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Found 13 results

  1. On joining this Forum nearly two years ago, after getting back into modelling after a long while, I did a few Group Builds, some successful, others not so. After giving up on my M3/M4 build a week or two ago I scanned my stash for a bit of inspiration and decided to start one of the WnW kits I have collected this last 8 months or so. Now, I'm not generally into WW1 subjects, not that I don't find them interesting, it's just all that rigging, but still, somehow, have ended up with 1/2 a dozen of these fine kits. Not having read a bad review of any of them, and the quality of the engineering begs them to be built, I decided on the Fokker D.VII as this has no rigging apart from aileron wires. I decided to put this in a WiP as it will make me finish it but not under the pressure of a deadline! So, here we go. First off, it almost seems sacrilege to start snipping off parts and laying out the instructions before you. Everything about these kits is excellent, the instructions are like a reference book and leave no ambiguity as to where parts go in relation to one another. You have to decide early on which of the (5 in this case) subjects you are going to model as there are alternate parts/painting options to consider. I'm going to build option 'A', an early aircraft, just because I want to try covering almost a complete kit in decal (a first for me as well!) I started at the beginning with the cockpit/interior parts, care needs to be taken when removing the fine framework from the sprue's and cleaning them up, not that there is much in the way of mould lines, but they are there. So, a little progress and nothing untoward to report, everything fitting as it should. Some parts have a basic coat of paint, (Vallejo ModelAir), Aluminium for the ammunition boxes, bulkhead and seat. I've used IJN Light Grey Green for the framework. Vallejo Wood plus Umber wash and Transparent Orange for the floor, but I haven't quite got the effect I was after, but it's all a learning curve! More frame work ready to get primed and painted. By the way, I'm not an expert on WW1 aircraft (or anything else for that matter!), just relying on WnW's good research and colour call-outs.
  2. A model from 9 years ago: A simple slap-on weekend project as a relaxing distraction from more involving endeavors, using an old and affordable kit as a divertimento. The Fokker D.VII needs no introduction; after the first world war a number of these and another planes were used as civil machines. The one represented here, O-BEBE, belonged to Belgium and was used at a flying school, still wearing its camouflage but sporting prominent registrations on a white background. I got the Revell D.VII, which is an old mold and a not totally bad -but a bit crude- kit. It suited the project since I wasn’t especially looking for detail and I am used to deal with kits that have some shortcomings. It has no interior, only the dreaded styrene mummy that sits on a tab. Now, what is unforgivable regarding the Revell kit is its laughable lozenge decals. Who in heaven thought that you can provide a “paint-by-numbers” white decal with a delimitation grid in black for the modeler to fill the polygons with the different colors? It is just me, or this one qualifies for the silliest decal sheet ever? In any case, fortunately, I wasn’t going to use the decals anyway. Flash, ejector marks and dubious spots were sanded, scrapped, filed, filled and otherwise made inconspicuous before construction began. The too prominent ribs were toned down too. Revell provides one side of the wheel covers as a separate part. If this was thought to facilitate painting, you still have to deal with the tire-cover separation line on the other side anyway; and in any case, the two-part approach could have been tire and rest-of-the-wheel. The funny thing was that the covers won’t fit, due to some excess plastic in the recess. I had to use a rotary tool to remove plastic in order to be able to make room for the cover. Some genius was loose in the Revell quarters. A bit of structural detail was added to the cockpit area and the addition of a floor, seat, pedals, joystick and instrumental panel made for a suitable interior. The decals were home made. Once the fuselage halves were closed the area were the guns used to be was filled and blended and a new windscreen -as seen in photos of the original plane- made. The lower wing was glued in place –had to sand a tad here and there- and also blended-in. The other parts were being decaled separately meanwhile. Since lozenge decals cover large areas, it is not always easy to position and align a thin decal film. Once all decaling was completed and the locating holes or gluing areas of parts were cleared, the parts were given a coat of varnish in order not to mar the decals during later manipulation. Once all major components were ready, final assembly began. The struts could be replaced if so wished by more to-scale streamline stock. I only used the outer wing “N” struts for the sake of alignment. All the other struts were replaced. Some details were added like control horns and control cables, plus rigging. When I was making the decals, I spent some time reading discussions on lozenge. Boy, were these discussions long. What it seemed to be the undeniable truth at some point was just bogus at some other point. “Proofs” that demonstrated something, only demonstrated their own relativity time later. What was supported by one photograph was contradicted by the next. As in many areas of life, although some general agreement exists, there is not really ultimate word on lozenge. Add to that the variations of weathering, printing process, monitor screens, chromatic aberration, ortho and panchro nuances and quirks and you have a carnival. Where I am going with all this? Firstly, you don’t have to have the latest thing in town to make a nice or fun model. Secondly, you can choose an original livery, not necessarily the "that plane again" machine. And thirdly, all this within reasonable effort and budget. The silliest "paint-by-number" decals sheet ever, a despicable attempt to get rid of the compromise of choosing the lozenge colors. Cheeky monkeys...
  3. Hello Everyone ... Well my KUTA build(s) for this year are a pair of Fokker D.VII’s from Roden. One is about 2/3rds built which i will finish as either a USMC/US.Army war prize from 1923. Or as Ernst Udet’s Red/White striped Fokker. The unbuilt Fokker will be done as Bruno Loerzer’s Black & White striped plane from the box art. I have the Aviattic lozenge for the D.VII’s and am looking forward to using them. I will post photo’s of the kits themselves when i get to my office later. Fingers that all goes well after my recent Roden Albatross debacle. Questions, comments, or jokes. Dennis
  4. Hello everyone ... Question about udet’s scheme. Ive seen photo’s of the plane but no evidence of the Red/White stripes. Ive also seen at least three profiles including the one at WNW. No one seems to have any consensus as to straight m/diagonal stripes on the upper wings ? One profile shows the stripes on upper lower of the top wing, complete lozenge lower wing. Another shows striped only top of the top wing with lozenge bottom of upper wing, lower wing is lozenge both sides. A third shows stripes on top of top wing and bottom of lower wing, with lozenge in the insides of the wings ? WNW Show only lozenge no red stripes at all ? Are any correct ? Dennis
  5. Famous Airplanes - Fokker D.VII. Kaiser's best fighter by Tomasz J. Kowalski, Szymon Grzywocz , Damian Majsak. ISBN : 9788365437679 Kagero via Casemate UK The Fokker D.VII is a very popular subject among modellers of Great War aviation. Not only was it one of the very best fighters of the war, it also wore a large variety of very colourful finishes. The available models cover all major scales, from 1:144, 1:72, 1:48, to the outstanding 1:32 kits from Wingnut Wings. This A4 sized softback book from Kagero has dual text in English/Polish text, and Chapter 1 starts with an interesting history covering the design, development, and introduction to service of the D.VII. It goes on to outline it's combat history, and subsequent post war use. All this is supported with contemporary black & white photographs, and some excellent 1:72 three view drawings showing the differences between the Mercedes and BMW powered versions, plus some frontal drawings of early, mid, and late production engine cowling & exhaust arrangements. At the back of the book are some superb full colour cutaway drawings showing the cockpit, guns, and engine, plus some Ronny Bar profiles. All of which makes for a very useful one-stop reference work. The outstanding parts of this publication though, are chapters 2 and 3, which cover step by step build of the Wingnut Wings kit. Chapter 2 is by Damian Majsak, who builds kit 32011 Fokker D.VII (Fok), in Gotthard Sachsenberg's black and yellow checkered scheme. Damian's build is 'straight from the box' showing how to get the best from the kit, with an emphasis on the complex 'front end' construction of the interior tubular structure. This forms the cockpit/engine area, and step by step photographs show how it all goes together, along with the colours. I wish I had had this available when I built my first one, as I got it slightly wrong and had to redo it. The painting & decalling stages are shown in some detail, it is always useful to see how it is done in sub assemblies. Finally, the finished model is set on a simple base with some Kagero resin figures. In Chapter 3 Szymon Grzywocz builds kit 32030 Fokker D.VII (OAW) in Wilhelm Leutsch's blue & yellow machine, with a large dragon painted on the side. The work on the engine is outstanding, and the section on applying aftermarket (Aviatic) lozenge decals to the wings is very informative. Szymon has incorporated many enhancements on his model, like engine spark plugs & wiring, open hatches, removed fuel cap, ammo belt being loaded, to name a few. All of which are very inspiring. To top it all off he has set it on a neat little diorama base featuring a couple of mechanics refueling the aircraft. Conclusion. It has been a while since I enjoyed a book as much as this one. It strikes a perfect balance between telling the story of the Fokker D.VII, and showing how to get the best out of the Wingnut Wings kit. The supporting illustrations, drawings, and photographs are well chosen, with 50+ contemporary black & white pictures, some of which were new to me. Best of all are the photographic sequences of the two builds, offering information and inspiration in equal measure. If you are interested in modelling the D.VII, particularly the Wingnut Wings kit, then this is just the book for you. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. BIG3882 Big Ed set for the Wingnut Wings Fokker D.VII. Eduard 1:32 Newly released from Eduard is this 'Big Ed'package containing three of their previous sets for the Wingnut Wings Fokker D.VII. They will be applicable to all four of the D.VII releases from Wingnut Wing (32607 Fokker D.VII early, 32011 Fokker D.VII, 32027 Albatros D.VII, and 32030 OAW D.VII). The individual sets are as follows. 32914 Fokker D.VII 1:32 Presented on an 8 x 7 cm brass sheet there are 42 distinctly numbered. Many of them occur multiple times, such as 17 part 7's (hinge details), 15 part 11's (turnbuckles) and others only once but using multiple parts, such as the throttle unit. There is no colouring or pre-painting as all the items (save the bezels) will be fitted before the model is primed. A number of bezels for to place over the instruments once the decals have been applied. (The best way to attach these is with Johnsons Kleer or clear varnish). There is a very finely etched throttle quadrant consisting of five parts. This should build up into a very nice little unit that will be better than its injection molded counterpart in the kit. The engine gets wiring from the magnetos to the distribution tube, and leads from the tube to each individual spark plug. The magnetos also get a surrounding strap. There is some detailing for the carburetor unit, a circular plate around the crankshaft, and a pair of 3D etched data plates that go on the crankcase. These should look really good with kit decals applied on top. The fuselage gets some small fittings for the control cable exit points, and some brackets where the lower wing mounts. These details are already molded on the kit fuselage halves, so will need scraping off. The idea is that the etched replacements have much sharper detail. Similarly there are inspection covers and scuff plates for the wings, and again the moulded kit items will require scraping off before the etched items are attached. There are also some extremely fine hinge details to fit on aileron and elevator hinge points. I'd suggest that Johnsons Kleer or white glue will be the best medium for attaching these. They are so small that cyano may well grip and lock them in place before you have had a chance to move them properly into position. There is very little rigging on the Fokker D.VII, but what there is gets some extremely fine little turnbuckles. These are for the fixed wires on the tailplane & undercarriage, and the control wires to the ailerons and elevator. Fortunately there are a few spares provided. The propeller boss gets new plates, front and back. Again, these will require that the existing kit detail is scraped off. The wheels are given new valve covers, in real life a small canvas flap that could be untied to give access to the tyre valve. Fokker, Albatros, and OAW all built the D.VII and each one had a different style of valve cover. These look like the Fokker version, so before you scrape off the valve covers, check that you have the same shape one as the etched part. Finally, the two LMG 08/15 Spandau machine guns get cocking levers, sights, a couple of brackets and etched jackets and front plates. These last two items are already supplied in etched brass in Wingnut Wings own kits. But they are not wasted,I recently trashed one of mine when rolling it to shape (I forgot to anneal it, and it split), so these make very useful spares. The Wingnuts MG's can be a little fiddly to assemble, but these ones look like they could be easier to do. You cut the muzzle from the barrel (kit part D13), assemble the etched jacket (part 1) & front plate (part 13), and then re-attach the muzzle to the front plate. 33176 Fokker D.VII seatbelts 1:32 All the Wingnut Wings Fokker D.VII kits come with a set of etched brass seatbelts, but they are unpainted, plain brass. It is up to the modeller to prime and paint them. I don't have a problem doing this, but given the choice, I would go for a set of pre-painted belts as I simply cannot hand paint them to anything like the same standard. Eduards set provides the standard four point harness in a buff colour, with stitching detail and metal parts picked out in black. Simple, and perfectly done.Very often German Aircraft of this period were photographed with the two shoulder straps hanging outside the cockpit, ready for the pilot to climb in and strap up for a quick getaway. If you want to depict your model like this, then these will be far better than anything you can hand paint. I notice that the lap belts are different to those in the kit, in that they are anchored between the cushion and the side of the seat itself. This arrangement is actually photographed in the WNW instructions showing the Memorial Flight Associations D.VII, which is a very high standard replica. The kit has them anchored to the seat support frames, so both methods are likely correct. JX205 Fokker D.VII Masks 1:32. A simple little set of pre cut masks on kabuki tape. The outer 'hubs' of the Wingnut Wings kit come a separate parts, so that you get a nice easy demarcation when you paint the tyre and hubs separately. The inner faces though, are molded with the tyre and it takes a steady hand to get a neat paint demarcation. These masks will make that job so much easier. Likewise, the small windshield (masks are provided for both types) has a frame around it and requires a very steady hand, and any paint straying onto the glazed are will be very noticeable. This neat little set takes care of both those problems. Conclusion. Purchasing these very useful sets in one package makes sense from a cost and convenience point of view, and it provides pretty much everything you could want to enhance your D.VII. Given that the Fokker D.VII's seem to have been one of Wingnut Wings bestsellers, this package is bound to be popular and find it's way onto the many of the kits being built out there. Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  7. Fokker D.VII sets. Eduard 1:32 Newly released from Eduard are three sets covering Wingnut Wings superb range of Fokker D.VII's. These kits are so good that we may well wonder what possible scope there is for any aftermarket products? Well, I think Eduard have found some very useful items that answer that question. 32914 Fokker D.VII 1:32 Presented on an 8 x 7 cm brass sheet there are 42 distinctly numbered. Many of them occur multiple times, such as 17 part 7's (hinge details), 15 part 11's (turnbuckles) and others only once but using multiple parts, such as the throttle unit. There is no colouring or pre-painting as all the items (save the bezels) will be fitted before the model is primed. A number of bezels for to place over the instruments once the decals have been applied. (The best way to attach these is with Johnsons Kleer or clear varnish). There is a very finely etched throttle quadrant consisting of five parts. This should build up into a very nice little unit that will be better than its injection molded counterpart in the kit. The engine gets wiring from the magnetos to the distribution tube, and leads from the tube to each individual spark plug. The magnetos also get a surrounding strap. There is some detailing for the carburetor unit, a circular plate around the crankshaft, and a pair of 3D etched data plates that go on the crankcase. These should look really good with kit decals applied on top. The fuselage gets some small fittings for the control cable exit points, and some brackets where the lower wing mounts. These details are already molded on the kit fuselage halves, so will need scraping off. The idea is that the etched replacements have much sharper detail. Similarly there are inspection covers and scuff plates for the wings, and again the moulded kit items will require scraping off before the etched items are attached. There are also some extremely fine hinge details to fit on aileron and elevator hinge points. I'd suggest that Johnsons Kleer or white glue will be the best medium for attaching these. They are so small that cyano may well grip and lock them in place before you have had a chance to move them properly into position. There is very little rigging on the Fokker D.VII, but what there is gets some extremely fine little turnbuckles. These are for the fixed wires on the tailplane & undercarriage, and the control wires to the ailerons and elevator. Fortunately there are a few spares provided. The propeller boss gets new plates, front and back. Again, these will require that the existing kit detail is scraped off. The wheels are given new valve covers, in real life a small canvas flap that could be untied to give access to the tyre valve. Fokker, Albatros, and OAW all built the D.VII and each one had a different style of valve cover. These look like the Fokker version, so before you scrape off the valve covers, check that you have the same shape one as the etched part. Finally, the two LMG 08/15 Spandau machine guns get cocking levers, sights, a couple of brackets and etched jackets and front plates. These last two items are already supplied in etched brass in Wingnut Wings own kits, so I was a little surprised to see them here. The Wingnuts MG's can be a little fiddly to assemble, but these ones look like they could be easier to do. You cut the muzzle from the barrel (kit part D13), assemble the etched jacket (part 1) & front plate (part 13), and then re-attach the muzzle to the front plate. 33176 Fokker D.VII seatbelts 1:32 All the Wingnut Wings Fokker D.VII kits come with a set of etched brass seatbelts, but they are unpainted, plain brass. It is up to the modeller to prime and paint them. I don't have a problem doing this, but given the choice, I would go for a set of pre-painted belts as I simply cannot hand paint them to anything like the same standard. Eduards set provides the standard four point harness in a buff colour, with stitching detail and metal parts picked out in black. Simple, and perfectly done.Very often German Aircraft of this period were photographed with the two shoulder straps hanging outside the cockpit, ready for the pilot to climb in and strap up for a quick getaway. If you want to depict your model like this, then these will be far better than anything you can hand paint. JX05 Fokker D.VII Masks 1:32. A simple little set of pre cut masks on kabuki tape. The outer 'hubs' of the Wingnut Wings kit come a separate parts, so that you get a nice easy demarcation when you paint the tyre and hubs separately. The inner faces though, are molded with the tyre and it takes a steady hand to get a neat paint demarcation. These masks will make that job so much easier. Likewise, the small windshield (masks are provided for both types) has a frame around it and requires a very steady hand, and any paint straying onto the glazed are will be very noticeable. This neat little set takes care of both those problems! Conclusion. These are some very useful sets. The main brass etched one which will certainly add some subtle details to the already excellent Wingnut Wings kits. I'm a little puzzled by the inclusion of gun barrels, but the throttle quadrant and engine additions are the 'stand out' items for me. The Wingnut Wings engine kits do not come with wiring but in this scale it is essential, and this set makes it simple to do. Add in all the nice little refinements like the bezels, inspection plates, and turnbuckles, and this becomes a very worthwhile set to enhance your D.VII with. Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  8. I started this build a month or so back for a group build on another forum, and thought I might as well add it to the GB here! The first 3 posts are copied from my other post and are pasted here as one entry, the last one is the current state of affairs: 1) My will power being what it is, (non-existant) I have decided to enter this GB with one of the newtool MAC Distribution kits. I have a couple of them and they appear to be very good: with crisp detail, comprehensive decal sheets and even a small PE set, although for some reason this doesn't include the MG cooling jackets! I will build the machine of Ltn Georg von Hantelmann, Jasta 15. I will finish the Hannover first, so there will be no updates for a little while - this post is so I can't change my mind! Ian just noticed they spelt Goering's name wrong on the box! oops! 2) I've finally made a start on this one, although nothing worth any pics yet. I've thinned out the cockpit and engine cowl edges and removed the horizontal frame moulded into the cockpit sides right under the opening as it isn't visible on the real thing. Also given the interior a coat of white ready for the interior lozenge decals. I'm thinking of using a spare Roden engine that I have in my spares box, but I'm missing the valve train part for the top. Does anyone have one to spare? Thanks, Ian 3) The more I work on this, the worse the kit appears to be! I spent today thinning the flight surface trailing edges and separating the control surfaces. It looks as though I've ground to a halt almost before I've begun as I need an engine (email sent to Roden) and decals - I thought I had Aviattic 5 colour so I could at least do the insides and get the fuselage together, but I don't, so I'll have to wait on the generosity of Richard and his free decals to arrive! I've also attacked the decal stash to find the correct interim wide crosses for the fuselage and wings. Almost tempted to start another in the meantime but then I'd be back where I started...... : Ian
  9. Wingnut Wings Fokker D.VII The Seven Swabians. The Fokker D.VII probably needs no introduction, Germany's best fighter of WW1, and the only aircraft named in the Armistice as having to be turned over to the allies. Wingnut Wings have produced a brilliant range of D.VII's covering all three versions (Fokker, OAW, & Albatros) along with a superb range of aftermarket decals. Both were received and reviewed at Britmodeller, The kit here and The decals here It has taken a while to get this one on to the workbench, mainly because I just could not choose a colour scheme for it. All those in the box are very tempting, and I will do some of them, whist the aftermarket sheets offer more lovely ones! I have solved the problem by buying more kits, which enabled me to open the box and get started on this one without agonising about which one to do! This is 'The Seven Swabians' from the Brothers Grimm fairytail about a gang of seven foolish men who go hunting for a dragon, and terrify themselves by dicovering one in the forest which turns out to be a rabbit. Wilhelm Scheutzel of Jasta 65 had this design painted on his D.VII, and flew it in combat in late 1918, scoring 1 victory over a DH.4. The decal instructions point out that Scheutzel had a flare pistol mounted on the centre section in front of the cockpit, forunately it is one of the many extras that come in the standard kit. The kit is a joy to build, WIP Here On with the photos, I also bought a 'Wings cockpit' figure from MDC of a pilot taking a break with a mug of coffee, he seemd perfect as they guy looking at his aircraft and wondering what he was thinking when he ordered this scheme to be applied. What do you do when you finish such an enjoyable build? Get another D.VII out of the stash and start building it! D.VII (Albatros) engine and interior under way; Thanks for looking, John
  10. This is the newly released Fokker D.VII from Wingnut Wings, an inbox review of which can be found HERE It is a beautifully moulded, engineered, and presented kit and I couldn't wait to get started. Firstly I had to choose which one to do and after a lot of thought decided to go for 286/18 flown by Willi Gabriel of Jasta 11. Two things helped form this decision, 1) The colour scheme is fabulous, plus it requires the fuselage to be finished in 'Fokker streaky green' which in reality is a rough brush painted multi tone green finish, quite hard to do on a model. The kit provides a nice set of decals for it so I am keen to see how they work. 2) Willi Gabriel was an interesting character, and I always like to learn a little about the guys who flew the aircraft I model. He joined Jasta 11 in May 1918 and was given 4 weeks to start scoring victories or be kicked out. On his fisrt day he shot down a DH.9 and so confirmed his place. Other victories followed, but in June Herman Goering (yes, the Herman Goering of WW2 Luftwaffe fame) arrived as CO, and he and Gabriel did not get on. On 18 July 1918 when returning from a patrol led by Goering, Gabriel spotted a flight of Spads and broke formation, shooting down two of them, followed a a flight of three Breguet two seaters, which he also attacked and downed one over his home airfield. Goering was furious at Gabriel for having left the formation, and reprimanded him. Later that same day on an afternoon patrol Gabriel did it again, shooting down a two seat Spad. The culmination of all this was that Gabriel was busted off the Jasta, bringing his war to an end. He returned to active service in the Luftwaffe in ww2, flying Ju88's and Me.210's, and died in 1968 aged 75. The build starts with the interior components, and Wingnuts provide a great deal of them. The interior framework and engine mounts; The 'metalwork'. The fuel tank is painted in Revell 94 Gold, which I think gives a better Brass finish than their Brass paint. The firewall, ammunition tank, and spare link collection tank are all done with Alclad Aluminium. The seat & etched belts, Cockpit floor, rudder pedals, and control column; The wood effect is Tamiya XF-55 Deck tan varnished with Johnsons Kleer. The grain is done with Griffin Alkyd oils mixed to give an appropriate wood shade from Raw Sienna, Light red, and Burnt Umber in various proportions. The gun mount, Compass, and instrument panel. All interior components together; The Mercedes engine is a little beauty. Major components; I have left the two magnetos on a section of sprue, as I have drilled them to take spark plug wires, and they are easier to handle like this. Metal areas are again Alclad Aluminium, black is Citadel Chaos Black. I have made 2 props in case of accidents with one of them. Like the cockpit floor they are done with deck tan, but then masked to give a laminted effect. Red brown is sprayed on, leaving a very strong 2 tone look. This is covered with a dark mix of Griffin Alkyd oils, so that the laminated affect only just shows through under the grain; The top 3 pictures are various stages of the same prop. All this lot needs to come together now, and the fuselage 'zipped up'. Cheers John
  11. 30010 Fokker D.VII (F) Fighting Fokkers Part 5. Following on from the 'Fighting Fokkers'decal sets 1 to 5 which cover the Fokker, Albatros, and OAW built D.VII's Wingnut Wings have released another set for the new Fokker D.VII(F) kit. The instructions look very similar to those in Wingnuts kits, being printed on the same glossy paper and with the same high standard of information. The first page consists of side profiles whilst the subsequent three pages show upper and lower views, and contemporary black and white photographs of the actual aircraft. With call outs for each decal number and also paint colours, there should be no room for doubt about what goes where. A list is even provided with each scheme to inform you which engine parts from the kit will be required. The subjects are well chosen, giving a nice variety of different types of scheme from von Hantelmanns red and white 465/18, Loerzers black and white striped 7716/18, through to Fritz Haacks half black half white machine with an owl painted on the side, which is a scheme I have never seen before. The decals themselves are by Cartograf, very cleanly printed on thin carrier film, with good colours and perfect registration. The main sheet is A4 sized with a smaller supplementary sheet of wing and fuselage and lots of detail items like data plates, instrument faces, propeller logos etc. No lozenge decals are supplied as these will be found in the base kit anyway. Once again Wingnut Wings have provided 'modelers gold' with a superb set of very attractive and presented decal options. The only problem you will have is deciding which one to go for, particularly as the kit itself contains five lovely options. World War One aviation modelers, you've never had it so good! Very highly recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  12. Fokker D.VII Decals. 1:32 Wingnut Wings Although the Wingnut Wings D.VII kits already come with five different choices of markings in each box, they have released several sets to give you an even wider choice. Sensibly the individual sets offer extra schemes for one particular variant, so 'Fighting Fokkers Part 1' covers Fokker built aircraft, Part 2 Albatros, and Parts 3 & 4 OAW. Like in the kits, the decal instructions are printed in full colour on thick glossy paper, with drawings that look to be by Ronny Bar (although no credits are given). The first page consists of side profiles whilst the subsequent three show upper and lower views, and contemporary black and white photographs of the actual aircraft. With call outs for each decal number and also paint colours, there should be no room for doubt about what goes where. A list is even provided with each scheme to inform you which engine parts from the kit will be required for it. In each section there are a few paragraphs of text about the actual craft, and where known a little history about the pilots who flew it. This is a very nice touch which brings the subject matter to life. For instance, option D on the 'Part 1' sheet was flown by Max Holtzem, who after the war emigrated to the USA and ended up with North American Aviation as a Flight Inspector on P-51 Mustangs during the second world war. He remained active in aviation circles until his death in 1980 at the age of 87. Great little nuggets of information that characterise the Wingnut Wings attention to detail in all that they do. The decals themselves are by Cartograf, very cleanly printed on thin carrier film, with good colours and perfect registration. Most sheets are A4 sized with an A5 sized supplementary sheet of wing and fuselage crosses where required, as well as a plethora of data plates, propeller logos, instrument faces etc. None of the sets contain lozenge decals as these will all be found in the base kit anyway. (Notes - German aircraft were given a serial number followed with a '/' and the year of manufacture. So 373/18 is D.VII number 373, built in 1918. Jagstaffeln (Jasta)numbers are sometimes followed with a letter. these denote the region they were formed in, 'b' for Bavarian, 's' for Saxon, 'w' for Württemberg). 30006 Fokker D.VII (Fok) Fighting Fokkers Part 1. A. 'MK' Ludwig Reimann, Jasta 78b, late 1918. B. 373/18, Heinrich Piel, Jasta 13b, June 1918. C. 382/18, Georg von Hantelman & Kurt Wustoff, Jasta 15, June 1918. D. 402/18, Max Holtzem, Jasta 16b, Mid 1918. E. 244/18, Lothar von Richthofen, Jasta 11, and Aloys Heldmann, Jasta 10, June - July 1918. Close up detail; 30007 Fokker D.VII (Alb) Fighting Fokkers Part 2. As well as the standard five options, there are two 'bonus' options included on the sheet. Bonus 1 is a factory fresh fully lozenged 652/18 before any unit or personal markings were applied, whilst bonus 2 is Ltn.d.R Simons red and white striped fuselage machine. You will need to do the stripes yourself. A. 571/18, Adolf Gutknecht, Jasta 43, July 1918. B. 666/18, Hans Dannenberg,Vzfw Mohring, Rudolf Neckel, Kest 1a/Jasta 90, late 1918. C. 833/18 Robert Greim, Jasta 34b, October 1918. D. 5278/18, 'Hertha', Jasta 27, October/November 1918. E. Otto Creutzmann & Josef Raesch, Jasta 43, June - July 1918. 30008 Fokker D.VII (OAW) Fighting Fokkers Part 3. A. 2052/18, Karl Thom, Jasta 21s, 1918. B. 4453/18, Alfred Lindenberger, Jasta 2, November 1918. C. 4631/18, 'Lot', Jasta 64w, late 1918. D. 4635/18, 'U.10' Heinz Frieherr von Beaulieu-Marconnay, Jasta 65, September 1918. This aircraft was zapped after capture by the US 95th Aero squadron, with its kicking mule. The option is on the sheet should you wish to use it. E. 6441/18, Max Nather, Jasta 62, October - November 1918. 30009 Fokker D.VII (OAW) Fighting Fokkers Part 4. There are so many great schemes for OAW D.VII's that one extra set was never going to be enough, so here we have a second. A. 4025/18, Paul Strahle, Jasta 57, September 1918. B. 4649/18 'Seven Swabians' Wilhelm Scheutzel,Jasta 65, 1918. C. 6344/18, 'Yellow X', Jasta 58, late 1918. D. 6428/18, Hans Joachim von Hippel, Jasta 71, October - November 1918. E. Ltn Fritz von Schliewen, Jasta 6, September 1918. Close up detail; (Note - The 'Seven Swabians' are commonly mistaken for the 'Seven Dwarfs'. They have nothing to do with the Snow White tale, but are from a Brothers Grimm story). I suspect that these decal sheets are aimed at, and will be bought by Great War aviation aficionados. They have the same quality of research, presentation, and production that we have come to expect from Wingnut Wings, and makes them the number one model company. The standard kits already contain a superb range of options to satisfy the casual enthusiast. But once you get hooked and start to read up on the pilots, squadrons and aircraft, a plan inevitably starts to form in your mind as to how you can build a representative range, and these sheets will help tremendously. I find it starts with the personalities, and then moves on to their aircraft. My particular favourites amongst these sheets are Georg Von Hantelmann, Kurst Wustoff, Lothar von Richtofen, Alfred Lindenberger, Max Nather, Robert Greim, Paul Strahle, and Hans Joachim von Hippel. And then of course 'Hertha' and 'Seven Swabiens' are so colourful they deserve to be built as well. Looking at these decals has found me spending hours defining the builds I want to do, sorting out a representative selection of D.VII sub types, Jastas, and pilots. Inspirational decal sheets indeed. Yet again Wingnut Wings have come up with a top quality product. Very highly recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  13. We've just received the December 2012 releases from Wingnut Wings, and a pretty impressive bunch they are too. Three... yes, THREE Fokker D.VIIs, from the home of the Fokker (Fok), Johannisthal (Alb) and Schneidemühl (OAW - Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke) with any of their idiosyncrasies faithfully reproduced. Not only, but also... a Sopwith Triplane and this year's final surprise release from WNW, the Hannover C1.II with its distinctive biplane tail. In addition to those five releases, there are four additional decal sets. One for the Fok built aircraft, one for the Alb built aircraft, and two for the OAW built aircraft. Each one contains five colourful options, just in case the kit options don't float your boat. We'll be crafting detailed reviews of them just as soon as we can, and have a new reviewer that is knowledgable on the subject of WWI aircraft, and just happens to be an excellent modeller too. Please join me in welcoming John, also known as Viking on Britmodeller to the reviewing cadre. A couple of quick pics on the lounge rug this lunch time seemed to be in order In the meantime, if you just can't wait and want to find out a little more info, you'll find all the featured releases at WNW's website, here Mike.
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