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Found 31 results

  1. PZL P.11g 'Kobuz' Polish Fighter 1:72 IBG For its time, the PZL P.11 was one of the most advanced fighter aircraft in the world. While many nations were still using bi-planes, Warsaw-based PZL (Państwowe Zakłady Lotnicze - State Aviation Works) had designed and built an all-metal gull winged monoplane fighter. The high wing provided the pilot with a good field of view and produced less drag that the bi-plane fighters of the time. The type drew orders from overseas as well as Poland. The aircraft was ordered by Romania and was built under licence by IAR. By the time of the German invasion of Poland however, the type was outclassed by the Bf 109. The majority of the Polish Air Force was lost fighting bravely against the invasion. The P.11g variant was a stop gap intended to bridge the gap caused by the delays getting the P.50 into service. It featured a more powerful engine and an airframe that was strengthened accordingly. It also featured an enclosed cockpit and improved armament. The P.11g was unable to enter service however, its development curtailed by the invasion of Poland in September 1939. The PZL 11 is one of a growing number of aircraft kits produced by IBG Models. This kit follows the likes of the RWD-8 and PZL 23A and continues IBG's method of producing numerous versions from a common set of moulds. This boxing is the PZL 11g, but an PZL 11a is also available (reviewed here). Inside the box are eleven frames of light grey plastic, a single frame of clear plastic, a fret of photo etched brass parts, a small sheet of pre-marked clear plastic and decals. The parts are all superbly moulded and I'd go as far as to say they look as good as anything else from central Europe. A quick review of the instructions reveals this to be a well-detailed kit, with fine surface details and high quality mouldings. Constructions starts with the cockpit. Most of the details are moulded in plastic, but the fret of photo etched parts contributes components such as the rudder pedals, throttle and seat harness. Aside from a rather nice cockpit framework, there is also plenty of detail moulded into the fuselage sidewalls, which should make for a rather nice overall effect. The two machine guns also fit into the inside of the fuselage halves before they can be fixed together. Once the fuselage has been assembled, construction turns to the engine and cowling. This multi-part assembly is very nicely detailed and there are individual parts provided on the photo etched fret for the ignition wiring (although this could be omitted if fiddling around with these tiny components is likely to drive you to distraction). Once the engine and cowling have been fitted to the fuselage, the flying surfaces can be assembled. The fit and rudder are separate parts, as are the elevators. This means you can finish the model with these parts in your choice of position (photographs of examples on the ground seem to show the elevators in a lowered position). The ailerons are also moulded separately to the wing. The undercarriage is nicely detailed and there are photo etched parts for the strengthening wires. When it comes to the enclosed canopy, you have two options. The sensible, conventional choice is a two-part canopy nicely moulded in clear plastic. The option for show-offs or lunatics involves hewing a framework from three tiny bits of photo etched brass and then gluing in place no fewer than ten individual pieces of clear plastic film. Surely this has to be the modelling equivalent of a chicken phaal, only taken on by the unaccountably brave or foolhardy. The decal sheet provides three options, all of which are hypothetical 'what it?' markings: PZL P.11g 'Kobuz', September 1939; PZL P.11g 'Kobuz', 111th Fighter Squadron, 1940; PZL P.11g 'Kobuz', Pursuit Brigade, 1940. The decals are nicely printed. A decal for the instrument panel has been included too. Conclusion There appears to have been a resurgence of interest in the early WWII period and this kit adds to the growing number of kits that represent aircraft from that time. Although we've been relatively well served in recent years by Azur Frrom and Arma Hobby and their P.11s, IBG's version includes a number of advantages such as separate control surfaces. Once again the Polish firm have produced a high-quality kit of an important aircraft. The level of detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture is up there with the best. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. IBG Models is to release a 1/32nd PZL P.11c kit - ref. Source: https://www.facebook.com/ibgmodels/posts/2274797485975216 3D renders V.P.
  3. September Sky 1939 (72528) 2 in 1: PZL 37 B II and PZL P.11a 1:72 IBG Models In the early hours of 1 September 1939, German forces began the invasion of Poland, triggering a global conflict that would endure for over 2000 days and claim the lives of millions of combatants and civilians. At the time of the outbreak of war, Poland's air force comprised around 800 aircraft. Some types were outdated but many, such as the PZL 37 B were state of the art designs. In this box, IBG Models have packaged two of their kits to represent the Polish Air Force during the early days of the campaign. Included in IBG's package is their PZL P.11a fighter aircraft and PZL 37 B II bomber kits. In usual IBG Models style, there are photo etched parts provided to enhance detail and also marking options appropriate to the period depicted. As we've already review the PZL P.11a here, I will focus on the 37B II bomber for this review. The PZL 37 Łoś (Moose) was a medium bomber designed in-house at the PZL factory in Warsaw. Early 'A' versions were fitted with a single vertical stabilizer, while later 'A' and 'B' version featured an improved twin tail. At the time of its entry into service, the PZL 37 was one of the most advanced bomber aircraft in the world and there was significant interest in both acquisition of export variants and licence production by a number of foreign nations. The PZL 37 was used by the Polish Air Force following the invasion in September 1939. 26 survivors were withdrawn to Romania and were eventually used by the Romanian Air Force. Captured examples were also tested by Germany and the USSR. Of the original production batch, none survive today. Construction of the twin-engined bomber starts with the interior. The internal elements of the bomb bay must be assembled first, as the roof of the bomb bay forms the floor of the cockpit. Four (two small and two large) bombs are provided. The crew area comprises seats for the pilot and bomb aimer, as well as a nicely detailed bomb sight, control column, three 7.92mm machine guns and plenty of sidewall detail. The fret of photo etched parts contributes extra details for the control column, throttle controls and seat harnesses. Aside from the rather nice extra details, there is also plenty of detail moulded into the fuselage sidewalls. Once the interior sub-assembly is complete, the whole lot can be sandwiched between the fuselage halves. The instructions recommend fitting the rather nice transparent parts at this stage. Once in place, it becomes clear just how sleek this aircraft is. As is the norm with IBG Model kits, the control surfaces are all moulded separately and can be posed if desired. Construction then turns to the engines and wings. Two different engine types are provided, each of which comprises a main block, photo etched ignition wiring, a three-part cowling and propeller with two-part spinner. Construction of the wings is more complex that you might think. Each of the main landing gear bays is built up from photo etched parts, while the wing root bomb bays are a plastic frame moulded in just one part. For some reason I would have thought this method of assembly would have been reversed, but the photo etched parts shouldn't be too difficult to fold and glue in place. eight small bombs are provided to fill the wing bomb bays. Again, the flaps and ailerons are separate parts. The decal sheet provides two options for each type: PZL P.11a, 112th Fighter Squadron, Zielonka Airfield, Poland, September 1939; PZL P.11a, 111th Fighter Squadron, Zielonka Airfield, Poland, September 1939; PZL 37 B Łoś, 16th Bomber Squadron, September 1939; and PZL 37 B Łoś, 17th Bomber Squadron, September 1939. The decals are nicely printed and a small selection of stencils has been included too. Conclusion There has been a noticeable resurgence of interest in the early WWII period, with the likes of Airfix and IBG Models releasing a number of types in recent years. It's nice to see IBG Models paying tribute to the brave men of the Polish Air Force with such a high quality set. I've reviewed the PZL P.11 a couple of times before, but this is the first time I've seen their PZL 37B. Happily the kit doesn't disappoint and it displays the characteristic crisp moulding and fine detail we've come to expect from the Polish manufacturer. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. IBG Models is to release a family of 1/72nd Państwowe Zakłady Lotnicze - PZL P.11 aircraft kits. - ref. 72517 - PZL P.11a - ref. 72518 - PZL P.11b - ref. 72519 - PZL P.11c - ref. 72520 - ?? - ref. 72521 - PZL P.11f - ref. 72522 - ?? - ref. 72523 - PZL P.11g Kobuz Sources: http://www.modelarovo.cz/norimberk-2018-jak-jsme-ho-videli-my/ https://nowosci.plastikowe.pl/aktualnosci/zapowiedzi-ibg-models-pzl-p-11a-1-72-pozna-jesien-2018/ V.P.
  5. IBG Models is to release in 2018 (?) a 1/72nd Polskie Zakłady Lotnicze / PZL P.24 kit - ref. 72523 Source: http://www.modelarovo.cz/norimberk-2018-jak-jsme-ho-videli-my/ V.P.
  6. PZL P.11A Polish Fighter Plane 1:72 IBG For its time, the PZL P.11 was one of the most advanced fighter aircraft in the world. While many nations were still using bi-planes, Warsaw-based PZL (Państwowe Zakłady Lotnicze - State Aviation Works) had designed and built an all-metal gull winged monoplane fighter. The high wing provided the pilot with a good field of view and produced less drag that the bi-plane fighters of the time. The type drew orders from overseas as well as Poland. The aircraft was ordered by Romania and was built under licence by IAR. By the time of the German invasion of Poland however, the type was outclassed by the Bf 109. The majority of the Polish Air Force was lost fighting bravely against the invasion. The PZL 11 is one of a growing number of aircraft kits produced by IBG Models. This kit follows the likes of the RWD-8 and PZL 23A and continues IBG's method of producing numerous versions from a common set of moulds. This boxing is the PZL 11A, but an PZL 11G is also availble. Inside the box are seven frames of light grey plastic, a single frame of clear plastic, a fret of photo etched brass parts, a small sheet of pre-marked clear plastic and decals. The parts are all superbly moulded and I'd go as far as to say they look as good as anything else from central Europe. A quick review of the instructions reveals this to be a well-detailed kit, comparable to an Eduard product in places, althought without the complex breakdown of parts. Constructions starts with the cockpit. Most of the details are moulded in plastic, but the fret of photo etched parts contributes components such as the rudder pedals, throttle and seat harness. Aside from a rather nice cockpit framework, there is also plenty of detail moulded into the fuselage sidewalls, which should make for a rather nice overall effect. The two machine guns also fit into the inside of the fuselage halves before they can be fixed together. Once the fuselage has been assembled, construction turns to the engine and cowling. This multi-part assembly is very nicely detailed and there are individual parts provided on the photo etched fret for the ignition wiring (although this could be omitted if cutting out and glueing these tiny components is likely to drive you round the bend). Once the engine and cowling have been fitted to the fuselage, the flying surfaces can be assembled. The fit and rudder are separate parts, as are the elevators. This means you can finish the model with these parts in your choice of position (photographs of examples on the ground seem to show the elevators in a lowered position). The ailerons are also moulded separately to the wing. The undercarriage is nicely detailed and there are photo etched parts for the strengthening wires. A choice of parts are provided for the windshield. You can choose the conventional option, which is a straightforward part moulded from clear plastic. If you are feeling brave, you can take the second option. This involves folding the cockpit canopy from photo etched brass and then fixing the pre-marked clear plastic sheet in place. The decal sheet provides three options: PZL P.11a, 112th Fighter Squadron, Zaborow Airfield, Poland, September 1939; PZL P.11a, 114th Fighter Squadron, Poniatow Airfield, Poland, September 1939; PZL P.11a, 113th Fighter Squadron, Warsaw, Poland. The decals are nicely printed. A decal for the instrument panel has been included too. Conclusion There appears to have been a resurgence of interest in the early WWII period and this kit adds to the growing number of kits that represent aircraft from that period. Although we've been relatively well served in recent years by Azur Frrom and Arma Hobby and their P.11s, IBG's version includes a number of advantages such as separate control surfaces. Once again the Polish firm have produced a high-quality kit of an important aircraft. The level of detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture is up there with the best. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. 3Ro Italian Truck - General Service 1:35 IBG (35052) The Lancia 3Ro was a 4x2 Heavy truck built by Lancia in the 1930s and 40s for military and civilian use. The Ro and 3Ro were the mainstay of the transport service of the Italian Army. The 3Ro had a lengthened chassis from the Ro having a 4.3m wheel base. Like may military trucks the chassis could have a general/troop carrying chassis, a tanker versions, repair shop versions, AA gun versions and even an SPG version. With the cab cut away and lower sides this could carry a 90/53 gun or a 100/17 Howitzer. During the dessert war the Germany Army commandeered a lot of these vehicles as well as ordering them direct from the factory which was still in German controlled Italy after the Italian surrendered. After WWII the truck remained in use with the Italian Army, the last ones being retired in 1964. The Kit The kit arrives on 18 sprues of grey plastics, two small clear spures and a set of tyres. The plastic is the familiar hard type IBG uses and is crisply moulded. Construction starts as with a lot of IBG kits with the wheels. The main body of the tyre is moulded as one part with the hub and sidewall separate so that there is no seam on the tyre itself. Next up the engine is made up, this is not overly detailed, but has enough parts for an accurate representation to be made. The transmission and rear axle is also made at this point. Next up the main chassis of the truck is made up. The two main side rails are connected by the various cross members, and additional parts are added. The leaf springs are added, and the front axle is made up and added to its pair of springs. The transmission is added in and the rear axle added, these can then be joined with the propshaft. The spare wheel and its carrier are added to the rear of the vehicle. At the front the engine can now be added along with the radiator. There is a gear box to add to the front which looks like it is for manually starting the vehicle. The wheels can now be added to the appropriate axles. Work can now start on the body. The seat for the main cab is built up and added to the cab floor. The gear leaver and handbrake lever are then added. The cab is then built up around the floor pan. This can then be added to the main chassis. The bonnet is then made up over the engine. The front wheel arches are then added. Just before the rear body goes on the exhaust is added. For the rear body the kit comes with two options. There is an impressively moulded one part rear body which can be fitted to the floor, a tailgate can then be added. If you want an open bed then the parts for this are also supplied. Here were have two separate sides and all the parts to recreate the frame structure which is under the rear tilt canopy. Once the bed is on fuel tanks and the battery box are added. Markings A small decal sheets provides markings for three trucks, 1. An unknown unit. 2. LII Artillery Group, North Africa 1942 3. Unknown unit, Tunisia 1942,43 Conclusion This is a good looking model of an important Italian transport asset during WWII. These truck were also used by the Germans, and the allies where they captured them. It is good to see kits of this type which were not front line vehicles becoming available. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Type 2 Ho-I Japanese Infantry Support Tank 1:72 IBG The Type 2 Ho-I tank was a development of the Type 97 medium tank. It was designed as a self-propelled howitzer that could provide fire support, as well as taking on enemy fortifications such as pillboxes. Powered by a Mitsubishi V-12 diesel engine, the tank had a range of 100 km and a maximum speed of 27mph. The main armament was a 75mm type 99 gun. Only 31 examples were produced, and all of those were converted from existing Type 1 Chi He tanks. Further production was impossible due to allied bombing of Japanese production facilities. The tanks were allocated to the defense of the Japanese home islands, but were never used as the cessation occured before the planned invasion. IBG Models have kitted a variety of Japanese tanks, with this Type 2 Ho-I being the latest in the line. The kit arrives packed into a surprisingly large top-opening box inside which are a number of fairly small frames of crisply moulded grey plastic. As with other IBG Models kits, this has all the hallmarks of a cutting edge kit, with crisply moulded parts that are easily as good as those from any other mainstream producer. a small fret of photo etched parts is included, as well as crew figures - a feature which seems unique to their Japanese subjects for some reason. In something of a departure for IBG Models, the tracks and the inner halves of the wheels and drive sprockets are moulded as one large part. When done well, I think this works just fine for the smaller scales. Thankfully IBG have done this very well indeed. Any minor compromise in detail is made up for by not having to cement together dozens of individual links or use the accursed vinyl tracks of yore. The upper track runs even have a realistic amount of sag moulded in. The outer faces of the wheels and sprockets are moulded separately, which means they can be painted separately for ultimate convenience. The running gear fits onto the sides of the lower hull box via four suspension arms moulded in pairs. There should be no issue getting everything to align just as it should. Next up is the upper hull, to which the small fenders headlights and pioneer tools must be attached. The exhausts fit onto either side of the rear hull, and photo etched guards are provided for the covers. The boxy, hexagonal turret is made up of just two parts, with the floor moulded separately to the floor. Slide moulding has been used to keep the part count down and the detail level up. Both the commander's cupola and the second hatch are moulded as distinct parts, which is a must given the inclusion of crew figures. The muzzle of the howitzer has also been manufactured using a multi-part mould to save the modeller having to drill out this small part. IBG have thoughtfully included two crew figures – and very nice they are too – although they are not mentioned in the instructions and don't even feature on the diagram that shows the layout of the sprues. A very nice Type 97 machine gun is included, but its attachment isn't shown in the instructions. Just one marking option is shown in the instructions, for a tank of an unknown regiment deployed in Japan in 1945. The decal sheet itself is nicely printed. Conclusion I really enjoyed reviewing IBG's recent AFV kits, so it's great to see them turn out another cracker in the form of this Ho-I. Detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture looks to be up there with the very best. The inclusion of photo etched parts and particularly crew figures is very welcome too. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. IBG Models from Poland (http://ibgmodels.com/) is to release a new tool 1/72nd RWD-8 kit - ref. 72501 - RWD-8 PWS - ref. 72502 - RWD-8 DWL - ref. 72527 - RWD-8 DWL in Palestine (Israeli Service) Sources: http://www.ipmsdeutschland.de/Ausstellungen/Nuernberg2015/Bilder_AT/Bilder_AT_1.htm http://www.modellversium.de/galerie/2-ausstellungen/11739-spielwarenmesse-nuernberg-2015-teil-2-verschiedene-hersteller.html V.P.
  10. Hurray PZL.42 was a experimental Karaś with twin tail. By the way, Karaś means "Crucian carp". (I hope they check plans, not like with RWD-8)
  11. IBG Models 2019 catalog downloadable here: http://www.ibgmodels.com/IBG_Models_KATALOG.pdf Source: https://www.facebook.com/ibgmodels/photos/a.714356155352698/2075188365936130/ V.P.
  12. 917t Japanese Truck (Yokohama Cab) 1:72 IBG Models (71060) The G917T was a compact truck designed by Ford and manufactured around the world in the 1930s and 40s. The British version was known as the Fordson E88. A version of the truck apparently made its way into production in Japan, albeit with a redesigned cab, where it was known as the Model 81 3 ton truck. The truck was generally powered by a 3.6 litre V8 petrol engine which developed between 75 and 90hp. Four-wheel-drive versions were also developed for military use. IBG Models have built up quite a reputation with their range of excellent kits. The quality of casting and detail easily rivals Revell at their best, but more often than not, extras such as photo etched parts are also included. This new truck is a based on the German 917T truck that I reviewed recently, but it is nevertheless a very welcome addition to the range. It arrives packed into a top-opening box about twice the size it needs to be (I've noticed that IBG Models always us the same sized box regardless of the model) inside which are five frames of crisply moulded grey plastic, a frame of clear parts, a small fret of photo etched details and a small decal sheet. The plastic parts are crisply moulded and well detailed. Construction starts with the engine. This comprises eight parts, including a photo etched brass fan. This is quite something to behold for a kit in this scale and at this price point. The axles, drive shaft and brake assemblies are also assembled and fitted to the ladder chassis at this stage. Photo etched parts are used for some of the finer details such as the tow hooks. The radiator and wheels must be added before work on the body can begin. Both are well-detailed and the tyres are moulded onto the wheel hubs. The cab is nice detailed and includes a two-part bench seat, a steering wheel with separate column, a gear stick and handbrake. A neat little crew figure is also included. Two rifles are provided, and these fit to the rear wall of the cab. The roof and doors are moulded as separate parts and the latter are designed in such a way that they can be fixed in place in either open or closed position. The front part of the body is made up of a bonnet, two sides and the separate front wings. The bonnet is not designed to be finished in the open position. The rear of the truck is a simple wooden-sided flat load area. Unlike the Wehrmacht version of the kit, there is no option for a tarpaulin cover. Finishing touches include a small tool box and a photo etched part that folds up into a box to hold two clear plastic water bottles. If you want to load the truck fully however, you'll need to turn to aftermarket producers for help. The decal sheet provides for a single colour scheme appropriate for trucks based in China between 1940 and 1945. You can change the plate and other identification numbers in order to add a bit of variety, however. Conclusion I really enjoy reviewing IBG's kits and it's great to see them address the paucity of Japanese softskin vehicles with this handy truck. It's curious that IBG Models always include crew figures with their kits of Japanese subjects, but not with any other kits. Presumably this is because of some form of tie-up with a Japanese company and this is an additional requirement. Whatever, it's a nice touch and it very welcome. Overall, this kit can be highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. 917t German Truck 1:72 IBG Models The G917T was a compact truck designed by Ford and manufactured around the world in the 1930s and 40s. The British version was known as the Fordson E88, while German variants included the 987T, 987TG, 917T and 997T. The German variants were manufactured at Ford Cologne until 1942, when production ceased due to the supply of components being cut off following the USA's entry into World War Two. The truck was powered by a 3.6 litre V8 petrol engine which developed between 75 and 90hp. Four-wheel-drive and stretched wheelbase ambulances were also developed for use by the Wehrmacht. IBG Models have built up quite a reputation with their range of excellent kits. The quality of casting and detail easily rivals Revell at their best, but more often than not, extras such as photo etched parts are also included. This new kit of the classic Ford-designed truck is a very welcome addition to the range. It arrives packed into a top-opening box about twice the size it needs to be (I've noticed that IBG Models always us the same sized box regardless of the model) inside which are three frames of crisply moulded grey plastic, a separately moulded tarpaulin cover, a frame of clear parts, a small fret of photo etched details and a small decal sheet. The plastic parts are crisply moulded and well detailed. Construction starts with the engine. This comprises eight parts, including a photo etched brass fan. This is quite something to behold for a kit in this scale and at this price point. The axles, drive shaft and brake assemblies are also assembled and fitted to the ladder chassis at this stage. Photo etched parts are used for some of the finer details such as the tow hooks. The radiator and wheels must be added before work on the body can begin. Both are well-detailed and the tyres are moulded onto the wheel hubs. The cab is nice detailed and includes a two-part bench seat, a steering wheel with separate column, a gear stick and handbrake. The roof and doors are moulded as separate parts. The doors are designed in such a way that they can be fixed in place in either open or closed position. The front part of the body is made up of a bonnet, two sides and the separate front wings. Despite all the detail included in the engine, the bonnet is not designed to be finished in the open position. The load area can be finised with or without tarpaulin. If you choose not to use the part for the tarpaulin cover, then a wooden-sided flat load area can be added in its place. The tarpaulin cover is moulded as a single part, however, which is much easier for the modeller in a hurry! Finishing touches include a spare jerry can and a rack to hold it, as well as some tools. If you want to load the truck up, you'll need to turn to aftermarket producers for help. The decal sheet provides two options: 6th Panzer Division, Eastern Front, 1941; and DAK, North Africa, 1942. Conclusion I really enjoy reviewing IBG's kits and it's great to see them turn out another important softskin vehicle. Detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture looks to be up there with the very best. It's a shame crew figures haven't been included, but this is nevertheless a great little kit that can be highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  14. Type 89 Japanese Medium Tank Kou (Gasoline Hybrid Production) 1:72 IBG (72039) The Type 89 I-Go was a medium tank employed by the Imperial Japanese Army between 1932 and 1942. It has the distinction of being the first mass-production diesel engined tank, although the version depicted in this kit is the petrol engined version. Armed with a 57mm main gun, the Type 89 proved to be effective against enemy fortifications in campaigns in Manchuria and China. Despite being upgraded and modernised at various points during its life, such as with the addition of a radio, it was still a fundamentally 1920s design and was considered obsolete by the outbreak of the Second World War. Based in Warsaw, Poland, IBG Models started out in 1991 as a model kit importer and distributor. They released their first plastic kit – a 1:72 scale Bedford QLD - in 2008, and have gradually built up a range of interesting kits of different vehicles from the WWII period in both 1/72 and 1/35 scale. They have kitted a variety of Type 89 tanks, with this hybrid production version being the latest in the line. The kit arrives packed into a surprisingly large top-opening box inside which are a large number of sprues of crisply moulded grey plastic. Just because this producer hails from central/eastern Europe, don't think for a moment that this is a limited run kit. It has all the hallmarks of a cutting edge kit, with high quality, slide moulded parts as good as those from any other mainstream producer. Construction starts with the lower hull, suspension and running gear. The road wheels are each moulded with separate inner and outer faces, both of which fit onto the pre-moulded leaf spring suspension units. The drive sprocket, idler and return rollers are all nicely moulded too. The tracks are very nicely rendered and are of the link and length variety, for which I have a strong preference. The box-like hull is made up of upper and lower parts, with just the front glacis plate needed to finish it off. Extensive use has been made of slide moulding in order to reduce the part count whilst retaining a high level of detail. You won't need to worry too much about the fit and finish of the suspension components, as for the most part they will be covered up by the large armoured covers. Next up are the fenders and stowage boxes, which have to be fitted to the sides and rear of the hull. Naturally smaller details such as tools are all moulded separately, which is great for detail-hungry modellers. A rather nice exhaust is included, as well as photo etched parts for the exhaust shroud. This will prove to be a shrewd move, as such as part could not be satisfactorily recreated from injection moulded plastic. The turret is made up of eight parts, and again slide moulding has been used to keep the part count down and the detail level up. The muzzle of the 57mm gun has also been manufactured using a multi-part mould to save the modeller having to drill out this small part. The commander's hatch can be finished in either open or closed positions. For once you can actually take advantage of this feature because IBG have thoughtfully included two crew figures – and very nice they are too – although they are not mentioned in the instructions and don't even feature on the diagram that shows the layout of the sprues. Just one marking option is shown in the instructions, a Type 89 tank of an unknown regiment deployed in Shanghai, China in 1937. The decal sheet itself is nicely printed. Conclusion I really enjoyed reviewing IBG's recent AFV kits, so it's great to see them turn out another Type 89. Detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture looks to be up there with the very best. The inclusion of photo etched parts and particularly crew figures is very welcome too. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. TKS Tankette with Hotchkiss wz.25 HMG (35045) 1:35 IBG Models The TKS Tankette was an improved version of the Polish TK Tankette which itself was based on a British Carden Loyd tankette. The TKS had an improved chassis and armour upgraded from 8mm to 10mm, as a result a more powerful engine was also fitted. Only 24 upgraded TKS's had been provided to the Polish Army by the time of WWII. They were designed to be used for reconnaissance and infantry support. Unfortunately they were of little use against German tanks except the Panzer I. The Tankette was armed with a Hotchkiss wz.25 which was a Polish version of the Hotchkiss M1914 machine gun re-chambered for the Mauser 7.92mm cartridge. The gun was able to be removed from the Tankette and used on a roof Mount enabling it to be used in the anti aircraft role as well. A small number were fitted with a 20mm gun which was of more use against tanks with one unit successfully destroying 3 German tanks. After the German invasion the Germans did use them like they did most equipment but only in support and training roles. The Kit This is a new kit for IBG this year. All the parts are well moulded and crisp. They have had help with this kit from The Polish Army Museum and they acknowledge this on the box. After just reviewing a Panther is surprising how small this kit is at about 4 inches long. The kit is complete with a full interior to show off. There is also the addition of two crew members which are posed using the Hotchkiss mounted on the roof in an anti-aircraft role. The kit arrives on 10 small sprues, 4 for the tracks and 2 for the figures. There are also 3 small PE frets and a sheet of white decal markings (not shown). Also worth note is some very clear 3D cad instructions, Construction starts with the engine and a few parts which will later go into the interior. Once these are done things move onto the running gear. The idler wheels and the suspension units are added to the side rails along with the small return rollers and main running wheels. These can then be added to the lower chassis along with the drive wheels. The tracks then need to be built up. These are link and length and are quite small even though this is a 1/35 the track size is more akin to a 1/72 armour kit, No jig is provided but the tracks will sit on the wheels. Once the tracks are on the top covers can be added and the drive axle added. Now the tracks are on the interior can be fitted out. The engine and gear box are added along with the radiator, steering mechanism, and other internal parts. The front cover with the inlet grill for the radiator is then added. This completes the lower hull. For the upper hull hatches are made up and added to the front. The top hatches can be in the open or closed positions though it would be a shame to close them and loose all that interior detail. The gun and its mounting can then be inserted, though if you are going to mount the gun on top just put the mounting in. The top can then be added to the chassis. To finish off some small parts including tools are added along with the exhaust assembly. The top mount for the machine gun also needs to be added. Two Polish army figures are supplied in poses manning the top machine gun against air attack? The figures are well sculpted. An ammunition box and ammunition run are included as PE parts. The decal sheet (not shown) provides markings for a machine used by the 10th Cavalry Brigade in September 1939. Conclusion I really enjoy reviewing IBG's kits and it's great to see them turn out another kit of a Polish Subject. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  16. IBG Models started working on Lublin R-XIII series. The Lublin R-XIII was the Polish army cooperation plane (observation and liaison plane), designed in the early-1930s in the Plage i Laśkiewicz factory in Lublin. It was the main army cooperation plane used by Polish Air Force in 1939. At least 4 boxes are planned, including seaplane on floats. Source (in Polish): plastikowe.pl
  17. It is my last finished model. It is a lovely kit. Perfect adjustments and easy building. I recommend. I formulated the colours with Tamiya mixes. Chears.
  18. This is IBG's new Scammell Pioneer, the first of three versions they're bringing out, with the artillery tractor and transporter to follow. For the most part, it's an excellent kit, with great fit and nice detailing. There are a few shortcomings with it though, the biggest of which is the incorrect windscreen shape. On top of that, there are a few simplifications and missing details, some of which I added, such as the linkages for the chassis mounted winch. The access ladder was scratch built, as IBG don't provide one in the kit, and a lot of the brackets and fixtures on the rear where enhanced or replaced as necessary. The fuel tank had the moulded-on boarding steps removed, and replaced with something more in-scale. For the crane rigging, IBG only provide a length of thread, so some Eureka copper cable was used for the two winches, and a detail set from KFS Models was used for the pulleys and shackles on the back. Despite all that, it was a great kit to work on, and the scratch building fell into the fun category, rather than the tedious one. As a kit though, it looks like it's going to be out-classed by the Thunder Models alternative, but it'll still be worth picking up, as long as it's priced below the Thunder one. This one's finished as a Russian lend-lease example, and painted in SCC2, rather than the 4BO indicated in the instructions. Thanks for looking Andy
  19. IBG catalog 2018 is here: http://www.ibgmodels.com/IBG_models_KATALOG.pdf Source: https://nowosci.plastikowe.pl/aktualnosci/zapowiedzi-2018-2019-ibg-models/ V.P.
  20. 44M Zrinyi I Hungarian 75mm Assault Gun 1:72 IBG The Zrinyi was a Hungarian assault gun based on the chassis of the Turán medium tank. The vehicle was produced in two variants. The Zrinyi I was fitted with a long-barrelled 43M 75mm gun and was intended to fulfil the role of tank killer, while the Zrinyi II was fitted with a short-barrelled 105mm MÁVAG howitzer for use in the infantry support role. Between 40 and 66 Zrinyi IIs were completed, while the Zrinyi I never progressed beyond the prototype stage. IBG Models have busy plugging gaps in the collections of 1:72 AFV modellers for some time now. They've given us a number of unique kits of Hungarian armour, of which this is the latest. The kit follows the Turan I and II and Zrinyi II, with which it shares a significant number of parts. The kit arrives packed into the standard IBG box, which is at least twice as large as it needs to be. Inside are five frames of crisply moulded grey plastic and a small decal sheet. The plastic parts are crisply moulded and well detailed. Three of the sprues are from the aforementioned Turan/Zrinyi kits, while two are specific to this release. Construction starts with the running gear and lower hull. There are sixteen wheels and two bogeys on each side, so quite a lot of cutting, sanding and patience is required. Luckily everything fits together well and the breakdown of construction means it is easy to align everything correctly. The lower hull is made up from a floor pan, sides and glacis plate, onto which the pre-assembled road wheel bogeys, return rollers and drive sprockets are fitted. The whole thing took me a couple of evenings due to the large number of small parts, but as the rest of the build is so straightforward, it doesn't take long to catch up. The tracks are of the link and length variety. They are nicely detailed and appear to fit well (although this is as far as I have got with my build). Once fitted, construction turns to the upper half of the hull. The fenders and armoured front plate fit onto the box-like upper hull, along with the delicate 75mm gun. Be careful cutting this part from the sprue as it is very thin and the plastic is quite soft. I will need to use some filler to repair mine as I was less than careful. Finishing details, such as the tools, are all moulded separately - and indication that this kit is aimed at the enthusiast modeller rather than the casual dabbler. IBG has included some nice finishing touches such as spare road wheels and jerry cans to fit to the rear of the vehicle. The decal sheet provides just one option, which is about as good as you can hope for given than just one prototype was constructed. Conclusion I have to congratulate IBG Models for producing a mainstream kit of a prototype Hungarian assault gun. As usual, the level of detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture is up there with the best names in the business. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. PZL 23B Karas Polish Light Bomber (early) 1:72 IBG The PZL.23 Karas was a light bomber and reconnaissance aircraft developed by Państwowe Zakłady Lotnicze (PZL) during the interwar period. A modern aircraft by the standards of the day, the Karas was of all-metal construction and was powered by a licence-built version of the Bristol Pegasus VIII radial engine. The Karas was the main light bomber in the Polish Air Force by the outbreak of war. As such, it has the distinction of having conducted the first bombing raid on Reich territory, when a single aircraft of the 21st Squadron bombed a factory in Ohlau (now Oława in modern-day Poland) on 2 September 1939. The maximum bomb load that the type could carry was 700kg, comprising 6 x 100kg and 2 x 50kg bombs. The PZL 23 is the second aircraft kit produced by IBG Models. The first, the RWD-8, appeared in 2015 and was available in three different boxings. This kit continues that trend, with OBG releasing PZL 23A, B (early), B (late) and PZL 42 boxings. Here we have the early version of the PZL.23B. Inside the box are five sprues of light grey plastic, a single sprue of clear plastic, a set of photo etched detail parts and decals. The parts are all superbly moulded and I'd go as far as to say they look as good as anything from Japan. A quick review of the instructions reveals this to be a well-detailed kit, comparable to an Eduard product in places, although without the complex engineering that the Czech manufacturer is famous for. Constructions starts with the cockpit. Most of the details are moulded in plastic, but as you would expect the fret of photo etched parts contributes details such as the sight for the rear gunner's Vickers machine gun and some struts for the crew seats. The overall area is superbly detailed and even includes photo etched rudder pedals. The central part of the cockpit, including the bomb aimer's position, fixes to the central span of the lower wing, while the pilot and the rear gunner's positions fit inside the vertically split fuselage halves. Once the fuselage halves are fixed together, they can be joined to the wing. The upper cowling can also be fitted in place at this stage. Once the fuselage and wing are complete, the engine and the rest of the flying surfaces can be assembled. The Pegasus engine is nicely detailed and fits into the one-piece cowling behind the two-bladed propeller. The horizontal stabilisers and vertical tail are all moulded as solid parts, but are very nicely done. The gondola, which houses the combat position and lower-rear gun position for the bomb aimer, is a seperate sub-assembly which features a nice Vickers F gun with photo etched ring and bead sight. The main gear legs can be finished with partial or full streamlined fairings. Once in place, all that remains is to fit the exhaust pipe and bomb load. The correct mix of 100kg and 50kg bombs have been supplied. The canopy (and the rest of the clear parts are very well moulded, with crisp framelines. The decal sheet provides just one option, for PZL. 23B Karas, 1st Production Series, 12 Reconnaissance Squadron, 1st Air Regiment. The decals are nicely printed and a smattering of stencils have been included too. Conclusion Once again I have to congratulate IBG Models for producing a mainstream kit of an interesting and important, if not terribly well-known type. For those used to building limited run kits of types such as this, the fact that the kit is so nicely executed is a massive bonus. The level of detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture is up there with the best names in the business. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  22. Scammell Pioneer R100 Artillery Tractor 1:35 IBG Models The Pioneer was designed in the 20s as a large tractor unit for unmade roads, which eventually caught the eye of the War Office as a potential candidate for tank transport, but it wasn't until later in the decade that it became a more serious tank transporter. In the meantime, the R100 derivative was used from 1935 onward to pull smaller and medium weight artillery, taking full advantage of its terrain handling ability that was due in equal parts to its excellent suspension set-up and a powerful engine that was capable of delivering torque at low revs, making it ideal for unmade roads and rough terrain, even though only the rear wheels were driven by the 6-cylinder diesel engine. Its large cab size allows the crew and their equipment to travel inside, which endeared it to them immensely when the heavens opened. It was relieved of towing the larger weapons when the AEC Matador arrived, but until then it had been used with the British 8" Howitzer as well as the American Long Tom gun. Many unfortunate vehicles were destroyed or captured at Dunkirk, and having lost so many it was never available in the desired quantities, so often worked alongside other similar vehicles, with almost a thousand units built by the time they were discontinued. During wartime a career that long was unusual, so it must have been doing something right. The Kit For a long time there hasn't been a mainstream model of this staple of WWII British AFV Prime Movers in this scale, with a ready market just waiting to be tapped. There was a lot of buzz in this section of the hobby when it was first announced by IBG, and after the 2V2S Breakdown Tractor, we're now blessed with the R100, which is a substantially different tooling with new sprues aplenty. The box is a top-opener in IBG's standard green colour, and on the top is a painting of the subject matter, with examples of the colour schemes on the sides. Inside are fourteen sprues of mid grey styrene, one of clear parts, a substantial fret of Photo-Etch (PE) brass, a bag of wheel tread parts (x6) a decal sheet, and the instructions. A bonus feature is the inclusion of a print of the box art on satin sheened stock, showing off the blurring of the wheels in motion, which is good enough to pin up as inspiration if that's your thing. First impressions are very favourable, with plenty of detail throughout, the inclusion of the engine bay, underpinnings and those superbly detailed wheels with separate sidewalls attaching to the slide-moulded contact surfaces. Coincidentally, those are the first parts to be constructed when the build begins, with six of them assembled as already mentioned, taking care to align the treads correctly, which are directional. Other sub-assemblies are then built up for use later, such as a pair of PE cowling parts for under the cargo bed; the immense fuel tanks; stowage baskets using PE parts to good advantage for scale-fidelity, and of course the 6-cylinder diesel engine that gave the R100 such good traction in poor conditions. This last assembly is built up on a two-part block with intakes, manifold, ancillary parts and PE brackets, which are joined at the front by the radiator housing that has two stacked cores, and a cowling around the rear that ducts the air from the fan on the front of the engine. All these are put to one side after painting while the rear double axles are built up, again from a sizeable part count. The front axle with anti-roll bars are also made up at this point, after which the main ladder-style chassis rails are put together, and two huge leaf-springs are fitted to suspend the rear axles. The radiator housing, towing hooks, headlamps and various PE brackets are fitted, and another batch of sub-assemblies in the shape of mudguards, winch, and transfer box are built up for attachment to the chassis along with the engine, linked by drive-shafts. The front axle mounts on a central pivot at the front, with the wish-bone shaped anti-roll bar fitted to a point in front of the transfer box, then the steering linkage is added, as is the exhaust pip that weaves its way through the chassis rails to the muffler aft of the transfer box. The big twin axle sits on the big leaf springs, taking engine power from the transfer box from another drive-shaft, the fuel tank is attached to the outer rail of the chassis, and a lozenge-shaped reservoir fits in a space behind the differential. At this point the chassis and running gear are ostensibly complete and attention turns to the floor and superstructure. The body is split between the cab and the passenger compartment, and it is the latter that is built up first, with quite a number of parts creating some of the complex shapes to accommodate the equipment underneath as well as the wheel arches. PE parts are used in the underside of the floor around the rearmost axle, and a small accessway is part-formed in anticipation of mating with the cab section, which is built up next. The roof sections are also built with internal and external detail, as is the bulkhead between the two sections, which has the seat backs attached with PE mounts for scale fidelity. The cab floor has a large transmission bulge at the front, with the driver's controls and pedals added to the right, and a frame around the gear selector made from a PE part. More PE is used in constructing the front firewall, to which the windscreen is pre-moulded. More PE parts are used to represent the metal trackways on which the windscreen panels rotate for cooling the cab, but the glazing isn't added until the assemblies are installed on the chassis. There is an issue with the shape of the cab that gives it a slightly trapezoidal look from the front, which should in fact be square. There is a documented fix for this on Britmodeller already (although it's the Breakdown Tractor), which you can see here along with some work on the cab roof to give it a more prototypical look. The crew seats all have separate supporting frames and cushions, which will match up to the backs on the bulkhead that is glued around the cab to create the enclosure. The steering wheel, wing mirrors and top engine cowling are fitted along with the optional side cowlings, stowage bin and the passenger compartment, which is plonked on the rear with an access ladder fitted to the left rear. The side access doors are both separate, so can be posed at any angle, and a rack of three Lee Enfield rifles are stowed in the accessway with their buttstocks held in place by recesses. The rooves are added to both compartments, after which the model is flipped over to fit the wheels that were made up at the beginning, plus a few small brackets that fit onto the chassis after a bit of folding. Markings There are four basic schemes included, with five vehicles portrayed in the painting guide, serving in France, Italy and Crete during WWII. The decal sheet is surprisingly not postage stamp-sized, and printed for IBG by Techmod on blue decal paper with good spacing between the decals to ease cutting out. From the box you can build one of the following: R100 from 52nd (Bedfordshire Yeomanry) heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery of III Corps of British Expeditionary Force, France 1940 R100 from 61st Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery of I Corps of British Expeditionary Force, France 1940 R100 from 18 Battery, 56 Heavy Regiment, 2nd Army Group Royal Artillery, Italy 1943 R100 from 52nd (Bedfordshire Yeomanry) heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery of British 2nd Army, France September 1944 R100 from unidentified Luftwaffe ground unit, Crete 1943 Decals are by Techmod as previously mentioned, with good registration, sharpness, colour density, and a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion This is the second release from the Pioneer range, working up to the archetypal tank transporter, which I'm really looking forward to. The detail on this kit is excellent throughout, and from the box you receive all the parts necessary to build the interior and exterior, with just the addition of a few wires here and there if you plan on opening up the engine. A nice variety of colour options including a captured example, plus a fairly comprehensive PE sheet makes for a good package that's well worth a look. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  23. This is IBG's newish release of the Polish Rosomak APC, which is really just a licence built version of the Finnish Patria. It's a very nice kit, with a pretty much full interior supplied, although hardly any of it can be seen, even with all the hatches open. The fit was great and the detailing's good. The wheels/tyres in particular were nice, being all styrene, so much easier to paint and weather than the usual soft vinyl type. Not the most inspiring of colour schemes, and the weathering's a bit bland, but it's pretty representative of how they looked when they were operating in Chad. Thanks for looking Andy
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