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Found 19 results

  1. IBG Models started working on Lublin R-XIII series. The Lublin R-XIII was the Polish army cooperation plane (observation and liaison plane), designed in the early-1930s in the Plage i Laśkiewicz factory in Lublin. It was the main army cooperation plane used by Polish Air Force in 1939. At least 4 boxes are planned, including seaplane on floats. Source (in Polish): plastikowe.pl
  2. It is my last finished model. It is a lovely kit. Perfect adjustments and easy building. I recommend. I formulated the colours with Tamiya mixes. Chears.
  3. IBG Models is to release a family of 1/72nd Państwowe Zakłady Lotnicze - PZL P.11 aircraft kits. - ref. 72517 - PZL P.11a - ref. 72518 - PZL P.11b - ref. 72519 - PZL P.11c - ref. 72520 - ?? - ref. 72521 - PZL P.11f - ref. 72522 - PZL P.11g Kobuz Sources: http://www.modelarovo.cz/norimberk-2018-jak-jsme-ho-videli-my/ https://nowosci.plastikowe.pl/aktualnosci/zapowiedzi-ibg-models-pzl-p-11a-1-72-pozna-jesien-2018/ V.P.
  4. This is IBG's new Scammell Pioneer, the first of three versions they're bringing out, with the artillery tractor and transporter to follow. For the most part, it's an excellent kit, with great fit and nice detailing. There are a few shortcomings with it though, the biggest of which is the incorrect windscreen shape. On top of that, there are a few simplifications and missing details, some of which I added, such as the linkages for the chassis mounted winch. The access ladder was scratch built, as IBG don't provide one in the kit, and a lot of the brackets and fixtures on the rear where enhanced or replaced as necessary. The fuel tank had the moulded-on boarding steps removed, and replaced with something more in-scale. For the crane rigging, IBG only provide a length of thread, so some Eureka copper cable was used for the two winches, and a detail set from KFS Models was used for the pulleys and shackles on the back. Despite all that, it was a great kit to work on, and the scratch building fell into the fun category, rather than the tedious one. As a kit though, it looks like it's going to be out-classed by the Thunder Models alternative, but it'll still be worth picking up, as long as it's priced below the Thunder one. This one's finished as a Russian lend-lease example, and painted in SCC2, rather than the 4BO indicated in the instructions. Thanks for looking Andy
  5. Hurray PZL.42 was a experimental Karaś with twin tail. By the way, Karaś means "Crucian carp". (I hope they check plans, not like with RWD-8)
  6. IBG Models is to release in 2018 (?) a 1/72nd Polskie Zakłady Lotnicze / PZL P.24 kit - ref. 72523 Source: http://www.modelarovo.cz/norimberk-2018-jak-jsme-ho-videli-my/ V.P.
  7. IBG catalog 2018 is here: http://www.ibgmodels.com/IBG_models_KATALOG.pdf Source: https://nowosci.plastikowe.pl/aktualnosci/zapowiedzi-2018-2019-ibg-models/ V.P.
  8. A new year and a new Japanese tank from IBG Model.
  9. 44M Zrinyi I Hungarian 75mm Assault Gun 1:72 IBG The Zrinyi was a Hungarian assault gun based on the chassis of the Turán medium tank. The vehicle was produced in two variants. The Zrinyi I was fitted with a long-barrelled 43M 75mm gun and was intended to fulfil the role of tank killer, while the Zrinyi II was fitted with a short-barrelled 105mm MÁVAG howitzer for use in the infantry support role. Between 40 and 66 Zrinyi IIs were completed, while the Zrinyi I never progressed beyond the prototype stage. IBG Models have busy plugging gaps in the collections of 1:72 AFV modellers for some time now. They've given us a number of unique kits of Hungarian armour, of which this is the latest. The kit follows the Turan I and II and Zrinyi II, with which it shares a significant number of parts. The kit arrives packed into the standard IBG box, which is at least twice as large as it needs to be. Inside are five frames of crisply moulded grey plastic and a small decal sheet. The plastic parts are crisply moulded and well detailed. Three of the sprues are from the aforementioned Turan/Zrinyi kits, while two are specific to this release. Construction starts with the running gear and lower hull. There are sixteen wheels and two bogeys on each side, so quite a lot of cutting, sanding and patience is required. Luckily everything fits together well and the breakdown of construction means it is easy to align everything correctly. The lower hull is made up from a floor pan, sides and glacis plate, onto which the pre-assembled road wheel bogeys, return rollers and drive sprockets are fitted. The whole thing took me a couple of evenings due to the large number of small parts, but as the rest of the build is so straightforward, it doesn't take long to catch up. The tracks are of the link and length variety. They are nicely detailed and appear to fit well (although this is as far as I have got with my build). Once fitted, construction turns to the upper half of the hull. The fenders and armoured front plate fit onto the box-like upper hull, along with the delicate 75mm gun. Be careful cutting this part from the sprue as it is very thin and the plastic is quite soft. I will need to use some filler to repair mine as I was less than careful. Finishing details, such as the tools, are all moulded separately - and indication that this kit is aimed at the enthusiast modeller rather than the casual dabbler. IBG has included some nice finishing touches such as spare road wheels and jerry cans to fit to the rear of the vehicle. The decal sheet provides just one option, which is about as good as you can hope for given than just one prototype was constructed. Conclusion I have to congratulate IBG Models for producing a mainstream kit of a prototype Hungarian assault gun. As usual, the level of detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture is up there with the best names in the business. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. PZL 23B Karas Polish Light Bomber (early) 1:72 IBG The PZL.23 Karas was a light bomber and reconnaissance aircraft developed by Państwowe Zakłady Lotnicze (PZL) during the interwar period. A modern aircraft by the standards of the day, the Karas was of all-metal construction and was powered by a licence-built version of the Bristol Pegasus VIII radial engine. The Karas was the main light bomber in the Polish Air Force by the outbreak of war. As such, it has the distinction of having conducted the first bombing raid on Reich territory, when a single aircraft of the 21st Squadron bombed a factory in Ohlau (now Oława in modern-day Poland) on 2 September 1939. The maximum bomb load that the type could carry was 700kg, comprising 6 x 100kg and 2 x 50kg bombs. The PZL 23 is the second aircraft kit produced by IBG Models. The first, the RWD-8, appeared in 2015 and was available in three different boxings. This kit continues that trend, with OBG releasing PZL 23A, B (early), B (late) and PZL 42 boxings. Here we have the early version of the PZL.23B. Inside the box are five sprues of light grey plastic, a single sprue of clear plastic, a set of photo etched detail parts and decals. The parts are all superbly moulded and I'd go as far as to say they look as good as anything from Japan. A quick review of the instructions reveals this to be a well-detailed kit, comparable to an Eduard product in places, although without the complex engineering that the Czech manufacturer is famous for. Constructions starts with the cockpit. Most of the details are moulded in plastic, but as you would expect the fret of photo etched parts contributes details such as the sight for the rear gunner's Vickers machine gun and some struts for the crew seats. The overall area is superbly detailed and even includes photo etched rudder pedals. The central part of the cockpit, including the bomb aimer's position, fixes to the central span of the lower wing, while the pilot and the rear gunner's positions fit inside the vertically split fuselage halves. Once the fuselage halves are fixed together, they can be joined to the wing. The upper cowling can also be fitted in place at this stage. Once the fuselage and wing are complete, the engine and the rest of the flying surfaces can be assembled. The Pegasus engine is nicely detailed and fits into the one-piece cowling behind the two-bladed propeller. The horizontal stabilisers and vertical tail are all moulded as solid parts, but are very nicely done. The gondola, which houses the combat position and lower-rear gun position for the bomb aimer, is a seperate sub-assembly which features a nice Vickers F gun with photo etched ring and bead sight. The main gear legs can be finished with partial or full streamlined fairings. Once in place, all that remains is to fit the exhaust pipe and bomb load. The correct mix of 100kg and 50kg bombs have been supplied. The canopy (and the rest of the clear parts are very well moulded, with crisp framelines. The decal sheet provides just one option, for PZL. 23B Karas, 1st Production Series, 12 Reconnaissance Squadron, 1st Air Regiment. The decals are nicely printed and a smattering of stencils have been included too. Conclusion Once again I have to congratulate IBG Models for producing a mainstream kit of an interesting and important, if not terribly well-known type. For those used to building limited run kits of types such as this, the fact that the kit is so nicely executed is a massive bonus. The level of detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture is up there with the best names in the business. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. IBG Models from Poland (http://ibgmodels.com/) is to release a new tool 1/72nd RWD-8 kit - ref.72501 - RWD-8 PWS - ref.72502 - RWD-8 DWL Sources: http://www.ipmsdeutschland.de/Ausstellungen/Nuernberg2015/Bilder_AT/Bilder_AT_1.htm http://www.modellversium.de/galerie/2-ausstellungen/11739-spielwarenmesse-nuernberg-2015-teil-2-verschiedene-hersteller.html V.P.
  12. Scammell Pioneer R100 Artillery Tractor 1:35 IBG Models The Pioneer was designed in the 20s as a large tractor unit for unmade roads, which eventually caught the eye of the War Office as a potential candidate for tank transport, but it wasn't until later in the decade that it became a more serious tank transporter. In the meantime, the R100 derivative was used from 1935 onward to pull smaller and medium weight artillery, taking full advantage of its terrain handling ability that was due in equal parts to its excellent suspension set-up and a powerful engine that was capable of delivering torque at low revs, making it ideal for unmade roads and rough terrain, even though only the rear wheels were driven by the 6-cylinder diesel engine. Its large cab size allows the crew and their equipment to travel inside, which endeared it to them immensely when the heavens opened. It was relieved of towing the larger weapons when the AEC Matador arrived, but until then it had been used with the British 8" Howitzer as well as the American Long Tom gun. Many unfortunate vehicles were destroyed or captured at Dunkirk, and having lost so many it was never available in the desired quantities, so often worked alongside other similar vehicles, with almost a thousand units built by the time they were discontinued. During wartime a career that long was unusual, so it must have been doing something right. The Kit For a long time there hasn't been a mainstream model of this staple of WWII British AFV Prime Movers in this scale, with a ready market just waiting to be tapped. There was a lot of buzz in this section of the hobby when it was first announced by IBG, and after the 2V2S Breakdown Tractor, we're now blessed with the R100, which is a substantially different tooling with new sprues aplenty. The box is a top-opener in IBG's standard green colour, and on the top is a painting of the subject matter, with examples of the colour schemes on the sides. Inside are fourteen sprues of mid grey styrene, one of clear parts, a substantial fret of Photo-Etch (PE) brass, a bag of wheel tread parts (x6) a decal sheet, and the instructions. A bonus feature is the inclusion of a print of the box art on satin sheened stock, showing off the blurring of the wheels in motion, which is good enough to pin up as inspiration if that's your thing. First impressions are very favourable, with plenty of detail throughout, the inclusion of the engine bay, underpinnings and those superbly detailed wheels with separate sidewalls attaching to the slide-moulded contact surfaces. Coincidentally, those are the first parts to be constructed when the build begins, with six of them assembled as already mentioned, taking care to align the treads correctly, which are directional. Other sub-assemblies are then built up for use later, such as a pair of PE cowling parts for under the cargo bed; the immense fuel tanks; stowage baskets using PE parts to good advantage for scale-fidelity, and of course the 6-cylinder diesel engine that gave the R100 such good traction in poor conditions. This last assembly is built up on a two-part block with intakes, manifold, ancillary parts and PE brackets, which are joined at the front by the radiator housing that has two stacked cores, and a cowling around the rear that ducts the air from the fan on the front of the engine. All these are put to one side after painting while the rear double axles are built up, again from a sizeable part count. The front axle with anti-roll bars are also made up at this point, after which the main ladder-style chassis rails are put together, and two huge leaf-springs are fitted to suspend the rear axles. The radiator housing, towing hooks, headlamps and various PE brackets are fitted, and another batch of sub-assemblies in the shape of mudguards, winch, and transfer box are built up for attachment to the chassis along with the engine, linked by drive-shafts. The front axle mounts on a central pivot at the front, with the wish-bone shaped anti-roll bar fitted to a point in front of the transfer box, then the steering linkage is added, as is the exhaust pip that weaves its way through the chassis rails to the muffler aft of the transfer box. The big twin axle sits on the big leaf springs, taking engine power from the transfer box from another drive-shaft, the fuel tank is attached to the outer rail of the chassis, and a lozenge-shaped reservoir fits in a space behind the differential. At this point the chassis and running gear are ostensibly complete and attention turns to the floor and superstructure. The body is split between the cab and the passenger compartment, and it is the latter that is built up first, with quite a number of parts creating some of the complex shapes to accommodate the equipment underneath as well as the wheel arches. PE parts are used in the underside of the floor around the rearmost axle, and a small accessway is part-formed in anticipation of mating with the cab section, which is built up next. The roof sections are also built with internal and external detail, as is the bulkhead between the two sections, which has the seat backs attached with PE mounts for scale fidelity. The cab floor has a large transmission bulge at the front, with the driver's controls and pedals added to the right, and a frame around the gear selector made from a PE part. More PE is used in constructing the front firewall, to which the windscreen is pre-moulded. More PE parts are used to represent the metal trackways on which the windscreen panels rotate for cooling the cab, but the glazing isn't added until the assemblies are installed on the chassis. There is an issue with the shape of the cab that gives it a slightly trapezoidal look from the front, which should in fact be square. There is a documented fix for this on Britmodeller already (although it's the Breakdown Tractor), which you can see here along with some work on the cab roof to give it a more prototypical look. The crew seats all have separate supporting frames and cushions, which will match up to the backs on the bulkhead that is glued around the cab to create the enclosure. The steering wheel, wing mirrors and top engine cowling are fitted along with the optional side cowlings, stowage bin and the passenger compartment, which is plonked on the rear with an access ladder fitted to the left rear. The side access doors are both separate, so can be posed at any angle, and a rack of three Lee Enfield rifles are stowed in the accessway with their buttstocks held in place by recesses. The rooves are added to both compartments, after which the model is flipped over to fit the wheels that were made up at the beginning, plus a few small brackets that fit onto the chassis after a bit of folding. Markings There are four basic schemes included, with five vehicles portrayed in the painting guide, serving in France, Italy and Crete during WWII. The decal sheet is surprisingly not postage stamp-sized, and printed for IBG by Techmod on blue decal paper with good spacing between the decals to ease cutting out. From the box you can build one of the following: R100 from 52nd (Bedfordshire Yeomanry) heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery of III Corps of British Expeditionary Force, France 1940 R100 from 61st Medium Regiment, Royal Artillery of I Corps of British Expeditionary Force, France 1940 R100 from 18 Battery, 56 Heavy Regiment, 2nd Army Group Royal Artillery, Italy 1943 R100 from 52nd (Bedfordshire Yeomanry) heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery of British 2nd Army, France September 1944 R100 from unidentified Luftwaffe ground unit, Crete 1943 Decals are by Techmod as previously mentioned, with good registration, sharpness, colour density, and a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion This is the second release from the Pioneer range, working up to the archetypal tank transporter, which I'm really looking forward to. The detail on this kit is excellent throughout, and from the box you receive all the parts necessary to build the interior and exterior, with just the addition of a few wires here and there if you plan on opening up the engine. A nice variety of colour options including a captured example, plus a fairly comprehensive PE sheet makes for a good package that's well worth a look. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. AndyRM101

    KTO Rosomak

    This is IBG's newish release of the Polish Rosomak APC, which is really just a licence built version of the Finnish Patria. It's a very nice kit, with a pretty much full interior supplied, although hardly any of it can be seen, even with all the hatches open. The fit was great and the detailing's good. The wheels/tyres in particular were nice, being all styrene, so much easier to paint and weather than the usual soft vinyl type. Not the most inspiring of colour schemes, and the weathering's a bit bland, but it's pretty representative of how they looked when they were operating in Chad. Thanks for looking Andy
  14. Chevrolet C60S with Holmes Breakdown Cabs 11 and 13 1:72 IBG Models The Canadian Military Pattern truck was a class of vehicles produced by Ford, Chevrolet/GM and Dodge to a British Army specification. The trucks were used by Britain and her Commonwealth allies in almost every theatre of war from the time of the truck's introduction in 1940. By the end of the War, over half a million examples had been built, accounting for around two-thirds of all military vehicle production in Canada during the period. The most commonly produced sub-variant was the 4x4 3 Tonne version, which appeared in C60s and C60l (Chevrolet) and F60s and F60l (Ford) types. The 'S' indicated a short wheelbase (134 inch) variant, as opposed to the 'L' long wheelbase of 158 inches. A range of standard cab designs were employed, with the first, second and third designs rather confusingly labelled Nos.11, 12 and 13. After the War the type continued in military service around the world, as well as finding non-military roles such as forestry, grain transport and snow ploughing. IBG Models have been on a roll lately, churning out a range of excellent kits at a rate that would rival some of the major players in the market. This seems quite fitting seeing as they now make some of the best small scale AFV kits around. This new kit of the C60S is a very welcome addition to the range. It arrives packed into a surprisingly large top-opening box inside which are a five frames of crisply moulded grey plastic, a length of scale tow cable and a small decal sheet. The plastic parts are crisply moulded and well detailed. The attachment points seem finer than in a lot of their previous releases. Care will still need to be taken when removing some of the smaller parts. Construction starts with the engine. This comprises four parts, including a separately moulded exhaust manifold and fan. The axles, drive shaft and brake assemblies can also be constructed at this stage. The parts all look very similar to the Otter armoured car we reviewed a few months ago – no surprise given that the two vehicles shared common underpinnings. Construction moves swiftly on to the cab. Although the description on the box indicates that parts for both Pattern 11 and 13 cabs are included (as indeed they are), both of the vehicles depicted on the decal sheet use the Pattern 13 cab. The cab itself is well-detailed, and included two-part seats and a steering wheel with separate column. Once cab is finished, construction returns to the ladder-type chassis. The leaf spring suspension units can now be added, along with the drive shafts, transfer box, fuel tank and exhaust. The wheels can now be added, and while they are moulded with tyres in place, they are nicely detailed for the scale. Before the load area can be assembled, IBG suggest constructing the recovery crane/winch. This comprises over 20 parts, which should give you an indication of how detailed it is. The crane can then be fixed to the rear body, which can in turn be added to the chassis, along with the cab. All that remains to do to finish the model is to add the provided tow cables. The decal sheet provides the following options: • 16th Light Detachment (A) of the 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, England, 1942; and • 4th Canadian Armoured Brigade Workshop RCEME, 4th Canadian Armoured Divisions, Normandy, France, 1944 Conclusion I really enjoy reviewing IBG's kits, and it's great to see them turn out another superb model in the form of the C60s. Detail is excellent and the quality of manufacture looks to be up there with the very best. It's a shame that crew figures, such as those included with their recent Type 89 tank, haven't been included, but I guess they were spoiling us with that particular kit. Nevertheless, this is a great little kit that can still be highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of IBG Models
  15. Chevrolet C30A General Service IBG Models 1:35 The Ford-built CMP trucks had a 239 cu in (3.9 L), 95 bhp (70.8 kW) V8 engine, while most of the Chevrolet-built CMP trucks had a 216 cu in (3.5 L), 85 bhp (63.4 kW) straight-6 overhead-valve engine. An American-made 270 cu in (4.4 L) GMC straight-6 engine powered the C60X 3-ton truck. The Ford and Chevrolet trucks shared a standard cab design, which evolved over the years of production. The first (designed at Ford by Sid Swallow), second and third cab designs were called No. 11, 12 and 13, respectively. The first two type were similar, the main difference being a two-part radiator grille in No.12 cab (its upper part was opened with a bonnet, which was known as the "Alligator cab"). The final No. 13 cab, an entirely Canadian design made from late 1941 until the end of the war, had the two flat panes of the windscreen angled slightly downward to minimize the glare from the sun and to avoid causing strong reflections that would be observable from aircraft. All the CMP cab designs had a short, "cab forward" configuration that gave CMP trucks their distinctive pug-nosed profile. This design was required to meet the original British specifications for a compact truck design that would be more efficient to transport by ship. The specifications also demanded right-hand drive. Internally the cab had to accommodate the comparatively large North American engines and it was generally cramped. The standard cabs were then matched up with a variety of standard chassis, drive trains and body designs. Chevrolet-built vehicles could be recognised by the radiator grille mesh being of a diamond pattern, whereas Ford-built ones had grilles formed of a square mesh. The production of CMP truck bodies in Canada was subcontracted out to smaller companies in Ontario and Manitoba, organized into the wartime Steel Body Manufacturers Association by the Department of Munitions and Supply. The wide variety of truck body designs included general service (GS), water tanker, fuel tanker, vehicle recovery (tow truck), dental clinic, mobile laundry, wireless house, machinery (machine shop), folding boat transport, and anti-tank gun portee. In the list below, a drive specification of NxM means that the vehicle has a total of N wheels and that M of those wheels are driven. The military specifications did not permit more than two wheels per axle. The British standard load capacities of 8 cwt (hundredweight), 15 cwt, 30 cwt and 60 cwt correspond roughly to the American loads of 1/2 short ton, 3/4 ton, 1.5 ton and 3 ton, respectively. The 60-cwt CMP trucks were usually called 3-ton lorries or trucks The Model The kit comes in a very attractive, full colour box with a representation of the vehicle in use. The kit represents the Canadian built 4x4, 134 inch wheelbase, 30 cwt vehicle, hence the C30A and is contained on 17 sprues of light grey styrene, although there are quite a few parts that are only destined for the spares box, as they are not used in this build. There is a single sprue of clear styrene, a small sheet of etched brass and a medium sized decal sheet. All the parts are very nicely moulded, with no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a few moulding pips. The build process is quite complex with lots of detail in and around the chassis, as for most truck models, so this won’t be a quick and easy build, but one that will need time, patience, and care to assemble, certainly not for a beginner. The instructions are very clear and easy to read, but not always logical particularly with the way the sub-assemblies are used, although they use the CAD/Photo style of drawings. Construction begins with a load of sub assemblies. Firstly the styrene wheels are assembled, each provided in two halves, which may require some careful sanding of the seam, along with the rear cross member spring unit, which includes the tow hook, associated clamps and the anti-swing bars. The two fuel tanks are made up from five parts, the lower section includes the ends, the top section, filler cap/pipe and the two supports. The next three steps involve the bending of PE parts to shape. The transfer box support is easy enough, with the end being folded to 90’, as is the panel that will be fitted beneath the radiator grille. The grille itself is a little more awkward in that the sides of both the upper and lower sections need to be bent to 28’ whilst the outer frame need to be flat, so it would be handy to have a folding tool to hand. With those done, it’s onto the drive-train with the transfer box made up from four parts, the front axle/differential made up from eleven parts and the rear axle from six parts. The front bumper is then fitted out with the guard supports and towing eyes. The build proper begins with the assembly of the very nicely detailed engine. The two block halves are glued together, and then fitted with the sump, cylinder head, front, which includes the auxiliary drive points and rear, which includes the bell housing. The drive belt is a single piece moulding onto which the PE fan is attached, with the intake manifold, air filter unit, alternator and fuel pump finishing it off. The cab is assembled from the floor pan to which is fitted the scuttle, gearbox/engine cover, bonnet, wheel arches, windscreen, instrument binnacle, front end, grille and bonnet side panels. The four part seats, gear sticks, pedals and fire extinguisher are then fitted. There is a choice of having a plain roof or one with a roof hatch fitted. The truck bed is made up from the single piece bed, to which the side benches are added, along with the rear mud flaps and tailgate. If you’re not going to use the superbly moulded tilt then you will have to add the bed sides and three storage bin hatches per side as well as the front bulkhead. The kit comes with a full set of tilt rails, which is a really nice touch, as a lot of kits don’t give you these even if a tilt is included or not. There are four cross beams, five beams that run on the roof and one on either side fore to aft. Finally we get to the chassis, which is normally one of the first things assembled in a truck kit. Each of the chassis rails is fitted with the single leaf springs and their supports at the front, whilst at the rear there are double leaf springs fitted, along with the tow bumper beams and their brackets. Each rail is then joined together by the front bumper, five cross members and the rear end beam with tow hook assembled earlier. With the chassis assembled, all the sub assemblies can now be fitted to it, the engine, with four piece exhaust, the wheels, with alternative central hubs, the front and rear differentials, transfer box, all joined together by the various drive shafts, truck fuel tanks, truck bed, cab and access steps, which at this point you should have a completed model. IBG Models have also included some useful items to give a bit of life to the vehicle in the shape of eight rifles and a couple of Jerry cans. Decals The small decal sheet provides decals for two different trucks, with various placards for around the truck, plain stars for the cab doors and a large star with segmented circle for the cab roof. The decals have been printed by Techmod and appear to be very well printed, with good opacity and very thin carrier film. Chevrolet C30A from the 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade, HQ Company, 2nd Canadian Armoured Division, England 1942 Chevrolet C30A from the 48th Highlanders of Canada, 1st Canadian Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Infantry Division, England 1942 Conclusion It’s great to see another version of the well recognised CMP truck released as an injection moulded kit. Whilst it is certainly not for the beginner, with care, patience and a bit of skill the average modeller should be able to produce a great looking model. I continue to be pleasantly surprised by the quality of the mouldings and will certainly be looking forward to their future releases. Review sample courtesy of
  16. Dear friends, I would like to notify all of you about latest new items that arrived in our shop's stock. - CL-415 from Amodel in 1:144 scale (AMO1476) - Yakovlev Yak-18T "Red Aeroflot" from Amodel in 1:48 scale (AMO4810) - 2 cm Flak-30 anti-aircraft guns from First To Fight in 1:72 scale (FTF035) - Bofors 40 mm Polish Anti Aircraft Gun from First To Fight in 1:72 scale (FTF036) - HMS Middleton 1943 Hunt II class destroyer escort from IBG Models in 1:700 scale (IBG70005) - HMS Zetland 1942 Hunt II class destroyer escort from IBG Models in 1:700 scale (IBG70006) - Swedish light tank - Stridsvagn M/38 from IBG Models in 1:72 scale (IBG72033) - Swedish light tank - Stridsvagn M/40L from IBG Models in 1:72 scale (IBG72036) - SU-122 (Initial Production) w/Full Interior from MiniArt in 1:35 scale (MA35175) - B-29 Superfortess flaps from Metallic Details in 1:48 scale (MD-PE4814) - E-50 Ausf M from World of Paper tanks in 1:50 scale (WPT-AR-0001) - Air defense missile system, S-25 Berkut from ZZ Modell in 1:87 scale (ZZ87013) Sincerely, Alex Scale-model-kits.com - plastic scale model kits on-line shop
  17. The IBG Models catalog 2016 is online: http://www.ibgmodels.com/2016_IBG_cat.pdf Source: https://www.facebook.com/ibgmodels/?fref=nf Nothing about the 1/72nd aircraft programme announced about a year ago in the catalog 2015... http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234979057-172-polish-wing-1918-2015-ibg-models172nd-ac-programme-2015/ V.P.
  18. Chevrolet C60S Petrol Tank IBG Models 1:35 History The Canadian Military Pattern (CMP) truck was a class of military truck - of various forms - made in large numbers in Canada during World War II to British Army specifications for use in the armies of the British Commonwealth allies. Standard designs were drawn up just before the beginning of the war. Early in 1937, the Ford Motor Company of Canada and R. S. McLaughlin of General Motors of Canada Ltd were each invited by the Canadian Department of National Defence to produce a Canadian prototype of a 15-hundredweight light infantry truck that had then been recently adopted by the British War Office. By 1938, Canadian military authorities had shifted their interest to heavier 4x4 and 6x4 designs. In that year, Ford and General Motors of Canada Limited were invited to produce prototypes of a 6x4 medium artillery tractor derived from the British 6x4 Scammell Pioneer. By 1939, plans had been prepared for the mass production in Canada of a range of military vehicles based on fairly strict CMP British specifications. These trucks were originally designated "Department of National Defence (DND) Pattern"; however, when production volumes increased and it became clear that the Canadian-built vehicles were to serve widely in the forces of other countries, the class of trucks was redesignated "Canadian Military Pattern (CMP)". At the outbreak of World War II, Canada's large and modern automobile industry was shifted over to the production of military vehicles out-producing Germany. While the Dunkirk evacuation in the spring of 1940 succeeded in rescuing close to 340,000 Allied soldiers who had been encircled by the invading German army, the British Expeditionary Force had been required to abandon most of its military vehicles in France. It then became an urgent need to replace those losses and to provide new vehicles to equip the rapidly expanding armed forces of the Commonwealth. Canadian military truck production included both modified civilian designs as well as purely military designs based on the CMP specification, in roughly equal numbers. Truck production was focussed on a broad range of medium-capacity vehicles; Jeeps and trucks larger than 3 tons in capacity required by the Canadian Army were purchased suppliers. Most CMP trucks were manufactured by the Chevrolet division of General Motors of Canada Ltd and by the Ford Motor Company of Canada. The vehicle manufacturers were able to rapidly ramp up their production because of an unusual degree of inter-company collaboration in Canada, the use of interchangeable parts, and because of the large amount of idle production capacity that was a lingering result of the Great Depression. A smaller number of CMP trucks were assembled from Canadian-made chassis and parts in Britain, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa (2,600), India (9,500) and Egypt. Following British convention, CMP trucks had right-hand drive even though most of them were built in Canada, which primarily used left-hand drive vehicles. The CMP specification proved versatile, and it formed the basis of a wide variety of different truck types and armoured vehicles. In Australian service (almost always with the No. 13 cab) these vehicles were known as the "Chev Blitz" or the "Ford Blitz". Just over 500,000 CMP trucks were manufactured in Canada, accounting for roughly two-thirds of the 815,729 military vehicles made in Canada during World War II. The most prevalent type was the 4x4 3-ton truck (including models C60S, C60L, F60S and F60L), with just over 209,000 vehicles made. In addition, roughly 9,500 4x4 CMP chassis were made, mainly to be used to build armoured cars and other vehicles in Allied countries. CMP truck production in Canada exceeded the total military truck production of Nazi Germany. The British History of the Second World War (the official history of the war) argues that the production of soft-skinned trucks, including the CMP truck class, was Canada's most important contribution to the eventual Allied victory. The Ford and Chevrolet trucks shared a standard cab design, which evolved over the years of production. The first (designed at Ford by Sid Swallow), second and third cab designs were called No. 11, 12 and 13, respectively. The first two types were similar, the main difference being a two-part radiator grille in No.12 cab (its upper part was opened with a bonnet, which was known as the "Alligator cab"). The final No. 13 cab, an entirely Canadian design made from late 1941 until the end of the war, had the two flat panes of the windscreen angled slightly downward to minimize the glare from the sun and to avoid causing strong reflections that would be observable from aircraft. All the CMP cab designs had a short, "cab forward" configuration that gave CMP trucks their distinctive pug-nosed profile. This design was required to meet the original British specifications for a compact truck design that would be more efficient to transport by ship. The specifications also demanded right-hand drive. Internally the cab had to accommodate the comparatively large North American engines and it was generally cramped. The standard cabs were then matched up with a variety of standard chassis, drive trains and body designs. Chevrolet-built vehicles could be recognised by the radiator grille mesh being of a diamond pattern, whereas Ford-built ones had grilles formed of a square mesh. The production of CMP truck bodies in Canada was subcontracted out to smaller companies in Ontario and Manitoba, organized into the wartime Steel Body Manufacturers Association by the Department of Munitions and Supply. The wide variety of truck body designs included general service (GS), water tanker, fuel tanker, (the subject of this kit), vehicle recovery (tow truck), dental clinic, mobile laundry, wireless house, machinery (machine shop), folding boat transport, and anti-tank gun portee. The Model The kit comes in a glossy top opening box, with, what looks like a colourful Mirror Models style top. On opening even the sprues are reminiscent of Mirror Models kits. The box is stuffed full of parts and once you have had the sprues out for a bit of fondling you will find them very difficult to get back in so that the lid fits flat. There are sixteen sprues of blue-grey styrene, one sprue of clear styrene, two small sheets of etched brass and a smallish decal sheet. Have had a good look at the parts, I can tell you that the moulding is superb, with very crisp details, no sign of flash or other imperfections and only a very few moulding pips. Some parts do have quite a few sprue gates, but they are commendably small, so should take more than a couple of swipes of a sanding sponge to clean up. Since this is a variation of the other Chevrolet trucks IBG have, or are due to release there are a number of parts included that won’t be required for the fuel tanker, especially parts such as the two different types of chassis rails, half the parts off one sprue, plus a couple of parts from several other sprues. The build process is quite complex with lots of detail in and around the chassis, as for most truck models, so this won’t be a quick and easy build, but one that will need time, patience, and care to assemble, certainly not for a beginner. The instructions are very clear and easy to read, but not always logical particularly with the way the sub-assemblies are used, although they use the CAD/Photo style of drawings that I know some people don’t like, each to their own. Construction begins with a load of sub assemblies. Firstly the styrene wheels are assembled, each provided in two halves, which may require some careful sanding of the seam, along with the rear cross member spring unit, which includes the tow hook, associated clamps and the anti-swing bars. The access steps are next, with the option of styles for either the Cab 12, or Cab 13 with its extra storage box on one of the steps. The two fuel tanks are made up from five parts, the lower section includes the ends, the top section, filler cap/pipe and the two supports. The next three steps involve the bending of PE parts to shape. The transfer box support is easy enough, with the end being folded to 90’, as is the panel that will be fitted beneath the radiator grille. The grille itself is a little more awkward in that the sides of both the upper and lower sections need to be bent to 28’ whilst the outer frame need to be flat, so it would be handy to have a folding tool to hand. With those done, its onto the drive-train with the transfer box made up from four parts, the front axle/differential made up from eleven parts and the rear axle from six parts. The front bumper is then fitted out with the guard supports and towing eyes. The build proper begins with the assembly of the very nicely detailed engine. The two block halves are glued together, and then fitted with the sump, cylinder head, front, which includes the auxiliary drive points and rear, which includes the bell housing. The drive belt is a single piece moulding onto which the PE fan is attached, with the intake manifold, air filter unit, alternator and fuel pump finishing it off. The cab or cabs are next with the option to produce a type 12 or 13, so make sure you know what vehicle you wish to build and use the correct parts, as there are quite a few that are similar. Each uses a different floor pan which is then fitted with the respective scuttle, gearbox/engine cover, bonnet, wheel arches, windscreen, instrument binnacle, front end, grille and bonnet side panels. The common parts are the four part seats, gear sticks, pedals and fire extinguisher. Each cab also has the choice of having a plain roof or one with a roof hatch fitted. With the cab/s assembled the fuel tank construction begins. This is made up of a separate ladder frame, the outer rails of which have fitted with the separate top panels and three tank supports. The controls are contained in a large box mounted to the rear of the tank and contains the pumps, dials and pipework required to fill and empty the tank, all included in the kit and with the rear doors, which can be posed open or closed. The tank itself is made up form upper and lower halves, closed off at one end and fitted with two hatches, a vent plug and four hand rails. The open end is glued to the pump housing before being fitted to the support frame. On each side of the tank there are two walkways, each fitted at the forward end with three two part storage boxes, and the two rear mudguards, plus their respective support arms. Finally we get to the chassis, which is normally one of the first things assembled in a truck kit. Each of the chassis rails is fitted with the single leaf springs and their supports at the front, whilst at the rear there are double leaf springs fitted, along with the tow bumper beams and their brackets. Each rail is then joined together by the front bumper, five cross members and the rear end beam with tow hook assembled earlier. With the chassis assembled, all the sub assemblies can now be fitted to it, the engine, with four piece exhaust, the wheels, with alternative central hubs, the front and rear differentials, transfer box, all joined together by the various drive shafts, truck fuel tanks, main fuel tank, cab and access steps, which at this point you should have a completed model. IBG Models have also included some useful items to give a bit of life to the vehicle in the shape of four rifles and a couple of Jerry cans. Decals The small decal sheet provides decals for two different trucks, one with a type 12 cab and one with a type 13 along with various placards for around the truck, plain stars for the cab doors and a large star with segmented circle for the cab roof. The decals have been printed by Techmod and appear to be very well printed, with good opacity and very thin carrier film. The Type 12 truck is from the 4th Canadian Armoured Brigade Company, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps of the 4th Canadian Armoured Division, Normandy, France, August 1944 The Type 13 truck is from the 5th Canadian Infantry Brigade Company, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, Normandy, France, August 1944 Conclusion It’s great to see this rather unusual version of the well recognised CMP truck released as an injection moulded kit. Whilst it is certainly not for the beginner, with care, patience and a bit of skill the average modeller should be able to produce a great looking model. Being the first IBG model I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing, I have been pleasantly surprised by the quality of the mouldings and will certainly be looking at their back catalogue. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  19. We already knew that IBG is working on 1/72nd RWD-8 DWL & PWS kits (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234975780-172-rwd-8-pws-dwl-by-ibg-models-box-artcads-release-june-2015/) but some other aircraft are planned under the "Polish Wing 1918-2015" models line like: - RWD-9 - RWD-17 - PZL P.6 - Lublin R.IX - Lublin R.XIII Source: https://www.facebook.com/tankmodels/photos/pb.174127712605287.-2207520000.1423641596./955171137834270/?type=1&theater V.P.
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