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Found 232 results

  1. After finishing my Trumpeter Challenger 2 Optelic I went back to my Mosquito build which is presenting me with a few problems as I have decided to follow @The Baronlead and make the engine bearers from brass rod/tube. Wanting something a little easier to build alongside the Mosquito I had a look in the stash and found this:- A straight forward model with no interior so shouldn't be any problems except for the wheels which have vinyl tyres including the centre pair of wheels which are all metal and have a ridged arrangement to help with the cross country performance. DEF (I think) produce a set of resin wheels but are twice the price of what I paid for the kit. Have not decided whether to stick with whats in the box or use them to cast resin replacements. Also undecided as to whether to put at least one of the two drivers positions in which will of course need to be scratch built, time will tell on this. Here are the box contents and instruction sheet pictures As you can see there is a small photo etch fret and markings for one vehicle are also supplied. Thanks for looking in I'll make a start on this soon Roger
  2. Welcome to the RFI for my very first helicopter. The Kamov 27 Helix by Hobby Boss. It’s a lovely kit with very little to correct. I used : Tamiya paints. (Acrylic) flory washes vallejo Paint (Acrylic) Tamiya weathering powder. ammo filters and EZ-line I scratch built the seat harnesses and some of the interior wiring. without further ado here she is. here’s an internal shot from the WIP. one last pic. Hope you like her. The WIP can be found here. If you followed along thanks for your help and companionship. My latest build is here. Take care kids and as always Happy Modelling. Johnny.
  3. My entry for this GB will be the HobbyBoss 1/48 Hawk T-1A No 4 Flying Training School, RAF Valley Though I had thought of building an F-5E Tiger of VFC-13 Flying Saints Adversary Squadron - “Training the Fleet Air Wings” from NAS Fallon
  4. #12/2018 After the KG(J)54 bird, my dad now built a partner for it from KG(J)6. Hobby Boss kit with EagleCals, Tamiya and Gunze acrylics, EZ Line for all the wires. This aircraft was found by allied troops in May 1945. It was used by Wilhelm Niederkrüger for two recorded training flights. Not known if it was used for more or combat duty. Build thread here http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/inde ... a-1a-kgj6/ DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0002 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0003 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0004 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0005 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0007 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0008 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0009 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0010 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0011 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0012 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0013 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0014 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0015 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0016 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0017 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0018 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0019 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0020 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0017 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0019 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0020 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0021 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr
  5. It's been quite some time since i posted anything, but I recently started hobby boss's Gloster gladiator (or RAF gladiator as they call it). (i hope the flickr pictures will show up as it's the first time i use this site for pics) I also have airfix's gladiator wich is a more detailed and accurate kit, but since i will be finishing this kit as a Belgian maschine i will be airbrushing the markings and since i have limited experience with this i wanted to try it first on a kit that would build up quickly so i could get right into painting. contents of the box 3 piece cockpit At this point i realised the belgian gladiators had a differentstyle windshield but fortunately the airfix kit had this style and the option of an open and closed canopy so since i'll be building the airfix with an open canopy the closed item would be a straight swap right.... Turns out the hobby boss made the rear taper far to wide so the solid portion should only be half the with... what to do... moddify the hobby boss clear part... a lot of work and no accurate result still so out with the saw for the solid portion i made a mold from milliput and plug moded a nes piece from clear blister plastic Cardboard backing with CA reinforcement... took a few tries as usual but works well enought for such small parts. More sanding needed but much better I added a few more details to the interior, i didn't go all the way, as not much can be seen trough the canopy. i'll save that for the airfix kit. For the interior green i started with a much darker green and than came in with a dusting for a much lighter shade followed with an enamel wash since i had some color left i sprayed most of the top as well, it gives an impression of the final color and to play with the wing shading And that's where we are right now
  6. I'm going to commit to this and start a thread for my Black Widow build. Have always loved the twin boom P-61 and P-38, this will be my first Black Widow in 1/48 so excited to get cracking with it. Just got to finish off my current build (Wildcat) then I'll make a start. I read yesterday that someone mentioned there was fitment issues with the nose weight causing the fuselage to not fit snugly, has anyone else had an issues with this kit? Going to be using the kit decals for Sleepy Time Gal - with an overall black finish to fit nicely in with the nightfighter category of this GB Aaron
  7. Source: http://www.hobbyboss.com/index.php?g=home&m=product&a=show&id=310&l=en V.P.
  8. RAAF F/A-18C Hornet(85809) 1:48 Hobby Boss The F-18's humble beginnings as the loser of the light fighter contest that gave the US Air Force the F-16 Fighting Falcon were soon left behind when it was decided that something a little more rugged was needed for the Navy and Marine Corps, who would need to fly from carriers and wanted to carry warloads at supersonic speeds. Single and two-seater variants were offered, with the A and C being the solo pilots, and the B and C the two-seaters, all of which were combat capable. The larger E/F Super Hornets were later created to extend the capabilities of the airframes, with a substantially larger airframe and load carrying capability. The US have recently withdrawn their Cs from service, but the aircraft carries on in service with other operators and is likely to continue to do so for some considerable time. Now I'm going to stop talking about Cs, as Australia has As and Bs, with no Cs being held in inventory by the Australian Air Force that I'm aware of, which is further backed up by a quick check of their own website. Checking the registry for the two airframes depicted on the decal sheet shows them as block 20 and 22 Model A Hornets, with a fair amount of corroborating evidence backing that up. They were delivered to the RAAF in the late 80s, and are getting toward the end of their service lives now, which is being teased out until the long awaited F-35As are in service, and at time of writing the first few have reached Australian soil. The Hornet airframes will be sold on where possible, with a deal already having been made with Canada for some of them. The Kit With an inauspicious start due to the misnaming of the type, I fully expected an F-18C to be in the box, which although ostensibly similar to the A, has some differences that we'll attempt to cover later in the review. Firstly, it should be noted that this is not a new tooling, but a rebox of an earlier kit with new decals showing two display birds wearing Anniversary markings. Inside the fairly standard Hobby Boss box are eight sprues in grey styrene, a sprue and a separate part in clear, two decal sheets, the instruction booklet and a glossy full-colour markings placement and painting guide. First impressions are that some of the smaller parts are a little rough in places, with less attention paid to placement of ejector pin marks, and the occasional rough bit of tooling, however the main airframe is well detailed and from looking at builds of previous boxings of the kit online, it certainly looks the part. As an aside I wouldn't set myself up as an F-18 expert (far from it), but I've been doing a bit of research and have noted what I've found along the way through this review to help anyone with this model create a more accurate version if they're so minded. If you have access to an F-18 guru, I would suggest you seek their advice regarding the differences between the C and A variants of the Legacy Hornet, as I'm a fallible human (of sorts). The build begins with the cockpit, with the Martin Baker SJU-NACES seat built up from side panels, cushions, headbox and ejection lever but without any harnesses, so you can either make your own or pick up some suitable aftermarket. The cockpit tub is a single part, with a HOTAS arrangement and instrument panel added, with seven decals for the consoles and panel to bring out the nicely moulded detail without painstaking painting. At the same time, the nose gear bay is made up from a roof with moulded-in detail, and two detailed sides. It slots into the lower fuselage part, and is joined by the cockpit, which simply sits on top of it. There is no sidewall detail, but little will be seen unless you squint really hard. The upper fuselage includes the wings and the Leading Edge Extension (LEX), with the lowers added before the halves are joined, plus a small portion of the tip of the LEX, after which it can be mated with the lower, which locates with a number of pins. The main gear bays are moulded into the lower fuselage, and are quite nicely done, as is the rest of the external detail. The landing gear can be left off until after painting, which is always nice, and is built up from single part legs, with additional struts, linkages and dampers fitted as appropriate. The main tyres are supplied in halves, while the twin nose gear wheels are each single parts. These are put to the side and added further on in the build, which in fairness does seem to jump around a little. The nose of the model is a separate section, with the front bulkhead of the nose gear moulded into the two halves, leaving a seamline unless you put them together carefully. A small insert fits into a depression in the nose, and a group of sensors and aerials are installed underneath. Parts J1 and J2 are shown fitted, but should be left off for accuracy's sake, as they appear on the C. This is again the case with two more bulges J43 and J44, which are shown installed at the front of the fuselage where it joins the nose. The intake trunks, elevators, gear legs and arrestor hook are all added with the airframe inverted, although many people will leave much of this off until later. As yet the wings are bereft of the large flaps and slats, which are added next, along with the intake lips, which are made up with their splitter plates and a spacer, then inserted into the trunk later on. There are no engine fronts or blanking plates, but little will be seen down there without a flashlight. The exhausts are fitted to lengths of trunking that are split vertically, with ribbed detail visible inside, to which a blanking plate with moulded-in afterburner details added. The exhaust cans are a single part with the notched petals moulded into the surface, which many of the Aussie birds have. There are two of course, and they slot into the fuselage side-by-side. Just like the real thing, the kit has a cockpit aperture suitable for the two-seater, which is covered over with a turtle-deck with equipment under the real one, with a spine extension that completes the contouring of the area. The 3-part HUD goes on the coaming and is covered by the windscreen, and the canopy is attached to the frame before it is fixed in the open or closed position using the twin legs at the rear - this has a central seam on the outside due to the "blown" shape, so sand and polish this away if you're feeling brave. There are two more parts J9 and J10 here that aren't required for the RAAF aircraft, so leave those in the box after checking your references and fill the little marks that show their location. The tail fins are both handed, and have a central third sensor fairing in their trailing edge above the moulded-in rudders, which should be removed to backdate it back to an A, with plenty of pics on the net to help you with that if you fancy the challenge, and if you're looking for more work, a few small appliqué stiffener panels could be added for extra fidelity – again, check your references. At this point the nose is also added, with a slot helping with alignment. There are a number of antennae and blade aerials to fit along the spine, after which the airframe is ostensibly complete aside from the gear bay doors, some of which will need a little work to get them looking nice, and the crew access ladder that pops out of the port LEX and is made up from three parts. The flap actuator fairings should be fitted too before you begin adding pylons, and these are all separate and will sadly need adapting if you wish to pose the flaps deployed, which is a shame as just a few additional parts could have made that a breeze. The airbrake between the tail fins can be posed open by using the ram to hold it in position, with some detail within the bay if you choose to do so. Before you can decide which of the supplied weapons to use, you will need to construct the pylons, with four identical units for under the wings, and a centreline pylon, plus the moulded-in wingtip rails and separate adapters for the Sidewinders. There is a fairly generous helping of munitions on the two sprues, as follows: 2 x AIM-9L Sidewinders 2 x Mk.82 bombs on dual ejector rack 1 x AAR-50 thermal navigation pod with fairing 2 x AGM-84E SLAM Cruise Missile 1 x AN/ASQ-173 laser tracker pod with fairing 2 x AGM-88 HARM anti-radar missile 2 x AIM-7 Sparrow A2A missile 1 x AN/AAS-38A Nitehawk FLIR pod with fairing 2 x JDAM laser guided bombs 2 x GBU-10 Paveway II laser guided bombs 2 x Fuel tanks A diagram on the rear of the instructions shows where each weapon can be carried, but check your references to see what kind of loads are carried in the real world if you're looking for accuracy. Markings The two colour schemes included with this kit are likely to be the biggest draw, because they're quite colourful and appealing. The decals are up to Hobby Boss's usual standards, with decent registration, colour density and sharpness, which is nice. A21-26 - 20 years of F/A-18 scheme The modeller will need to paint the dark blue topside to match the red and white pinstriping, but the dark grey walkway sections are supplied as decals, so there's that! Most pictures show the airframe having five bird-slicers in front of the windscreen however, which isn't an option on this kit. They stand out because they are painted grey and appear just in front of the central white star on the nose. You might want to check your references and consider scratch building the strakes if it bothers you. It's a high gloss finish, so preparation and gloss varnishing after painting and decal will make or break the finish. A21-35 – 30 Years Anniversary A more straight forward scheme with darker grey topsides over a light grey, with red tails. You will need to paint the tails and apply the stars and 30 year logo, which is a good thing, as decals sometimes don't settle down well on the edges of flying surfaces. The instructions note that the leading edges and tips of the inner faces only are red, with the rest grey. The arrow on the spine is broken down into three parts, so alignment will be key here too, and this aircraft wasn't quite as pristine as A21-26, with some difference in tone between panels here and there to give the weathering fans a bit of leeway. This airframe also seems to have the bird-slicers on its nose, so break out the styrene strip! Conclusion It's an older kit, although 2007 isn't all that long ago unless you've been waiting for a bus since then. This does show in places, but thankfully they're not too many, and easily fixed. The biggest head-scratcher is the marking of the kit as an F/A-18C, but as that's not exactly a massive issue to get around, with only one aspect (the tail fairings) requiring any scratch-building (plus the bird-slicers), it's just a bit of an "oopsie" for HB's people, and a case of not paying 100% attention when putting the package together, or hoping against hope that we won't notice. With these aspects aside however, it's not too tricky to make a decent model from it. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Hobby Boss is to release in 2018-2019 two 1/32nd B-24 kits - ref. 83211 - Consolidated B-24J Liberator - ref. 83212 - Consolidated B-24D Liberator Source: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/ms.c.eJxFkdGRRTEIQjvaUVGj~;Te2czHmfTJROJhWQVhLnOo~_8tefdtVWg5Zdbfm9F3w0kOaR0Xr1Eeo4d16KWnu0VY~;~;zjfol3cewjzrmwcbHpfV~;vmlYPMP5yN3nzxp6w8M3~;I6~_Vt9~_3Bf8~_5bkz~_xPDH5uvk6~;rr~_ciZv74Wk3~_vv8b37735GHom9j7P~;4y~;6xet7gv20lof3anl8xXdcPyTvW~_8~;qumHWp7J0~;wHK7NkWQ~-~-.bps.a.910352652456662.1073742118.103526326472636/910353465789914/?type=3&theater V.P.
  10. Ahoy! On the bench at the minute I have my first Hobby Boss kit. Completed an Eduard Hellcat last year and decided it was time for the cat collection to grow... Having never build a Hobby Boss kit before I was a little reluctant to begin with, but having read several positive reviews thought it was worth a crack. Nothing fancy with this one, just using the box kit and some Eduard belts to spruce up the pit. This is my first WIP thread! Not sure it will be too exciting. Had two days off work earlier in the week and this is how it stands at the moment. When it came to gluing everything together I was getting a bit worries that there might be fit / alignment issues as there isn't a solid fit - bits tend to be a bit floaty. Probably not a problem for most, but I am a bit spoilt as I mainly build Tamiya kits! So glued the fuselage together and then the cockpit floor to the bottom tub section. Once the glue had set nicely, popped the other bits in place, quick dab of Tamiya liquid cement and then held the tub section into the fuselage - wiggled bits around so that everything sits as it should. Even so, there is still going to be a bit of filler needed above the headrest. The undercarriage section almost came a cropper, again due to vague locations, as a tip to anyone I'd recommend trying to get the struts in place and then popping it into place in the fuselage tub section to make sure everything fits. As in my case the fitment of one of struts is a little wayward, wasn't to bad thankfully and with a bit of prodding with a cocktail stick got it in place. Tonight should get a few more hours to crack on. Decided I wanted to the leave the fuel tanks off, which will mean a few holes need filling in the wing. Spotted a tip somewhere about stretching sprue to get a rod of plastic to fill holes, so might give that a bash. Thanks for popping by... More to follow Aaron
  11. Hobby Boss is to release in 2018-2019 a 1/72nd Kawasaki T-4 kit - ref. 87266 Source: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/ms.c.eJxFkdGRRTEIQjvaUVGj~;Te2czHmfTJROJhWQVhLnOo~_8tefdtVWg5Zdbfm9F3w0kOaR0Xr1Eeo4d16KWnu0VY~;~;zjfol3cewjzrmwcbHpfV~;vmlYPMP5yN3nzxp6w8M3~;I6~_Vt9~_3Bf8~_5bkz~_xPDH5uvk6~;rr~_ciZv74Wk3~_vv8b37735GHom9j7P~;4y~;6xet7gv20lof3anl8xXdcPyTvW~_8~;qumHWp7J0~;wHK7NkWQ~-~-.bps.a.910352652456662.1073742118.103526326472636/910352895789971/?type=3&theater V.P.
  12. HobbyBoss is to release in late February 2019 a 1/72nd Douglas A-4E Skyhawk kit - ref. 87254 Source: http://www.hobbyboss.com/index.php?g=home&m=article&a=show&id=129&l=en It'll be the first of a 1/72nd Skyhawk family. - ref. 87254 - Douglas A-4E Skyhawk - ref. 87255 - Douglas A-4F Skyhawk - ref. 87256 - Douglas A-4M Skyhawk V.P.
  13. Over the past few months we've been stocking a few bargain 1/35 kits, including ones from Meng, Miniart and Hobby Boss. We've had both Meng and Hobby Boss King Tigers in stock previously for under £20 each! We've got a few kits in stock right now and we'll get future bargains in stock, if we think there's a good chance of selling them! A good example of a bargain is the new Meng Magach 6 with all the extra armour n bits! Most of the offers are 1/3 or more off the UK RRP, some over 1/3 by quite a bit! Here's a link to our homepage https://mjwmodels.co.uk/ . You'll find the bargains by scrolling down the page and more on the second page too! thanks Mike
  14. Hello there! Another Zlin completed. This one (OM-MNQ) is from flying school in Košice, Slovakia. I really love this colour scheme nevertheless, the white and yellow is really hart to work with... The model is not perfect, but it was fast and nice build to me. I would like to thank KPM Prešov (model club) for the perfect decals. I hope you'll like it! Cheers, Andrew
  15. B-24J Liberator (83211) 1:32 Hobby Boss via Creative Models Consolidated's Liberator always seems to have flown in the shadow of the more popular B-17 Fortress in the media's eye even thought there were more of them, and in some aspects it was inferior, with poor low-speed handling and a lower ceiling, but it saw more than its fair share of action in almost every theatre of WWII, both in US use and in the hands of the RAF. It has a specification written around its main design traits, and had a long wingspan, twin bomb bays and four super-charged engines to provide motive power. It was unusual in having a high wing placement, tricycle undercarriage, and tamboured bomb-bay doors that retracted up the side of the fuselage, and was fitted with a fully glazed nose cone with .30cal machine guns for protection from head-on attacks. This was later updated to a turret fitted with .50cal guns with a glazed lower for the bomb aimer's position, but many of the earlier D models were still in use concurrently. Taking a leaf from the B-17's defensive armament book it could be fitted with up to 10 .50cal M2 Browning machine guns, with the layout changing during production changes, when various options were found to be unsatisfactory, such as the poorly defended nose, and the underside guns, which were eventually replaced with a Sperry ball turret that could be retracted into the fuselage to reduce drag, and must have pleased the crew no-end if they had to make a belly landing. The name "Liberator" was coined by the British, and soon spread to other operators, as they were early adopters of the type after the fall of France, serving with Coastal Command, and later with the RAF after the fuselage had been lengthened. In US Service the Liberator flew with the B-17, and later superseded it when the shorter range of the B-17 began to be an issue, with the Ploiesti raid being one of the most notable operations that featured the B-24, which suffered heavy losses due to the low level nature of the attack. After the J introduced the nose turret, the N was intended to be a major upgrade that incorporated a standard single tail fin to improve handling. Due to the end of the war this was cancelled, although the tail was still seen in the PB4Y-2 Privateer operated by the US Navy until long after WWII. After the huge success of the B-29 and the dawning of the jet age, the Liberator was drawn down at the end of the war, with only the Privateer soldiering on. A civilian airliner was prototyped as a potential offshoot, but that didn't proceed due to the same issues. The Kit There was quite a bit of hubbub about this kit when it was announced by Hobby Boss, and much has been said about its size and so forth. With the increasing number of 1:32 kits of WWII four-engined heavies however, it seems less unlikely now than it would have a few years ago. It is a brand-new tooling from Trumpeter's stablemate, and has been released at a price point that might make your eyes bulge for one of two reasons. If you're used to paying £30 for a kit, the fact that it's around £150 might make you swallow hard, but if you've bought other 1:32 heavies from other manufacturers, you might be surprised at how low the price is. Actually – make that three reasons for shock. The wingspan of this model is one metre five centimetres. 1049.5mm in total, with a length of 675.9mm. It's enormous! The box is pretty huge too, and has a rather retro-style boxart that reminds me of the model boxes of yesteryear, even down to some of the lettering, and the loose but effective manner that the bare metal has been painted. It is a top-opening box in sturdy cardboard, with a sub-box holding a number of the smaller sprues, and a compartment for the clear parts and delicate bits such as the PE, which are all separately bagged, the clear parts having bubble-wrapped bags for extra protection. Once you get over the awe of the size of the box and then the parts, you begin to realise that for the money you are getting an inordinate amount of plastic, which includes an almost complete interior, encompassing a lot of detail missed out from other kits of this scale and size. The surface detail is relatively straight forward, with engraved panel lines and rivets, which is consistent across the airframe and a good starting point for anyone that want to super-detail the exterior. A number of areas have been improved by the use of slide-moulding, and the landing gear has been strengthened by inserts within the detailed legs that appear to be made from a stronger plastic, although Aerocraft Models have produced a set of brass internal struts that will ensure your B-24 never does the splits once it's finished, which are really nice. This has got to be a must if you are planning on putting any kind of aftermarket in there, as it all adds weight. I'll be penning a review of this useful addition shortly, so keep an eye out. I'll link it from here when I'm done. First impressions are excellent – the panel lines may be a little deep for some, but I suspect they'll look fine once there's some primer then paint involved, and the level of detail is really good, especially considering the attractive price. Some folks have picked up on the engine fronts being a little simplified, but when you step back and consider the whole, it's not a deal-breaker and there are at least some Photo-Etch (PE) wiring harnesses to busy them up. Construction begins with the cockpit, which is set on the large floor, with consoles, seats and the main instrument panel fitted on it, the latter having a set of decals for the dials, and the throttle quadrant benefitting from a set of PE levers and side panel skins, which is nice to see from a mainstream manufacturer. The rear bulkhead has a doorway cut into the middle, and two tables for the next compartment attached in anticipation. Another short bulkhead affixes to the floor in front of the panel, closing off the nose from the cockpit area. The nose gear bay is moulded into the front of the lower floor, which has an opening for the crew hatch cut into it, and is detailed with separate rib-work aft of the partial bulkhead, with a PE skin in the hatchway. The nose gear leg is a short affair, with the aforementioned central inner leg, surrounded by the two outers, a large frame aft and a small scissor-link forward. The tyres are made of black flexible plastic, and have a two-part hub that fits from each side, and then slides onto the sturdy axle with a clipped mudguard close to the contact surface, which has a pair of small braces to prevent vibration. The leg is fitted into a square hole in the bay and stabilised by a central tong-shaped brace, plus retraction jack on the port side. A scrap diagram shows how the wheel and the forward bulkhead should look from the side, to avoid issues later. The two assemblies are brought together, with the entry floor moulded into the other side of the bay floor and additional parts added before the additional bulkhead with access ladder and another floor panel are fitted below the entryway, with the front resting on the partial bulkhead installed earlier. Another small piece of flooring is made up with ammo canisters flanking a simple hinged stool and the bomb-sight, with a rest pad in front of it for the bombardier's comfort during the run-in to target. This slots into the holes in the front of the lower bulkhead, and is joined by another bulkhead at the rear of the entry area, which has another stool fitted, this time with a back for the comfort of the radio operator as he hunches over his table. By now it is clear we're building the interior of the fuselage from front to back, which leads us to the bomb bays, which are bisected along their length by a tiny and dangerous 9" (23cm) wide walkway that wasn't at all liked by the crews. The bomb racks act as supports, and the completed assembly plugs into the roof, which is the underside of the wing. Ribs are added behind this area, and a bulkhead with doorway slots into the end. If you are planning on loading your B-24 with bombs, now is the time to build up twelve bombs, each of which is made up from two halves of the body, and another two parts for the fins, plus a spinner at the rear inside the box of the fins. Three go on each ladder, and you can have a bit of fun weathering their olive drab finish, as bomb dumps are usually outdoors a long way from shelter. The belly turret surround is also made up from a floor section with hexagonal hole for the turret, a short bulkhead that suspends it above the fuselage floor, and a step up/down to get in and around the turret. These two assemblies are then slotted into the back of the forward interior, and joined by the aft floor on which the waist gunners will stand to operate their .50cals from their windows. There is no "floor" as such aft of this area, so it is built into the fuselage halves later on. First, the various turrets are built up with their interiors looking very good OOB. The nose turret is first, with the internal structure built up around the two .50cals and fed by flexible styrene ammo belts from the centre. The glazing fits around the internals split front and back, with two small doors for the gunner's use separate at the rear, which necessitated a traverse full to the side to enable bail-out in an emergency, putting the gunner dangerously close to the likely still flailing props just behind his position. The aft turret is split into two side parts, into which the guns and their supports are installed, again being fed centrally via flexible styrene ammo runs. A piece of armoured glass at the front of the turret, and two more doors in the aft are added, then the turret is fitted through a base plate, and locked in place by adding the turret floor, permitting the turret to rotate freely, all being well. The belly turret is a more complex affair, as it has two axes of rotation. The suspension unit has the ammo cans fixed to the sides, and has a ring at the bottom, which has two pivots for the turret to rotate "up and down". The ball turret begins with the two clear side panels having a gun fitted and then joined together by a detailed cross-member with sighting equipment added. Then the clear central halves are closed around the assembly to form a rough ball, which is then clipped into the ring's pivots ready for installation. Before the fuselage and internals can be joined together, a great deal of equipment is added along the fuselage length on both sides, plus windows and various colours for the wall sections, which already have some nice detail moulded in. Scrap diagrams show the more complex assembly of the cockpit area parts, and colour call-outs are given where necessary, which is a big help. The waist gunner positions are added, as are copious yellow oxygen tanks, the prominent cable runs that pass through the bomb bay, and more ammunition. The uppermost sections of the rear fuselage are blank due to moulding constraints, but as the area will be seen through the waist windows, an insert that mimics the ribbing throughout the rest of the fuselage is installed on each side, with oxygen bottles and the waist gun window panels stowed there whilst they're in use. The starboard aft fuselage then receives a hollow bulkhead, equipment on the walls and a short length of walkway just forward of the rear turret, which acts as a step up/down for the cramped gunner, with his turret being installed at this stage, a small set of parts in the roof above the waist gunners, and the nose gunner's turret, which is locked in place without cement to allow it to turn. The interior is then installed in the starboard fuselage, the nose gunner's ammo belts are linked in, the belly turret is inserted through the hexagonal opening, and the long run of ammo is placed into its trough in the side of the fuselage, with additional parts having curves to enter the turret and leave their box by the waist gunner's station. This all sounds very quick, but there are a lot of parts, and a great deal of painting to be done during this stage, so it won't be a five minute job, and you still have another turret to build. The top turret has another two .50cals on a mount, which is sandwiched between the top and bottom "floor" and is joined by a number of other small parts, plus a short length of ammo leading down into the curved cans that are then fitted at the front, plus an armoured back with two oxygen tanks for the gunner in a small PE sling. It is set aside while the fuselage is joined, and slotted into the hole behind the canopy shortly after. The B-24's Davis wing relied on a long wingspan and narrow chord for high speed, but in return gave poor low speed handling, and had a high wing loading, which put a lot of stress on the airframe. In order for the model not to tear itself in half once completed, HB have included the mother of all spars, which extends 36cm across the centre of the aircraft once inserted. It slides into the slot over the bomb bays, and ledges on a lug to ensure it fits centrally, after which you can finally (finally!!!!) close up the fuselage, at which point you'll see a lot less of your hard work on the interior, but because of the scale, you'll still see a lot more than if it was 1:72 or 1:48. The aforementioned top turret drops into place behind the cockpit, and the canopy is fixed down over the aperture along with the nose-mounted astrodome, the "whiskers" on the nose sides, the open tamboured bomb bay doors and the wind deflectors in front of the waist gunner windows. Flipping the fuselage over, the bombardier's window goes on under the nose turret, the nose gear bay doors are added to the sides, four PE skins are fitted to the bomb bay centreline, the belly turret insert slots in on four upstands that hold it level with the skin of the outer fuselage, and here you'll just need to double-check that it is level before committing to glue. The rear hatch fills the aperture in the space between belly turret and tail, and that's the fuselage done for now. The main gear bays are buried deep in the wing, so need building up before construction on the wing begins in earnest. They are made up from individual slabs and a slightly curved roof that is in fact meant to be the underside of the skin. A number of ribs and stringers are installed, and it's all painted interior green, times two in mirror image. The finished wells fit into the lower wing, which has no nacelles at this stage, while the upper wing has the tops of the nacelles moulded-in, with a gap for the cooling flaps, which are separate. Top and bottom formation lights and a landing light near the gear bay are added from clear parts, and the process is repeated for the other side. The wings have heavy stiffening ribs inside, and are closed up around the spar that is now poking out of the fuselage on both sides, retained in place by stout turrets that pass through holes in the spar (see the pics for details). They could be adapted to be removable, and my first thoughts are to remove the turrets and add a neodymium magnet to the side of the gear bay to clamp against a piece of sheet metal that is attached to the spar. It could work, and it's bound to be something someone figures out fairly quickly, as there can't be all that many modellers with enough space to permanently display a complete B-24 with its wings on. During the mating process the flaps and ailerons are trapped between the halves, and the two lower engine nacelles with their cooling flaps and huge supercharger intakes recessed into the bottom complete the aft section of the nacelles and await the engine cowlings. There are some issues with the wing thickness and angle of incidence that have already been brought to light by other diligent modellers, but the fix is quite involved, and may terrify some of us (self included), for what might seem to some to be a slight difference, and to others it will make all the difference. I'm not sure yet which camp I fall into, but you can work that one out for yourself! Repeat the process (this is getting repetitive!) for the other wing, and then assemble the main gear legs around their central tougher strut, with retraction jacks, scissor-links and rubbery wheels with two-part hubs. This will be the first time the B-24 has stood on its own three wheels, and here I'm going to apply my usual pet worry about rubberised tyres on what is a rather heavy model. I don't know for sure what the long term prognosis will be for this plastic, but I would be sorely tempted to replace them with resin aftermarket wheels as and when they become available, just in case. We'll reconvene in 10 years and see whether I was right or not – I won't gloat if I am, I promise There are predictably four engine cowlings, and they are made up from an outer section and a small insert that blanks off the intakes on the sides. The Pratt & Witney R-1830 radial engines, which were a direct lift from the Catalina are depicted as two pseudo banks by applying the cylinder parts back-to-back, so that they will be seen through the front of the nacelle, and through the cooling flaps at the rear. The aforementioned PE harness is bent around the front bank, and an old-skool axle with collar is buried inside to take the three-bladed prop and allow it to spin freely once installed. The completed quartet are applied to the fronts of the nacelles once assembled, the retractable bumper is added at the rear, and small gear bay doors are attached to the newly fitted main gear legs. The instructions would have you fit the whiskers again at this stage, but don't be fooled – just do it the once, as late on as you can get away with, as they look eminently breakable! The build tails off with the big H-tail, and I'm really sorry about that pun. The main plane has separate elevators, all of which are made up of top and bottom parts, with the rudders also being separate from their fins, so that you can pose them as you please to add a little more interest to the area. The completed tail drops into the gap in the fuselage, closing over the fuselage, and completing the build save for a trio of antennae on the spine between wings and tail. At this stage you'll probably have knocked most things off your desk at some point with those massive wings, and be starting to wonder where you'll put it. Markings You'll probably need a larger spray booth for this one unless you've figured out how to make the wings removable, and you'll be pleased to hear that HB have included three decal options from the box on this large sheet. If you're phobic about natural metal finishes, you'll also be pleased to hear that there's an olive drab option too, although the aftermarket decal options are sure to balloon once this has been on general release for a while. Polka-dotted assembly ship anyone? There were a few Js. Now I'm wondering… and yes, there are some schemes out there that will probably be scaled up soon if not already. From the box you can build one of the following: B-24J-185-CO 44-40927 "51" 'My Akin?' of the 722nd BS, 450th BG B-24J-25-CF 42-109816 "YM" 'War Goddess' of the 409th BS, 93BG B-14J-175-CO 44-40674 "Going My Way" of the 431BS, 11BG As usual, Hobby Boss give very little info regarding the decal options, so I've had to use my rudimentary Google Fu to come up with any more information, although it's not hugely difficult. The two letter codes in the type represents the factory where the airframe was constructed, with CO standing for Consolidated's San Diego factory, and CF for their Fort Worth operation. The numeric code after the J Series letter is the Block Number. You can find a huge list of factories and such online here. Conclusion For the money, it's unlikely you'll get a bigger model, and to a great many of us it's a B-24J Liberator that will look awesome once built and painted. If you're a super detailer, you've got a lot more than a blank canvas on hand, as the detail levels are already excellent, especially when you consider the price. There are a couple of issues, the most notable being with the wing, but if that's not an issue for you, and I can very well see that being the case with a lot of folks, then it's a no-brainer. Go and get your credit card! If you're concerned about the wing, get your search engine to point you at the fix being worked on by our member Iain, or any others that are doubtless being worked on. As a point of note, it'll be impossible to sneak this box in past the missus if this is a criteria for you, but if you do get caught, it's almost big enough to live in anyway, so it's all good. Speaking personally, I'll be figuring out how to make the wings removable, loading it up with detail, and probably hiding my eyes about the wing, whilst singing "la-la-la can't hear you". Review sample courtesy of
  16. Hobby Boss is to re-release in late September 2018 its Hornet kit as 1/48th McDD F/A-18C Hornet RAAF kit - ref. 85809 Source: http://www.hobbyboss.com/index.php?g=home&m=article&a=show&id=119&l=en V.P.
  17. Decided to go back to reality and build Gerhard Barkhorn's Fw 190D-9 using the Hobby Boss 1:48 kit. It´s and absolute joy to build, everything fits together nicely and without gaps. The cockpit and engine both have mounting pegs which allow for the correct placement of both of them. Another thing nice about this kit is the landing gear legs, they fit perfectly and can´t be moved, unlike what happens with the Hasegawa kit, so you´re assured the correct rake of the Fw 190 from the start. The main markings came from the Dragon D-9 kit, the Swastikas are the only decals I used from the HB model.
  18. German Panzerlok BR57 Armoured Locomotive 1:72 Hobby Boss via Creative Models Ltd. During the 20s and 30s, the German National Railway dropped their previously dismissive doctrine regarding the use of armoured trains and realised that the armoured train was an effective way of pushing the railway further toward the front line, with sufficient protection for the locomotive to counter all but large calibre, high velocity rounds. A standard 1910 Prussian series G10 locomotive (0-10-0) with was fitted with armoured plates of thickness to render them almost invulnerable to small arms fire and air attack, permitting the loco to carry on unmolested unless the track was damaged. This type of loco became the standard in track clearing duties, and often pulled/pushed armoured and armed wagons mounting surplus gun turrets, seeking out ambushes in advance of important consignments that would follow. The BR57 often pulled two tenders and both pulled and pushed a couple of such wagons from the centre of the train. The Kit Although Hobby Boss don't immediately strike you as a producer of railway kits, they and their associate company Trumpeter do have a long-running and infrequent habit of producing (mainly military) engines, rail guns and wagons to go with such things. I have a couple of these in my collection, such as the Trumpy Leopold, the BR52 loco and a Panzerjägerwagen, as well as a diesel shunter the name of which I can't quite remember as I write this. This armoured loco is a new tool, and arrives in a standard HB box with a small card divider within, protecting the bodywork and under frame from damage, with the rest of the sprues individually wrapped, and in places protected by additional foam sheet. Take heed regarding the wrapping around the chassis ends though, as it is quite tightly wound, and could damage the delicate details underneath if removed roughly. Inside the box are seven sprues and two separate parts in sand coloured styrene, a glossy A4 painting sheet, instruction booklet and no decals, which I'm a little surprised about, as military vehicles of all types usually have at least a few stencils. Moving on… The detail of the slide-moulded upper shell parts is excellent, with bulky rivets and panels on the surface. The purists will want to replace the grab rails on the loco sides with wire ones for ultimate fidelity, but care will need to be taken here not to damage the surrounding detail. The overall part count is fairly low due to the fact that much of the structure is covered by armour, but what is there is finely moulded to a high standard. Construction begins with the lower chassis, which is a long narrow ladder into which the bearings, leaf-suspension and brake blocks are added on the inside face, with the wheels on the outer face. The wheels and their connecting rods are applied to the outer face, with a good level of moulded-in detail on the single part, given the limitations of plastic moulding. More parts including the pistons at the front of the wheel runs and the connecting rods are added before the running gear is mated with the lower floor of the loco. The boiler front and tread-plates are fitted to the front of this over the pistons, and plates are added to the front and rear. The armoured body is pretty much a single part, and is moulded with three tabs on the lower edge of each side, which must be removed before it is installed over the floor. Mirrors, couplings, a short funnel, and cheek plates to the pistons are then installed to finish off the loco. The tender has a wider, shorter chassis with three pairs of wheels added inside the frame, and suspension detail moulded to the outer surface of the frame. This and the loco coupling are fitted to the underside of floor, with the armoured shell fitting over the top with steps, grips, buffers and couplings fitted to the exterior. A small valance is fixed to the shroud around the accessway, and a plate is glued to the rear underside of the loco to fix the link between the halves in place, completing the build. Happily, Hobby Boss have included a stand, which consists of four track bed lengths with end-caps that result in a 60cm base that is covered in faux ballast, which if I'm being critical is a little bit too regular. The sleepers/ties are moulded into the ballast, and you slide eight lengths of rail into the cleats, linking them together with bolted plates as per the real thing (before welded rails became a thing of course). This gives the (roughly) 25cm loco and tender plenty of space to float around, and an additional truck or two could be added for a mini-diorama. Markings There are no decals in the box, and only one colour scheme included on the sheet, which is a base of Dark Yellow, over which is applied Red brown and Field Green stripes in a similar fashion seen on Panzers of the time. Given how filthy railway gear got due to the soot and grease, there is then plenty of scope for the modeller to express themselves with weathering. Conclusion A nicely moulded kit that would have benefitted from the inclusion of the footplate and controls, so that the sliding panels over the windows could have been left open. The boiler front is also locked away behind a non-opening armoured door, which again would have been useful to be able to leave ajar for a more candid look to the finished model. That aside, it's an appealing addition to a collection of military railway hardware, which I seem to have been indulging in without even thinking about. Maybe that's where my son gets it from afterall? Review sample courtesy of
  19. Continuing with the topic of my last model: I built the Hobby Boss 1:48 Me 262A-1a with the same theme, and painted it entirely in red, the way it looked in the show. Regarding the aircraft itself, it wasn´t as well fitting as the Fw 190D-9. The gun bay is designed to be posed open, so the covers won´t seat flush with the rest of the fuselage. I used the weight that came with the kit, and found it pushed the nose outwards a bit, but pressure, glue and superglue fixed everything in place. The biggest problem with this kit was the way Hobby Boss decided to attach the big pieces (wings, wheels and fuselage halves) to the sprues. They did so by putting the sprue gates inside the pieces. This isn´t a problem with pieces that are thick, but clean a bit too much on the wings and rudder, and you´ll shave a part of them. To sum up, I really enjoyed building these two models, they gave me inspiration to continue with the aircraft of the real pilots. Though my display space is running out.
  20. As the title says, is the noseweight provided on the Hobby Boss 1:48 Me 262A-1a heavy enough to avoid the aircraft from tailsitting? The weight doesn't feel too heavy. I was thinking on adding another 30 grams or so in the space between the cannon and cockpit's bulkheads. Adding the armament might also help. I could also delete the roof of the nose gear (where the cannons are glued), add the nose bulkheads, and then add another weight in there as a roof. Any help is welcome. Funnily enough, I wasn't able to find any build reviews for this kit
  21. I decided to post this here and not on my local Facebook modeler´s group because you lot seem more, polite and civilised. The Strike Witches anime is based on an alternate reality, where the Earth has been invaded by an alien race known as Neuroi in 1939, and the only ones who can fight them effectively are young girls with magical powers called witches, who use machines called Striker Units to fly and fight the Neuroi in the sky. The girls and their Striker Units are based on famous WW2 aces and aircraft. One of the characters of this anime is Gertrud Barkhorn from Karlsland, who uses an Fw 190D-9 as her Striker Unit. I got the inspiration to build this model after seeing Hasegawa´s release: https://www.1999.co.jp/eng/10531089. Since I knew I wouldn´t be able to get it, I got into the task of getting aftermarket decals and spares to make this version. And yes, I have the Dragon 190D-9 with decals for Gerhard Barkhorn´s aircraft, but the model is covered with imperfections, so I´ll use the decals of that kit on the Hobby Boss one. I used Revell Aqua colours, Skymodel decals for Gerhard Barkhorn´s markings, and Eduard´s Iron Crosses from a Bf 109F-2. Stay tuned, because there´ll be an Me 262 painted in bright red from the same show in the future.
  22. HobbyBoss is to release in late August 2017 a 1/18th Focke-Wulf Fw.190A-5 kit - ref. 81802 Source: http://www.hobbyboss.com/index.php?g=home&m=article&a=show&id=92 Box art V.P.
  23. Hobby Boss is to release in 2019-2020 a new tool 1/48th Boeing Bell MV-22 Osprey kit - ref. 81769 Source: https://www.facebook.com/TrumpeterModel/photos/pcb.1159171700908088/1159171487574776/?type=3&theater V.P.
  24. The Hobby Boss catalog is usually unveiled in early December. 2017-2018 - link 2018-2019 - link I'm really curious to discover the 2019-2020 catalog a/c novelties. To be followed V.P.
  25. Besides the Roden Bird Dog, my dad decided to build the Model USA kit from our stash too. Let´s see which of the two models makes it first to finish, or not at all DSC_0005 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr DSC_0007 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr
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