Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'JU-88'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modeling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
    • Group Builds
    • The Rumourmonger
    • Manufacturer News
    • Other Modelling Genres
    • Britmodeller Yearbooks
    • Tools & Tips
  • General Discussion
    • Chat
    • Shows
    • Photography
    • Members' Wishlists
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
    • Aerocraft Models
    • Above & Beyond Retail
    • Air-craft.net
    • A.M.U.R. Reaver
    • Atlantic Models
    • Bearhobbies.com
    • Bernd.M Modellbau
    • BlackMike Models
    • Casemate UK
    • Copper State Models
    • Creative Models Ltd
    • DACO Products
    • Freightdog Models
    • Hannants
    • Hobby Colours & Accessories
    • fantasy Printshop
    • Hobby Paint'n'Stuff
    • Hypersonic Models
    • Iliad Design
    • MikroMir
    • Kagero Publishing
    • Kingkit
    • L'Arsenal 2.0
    • Modellingtools.co.uk
    • Maketar Paint Masks
    • Marmaduke Press Decals
    • MJW Models
    • NeOmega & Vector Resin
    • Parkes682Decals
    • Pocketbond Limited
    • Precision Ice and Snow
    • Radu Brinzan Productions
    • Red Roo Models
    • RES/KIT
    • SBS Model - Hungary
    • Scale-Model-Kits.com
    • Scratchaeronautics
    • Shelf Oddity
    • Small Stuff Models
    • Sovereign Hobbies
    • Special Hobby
    • Starling Models
    • Thunderbird Models
    • Tiger Hobbies
    • Tirydium Models
    • Topnotch - Bases and Masks for Models
    • Ultimate Modelling Products
    • Valiant Wings Publishing
    • Videoaviation Italy
    • White Ensign Models
    • Wonderland Models
  • Archive
    • 2007 Group Builds
    • 2008 Group Builds
    • 2009 Group Builds
    • 2010 Group Builds
    • 2011 Group Builds
    • 2012 Group Builds
    • 2013 Group Builds
  • Brits Abroad GB

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 21 results

  1. As already announced in a ICM general thread ( http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234974439-icm-148-junkers-ju-88a5dornier-do-17z/), the Ukrainian brand is to release a new tool 1/48th Junkers Ju-88A-5 kit in 2015 - ref.48232. Source - ICM 2015 catalogue : http://www.icm.com.ua/katalog/ Box art V.P.
  2. epozar

    That elusive Ju-88 bombay

    Even that big 1/32 Revell model don't provide one.. what's going on with a Junkers Ju-88 internal bomb storage?
  3. ICM is to release in 2016 two new variants from its Junkers Ju-88 kit. Already released: Ju-88A-5 kit http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234975682-148-junkers-ju-88a-5-by-icm-released/ - ref.48233 - Junkers Ju-88A-4 WWII German Bomber NEW - Q2 2016 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48233 - ref.48234 - Junkers Ju-88A-14 WWII German Bomber NEW - Q3 2016 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48234 V.P.
  4. Ju-88A-4 WWII Axis Bomber 1:48 ICM (48237) The Ju-88 was designed as a schnellbomber in the mid 30s, and at the time it was faster than current fighter designs, so it was projected that it could infiltrate, bomb and ex-filtrate without being intercepted. That was the theory anyway. By the time WWII began in the west, fighters had caught up with the previously untouchable speed of the 88, and it needed escorting to protect it from its Merlin equipped opponents. It turned out to be a jack of all trades however, and was as competent as a night fighter, dive bomber or doing reconnaissance as it was bombing Britain. They even popped a big gun on the nose and sent it against tanks and bombers, with variable success. The A series sported a pair of Jumo 211 engines in cylindrical cowlings producing over 1,000hp each, and was improved gradually up until the A-17, with the A-11 being the official designation for the factory produced tropicalised version. It was fitted with filters to protect the engine from dust and dirt, as well as a rescue kit for ditching and forced landings. The A-4 was an Improved variant over initial versions. It would feature a longer wingspan, (due to redesigned wingtips), better defensive armament, a reinforced undercarriage; and provision for external bomb racks (4). Powerplant for the A-4 was Jumo 211 J-1 or J-2 engines (1410 hp) driving wooden bladed propellers. The Kit This is a new variation on the original tooling released a couple of years by ICM, with new parts added to make it version specific. There are new engine nacelles and props; new fin and rudder; changes to the cockpit mounted machine-guns, and different glazing options are chosen from the same clear sprue. The box is the usual top-opening with an inner lid style, and inside you will find eight sprues in grey styrene, one in clear, decal sheet and a glossy covered instruction booklet with spot colour inside, and the decal options in full colour on the back cover. If you have been lucky enough to see the A-5, you'll know that detail is right up there in terms of quality and crispness, with ICM really improving over the last few years, which has to be great news for modellers, as they aren't frightened of tackling what to us may seem niche subject matters. With the sprue-related excitement out of the way, work on the fuselage begins with the addition of sidewall details in the capacious cockpit area. Rear bulkhead, side consoles and seats are all added to the cockpit sides for a change, with an insert in the fuselage for the circular antenna and tail wheel added into the starboard side. The instrument panel is supplied with decals, and fits into the fuselage during joining. The missing floor is added to the lower fuselage panel that includes the lower parts of the inner wings and gives the structure some strength. It also receives the rudder pedals, control column, and the two remaining crew seats before being joined to the fuselage. The tail plane has articulated flying surfaces, and the wings are supplied as top and bottom, with the flaps and ailerons separate from the box, and neat curved fairings so they look good when fitted at an angle. The flaps include the rear section of the soon-to-be-fitted nacelles, which are added as separate parts to avoid sink-marks, and these and the ailerons run full-span, terminating just as the wingtip begins. At this time the landing gear is made up on a pair of upstands that are added to the underwing in preparation for the installation of the nacelle cowlings. The engines have to be built up first though, consisting of a high part count with plenty of detail, and a rear firewall that securely fits inside the cowling. Even though this is an in-line engine with a V-shaped piston layout, the addition of the annular radiators gives it the look of a radial, with their representation added to the front of the cowling, obscuring much of the engine detail. The side panels can be left off to show all that detail. The cooling flaps around the cowling are separate, and the exhausts have separate stacks, which aren't hollow but are large enough to make boring them out with a drill a possibility. The completed nacelle fit to the underwing over the top of the main gear installation, securing in place with four pegs, two on each side of each nacelle. The props are made from spinner, backplate and a single piece containing all three blades, sliding onto a pin projecting from the engine front, which will require some glue if you want to keep them on. At this point the instructions recommend adding the canopy glazing, which consists of a choice of two faceted nose cones, and the main greenhouse for the cockpit aperture. The rear portion is made from two additional parts due to its double "blown" shape to accommodate the two rearward gun positions, so that the gunner's head isn't pressed against the canopy. The guns are fitted through the windscreen and the two circular ports on the rear, although no ammo feed is supplied. Under the wings the dive spoilers are added with four bomb crutches on aerodynamic mounts, with bombs supplied that have two of their fins moulded separately, along with the stabilising struts that fit into notches in the fins. While the airframe is flipped over, the two-part wheels and twin main gear bay doors are added, both having good detail and the former a radial tread. Addition of the canopy mounted antenna completes the build, but this is likely to be done long after main painting for safety's sake! Markings The kit includes four marking options for Axis Air Arms supplied by Germany. Stencils are the first page of the painting section details the application of these. From the box you can build one of the following: Junkers Ju.88A-4 Grupul 5 Bombardment Romania 1944 Junkers Ju.88A-4 3/1 Bombazo szazaf, Hungarian Air Force, Russia 1943 Junkers Ju.88A-4 1/PLeLv 44, Onttola, Finland Summer 1944 Junkers Ju.88A-4 3/PLeLv 44, Onttola, Finland Summer 1944 The colours are picked out using letters that correspond to a table on the front page, which gives the names and paint codes in Revell and Tamiya ranges, so should be easy to convert to your paint system of choice. The decals are printed in-house and have good register, colour density and sharpness, with additional instrument dials included on a clear carrier film to help with cockpit painting. All of the stencils are legible, and overall they inspire confidence, with a thin carrier film cut close to the printing, with a few exceptions where lettering has film that could have been dispensed with to reduce the menace of silvering. Conclusion ICM's range of Ju.88s and Do.17s are a good example of how far they have come in recent years, adding value to their brand, and improving their reputation with each release. The kit is well-detailed and comprehensive in what it includes, and with a nice pair of decal options it says "build me". Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Junkers Ju-88 Kagero Monographs No 64 3D Edition Having reviewed the first two volumes on the Ju-88 HERE and HERE, I thought that this volume would cover other variants, it seems I was wrong, again. Whereas the first volume was mostly about the development and issuing of aircraft to squadrons, the second volume with the aircraft's participation from the phoney war, 3rd September 1939 up to the end of the fighting in France in June 1940. This volume deals with the development of the bomber and reconnaissance versions and their use in the Battle of Britain from 10th July to 30th September 1940. That said it is still a very good book, with lots of information on the actions in which the aircraft was used, losses and general info on the maintenance and servicing at the time. The text, which takes up seventy seven pages of the book, is accompanied by lots of period photographs from France and over Britain including those shot down whilst on missions over the UK. There are some idiosyncrasies in the photographs though, in that they are well out of chronological order, if the order of this series of books is anything to go by. There are photographs of Mistel aircraft, aircraft in Italy and North Africa, but these are not actually mentioned in the text. What is mentioned, and is very interesting, is the actual reports and interviews from the pilots about their missions. The rest of the book is filled with the fabulous 3D drawings that Kagero have become noted for, with some real close up detail of many of the aircraft equipment and fittings. It is these drawings that will probably be of most use to the modeller in helping get the most detail into a model, although the photographs can also help in working out aircraft codes, area of use and the dates in determining to model a particular aircraft. Conclusion The history of the Ju-88 is continued and expanded upon in this volume which, when accompanied with the photographs and 3D drawings makes this book another must have for the Luftwaffe historian and modeller alike.
  6. Ok the idea for this build is a bit of a mash up of a couple of builds I have wanted to do, but didn’t the time or the motivation for at the time. One has been running around in one form or another in my mind for quite a while now. I have come close a couple of times to starting it, (a Ho-229 was to be the base for one) and I sort of did with the Turbo-Prop Arado, but it still wasn’t quite what I had in mind. I have two similar projects on the go but they're on the back burner for a bit. The second was that I have a Planet Models Ju-388J nightfighter (Jumo 213 version) sitting in the stash that I have been dying to build and have never had the excuse to. So after seeing the Ju-88 STGB I finally had the idea of how to killer two birds with one stone and bring these two ideas together! So the plan is…… If the war had stretched into 1946 we would have seen some interesting aircraft and technologies in service, especially so with radar technology advancing as quick as is was. By the end of the war we were already seeing the next generation of radar systems which operated in the Centimetre band, like the RAF’s H2S and US H2X radars and the German FuG-240 (Berlin) & FuG-244 (Bremen) units. A few of the Ju-88’s were fitted with the FuG-240 and it was found they recovered their original speed which had been lost with the earlier radar units and their large antennas/antlers! It would have been only to be a matter of time before the use of the FuG-240 (and later versions) would have been more widespread, with it being fitted to newer aircraft models as they became available. With the venerable Ju-88 reaching it’s peak in the Ju-388 family this aircraft would have been a prime candidate for the new radar system. Well that’s the plan, chop the nose off a 388 and fit a new nose, simple really, but……….. I want it to be as believable as possible and not too whiffy which will make it a bit harder. So this will be the base, Planet Models Ju-388J-3 with Jumo 213 engines, of cause I reserve the right to add lots of other stuff as I go along, it wouldn’t a normal build if I didn’t throw in heaps of extras! The 388 is actually quite a nice model the only thing that may give me issues is the wings, they are very slightly warped and getting the dihedral right will be fun! The nose is just a resin cast of the long radome version, it looks a bit better in my opinion than the shorter version. Well best to start by cutting off the nose, luckily there is a very convenient panel line to follow for this. Strangely enough this happens to be almost perfectly round which will make life much easier as we go to fit the nose. Ok first fit, it doesn’t look all the great, I’ll need to move it forward a bit. That’s looking a bit better, so I’m going to have to add a bit to get the profiles right, I have a plan for that! First I’ll make a ring using plastic card, working with plastic will make this part so much easier! Next to fill the gap I’m going to use plastic strip like so. I just keep adding rings till I get the right diameter. Then add a disk at the back the size I require and the first part is done, only a small amount of filler required for shaping. Ignoring the joint gap for the moment I now have to decide how I want the new nose to sit, sort of inline with the horizontal axis or a bit dropped down? I like the inline one as it looks good, but I have to remember the flying attitude of the 388 (and 88 for that matter) was slightly nose up, they didn’t fly truly level! So I may need to have it slightly drooped down so the antenna face would be lined up to the vertical axis. Have a look at how the antennas were mounted on 88’s and you’ll see what I mean. Well I’ve made a start, there’s only a couple of hours work (I needed a brake from the Ta-152 as I was getting annoyed with it!) and the project is a goer. I’ve actually done the filling of the nose now as well and it’s looking good! This won’t be a full time project, just something to work on when my other builds frustrate me and I need a break from them. I can’t promise I’ll be finished by Xmas either as I’m bound to do other mods on this as I go along. This should be an interesting build!
  7. Hi! Here are the photos of my latest work. It`s the ICM kit,which despite having received a lot of "flack" builds up into a beautifull model. It has several issues, mainly with the cockpit, but, after the glass work was installed, this modeller can live very well with it. paints utilised: Vallejo Model Air e acrílicos Mig. detailing sets: Eduard interior and exterior set If you have interest, you can find in my blog around 90 fotos with all the building and painting process explained. http://josepiresmodelismo.blogspot.pt/ This model was part of Airfix Model World mag, December 2017 issue.
  8. Ju-88D-2/4 1:48 Special Hobby The Ju-88 was designed as a schnellbomber in the mid 30s, and at the time it was faster than current fighter designs, so it was projected that it could infiltrate, bomb and exfiltrate without being intercepted. That was the theory anyway. By the time WWII began in the west, fighters had caught up with the previously untouchable speed of the 88, and it needed escorting to protect it from its Merlin equipped opponents. It turned out to be a jack of all trades however, and was as competent as a night fighter, dive bomber or doing reconnaissance as it was bombing Britain. They even popped a big gun on the nose and sent it against tanks and bombers, with variable success. The D mode was developed for Long-range photo-reconnaissance with the 4 being tropicalised version of the 2. The Kit This is a new variation on the original tooling that was released recently by ICM, with new parts added to make it version specific, and the addition of some welcome resin parts for the wheels and cameras. The box is the usual top-opening with an inner lid style, and inside you will find eight sprues in grey styrene, one in clear, decal sheet and a glossy covered instruction booklet with spot colour inside, and the decal options in full colour on the back cover. If you have been lucky enough to see the original kit, you'll know that detail is right up there in terms of quality and crispness, with ICM really improving over the last few years, which has to be great news for modellers, as they aren't frightened of tackling what to us may seem niche subject matters. With the sprue-related excitement out of the way, work on the fuselage begins with the addition of sidewall details in the capacious cockpit area. Rear bulkhead, side consoles and seats are all added to the cockpit sides for a change, with an insert in the fuselage for the circular antenna and tail wheel added into the starboard side. The instrument panel is supplied with decals, and fits into the fuselage during joining. The missing floor is added to the lower fuselage panel that includes the lower parts of the inner wings and gives the structure some strength. It also receives the rudder pedals, control column, and the two remaining crew seats before being joined to the fuselage. The camera frame is built up and the resin cameras added. The tail plane has articulated flying surfaces, and the wings are supplied as top and bottom, with the flaps and ailerons separate from the box, and neat curved fairings so they look good when fitted at an angle. The flaps include the rear section of the soon-to-be-fitted nacelles, which are added as separate parts to avoid sink-marks, and these and the ailerons run full-span, terminating just as the wingtip begins. This variant was fitted with the under-fuselage gondola, and each side has separate glazing panels inserted from inside, and a seam running vertically through its length. It is added to the hole in the underside of the fuselage, with the front and rear glazing plus zwilling mounted machine guns later in the build. At this time the landing gear is made up on a pair of upstands that are added to the underwing in preparation for the installation of the nacelle cowlings. The engines have to be built up first though, consisting of a high part count with plenty of detail, and a rear firewall that securely fits inside the cowling. Even though this is an in-line engine with a V-shaped piston layout, the addition of the annular radiators gives it the look of a radial, with their representation added to the front of the cowling, obscuring much of the engine detail. The cooling flaps around the cowling are separate, and the exhausts have separate stacks, which aren't hollow but are large enough to make boring them out with a drill a possibility. The completed nacelle fit to the underwing over the top of the main gear installation, securing in place with four pegs, two on each side of each nacelle. The props are made from spinner, backplate and a single piece containing all three blades, sliding onto a pin projecting from the engine front, which will require some glue if you want to keep them on. At this point the instructions recommend adding the canopy glazing, which consists of a choice of two faceted nose cones, and the main greenhouse for the cockpit aperture. The rear portion is made from two additional parts due to its double "blown" shape to accommodate the two rearward gun positions, so that the gunner's head isn't pressed against the canopy. The guns are fitted through the windscreen and the two circular ports on the rear, although no ammo feed is supplied. Under the wings the dive spoilers are added with four bomb crutches on aerodynamic mounts, with bombs supplied that have two of their fins moulded separately, along with the stabilising struts that fit into notches in the fins. While the airframe is flipped over, the two-part wheels and twin main gear bay doors are added, both having good detail and the former a radial tread. Addition of the canopy mounted antenna completes the build, but this is likely to be done long after main painting for safety's sake! Decals The kit includes three markings options; Junkers Ju.88D-4 Luftwaffe 7A+GH, 1.(f)/121, North Africa RLM 79 & 80 over 78. Junkers Ju.88D-2 Luftwaffe 4N+FH, 1(F)22, Norway RLM 70 & 71 over 65. Undersides heavily dashed with RLM 70. Aircraft unusually features 2 kill markings. Junkers Ju 88D-2 Royal Hungarian Air Force, F9+15 Long Range Recon Sqn RLM 70 & 71 over 65. The decals appear to printed in-house and have good register, colour density and sharpness, with additional instrument dials included on a clear carrier film to help with cockpit painting. All of the stencils are legible, and overall they inspire confidence, with a thin carrier film cut close to the printing. Conclusion ICM's range of Ju.88s are a good example of how far they have come in recent years, Special Hobby have used this to their credit and with a few additional parts have brought us a great version of this aircraft. The kit is well-detailed and comprehensive in what it includes, and with a nice pair of decal options it says "build me". Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. If I didn’t know she’s an AAB-1 I would say she’s a Ju-88, bl**dy similar! This particular plane (serial number 7) was built by SNCASE plant in Toulouse and delivered to GB I/31 "Aunis" bomber group on May 8, 1945. That’s why she has no armament and looks very clean.The Hasegawa kit is not very easy to build, the nose is a real nightmare. Eduard Zoom interior set was added (waste of money and time as just the seatbelts are visible), the main U/C legs were moved forward and the wheels flattened a bit. Painted with Hunze H80, decals by PT Decals. Thank you for looking.
  10. Special Hobby is to release late Summer 2016 a 1/48th Junkers Ju-88C-4 kit - ref. SH48177 Variant based on the ICM Ju-88 plastic kit (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234994947-148-junkers-ju-88a-4-a-14-new-variants-by-icm-a-4-released-a-14-release-in-q3-2016/). Source: http://www.specialhobby.info/2016/06/newsletter-special-hobby-july-2016.html V.P.
  11. jan_cz

    1/72 Revell Ju-88 A-4 camo question

    Hi everyone, I am building Revell's 1/72 Ju-88 A-4. The kit features a colorful bird (4D+DT) from the 9 Staffel of III/KG 30. The instructions suggest that the engine cowlings, rudder, and the elevators should be yellow, while lower wingtips and fuselage band should be white. I have tried to find some photos for this color scheme, but have come short thus far. So here is my question, can any of you confirm the overall yellow engine cowling and elevators? To me, this seems odd, but not unfeasible. Any help is appreciated. TIA Jan
  12. Hello, here's my 1/72 Hasegawa Junkers Ju-88 G6 "Nachtjäger" of 6./NJG2, Fritzlar 1945. I used Eduard photo-etch, True Details resin wheels, Schatton antennas and markings from Authentic Decals. Painted with acrylics from the Gunze/Mr.Hobby range. The Hasegawa kit has some fit issues, which is strange for a modern HQ tooling. The fuselage halves need some filling and blending, the nose cap is over-sized, the wing tips and the belly insert with the guns don't fit very well either. The antennas are metal pieces from Schatton (http://www.modellbau-schatton.privat.t-online.de/). They are much finer than the kit's plastic parts. Since the antlers are a major focus point on this model I think they are well worth the investment! The colour scheme is mostly guesswork, as I've found only one conclusive period photograph online; this shows only a part of the fuselage section broken up at Fritzlar airport, Germany, May 1945. The markings come from Authentic decals, they aren't the best I've ever worked with. They break easily, have a yellow-ish carrier film and are slightly misprinted with 'shadow lines'. Luckily, this doesn't show after a couple of gloss and matt cotes. The camoflage was painted using Uhu Tac sausages: Exhaust fumes painted with Gunze/Mr.Hobby "Smoke" with drops of Black and Dark Brown added: Delicate work on the undercarriage, adding brake lines and scissor links: "Schräge Musik" ("Jazz Music") guns on the fuselage spine: All photographs by Wolfgang Rabel, IGM Cars & Bikes. Thanks for your interest. Greetings from Vienna!
  13. I will do the new(ish) Revell 1/72 Ju-88A-4. It will be build almost out of the box, exept some etch seatbelts and other decals. The decals still needs to be purshased. I am thinking of a desert scheme. Pictures will follow later. Cheers,
  14. Hello all, I'll be entering this GB with HB's 1/72 Ju-88 C-6. It's one of their easy kits, but it looks pretty well proportioned if lacking in detail. To counteract this I've bought Eduard's zoom set for the Hasegawa C-6 that will at least allow me to add some interest to the very visible cockpit area (seriously, it's the clearest green house I've ever seen). The scheme I'm doing is displayed below: I'll post some contents/sprue shots when I get a chance/can be bothered. Hopefully it should be a quick build with the low parts count but scratch building the entire cockpit could slow everything up as the only usable items in the box are the cockpit floor (which needs a big chunk taken out of it) and the seats.
  15. Junkers Ju-88 C-6 F1+XM Luftwaffe 4./KG 76, Taganrog, Ukraine, January 1943 Hello all! This is my Ju-88 C-6 built for the STGB, built OOB except for a few details from the Eduard Etch set for the Hase kit. The build went relatively smoothly, apart from my struggles with AK's paints, which I am rapidly falling out of love with. You can probably see that there a few items that are not where they should be (the gondola predominantly) and I'm not sure whether that's HB's fault or mine. But, it looks a bit like an '88 and it gave me a chance to practice some techniques I'd never done before and test out some new products so I'll chalk it up as a win. Cheers, Paul Work in Progress thread HERE
  16. Junkers Ju-88 Volume II Kagero Monographs No 59 3D Edition Having reviewed the first volume on the Ju-88 HERE i though that this volume would cover other variants, it seems I was wrong. Whereas the last volume was mostly about the development and issuing of aircraft to squadrons, this volume deals with the aircrafts participation from the phoney war, 3rd September 1939 up to the end of the fighting in France in June 1940. It seems we’re due several more volumes on the Ju-88 in the future. That said it is still a very good book, with lots of information on the actions in which the aircraft was used, losses and general info on the maintenance and servicing at the time. The text, which takes up sixty seven pages of the book, is accompanied by lots of period photographs from Dunkirk to Norway and everything in-between. The rest of the book is filled with the fabulous 3D drawings that Kagero have become noted for, with some real close up detail of many of the aircrafts equipment and fittings. It is these drawings that will probably be of most use to the modeller in helping get the most detail into a model, although the photographs can also help in working out aircraft codes, area of use and the dates in determining to model a particular aircraft. Conclusion The history of the Ju-88 is continued and expanded upon in this volume which, when accompanied with the photographs and 3D drawings makes this book another must have for the Luftwaffe historian and modeller alike. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Junkers Ju-88 Kagero Monographs No 57 3D Edition The Junkers Ju-88 really doesnt need any introduction, used throughout the war on all fronts and a multitude of different roles. This book concentrates with the design and production of the bomber/dive-bomber version up to the point of issuing the aircraft to the Luftwaffe, the other versions will probably be covered in volume two. This volume is really two books in one, with the first half, (well, sixty eight pages), covering the history of Junkers, design of the Ju-88and production of the prototypes and production machines. It is very interesting for the modeller in that there are plenty of period photographs with panels open/removed showing the construction of the fuselage and wings, close ups of the undercarriage, engines and some really good photos of the interior. The text that accompanies the photographs is very in-depth and tells of the story of the Ju-88 from the ground up including all the political intrigue and technical points told through the transcripts of interviews and reports, along with how the aircraft changed over the course of the design and prototype phases. Whilst the photographs are all in monochrome, the text also includes information on what colours were used on and in the aircraft which is very helpful. The next forty nine pages are filled with detailed 3D artwork of much of the equipment fitted to the aircraft. These include the Revi gunsight which was used for dive bombing, the radio sets, individually and as fitted to the rear bulkhead of the cockpit where the rear gunner/Navigator sat. The cockpit and nose framing is quite interesting as there are some fittings and fixtures not normally shown and could quite easily be scratch built, particularly if youre building the big 1:32 Revell kit. The machine gun mountings both in the cockpit and the lower gondola, along with the machine guns themselves are also included. Conclusion The history of the Ju-88s design is particularly well told in this book which, when accompanied by so many useful and interesting pictures makes this a must read. It will make a very useful reference book for the modeller as you get some superb photographs of the interior and structure that it could provide much need inspiration to go that little bit further with eh details of the next build. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  18. Announced new in the Zvezda 2015 catalogue introduction page??? http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234973092-catalogue-zvezda-2015/?p=1833400 Zvezda is to release in 2015 a 1/72nd Junkers Ju-88G-6 kit - ref.7269 Source: http://scalemodels.ru/news/8359-katalog-zvezda-2015.html V.P.
  19. G`day Chaps: I`m trying to convince my Loved One (and myself) that I`m still a modeller and not a collector, So here you have it, the second model I finish this year! JU-88G-6 1/48 Dragon. I bought this kit partially build on Trademe (local ebay) at a good price, It was painted with Vallejo and weathered with dry pastels. It has been a model of firsts, as I had never done a mottling before (need more practise) and had never tried dry pastels. Very nice kit. The only problem I had were the decals, they disintegrated so I had a go at DIY decals (need more practice too). Hope you like it. 7 by adrianmunozm, on Flickr 1 by adrianmunozm, on Flickr 2 by adrianmunozm, on Flickr 3 by adrianmunozm, on Flickr 5 by adrianmunozm, on Flickr 4 by adrianmunozm, on Flickr 6 by adrianmunozm, on Flickr 8 by adrianmunozm, on Flickr Adrian
  20. Kit: 1/72 Revell Junkers Ju-88A4 (5K+IL) 3./KG3 Shatalowka (Russia), Autumn 1942. Decals: Authentic Extras: Eduard Photo Etch Colors: Gunze/Mr.Hobby, Tamiya Cockpit in construction. Dive brakes from the Eduard set. The kit parts are overscale. Brake lines from stretched sprue. Thanks for your interest.
×