts are nicely moulded, however, with crisp detail throughout. There is no flash present and the sprue attachment points are reassuringly fine. As you might expect, construction is fairly straightforward. The main structure of the airship is split vertically down the middle, with the gondola moulded in place. The hull measures out at just under 330mm, which is pretty much spot on. Aside from joining the fuselage halves, the only real construction work involved is assembling the flying surfaces and engine pods. There is a choice of two or four-bladed propellers depending on which scheme you want to finish your model in. A stand is included to display the finished model, along with a decal to identify the finished model. The finished kit is an impressive size for the scale, comfortably rivaling or eclipsing most naval warships of the era. Mark I have included decals to finish the Graf Zeppelin at four different points during her career: Zeppelin LZ127 'Graf Zeppelin' First flights, 1928-29. This is the scheme she wore during her first commercial crossing of the Atlantic in October 1928; Zeppelin LZ127 'Graf Zeppelin' Round-the-world flight, 1929; Zeppelin LZ127 'Graf Zeppelin' Propaganda and commercial flights 1933-36. This scheme features painted flying surfaces, with the imperial German flag on the starboard side and the swastika on the port side; and Zeppelin LZ127 'Graf Zeppelin' Last flights, 1936-37. This scheme features the Nazi party flag painted on both sides of the vertical tail. Conclusion Just like their P/Q Class Zeppelin, the LZ127 is a really appealing kit. It should look great on its display stand and will make an ideal companion for Revell's LZ129 Hindenburg in the same scale. Construction is simple and while the level of detail is slightly basic, it is as good as it needs to be in this scale. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Here is my Mark I Models 1:144 scale Messerschmitt Bf 109G-1/R6 which I built back in 2016. It represents a machine flown by Horst Carnagico of Stab II./JG5, Luftwaffe, from Alakurrti airfield, Northern Russia, in April 1943. I have some reservations as to if it was indeed a G-1 but I'm going with what the kit says. This was the Eduard kit re-packaged by Mark I Models adding a resin cockpit and several decal options. It was built mostly OOB though I replaced the cannon barrels with thinner ones from metal rod. The kit was fully painted and varnished by brush. Thank you for looking and all comments are welcome as always Miguel
  4. Hello! Here is the other of two kits I completed this past weekend. It's Mark I Models' 1:144 scale Sukhoi Su-7BM "Fitter A" built as 5024, 28th Fighter Bomber Regiment (28. sbolp), Czechoslovak Air Force, at Caslav Air Base, in 1964. This kit was Attack's Su-7B repackaged by Mark I with resin parts added to make a nuclear-armed Su-7BM. Apart from the nuke itself, the resin parts included the fuselage spine ducts and a nose probe. The kit was built mostly OOB with only the missing wingtip probes and some main undercarriage arms added from stretched sprue as on the Su-7B. As with the Su-7B, I replaced the wing guns with thinner ones also from stretched sprue. I also added a missing duct along the port underside, also from stretched sprue. The blister on the top of the nose (for the Su-7B data boom) had to be removed (not mentioned in the instructions) and a side blister for the new nose probe had to be made since it didn't come with the nose data boom as seemed to be indicated in the instructions. The new data boom was slightly bent and I didn't manage to get it straight. When I had completed the kit I discovered that the outer wing pylons shouldn't have been added as these were only used on the later Su-7BMK and retrofitted to Indian AF earlier Fitter As. The instructions were very unclear and/or misleading in various aspects. Although it is doubtful Czechoslovakian AF Fitters ever carried nukes (unlike on the illustration of the card - this was a bagged kit), probably not even training rounds, I put the nuke on this kit in a bit of a "what if" had things turned for the worse. Of the four options in the kit, the only one we could "safely" have carrying the nuke would have been the Soviet machine but I didn't want two Soviet Fitters and the Czech machine had an emblem in the nose making it different and a little more colourful so I took that option. The kit was fully painted and varnished with brush. Thank you for looking and all comments are welcome Miguel
  5. DH Vampire FB.9 1:144 Mark I Models The De Havilland DH.100 Vampire was built to fulfil a wartime requirement for a small, lightweight jet fighter for the Royal Air Force. Although the prototype aircraft flew almost two years before the end of the War, the production aircraft arrived too late to see service in the conflict. Despite this, well over 3,000 examples were produced and the aircraft enjoyed a relatively long service life by the standards of the day. Powered by a single De Havilland Goblin turbojet, the diminutive Vampire was capable of 548 mph and had a service ceiling of over 40,000 ft. In common with many other fighters of the day, it was armed with four 20mm cannon. The FB.9 was a tropicalised variant of the FB.5 fighter bomber, of which 326 were built. Mark I Models have produced quite a range of 1:144 scale kits, including many British types from the WWII and Cold War eras. This kit is part of a range of Vampire kits released by the Czech manufacturer that - so far - includes the F.3 and FB.5/51/52. The kit is limited run in nature, but the plastic parts are nicely moulded, with crisp detail throughout. There is a small amount of flash present and the sprue attachment points are on the chunky side relative to the scale. As with other kits of single-engined aircraft in the range, you get two Vampires in the box. As you might expect, construction is fairly straightforward. The cockpit is pretty good, with a separately moulded seat for the pilot, an instrument panel and rear bulkhead as well as a tiny control column. Detail for the instrument panel is provided courtesy of a very small decal. Once the cockpit is complete, it can be sandwiched between the upper and lower halves of the fuselage along with the engine air intake vanes. The Vampire is a notorious tail sitter, so I'd be tempted to cram in as much nose weight as possible at this stage. Being such a small model, the tail booms are moulded as solid parts, as is the elevator. The undercarriage is surprisingly detailed for a model this size, and you even get a minescule pair of balance weights for the elevator. The canopy is pretty good, despite its tiny proportions. Mark I have included decals for four different aircraft: de Havilland Vampire FB Mk.9, WX207, 213 Sqn., Royal Air Force, Deversoir Air Base, Egypt, 1949-52. This aircraft is finished in Medium Sea Grey and Light Slate Grey over PRU Blue; de Havilland Vampire FB Mk.9, WR154, No.8 Flying Training School, RAF Swinderby, 1957; de Havilland Vampire FB Mk.9, WR110, 75/76 Sqn,. No. 78 Fighter Wing, Royal Australian Air Force, Ta Kall Air Base, Malta, 1952-54 (with an alternative scheme for 'Exercise Coronet; de Havilland Vampire FB Mk.9, R100, No.1 Sqn., Rhodesian Air Force, Thornhill Air Station, early 1960s. Conclusion Surprisingly tiny, even in this scale, Mark I's Vampire is nonetheless an appealing little kit. Somehow the tiny scale suits the diminutive proportions of the little jet. The standard of manufacture looks to be pretty good and it doesn't look as though it will be particularly challenging to build. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Spitfire F/FR Mk.XIV Bubbletop 1:144 Mark I Models When the prototype Spitfire took to the air for the first time on 5 March 1936, few involved could have foreseen where the development of the type would lead. By the end of the Second World War, the type had earned itself a place in the history books as well as the nation's psyche. Powered by the two-stage supercharged Griffon 65, the performance of the Mk.XIV was a quantum leap over its forebears, enabling the Spitfire to meet its German foe on equal terms. The FR Mk.XIV was a photo reconnaissance version, modified by Forward Repair Units to carry a single camera in the rear fuselage. Mark I Models have produced quite a range of 1:144 scale kits, including many British WWII and Cold War types. This kit is part of a range of Griffon-engined Spitfire kits released by the Czech manufacturer. The kit is limited run in nature, but the plastic parts are nicely moulded, with crisp detail throughout. There is a small amount of flash present and the sprue attachment points are on the chunky side relative to the scale. As with other kits of single-engined aircraft in the range, you get two Spitfires in the box. As you might expect, construction is fairly straightforward. The cockpit is basic but serviceable, with a separately moulded seat for the pilot, an instrument panel and rear bulkhead as well as a tiny control column. Detail for the instrument panel is provided courtesy of a very small decal. Once the cockpit is complete, the fuselage halves can be joined. The wings are a solid part, although you have the option to remove the wing tips and use the clipped versions supplied. The elevators are also solid, while the rudder is a separate part. The landing gear is nicely detailed and the main gear bays include a small amount of structural detail. The canopy is pretty good, despite its tiny proportions. The camera window is catered for by a decal. Mark I have included decals for four different schemes: Spitfire F Mk.XIV NH745 EB-V, No.41 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Eindhoven, March 1945; Spitfire FR Mk.XIV MV263 GCK, No.125 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Twente, April 1945; Spitfire FR Mk.XIV NH895 NI-K, No.451 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force, Wunsdorf, 1945; and Spitfire FR Mk.XIV SG-46 UR-G, No.2 Squadron, Belgian Air Force, Florennes, 1948 Conclusion Surprisingly tiny, even in this scale, Mark I's Griffon-powered Spitfire is nonetheless an appealing little kit. The standard of manufacture looks to be pretty good and it doesn't look as though it will be particularly challenging to build. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. DH Mosquito PR.IV/B.IV 'Special Liveries' 1:144 Mark I Models The de Havilland Mosquito was conceived as a high-powered, high-speed bomber. Unlike other aircraft of the day, it was depended on its speed, rather than defensive gun turrets, for survival. It was also noteworthy for being constructed of wood composite, a technique pioneered by de Havilland in the sleek de Havilland Albatross airliner. This helped to save weight, but also reduced reliance on the scarce alloys used in the construction of other aircraft. Overcoming the skepticism of the Air Ministry, during early trials the Mosquito proved to be comfortably faster than the Spitfire Mk.II. In the end, almost 8,000 examples were completed, with the type serving well beyond the end of the War. The B Mk IV was the original bomber version of the Mosquito, while the PR Mk IV was simply a photo reconnaissance conversion of the former. Mark I Models have produced quite a range of 1:144 scale kits, including many British WWII and Cold War types. This kit is part of a range of Mosquito kits released by the Czech manufacturer. The kit is limited run in nature, but the plastic parts are nicely moulded, , with crisp detail throughout. There is no flash present and the sprue attachment points are pretty fine for the scale. Being one of the larger kits in the line up, you only get one Mossie in the box instead of the pair of kits you find in their Spitfires or Vampires. As you might expect, construction is fairly straightforward. The cockpit is basic, but structurally complete, with a separate moulded seat for the pilot and a control column and instrument panel. Detail for the latter is provided courtesy of a very small decal. Once the cockpit is complete and the small fuselage windows have been fitted, the fuselage halves can be joined. The wings are simply split vertically and they are designed to fit inside the recesses on the fuselage sides. Each engine pod is moulded in vertical halves, with bulkheads to close the landing gear bays off at either end. The landing gear itself is nicely detailed and a choice of wheels are included depending on which of the painting schemes you choose to build. A choice of engine exhausts are also included. Despite its diminutive size, the canopy is pretty good. Mark I have included decals for four different schemes: de Havilland Mosquito PR Mk IV DK310, LY-G, No.1 PRU, Royal Air Force Benson, summer 1941. This aircraft is finished in Dark Slate Grey and Sky Grey over PRU Blue; de Havilland Mosquito PR Mk IV DZ473, No.540 Squadron, Royal Air Force Leuchars, June 1943. This aircraft is finished in overall PRU Blue and was used to photograph the V-2 rocket facility at Peenemunde; de Havilland Mosquito PR Mk IV G-AGFV, BOAC, Royal Air Force Leuchars, early 1943. This aircraft is finished in Dark Earth and Dark Green over Sky. It was used for high-speed diplomatic courier operations to Sweden; and de Havilland Mosquito B Mk IV G-AGFV, T9+XB, 2./VVB OKL Trials and Research Unit of the Luftwaffe High Command, Konigsberg-Neumark Airfield, Summer 1944. Conclusion Small and simple it may be, but this mini Mossie is no less appealing for it. The quality of manufacture looks to be pretty good and although there are no luxuries such as locating pins, it doesn't look as though it will be particularly challenging to build. Reccomended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. HMA R33/R34 Transatlantic Flyer 1:720 Mark I Models In 1916, While the R33 class of airships was still on the drawing board, the German airship L33 was downed by anti-aircraft fire over Essex. Despite the crew's attempts to destroy the stricken craft, it was captured largely intact and thus yielded the secrets of German airship construction to the British authorities. With the design now based heavily on the German airship, the R33 was constructed b Armstrong-Whitworth in North Yorkshire, while the sister ship R34 was built by William Beardmore and Co. in Renfrewshire. Neither airship was completed before the cessation of hostilities in 1918. The R33 enjoyed a surprisingly long career, much of which was spent resting the launch and recovery of aircraft from airships. In April 1925, she was torn from her mooring mast at Pulham during a gale, Despite suffering a partially collapsed nose section, the crew were finally able to regain control over the Dutch coast and eventually bought her back to Pulham 28 hours later. The first officer, coxswain (the fabulously named 'Sky' Hunt) and four other crew were recognised with medals. The forward section of the R33's control car is preserved at the RAF Museum at Hendon. The R34's career was no less eventful. A few weeks after John Alcock and Arthur Brown made the first non-stop transatlantic flight, the R34, commanded by Major George Scott, made the first return flight over the Atlantic. She was written off after an (non-fatal) accident in 1921. Mark I announced their intention to produce a series of 1:720 scale airships some time ago. They have covered the WWI era P/Q and R class airships via several different boxings, as well as the interwar LZ127 'Graf Zeppelin', making this the fourth kit in the range and the first British airship. Inside the box is a single frame of grey plastic which holds both the parts for the airship and the display stand. The kit is limited run in nature, with the moulds manufactured from hardened resin. The plastic parts are nicely moulded, however, with crisp detail throughout. There is no flash present and the sprue attachment points are reassuringly fine. As you might expect, construction is fairly straightforward. The main structure of the airship is split vertically down the middle, as are the fore and aft gondolas. The midship gondolas are moulded as solid parts. All of the gondolas have separately moulded propellers and struts to join them to the body of the airship. I spy another set of gondolas on the sprue, at least one of which is shaped to fit directly onto the hull, so presumably an R36 is on the way, presumably with a plug to lengthen the fuselage. The only other construction work involved is assembling the flying surfaces. A stand is included to display the finished model, along with a decal to identify the finished model. Mark I have included decals for three different schemes worn by the R33 and one for the R34: HMA R33, Pulham Airship Experimental Station, March-October 1919; HMA R33 G-FAAG, Croydon Airport, Summer 1921. Ths is essentially the same scheme as the first one, but with additional civil registration codes; HMA R33 G-FAAG, National Physical Laboratory, Cardington Airship Station, Bedfordshire and Pulham Experimental Station, Norfolk, April 1925 to November 1926. This is a plain design without the Roundels; and HMA R34, Royal Navy, East Fortune Airship Station, Scotland. This is the scheme worn for the first return crossing of the Atlantic in July 1919. Decals are provided for the markings and the windows and other features of the gondolas. Conclusion Just like their other airships, the R33/34 is a really appealing kit. It should look great on its display stand and will make an ideal companion for the other kits released by Mark 1 Models in the same scale. Construction is simple and detail is as good as it needs to be. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Hello everyone! Here is one of two Westland Wessex kits I built back in 2015. It is Wessex HC.2 XR505/081, Escuadrón Helicópteros, Aviación Naval Uruguaya, based at Base Aeronaval Capitán Curbelo, Laguna del Sauce, Uruguay, as seen on the USS Oak Hill (LSD-51) during Exercise Southern Partnership Station, Uruguay, in July 2009. This one one of five ex-RAF machines delivered to the Uruguayan Naval Aviation. It is the Mark I Models 1:144 kit with etched parts from Brengun. The kit needs some care and work as the fit of parts isn't great. The Brengun parts really improve the cockpit and supply several missing external details such as the winch and steps. The biggest flaw of this kit, and one that really needs a resin replacement, is the main rotor mast. As it comes, it is nothing like the real thing and makes the main rotor sit lower than it should. My simple solution in both kits was to cut off the mast, make the rotor head thinner (as it is on the thick side) and make a new mast from the kit's sprue sanded more or less to shape. It's not a great fix but looks much better. I'm currently building an HCC.4 and I'm giving thought to adding the links which would really improve the appearance. The exhausts were hollowed out as they came moulded solid. The kit was fully painted and varnished by brush. Thanks for looking and all comments are welcome. Miguel
  10. Hello everyone This is the first build I'm posting here and it's my latest kit finished just last weekend. It's a conversion of the Mark I Models 1:144 He 219A-5 into a A-6 "Mosquito-Jäger". This was a projected but unbuilt variant. This was an A-2/R2 with armour removed, no radar aerials and without flame dampeners. My sample of the kit came with a lot of flash which meant plenty of cleaning up though this isn't the norm (I have others in my stash). Basic improvements involved the following: - Moving the rear cockpit wall 4-5mm forward. I added a gunsight at the front. - Making a recess for the lovely etched Peilgerät DF star instead of sticking it on top of the fuselage spine as suggested by the instructions. The clear cover was made with Kristal Klear. - Opening gun and intake holes along the main wing leading edge. I also cut the slot for the landing light which was made from clear sprue. The intake hole in the tailplane was also opened up. - The nose wheel leg was too long and I shortened it by 2mm or more. - The shape of the spinners was wrong being bulbous and blunt and I sanded them to a more correct conical shape. The main conversion point was adding exhausts. I found spare ones in an Eduard Spitfire IX double kit. I opened up holes for them, blanking them inside and gluing them in these slots. All joints and seams needed sanding and some filler. I added weight but unfortunately it was insufficient, despite my tests which seemed to show there was enough, so the kit was glued to the nice card display base that came with the kit. When I discovered this variant in the Valiant Wings book, I immediately had the idea of a machine without paint in a metal finish as with a Bf 109G-6 that was actually stripped of paint to gain speed precisely to hunt DH Mosquitoes. Decals came from the kit except for the red Ms and werknummers which I took from an A-2 kit, and the kills in the tail from my spares (Jach Lippisch P.20 sheet I believe). ALthough representing a plane from 2./NJG1, it is, of course, completely fictitious. The Mark I Models He 219 is not an easy-build kit but with a little effort you can get a great result. Thanks for looking Miguel As a final note, I am posting these images from one of my albums in Google Photos. Please advise me if there are any problems. Thank you.
  11. LET L-13/TZ-13 Blanik "Military Service" 1:144 MARK I Models (MKM14495) The L-13 Blanik is a two seat training glider made by the Czech company Let Kunovice. It is probably the most widely produced and used glider in the world, being used by many civilian schools, and many military air arms. The L-13 was the first Czech glider to utilise laminar flow wing profiles. The L-13 has a reputation for durability and ease of operation. Over 3000 have been built since 1956 and exported all over the world. The ruggedness of the design combined with a low landing speed and ample control deflection make it very effective as a primary flight trainer. The type is said to posses many of the flight characteristics of wood/fabric aircraft but with the durability of more modern materials and construction techniques. The Kit Inside the box from Mark I you actually get two kits, each on its own sprue with the canopy in a separate bag (which is nice). The plastic is very nice, for this scale there is fine engraved panel lines where needed, and thin sprue gates for the parts. As you would expect the construction is fairly simple in this small scale. The bottom of the seat is moulded into the floor part, so the backs are added along with control columns. The back seat is also moulded onto the rear bulkhead. Once the seats/floor is in the instrument panels are added and the fuselage can be closed up. The tail/rudder is moulded as one part onto the left fuselage to keep it scale thickness. Once the fuselage is closed up the tail planes and wings are added, finally the one part canopy is added. Decals Decals are in house, look to be in register and should pose no problems. Its worth noting that the carrier film seems very minimal, so care will be needed. Markings are provided for 6 examples in Military Service. RAF Gliding & Soaring Association, Aboyne, Scotland 1980. DOSAAF, Aeroclub Novosibrisk, USSR 1970s. CVV-14 Gliding Centre, Italian Air Force, Frosinone AB, Italy 1985. Military School of Aeronautics, Uruguayan Air Force, Pando AB, Uruguay 2014-15. Voluntary Border Defence Service, Lithuanian Air Force, Silute AB, Lithuania, 1998. Air Force Academy, Brazilian Air Force, Pirassununga AB, Brasil 1970s-80s. Conclusion This is a simple little kit (but then the real ones are as well) it should make up to be a good interesting model. This is the first Mark I kit I have seen in a while and must say it looks good, they really do seem to know their stuff in 1.144. There is also a good selection of decal options to choose from. Highly recommended. Reviiew sample thanks to
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