Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Junkers'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modeling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
  • General Discussion
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
  • Archive

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 60 results

  1. Hello all! Here are some photos of my recently completed model, Revell's Ju 88A-1 in 1:32. It was a fight from start to finish, some pieces, such as the rudder pedals, didn't live to see the end of the project. I take all that to my own poor construction methods. I won't build another 32nd bomber again.
  2. Decided to start a side project, apart from Airfix's 1:48 Bf 109E. This photo is from earlier today. And this one is from today's evening. The camouflage has been outlined with a pencil. I had glue remaining just for the left engine cowling, I'll buy more tomorrow, if I can.
  3. Ju.290 Update Set (BRL72187 for Revell) 1:72 Brengun Revell's Ju.290 Seeadler is massive in 1:72, which gives an idea of just how big this bird (Sea Eagle) really is. This Photo-Etch (PE) set from Brengun is designed to improve on what Revell have given us by adding extra detail in all the right places. It arrives in a compact flat pack with a red Brengun themed header card and a sheet of black paper showing off the PE within. There are two frets of nickel-plated PE, plus a small slip of clear acetate with the instrument panel and gunsight on the mid-upper turret. The instructions are found behind the black paper, and construction begins with the rear turret, with interior detail in the canopy as well as within the opening into the fuselage, including a new set of ring sights at the tip of the barrel. Flipping to the front, the cockpit has a new set of instrument panels with the acetate rears depicting the dials, a new coaming, throttle quadrants, rudder pedals and other instruments on the sidewalls. The seats also get belts and a stowage pocket behind the right seat. The mid-upper is decked out with a brand new turret basket after removing the simplified tube that is provided in the kit, including instruments around the lip, ammo feed, and upgrades to the gun with the aforementioned gunsight. Externally, the main gear wells are adorned with a new bay skin, plus a new set of laminated bay doors and brake hose parts, while the airframe is given a make-over by replacing most of the antennae dotted around, including the whisker antennae on the nose, which will improve their look immensely. Lastly, the engines are fitted with a circular inner skin that gives the impression of depth and the cylinders behind the prop boss. As an aside, the picture of the PE wasn't taken in black and white, but came out looking that way for reasons best known to my scanner and how it reacts to the light reflecting off the metal. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Ju.52 Update Sets (For Revell) 1:48 Eduard Revell have recently re-released their still excellent Ju.52 Tante Ju kit (reviewed here), and Eduard have reciprocated by re-tooling their sets for the modern modeller. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Update Set (49987) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-printed, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels, throttle quadrant and radio gear plus a new engineering panel are the primary parts on the painted set, with new rudder pedals; racks & brackets; controls inside the fuselage; machine gun and ammo can details; and even some bracing to the nose-mounted engine's exhausts are also supplied. Zoom! Set (FE987) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE988) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as lap belts for the rest of the crew, the pilot has a four-point harness, and the rows of sideways-facing passenger seats have new lap belts added after removing all the moulded in representations from the whole aircraft. Passenger Seats (49988) This larger bare brass set two frets with a large floor skin for the passenger compartment, which is then decked out with two seats at the rear with recessed tops to accommodate parachute pack wearing crew. A set of grab handles are fitted to the inner fuselage sides, and two sets of twin seats are made up to line the sides, adding a substantial improvement in detail, and begging to be used in conjunction with the seatbelt set. Masks (EX655) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with extra masks for the side windows and other glazing parts. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for all the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Don't ask me what it is... AZmodel is to release a 1/72nd (Junkers ????) kit - ref. Source: https://www.facebook.com/azmodelkits/photos/a.478840912140523/2598691176822142/ V.P.
  6. Hello guys, as per the title, does anyone have any building tips for Revell's Ju 88A-1 in 1:32? Especially around the cockpit area. My first attempt at this model ended up with horrible gaps around the nose and cockpit area. With the second model, I learnt from my mistakes and managed to evade any issues with the cockpit. Sadly I had to trash the model after a shelf fell over it. Now, this will be my third attempt to build this plane, and I would like to receive some building tips. I plan on finishing this third model as my second one, B3+DR from KG54. Any building tips will be helpful, especially any tips regarding the fit of the cockpit and the sidewalls to the fuselage halves. I already have SAC's white metal landing gear to replace the plastic ones from the kit. Thank you very much, Francisco.
  7. Trumpeter is to release a 1/24th Junkers Ju-87A Stuka kit - ref. 02420 A test build was on display at the All Japan Model & Hobby Show 2016. Sources: https://www.facebook.com/INTERALLIED/photos/pcb.1577157062310657/1577157032310660/?type=3&theater https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/pcb.666914713467125/666914590133804/?type=3&theater Kit ref. number 02420 was originally announced as a 1/24th Ju-87D-3 in the Trumpeter's catalog 2016-2017. (http://scalemodels.ru/modules/news/img_9587_1449140881_2.jpg.html) V.P.
  8. Hi! Here are the photos of my latest work. It`s the ICM kit,which despite having received a lot of "flack" builds up into a beautifull model. It has several issues, mainly with the cockpit, but, after the glass work was installed, this modeller can live very well with it. paints utilised: Vallejo Model Air e acrílicos Mig. detailing sets: Eduard interior and exterior set If you have interest, you can find in my blog around 90 fotos with all the building and painting process explained. http://josepiresmodelismo.blogspot.pt/ This model was part of Airfix Model World mag, December 2017 issue.
  9. Junkers F.13 Conversion Set (MX 7222.07) 1:72 Master-X The Junkers F.13 was an all-metal, cantilever wing monoplane that was one of the most advance aircraft in the world when it first flew in June 1919. It was in production for 13 years - an incredible feat given the stupendous pace of aeronautical development throughout the early twentieth century. The aircraft was built around an aluminium alloy frame, with stressed skin in the classic Junkers style. The cockpit was only semi-enclosed, but the passenger compartment, which was fitted out to accommodate four people, was fully enclosed and heated. Over 322 examples were produced, with a great many different power plants finding their way into the airframe. This conversion set from Master-X is designed for the Revell kit - a stone cold classic from the German firm's 1990s purple patch. In the plastic bag, you get a replacement upper fuselage, horizontal and vertical tails, ailerons, wheels, propellor and lower cowling. The standard of casting is high and the rendering of the surface details means it will be a good match for the original kit. Of course the parts will need to be cleaned up prior to assembly, but from what I've seen, I wouldn't expect construction will present too many difficulties. Decals are included for the intended subject, an example used by the Eurasia Aviation Corporation in China in 1931. The colour scheme is a striking black, red and aluminium number. Conclusion This is a well-designed and nicely made conversion set which opens up new possibilities for Revell's excellent kit. The inclusion of decals is a necessity given the nature of the conversion, but one which makes this into a nice little project. An absolute must for fans of interwar aviation. Review sample courtesy of
  10. With a bit more room here, I was thinking about suitable types for a STGB. One aircarft type which crossed my mind was the Junkers Ju 87 Stuka. There are great kits out there in all the scales and an upcoming new release from Airfix in 1/48 and I couldn't see it listed in the completed GB listing, so it looks like it was never done before. Also the type flew from the Spanish Civil War up to the end of WWII and was operated in many different colour schemes by all the Axis Air Forces plus captured examples. And with its 3.7 cm canons, it was the closest thing to a flying tank. Any takers to put the name on the list? 1. Basilisk (Host) 2. Arniec 3. Caerbannog 4. jrlx 5. SimonT 6. Knight_Flyer 7. John 8. Black Knight 9. franky boy 10. vppelt68 (co-Host) 11. GREG DESTEC 12. modelling minion 13. Sgt.Squarehead 14. SleeperService 15. Valkyrie 16. Corsairfoxfouruncle 17. jrlx 18. CliffB 19. Mottlemaster 20. MarkSH 21. DaveyGair 22. Stew Dapple 23. Greg Law 24. Niknak 25. Silonez
  11. Afternoon everyone. For my next project, I'd like to try and replicate the Ju88r found at the RAF Museum Cosford (formally at Hendon) in 1/72 scale. This particular airframe has a fascinating history, I'm sure many of you know already know it, and I'd like to try and get as close as possible to this, but alas know very little about the differences in specifications of the Ju88. Extra information on the aircraft can be seen here: https://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/cosford/whats-going-on/news/german-bomber-wings-its-way-to-the-midlands/ I already have the Revell Ju88C (as here: https://www.scalemates.com/kits/revell-04856-junkers-ju-88c-6-z-n--176229) and wonder what I would need to do to get as close as possible to the RAF Museum R model? I'd really appreciate any tips, guides or information anyone has on this! Thanks in advance Matt
  12. I used to build a lot of WWI planes, some of them were vacforms . Time to have a go at one, no rigging on this one. Decals Three sprues of flashy parts, and there is some very little parts. Have assembled the engine and cockpit ready for paint tomorrow. Thanks for stopping by. Stephen
  13. As already announced in a ICM general thread ( http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234974439-icm-148-junkers-ju-88a5dornier-do-17z/), the Ukrainian brand is to release a new tool 1/48th Junkers Ju-88A-5 kit in 2015 - ref.48232. Source - ICM 2015 catalogue : http://www.icm.com.ua/katalog/ Box art V.P.
  14. For my second build which i will be doing consecutively with my Ju88 s-3 to enable painting to take place at same time (to save time ) i have chosen another 88 from low down in the stash pile ,the oldish Dragon Ju88 G-6 . I understand that this can be a tricky kit to build but i feel forwarned ! I will be using the Aims decal sheet Ju88 G-6 , mistel collection. I have chosen this one as i have a built Hasegawa Morgenstern and hope to have a more typical G-6 later in the coming months. have assembled a small selection of resin I have some CMK seats and Quickboost exhausts to come. I have made use of the "less than 25% built rule" to do some pre preparation on the kit prior to the start on the 7th may. basically iv removed and cleaned up some of the larger parts , suprising how long this can take The rest of the parts Now only the main course to get on the table
  15. Hello! Here is my Anigrand Craftswork 1:144 Junkers EF.130 medium jet bomber project which I built back in 2008. It is in fictitious markings of 1./KG6 of the Luftwaffe. This kit was one of the bonus kits with the Horten Ho.XVIII kit, and it was my first all-resin kit build. Apart from the work in cleaning up the parts and getting them to fit, I added a couple of details to the cockpit and thinned the undercarriage doors considerably. The scheme was inspired on a real one I found on a Ju 188 of 1./KG6. The kit was mostly painted by brush with some varnish applied by airbrush. Thanks for looking Miguel
  16. Here is Anigrand Craftswork's 1:144 resin kit of the Junkers EF.132 bomber project which I built in 2002. Markings are for a fictitious KG200 machine in the Luftwaffe. It was built mostly OOB with only the guns being replaced by thinner items. The undercarriage doors were thinned. It was all painted by brush except for the matt varnish which was applied with airbrush. Thanks for looking and all comments are welcome Miguel
  17. My first experience with the Wingnut Wings kit is finished and I must admit it was a pure joy! I`ve used TaurusModels engine goodies and my own hand-carved propeller with a resin hub by ProperPlane. Painted mostly with Tamiya acrylics.
  18. Hello, So it happens that it`s the first WnW kit on my bench. I`m also going to build Bristol Fighter WnW with Aviattic decals simultaneously with this one. What can I say - it's simply awesome!! Love every second of the time I spent building it so far. The box picture is by Artro modelling (too lazy to take one on my own).
  19. Ok the idea for this build is a bit of a mash up of a couple of builds I have wanted to do, but didn’t the time or the motivation for at the time. One has been running around in one form or another in my mind for quite a while now. I have come close a couple of times to starting it, (a Ho-229 was to be the base for one) and I sort of did with the Turbo-Prop Arado, but it still wasn’t quite what I had in mind. I have two similar projects on the go but they're on the back burner for a bit. The second was that I have a Planet Models Ju-388J nightfighter (Jumo 213 version) sitting in the stash that I have been dying to build and have never had the excuse to. So after seeing the Ju-88 STGB I finally had the idea of how to killer two birds with one stone and bring these two ideas together! So the plan is…… If the war had stretched into 1946 we would have seen some interesting aircraft and technologies in service, especially so with radar technology advancing as quick as is was. By the end of the war we were already seeing the next generation of radar systems which operated in the Centimetre band, like the RAF’s H2S and US H2X radars and the German FuG-240 (Berlin) & FuG-244 (Bremen) units. A few of the Ju-88’s were fitted with the FuG-240 and it was found they recovered their original speed which had been lost with the earlier radar units and their large antennas/antlers! It would have been only to be a matter of time before the use of the FuG-240 (and later versions) would have been more widespread, with it being fitted to newer aircraft models as they became available. With the venerable Ju-88 reaching it’s peak in the Ju-388 family this aircraft would have been a prime candidate for the new radar system. Well that’s the plan, chop the nose off a 388 and fit a new nose, simple really, but……….. I want it to be as believable as possible and not too whiffy which will make it a bit harder. So this will be the base, Planet Models Ju-388J-3 with Jumo 213 engines, of cause I reserve the right to add lots of other stuff as I go along, it wouldn’t a normal build if I didn’t throw in heaps of extras! The 388 is actually quite a nice model the only thing that may give me issues is the wings, they are very slightly warped and getting the dihedral right will be fun! The nose is just a resin cast of the long radome version, it looks a bit better in my opinion than the shorter version. Well best to start by cutting off the nose, luckily there is a very convenient panel line to follow for this. Strangely enough this happens to be almost perfectly round which will make life much easier as we go to fit the nose. Ok first fit, it doesn’t look all the great, I’ll need to move it forward a bit. That’s looking a bit better, so I’m going to have to add a bit to get the profiles right, I have a plan for that! First I’ll make a ring using plastic card, working with plastic will make this part so much easier! Next to fill the gap I’m going to use plastic strip like so. I just keep adding rings till I get the right diameter. Then add a disk at the back the size I require and the first part is done, only a small amount of filler required for shaping. Ignoring the joint gap for the moment I now have to decide how I want the new nose to sit, sort of inline with the horizontal axis or a bit dropped down? I like the inline one as it looks good, but I have to remember the flying attitude of the 388 (and 88 for that matter) was slightly nose up, they didn’t fly truly level! So I may need to have it slightly drooped down so the antenna face would be lined up to the vertical axis. Have a look at how the antennas were mounted on 88’s and you’ll see what I mean. Well I’ve made a start, there’s only a couple of hours work (I needed a brake from the Ta-152 as I was getting annoyed with it!) and the project is a goer. I’ve actually done the filling of the nose now as well and it’s looking good! This won’t be a full time project, just something to work on when my other builds frustrate me and I need a break from them. I can’t promise I’ll be finished by Xmas either as I’m bound to do other mods on this as I go along. This should be an interesting build!
  20. Master-X is to release in Summer 2018 a Eurasia (new variant) from its 1/72nd Junkers F-13 resin conversion set for the Revell kit - ref. MX7222-07 Source: http://master-x.wz.cz/F13eurasia.html V.P.
  21. Junkers D.1 - 1:32 Wingnut Wings This was one of Wingnut Wings surprise releases in April this year, few of us would have predicted that A Junkers D.1 was on the cards. Although Wingnut Wings are well known for producing beautifully engineered and presented kits, this one was so impressive when reviewed here it went straight onto my workbench, pushing all other projects aside. It hasn't disappointed, it is an absolute joy of a kit to build, pretty much flawless in every respect. The fit of parts is outstanding, virtually perfect, and there is no filler used at all, anywhere. Wingnut Wings kits are always outstanding, but this one probably tops the lot from all those I have built from their range so far. And with only one length of fishing line on the undercarriage. there is hardly any rigging either. The Junkers D.1 was the worlds first all metal monoplane fighter, and a hugely significant aircraft in the history of aviation. It arrived too late at the end of the First World War to have any real opportunity to prove itself, A few, perhaps four, were delivered to the western front, but most were delivered after the November 1918 Armistice. They saw post war service in the Baltic during 1919, with the German Freikorps fighting the Bolsheviks, where they were used to good effect. On with the photos; I've only lightly weathered, with a dark wash on various details and a bit of mud splatting on the underside. Cockpit details; To give an idea of its size, I've used that standard WW1 unit of comparison, an Albatros DV.a. The D.1 is surprisingly big. And a final comparison with Wingnut Wings other kit for a Junkers, the two seat J.1 ground attack machine. Those of you who have built one will know what a whopper of a model the J.1 is. Perfect companions; If you are thinking of trying a Wingnut Wings kit, but are wary of the biplane wing and rigging, then try this one. Cheers John
  22. Junkers D.1 1:32 Wingnut Wings. (#32065) As soon as this subject was announced, it caused a flurry of interest on various internet sites (including this one). Opinion seemed divided between those who felt that it was an insignificant aircraft with only forty built, and others who felt that it was a highly significant as the world’s first all metal monoplane fighter. Almost all agreed that it was a chunky little aeroplane, with opinions again divided between those who thought it ugly, and those who felt it had character. Right from the start, this seems to have been one of the most talked about of Wingnut Wings planned releases. History. Hugo Junkers method of metal tube structures covered with corrugated sheets had first been patented in 1912. Although there was an obvious weight penalty, all metal aircraft offered several advantages. Apart from being difficult to shoot down, probably the most unsung virtue was their serviceability. Wood, wire, and linen machines were very susceptible to poor weather, especially that encountered in the long winter months on the western front. Cold, wet, and damp could play havoc with these delicate airframes, at best degrading their performance and at worst making them unfit to fly. The two seat Junkers J.1 (Wingnut Wings kit 32001) had entered service in August 1917, and proved to be a popular and reliable machine. It was therefore logical that Junkers should also be working on a single seat fighter. What emerged from several prototypes and design variations was the D.1 which went into service in October 1918. There were 2 versions of the D.1, most commonly referred to as the ‘short’ and ‘long’ fuselage types. Without going into all the differences, it was the ‘short’ version that became operational, and is the one represented by this new kit. A few, perhaps four, were delivered to the western front, but most were delivered after the November 1918 Armistice. They saw service in the Baltic during 1919, with the German Freikorps fighting the Bolsheviks. The Kit. As always, the wonderful Steve Anderson artwork graces the silver edged Wingnut Wings box. Two D.1’s are depicted in flight against a backdrop of sunlit cumulus clouds. Lovely! It certainly exudes that ugly-but-aggressive look that makes it oddly attractive. Inside the box are four large sprues holding all the plastic parts, a small etched fret with the machine gun cooling jackets & seat belts, and a decal sheet. The instruction booklet follows Wingnut Wings excellent style of CAD drawings showing the assembly sequences, backed up with illustrations of what the completed sub-assemblies look like. These are supplemented with an amazing total of fifty one contemporary black & white photographs of the real aircraft, and a set of eleven colour photographs showing details of two preserved Daimler-Mercedes D.III engines. No wonder so many modellers regard Wingnuts Wings instruction booklets as reference manuals in their own right. They must put huge amounts of man hours into creating them, because they are so complete and no one does it better. Step 1 covers construction of the cockpit and engine bay. This is a fairly complex looking tubular structure, which is fitted to the single piece fuselage underside. The mouldings are breathtaking, particularly the centre section & wing spars part A30, which is a single piece; The finished article may look complex, but the core of this ‘birdcage’ framework is made up from only five parts (A7, A11, A12, A17, and A30). It is one of Wingnut Wings hallmarks that they can take intricate structures like this, and make them into easy to assemble units. I couldn't resist, and already started it. Dry fitted with no glue, the fit is excellent; Various other details such as bulkheads, seat, controls, and instruments are added to finish off the main interior. A small amount of rigging can be added if the modeller wishes, a diagram is provided to show what and where. These are for the engine control rod, rudder, throttle, and trigger cables. Five amp fuse wire will be the ideal material for the cables, with short lengths of stretched sprue for the rudder pedal lines. A very helpful CAD drawing shows the completed sub-assembly in full colour, thus also working as a painting guide. Step 2 details assembly of the Daimler-Mercedes D.IIIa / D.IIIau engine, the main differences being the intake manifolds and air pumps. As mentioned before, eleven full colour photographs support the assembly drawings, and again we have full colour CAD drawings of both sides of the completed engine. Wingnut Wings engines are the centre piece of any model, and this one will be visible more than most with those big removable cowling panels. I usually add ignition wires from the magnetos to the spark plugs, it is not difficult to do but is time consuming. No doubt etched brass aftermarket sets will be available soon to simplify this job. The D.IIIau is the high compression version of the engine, and was marked with red bands around the cylinders. These are provided as decals, along with tiny black & silver data plates that are affixed to the crankcase. Step 3 sees the fuselage brought together in a most ingenious way. The underside already has all the interior work fixed to it, and now the left and right sides are attached to it. These sides have a false top & bottom, so they are shaped like any normal kit fuselage, but the beauty is that the joining seams are hidden. On the bottom the main underside piece covers it, and the top seam is covered by a separate fairing from the cockpit to the tailplane. Not just one fairing, there is a choice of two, with slight detail variations in the style of corrugation and a roll over hoop depending upon which version you have chosen. It is attention to the minor details such as this that make these kits such a pleasure to build. Fitting the tailplane, radiator, and exhaust completes this stage. Step 4 is fairly simple, involving just the assembly of the wings. Here you are offered the choice of actually fitting them to the aircraft, or leaving them off. This is not quite as odd as it may at first seem, as there are plenty of photographs of D.1’s with their wings detached on the ground nearby. Given the small size of the finished model, there is plenty of scope for some neat little dioramas. You will have to decide to build with the wings ‘on’ or ‘off’, as changes to the wing stubs mean it will not be possible to pop them off and on. The ‘off’ version exposes a lot of the neat ‘birdcage’ assembled in stage 1, complimented by a pair of interior wing ribs to fit on the ends of stub wings. Step 5 is for adding some of the smaller exterior details such as the foot steps (choice of two), rudder, and LMG 08/15 Spandaus with their flash guards over the engine. Etched brass cooling jackets are provided, which will need to be annealed (briefly heated red hot in a gentle flame and left to cool) and rolled to shape. If you are not confident in doing this, then solid plastic alternatives are provided. As with the engine, the Spandaus are going to be much more visible than on a biplane, so are well worth taking time over. Step 6 completes construction of the D.1. The undercarriage, cockpit coaming, engine panels, and propeller are all fitted. Two short bracing lines are fitted between the rear undercarriage legs, and that’s it, there is no more rigging to do! Options. Al selection of five different machines is offered, four wartime and one post Great War machine serving with the German Freikorps in Latvia. Junkers D.1 5185/18, Aldershof, October 1918. Junkers D.1 5185/18, ‘Bänder’, Hombeek, MFJG, November 1918. Junkers D.1 “Weisser Schwanz”, Hombeek, MFJG, November 1918. Junkers D.1 5188/18? “11”, October 1918. Junkers D.1, Gotthard Sachsenberg (31 victories), Theodore Osterkamp (38 victories) & Josef Jacobs (48 victories), FA 416, September-October 1919. Decals. Decals are by Cartograf, so are of a very high standard. All printing is pin sharp with good colours and minimal carrier film. Plenty of small stencils, instruments and details are provided, along with the larger national and individual markings. The coloured bands on option B ‘Bänder’ are not known with absolute certainty, although red & white is thought most likely. However, should you disagree, green & white, yellow & white, and black & white are also provided. Conclusion Every new Wingnut Wings kit is waited for with great anticipation, and they never disappoint, by virtue of their being so well thought out and engineered. Announcement of this one seemed to cause a few grumbles out there on the ‘net, mainly along the lines of ‘why can’t we have an XYZ’. Well this is a hugely significant aircraft, being the world’s first all metal monoplane fighter, and deserves a place in any collection of 1:32nd aircraft models. It will be the perfect companion to the Wingnut Wings two seater Junkers J.1 (one of my favourite finished models of all the range). As well as in a Great War collection, the Junkers D.1 would sit very well against almost any Me/Bf 109 model. In fact this could be done for option E, as Theodore Osterkamp went on to fly the 109E with JG 51 in the Battle of Britain, scoring six more victories to add to his previous thirty two. They would indeed make a very interesting pairing. The quality of the mouldings ,particularly the representation of the corrugations is outstanding. It has been done with such finesse, with tiny little rivet detail and perfectly rounded ends to each line. The clever breakdown of the fuselage parts should make assembly very simple, with almost no, to minimal clean up. If you have been thinking of getting a Wingnut Wings kit but been put off by rigging, this is probably the best one yet for a novice to build. There are no clear parts, no complicated strutting, and only two little rigging lines on the undercarriage that can easily be done with fine wire or stretched sprue. Add to that that this is a Wingnut Wings package with all the quality that the name assures, this pugnacious and interesting little aeroplane deserves to be high up on everyone’s ‘wants’ list. I am so impressed and enthused by it, that it is going straight on to my workbench to be my number one build project. Look out for its imminent appearance in the ‘Work in progress’ section of this forum. <EDIT> Here it is in Work In Progress </EDIT> <EDIT> And the finished model is now in Ready for Inspection </EDIT> Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  23. New 1/32nd Wingnut Wings kit to be announced at the Nuremberg International Toy Fair in February 2018 - ref. 32065 Bets are open. Source: http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/E1F37DD3B7253148E790168BE0710F5D V.P.
  24. Hi all, Kit manufacture: Revell Scale: 1/72 Type: Junkers JU 88A-4 Extras used: OOB except brass rod pitot and EZ line antenna Paints and colours used: Vallejo RLM colours (older type). Weathered with Flory Grime, and oil paints. All sealed with Aqua Gloss and flattened with Xtracylix matt varnish. I finished this one a little while ago but have only just got round to photographer her.A good kit this with generally good fit, but a couple of challenging areas. The wingtips being one of them... Beautiful surface detail though, and a wonderfully detailed cockpit.Here's the pics: That's about it. Thank you for stopping by! As always, comments, criticism and advice is always welcomed!Val
  25. Junkers J.1 1:32 Wingnut Wings Popular with is crews. the Junkers J.1 was designed for ground attack, and featured a steel armoured 'bathtub' that formed the forward fuselage, protecting the engine and two crew members. The rest of the aircraft was build from duraluminium tubing, covered with corrugated duraluminium sheeting. Rather than using cables & pulleys for the controls, it had rods and bell cranks to connect to the ailerons, elevator, and rudder, which were not so prone to being severed by machine gun fire.For the same reason no wire rigging was used, instead a very strong central structure was formed from tubing. Some aircraft were fitted with downward firing machine guns, but they were found to be cumbersome and awkward to aim, so most J1's were used for low level reconnaissance and Army co-operation. All in all it was very advanced machine for it's day, and was the first all metal mass produced aircraft. It was one of Wingnut Wings first four releases and whilst many subsequent kits have sold out, the J.1 is still available. This suggests that it has not sold as strongly as some of the others, and in fact I had it low down on my own priority list of which Wingnuts kits to buy. I finally got round to getting one last Christmas, fearing that it might sell out soon, and leave me regretting not getting one. I am really glad that I did, because once I had the kit in my hands it went right to the top of my 'to do' list. The surface detail is beautifully done, and the finished model has a real 'presence' to it. It is huge! It dwarfs any other single engined model and has become one of my favorites. There is a minor problem to redress though (probably the only one in Wingnut Wings entire range), as an error was made with the length of the ailerons, resulting in a gap at their inner end. There are several suggested fixes on the internet I went with This one using spare parts D24 & D25 in the kit for a simple and easy correction. The LVG C.VI is a big model, but is dwarfed by the J.1; It easily comes apart for storage too! As always, I thoroughly enjoyed this build. If you have been dithering about getting one of these, like I was, don't hang about, get one ordered! You'll get to love it, it has got a sort of ungainly beauty about it just like its modern successor the A-10 Warthog. Thanks for looking, John
×
×
  • Create New...