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Found 1,527 results

  1. Kitchen Modeller

    The Redemption Spitfire

    Hi de ho folks - now that my current project is nearing the end, I've set my sights on the next one - which is the first in what I'm calling the redemption series. As some of you are aware, I'm not long back in this precarious hobby - After being bitten with a truly terrible attempt at building a scale model aircraft. Since then I have dived into the hobby with such abandon that it's scaring the family (as well as myself truth be told) But it's fine - I'm having a blast - those early builds where great fun and lead on to slightly better things - which brings us to the Mark V - my second attempt at building and painting a model airplane - an Airfix 1/72 Mark V It was built wheels up as I wasn't confident enough to attempt an undercarriage - this model was the first time I used filler and sanding, masking, clear coats, decal solution, washes and attempted getting the actual correct colours for the type (which still came out as a fail) In spite of it's flaws (of which there are oh so many) I still really like this kit - more due to the fact that I learned so much from it - it was a big discovery moment on what you could do with a few more bits in the toolbox. With later builds I probably took a few steps back but that's part of the learning process. But after building it, all I could think about was how I could have made a better job of it - another Spitfire was always on the cards. So this leads us to the next one which is going to be this baby I picked up on the Hannants website: Only 2 weeks all the way to New Zealand - I've ordered stuff from Aussie that took waaaay longer than that. And it was very reasonably priced.... a few beers on a friday night... browsing the internet... one thing lead to another and... I'll stop talking about hannants now. This will be my first Eduard kit - which is a treat to myself after my last build - A Dodge Charger from MPC that was the worst model I've ever built in my life. I'm won't get into it here but lets say I'm due for something that actually fits together without the loss of sanity points. I hoping this is the kit to get me there. Some sprues: There's a lot of plastic for a 1/72 model - there are 5 marking schemes and types from 5 different countries with specific parts for each one - pretty impressive. And the parts look good, can't see any flash or mold lines - again a refreshing change. The detail included is quite nice: No need to rivet - already included:) Some PE: Part 20 in the photo above is a trigger guard for the control column which made me smile - it's all insanely small so not sure I have the chops to implement this stuff but I'll give it a go. Some glassware: It's all very plush - I'm extremely happy with this kit and haven't started the build yet - hopefully things will continue in this vein. Lastly, I had to make a call on which version I'm going to build: Love this scheme - it's Czech, it's got invasion stripes and my favorite RAF camo. No contest. It might be a little while before things get started in earnest but hopefully not too long.... To be continued.
  2. Hi everyone, this is my first WIP on this site... I'm already some weeks into this build so no real 'in progress' pictures. I don't have too much time for modelling so my focus lies on building rather than taking pictures on the go. But now I found some time and thought I share some pictures. The kit should be well known, its the 1/350 Tamiya Tirpitz. I got it as a present from friends last year for my birthday and used the time to obtain some goodies for it: the eduard big ed set and a wooden deck from a chinese companie I do not know... So here we go: bridge assembly upper bridge full bridge assembly: and with radars all radars: funnel: scratchbuilt interior: ...aaaaand how little you see when the funnel cap is attached... I don't want to imagine how it looks after painting... At least I know its there! Now the hangars, first the only WIP I can show: side hangar before and after PE both done: big hangar: Now the big pieces: and everything together so far... looks like theres more brass than plastic and next the wooden decking... there are many issues with that... for example 1 easy to fix problems where eduard replaced the 'balconies'... 2 Big problem where eduard corrected wrong fittings on the deck... I still have no idea what to do with that... maybe fill in pieces out of sheet to simulate hatches... 3 Huge problem where shields where moved to the correct positions... see also the first picture of the wooden decking aft of the 2nd tower in front of the bridge... I dont know what to do... as shown on previous pictures eduard provides etched decking but I know my painting skills will never be good enough to stand up to the real wooden decking on the main deck... Any input is highly appreciated. Thanks for looking Konrad
  3. Spitfire Mk.IX Four Spoke wheel sets for Tamiya Eduard 1:32 The Tamiya 1:32 Spitfire Mk.IX is a beautiful kit throughout, but there are always ways of improving even a Tamiya uber kit, or at least that’s how Eduard think. These two sets provide the modeller the option for fitting different styles of tyres to their model. Both sets include a full set of wheels, including the tail wheel, which is a one for one replacement. The main wheels are split into three parts, the wheel and tyre, plus the inner and outer hubs, the inners having well produced brake detail. They also both feature the four spoke pattern wheels, the differences are the tyres themselves. Set 632 129 features smooth tyres, while set 632-130 features a treaded pattern tyre. All the parts are very nicely moulded and are easily removed from the moulding blocks due to the thin webs holding them to said block. A quick clean up after removal and you’re ready to glue the hubs in place, paint and glue to the kit undercarriage legs and your work is done. For ease of painting the sets also come with a sheet of masks to help give that clean paint job. 632 129 632-130 Conclusion As with any modelling it is best to check your references and build your Spitfire accordingly. With these sets you now have the option of building your model with the correct tyres if the ones in the kit aren’t suitable. The masks are a very handy addition too, just to make life that little bit easier. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Karabiner Kar 98K 1:35 Eduard Brassin More commonly known as the Kar 98 (to me at least), this was the staple bolt-action rifle of WWII for the German infantryman, although the MP40 gets all the attention in the movies. It entered service in the mid-30s and stayed in use until the end of the war, using a 7.92mm cartridge on a stripper-clip that made it easy to load up to five rounds into the rifle at a time, although it could also be fed manually if time wasn't of the essence. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. Inside are six rifles on three casting blocks, plus two more casting blocks with eight super-delicate bayonets. There is also a fret of Photo-Etch (PE) steel rifle slings, which have been pre-painted in leather and black colours on both sides. The smaller parts are for the opposite side of the stock where the sling pulls through and locates, and the front sling-loop where the length is adjusted for the comfort of the user. The rifles are attached to their pouring stub via the buttstock, which is easy to sand back to flat after removal, and a wafer thin flash extends up the rest of the stock next to a nearby, but disconnected, cylinder of resin to give them strength. This flash should be removed, which will be very easy due to its extremely thin nature. If you're feeling particularly brave you can also remove the small quantity of flash around the trigger, which is easier to do with a sharp knife than you'd imagine. Along with the six rifles are eight bayonets, and eight sets of slings, which is good to know, as those parts are very small and prone to pinging off or getting lost. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Ebay are having a 10% off promotion when you spend £20 or more today! This includes things in our MJW Models Ebay store - so you can get extra off things that are already cheap! See the promo link below for T's & C's and the link to our Ebay shop! You can get money off the new Eduard Tempest we have in stock - or any of the other many Eduard and Hobby Boss bargain kits we have listed! Ebay have a promotion on today (UK Ebay that is) - you can get an extra 10% off any purchase of £20 or more in certain categories - see the link below. https://pages.ebay.co.uk/coupons/2018/peachy.html This means you can get an extra 10% anything £20 or more in our Ebay store for today! https://www.ebay.co.uk/str/MJW-Models?_trksid=p2047675.l2563 thanks Mike
  6. Here is what became the first of a run of 1:144 MiG-21s, mostly from Eduard, that I built back in 2011-2012. This is Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21MF "Fishbed J" 5121, flown by Pham Tuan, of the 921st Fighter Regiment 'Sao Do', Vietnam People's Air Force, during the Vietnam War in the early 1970s. This is the Eduard kit built straight out of the box. It was completely painted by brush. Thanks for looking. Miguel
  7. 1/72 Fokker D.VII by Eduard confirmed here: http://ipmsnymburk.com/forum/viewtema.php?ID_tema=11559
  8. Place-holder. Probably Wildcat, Hellcat, or Bearcat... Oh, but what about that TF-9J? [Edit: Probably too ambitious for me now, but we'll see...]
  9. Hello I have just finished this 1/72 Eduard kit of an East German Air Force MiG-21 MF from Jagdfliegergeschwader 3. at Preschen during the late 1980s. This will be published in the next issue of the French magazine "Avions de combat" Patrick
  10. Like the title says - it's in stock now and available to buy from our website! https://mjwmodels.co.uk/edk82121-148-hawker-tempest-mkv-profipack-6603-p.asp thanks Mike
  11. Well Telford is over for another year, had a great day down there on Saturday and all credit to the organisers this year as the huge que we joined at 9.50 evaporated almost as quickly as my excitement did when I first saw it! First stop was the Eduard stall and I managed to pick up Eduards latest kit along with a set of brassin exhausts, plan is to create a diorama based on some of the pics taken at Newchurch in June 44 with a Tempest being refuelled by the accurate armour Bedford, I did think about the flaps and gun bays as well to make it a little more fussy but in the end thought a simple build of the kit was in order and maybe my second will include these? Spent a few hours today comparing the parts to some references and the kit looks superb in the box, surface texture is well upto Eduards latest standards and even includes raised rivits on the rear fuselage (applicable) along with recessed ones elsewhere. Detail everywhere looks great with the cockpit and wheel bays being standout areas. There are however a few issues i've spotted (I never compare models to plans, my view is if i cant see the problem by comparing the kit to photos its not worth worrying about!) The spinner openings for the blades are much too large and totally the wrong shape, in my view ruining the look of the part. I am guessing Eduard based it on some of the museum examples that exist most of which seem to have odd looking spinners but compared to any wartime shots the difference is very obvious. Dosen't look like a huge issue to rectify and will work on it through the week ahead. Presumably the AM guys will be offer something suitable in the not too distant future. Most if not all series1 airframes have bumps on the upper wing fillets, these re missing in the kit, again looks like an easyish addition. I could be wrong on this but I think the lower surface bumps covering the wing attachment bolts need removed on series1 aircraft (not 100% sure on this, I am going to remove the ones on this build however unless I can confirm it either way?) There should be a handhold in one side at least at the rear of the canopy, may have a go at adding this just need to be careful with it being a clear part. Again not sure at the minute I need to find a few more pics but it looks like some of the early Tempests at least have cone shaped guides on the front face of the radiator, i know there are some available for the typhoon kits out there which given more time I may have tracked down, will see how I go with this one. There are rows of slots on both wing undersurfaces where the future tanks fit, I can't see any evidence of these in the underside shots I have so will probably fill these, may also fill or at least reduce the points for the rockets as not sure if these should be shown on these early aircraft? If the above sounds like undue critism its not meant to, the only deal breaker for me is the spinner the rest are just small details and easily overlooked, the kit really does look good and I cant wait to start cutting plastic tomorrow! Slight update, started cutting plastic tonight and one word of advice, be careful when removing the cockpit frames from the sprus, they are very fragile, don't ask how I know.... you have been warned!
  12. SoftScience

    Nieuport 23

    Q: what do you do when your in-progress biplane is drying? You start another. Only you make sure it's really really tiny. Enter Eduard's Nieuport 23 in 72nd scale. I got the dual combo, which comes with two whole models, PE details, and a bevy of Belgian, French, Tsarist Russian, and Czechoslovakian markings options. For the first build, I think I'll go with this Russian plane with Bob written on both sides in cyrillic. I'm digging the Russian roundels and the cool looking empty cockades. So far, I've given the cockpit parts a nice woody look. Base coat was Tamiya flesh. The grain is brown artist acrylic, all sealed with clear yellow and orange. The PE side framing has been primed white for now. And yo, look; I wasn't kidding when I said this thing is tiny. I would have included a coin for comparison, but this is an international forum and our coins vary. So instead I spoke in a language most of us will understand. beer. Flying Dog, the best thing out of Maryland since....maybe since ever.
  13. My dad couldn´t resist and already unpacked the sprues of his today´s birthday present DSC_0001 by Reinhard Spreitzhofer, auf Flickr
  14. Mig-23ML/MF Resin Update Sets (for Trumpeter/Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Eduard have reboxed the Trumpeter kit of this aircraft as a special edition "Bedna" boxing with Czech markings, allowing you to build either an ML or MF airframe. Eduard's new sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner, and we reviewed the PE sets and masks here if you fancy a squint. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. The larger sets are safely ensconced in card boxes and use the same foam to protect the resin, Photo-Etch (PE), masks and decals where applicable. As usual with resin, take the precaution of wearing a mask when cutting or sanding resin, as the tiny particles are harmful to your health if breathed in. Washing the parts in warm water will also improve the adhesion of paint, as there may still be some moulding release agent on the parts when you receive them. Mig-23MF/ML Ejection Seat (648429) This is a drop-in replacement for the kit seat, comprising two resin parts, and nickel-plated, pre-painted parts for the crew belts, pull-handle and armrest. Mig-23MF/ML Engine Air Intakes (648434 & 648438) More drop-in resin parts that replace the intakes (not the splitter plate), adds PE blow-in doors, and a choice of two clear lenses on the top of the port intake, with a mask for each into the bargain. The difference between them? A small panel engraved into the rear of the ML. Mig-23ML 648438 Mig-23MF 648434 Mig-23ML Wheels (648431) With two resin main and two nose wheels, plus hub inserts for the outer sides, wafer-thin captive gear bay doors and a mudguard for the front leg, plus PE brake hoses, the protective cage that fits to the "knee" of the main gear legs, and masks (not shown) for the tyres to help you achieve a nice neat demarcation between rubber and hub. Mig-23ML Main Wheel Bays (648428) Replacing the kit bays with ultra-fine detailed resin parts, and adding extra internal parts for realism, resin inner and outer doors and jacks, plus an array of small PE parts for hoses, wiring etc. to create an impressive glimpse into the heart of the machine. Mig-23ML Exhaust Nozzle (648430) Yet another drop-in replacement for the kit exhaust, which is made up from seven resin parts for the ultimate in detail, and should look awesome when painted sympathetically, using the Gunze codes provided as reference. R-23R Apex Missiles for Mig-23 (648432) The pointy-nosed (technical description) R variant of this missiles is the Semi-Active Radar Homing (SARH) version, and you get two missiles in the box with separate steering vanes at the front, larger stabilisers at the rear, and a PE exhaust ring at the back, plus adapter rails. They can be posed with their FOD covers on by cutting off the front of the missiles and adding the supplied covers, plus a ring of PE protectors for the proximity sensors. Decals are provided for the stencils, and the colour call-outs are given in Gunze codes as normal. R-23T Apex Missiles for Mig-23 (648433) The blunt-nosed (another technical description) R variant of this missiles is the Infrared (IR) version, and you get two missiles in the box with separate steering vanes at the front, larger stabilisers at the rear, and a PE exhaust ring at the back, plus adapter rails. They can be posed with their FOD covers on by cutting off the front of the missiles and adding the supplied covers, plus a ring of PE protectors for the proximity sensors. Decals are provided for the stencils, and the colour call-outs are given in Gunze codes as normal. I know. Déjà vu all over again! Review sample courtesy of
  15. Mig-23ML/MF Update Sets (for Trumpeter/Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Eduard have reboxed the Trumpeter kit of this aircraft as a special edition "Bedna" boxing with Czech markings, allowing you to build either an ML or MF airframe. Eduard's new sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Upate Set Mig-23ML (48966) Supplied on a single large fret, this busy brass sheet contains a lot of small details that are spread over the entire airframe. In the cockpit there are new launch rails for the ejection seat, plus small panels on the bulkhead, cockpit sills, canopy internal parts and seat details. The nose gear bay receives new side skins; wiring detail and new bay door hinges, with additional detail added to the main bays too. On the fuselage, many small vents are added as raised parts; a pop-up intake and its tunnel are fitted to a hole you make in the exterior, and stiffeners are added here and there. The air-brakes have wiring added to their bays, and a new detailed skin added to the interior of the brakes themselves, while the intake splitter plates are removed and replaced by a new highly detailed micro-perforated part that should improve detail immensely with careful painting. Inside the intakes, the thick splitters are replaced by more in-scale parts, new auxiliary vents are added on top, and inside the side aux-intakes are backed with a louvered box. The fuel tanks are given PE filler caps, and other small parts are dotted around the airframe Upate Set Mig-23MF (48965) Supplied on a single large fret, identical to the one above in all but name (which is why there isn't another picture – just imagine the different number at the top), the difference are minimal and relate to one area, the tip of the tail fillet. Seatbelts STEEL Mig-23ML/MF (FE932) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the two sets of crew belts, you also get a set of the pull-handles between the pilot's knees that gets him out of there in case of an emergency. Masks Tface (EX615) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub masks for all the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. You also get another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. Review sample courtesy of
  16. Mig-25PD Updates (for ICM) 1:48 Eduard ICM's new Foxbat range of Foxbat kits go together really well, but as always with injection moulding you can do some aspects better with Photo-Etch. Along comes Eduard with a small collection of PE sets and a set of kabuki tape masks to make your life easier, and the detail better. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Interior (49928) Consisting of two frets of PE, one of which is nickel-plated and pre-painted, the other bare brass, this set adds extra detail to the cockpit that would be difficult, if not impossible to add via scratch-building. After scraping the detail from the sidewall, consoles and instrument panel, new panels are installed with detail picked out in relief and colour, plus a set of new sidewall skins with panelling details added. The main panel is split into several parts, laminated together to create a more realistic whole, replete with instrument dials behind the bezels. The seat is upgraded with a seat cover, more accurate pull handle, leg straps, and a new detail insert for the top of the headbox, whilst behind it the rear bulkhead is given a skin of riveted metal instead of the raised detail that was provided in the kit. After replacing the rudder pedals with more detailed parts, the rest of the set is used to improve the detail on the canopy, including sill details, internal structure, canopy and windscreen hoops with rear-view mirrors, and the seals around the moving section. Zoom! Set (FE928) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE929) Eduard's new STEEL seatbelt range combines the simplicity of pre-painted Photo-Etch (PE) belts with the thin, flexible steel that they now use, resulting in seatbelts that look more in-scale, and are easier to bend to drape more naturally over the ejection seat or crew seat as the case may be. The paint used also seems more flexible, and better able to cope with the rigors of fitting the belts into position without cracking and peeling off, which was sometimes a danger with the previous nickel-plated brass types. As well as coming pre-painted, they are also shaded to imply further depth to the buckles and overlaps, with the clasps, slides and attachment points showing bright in conjunction with the painted portions. Exterior (48968) This set is supplied on two larger brass frets, and contains plenty of parts to improve the detail further. The nose gear bay is skinned almost completely with a number of highly detailed parts, layered to give a better indication of depth, while the bay doors are given hinges and interior skins to complement. The main bays are skinned along the less detailed edges at the bottom of the bay, which is also the area most seen, with the bay doors also receiving some attention in the shape of panels, hinge-lines and brackets. The main legs are improved by the replacement of one of the arms by a detailed assembly that better represents the original, plus a set of hoses, and a hub detail part for the wheels. The intakes have new skin sections to better replicate the detail of the perforated area in the roof, and a skin for the dropped intake "scoops" at the bottom of the intake that sucks in more air at low speeds. Detail panels are added to the guide vanes that hold the intakes away from the fuselage, although little will be seen of these at the end of construction. Careful test-fitting will be needed here also, just in case it affects fit of the parts. At the front of the engine a fan enhancement is added, with the afterburner ring being more delicately depicted by fine PE parts, which are fitted with a centre section so that they are drop-in replacements for the kit parts. A side profile shows the correct shape for the rings after installation, which is conical. Between the exhausts, small parts are added to the wedge-shaped fairing, and the separator between the closely spaced exhausts. There are a virtual forest of aerials, raised panel, AoA probes and other parts around the nose, static wicks on the wings and tail, skins for the pylon contact points if you are posing them empty, and a few replacement bay doors to the nose gear. Masks (EX617) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX618) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Spitfire Mk.22/24 Upgrades (for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard This kit from Airfix may not be the newest on the block, but it's a golden oldie that is generally well-liked by modellers, so much so that it has been re-released by Airfix a number of times over the years. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Detail Set (49924) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. It begins with a re-scribing template for the Mk.22 radio hatch, which was in a different place to the 24, the lines for which will need filling to finish the job. A complete set of new layered instrument panels, placards and sidewall instruments are the primary parts on the painted set, with a new seat with supports; rudder pedals; gun bay internal structure; wing details; radiator skins; roll-over bar behind the pilot's head; access door; main gear and tail-wheel bay detail also supplied. Zoom! Set (FE924) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE925) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new printing method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the crew belts, you also get a bracket on the head armour that holds the tensioning of the shoulder belts, which will require you to remove the moulded-in part. landing flaps (48963) Eduard landing flaps use an ingenious technique to achieve excellent true-to-scale flaps using few parts, and requiring the modeller to simply remove the over-thick ribbing, plus scrape the upper wings to accommodate the thickness of the completed bays, and hollow out a hole in the upper wing for the flap indicator. Each half of the two flap sections (bay and flap itself) is constructed in the same manner, by twisting and folding over the attached ribs to create a 3D shape, plus some 0.6mm rod for the hinges from your own stock. The bays glue to the inside of the upper wing and the flap attaches to the rear wall of the new bay. Repeat this for the other side, and you're almost done. The indicator is placed in the hole opened earlier, and the cover is glued over it, with a scrap diagram showing its correct position. Masks (EX610) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub/tyre masks for all the wheels (including the tail-wheel), allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Review sample courtesy of
  18. As I have finally finished my Brits Abroad GB build I thought I would rather belatedly join the Pacific at War GB. I must have something in the stash I thought...well I do but only just. After trawling through a number of boxes I finally came across this kit. Most of the markings don’t qualify being either European or Japan based. But this one does fit the bill I think. This plane was on HMS Khedive about which more info can be found here, https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Khedive_(D62) What confused me slightly was the reference to HMS Trincomalee. The only HMS Trincomalee I could find reference to was sold for scrap in 1897. See https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Trincomalee for further details. Trincomalee is however a district of Ceylon and a major RAF base in WWII. Am I missing something or has Eduard made a mistake? Dave
  19. F4U Wheels (for Tamiya) 1:72 Eduard I've reviewed quite a few different resin wheels from Eduard, and they've never failed to impress me. The resin is always flawlessly and the details are crisp and sharp. This set provides a complete set of resin wheels for Tamiya's 1:72 Corsair. The main wheels have flat spots cast in place, while the tail wheel actually includes a complete replacement strut assembly (except for the tail hook). The latter includes photo etched details and paint masks are included for both main wheels and tail wheel. Conclusion It's curious that Eduard have waited until now to release upgraded wheels for a kit that is nearing its twenty-first birthday. Notwithstanding that, the wheels themselves are up to Eduard's usual high standard and they will make a noticeable difference to the kit. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  20. Eduard leaflet for May: http://www.eduard.com/store/out/media/distributors/leaflet/leaflet2016-05.pdf change digit in link for older issues
  21. Su-27UB Updates (for Hobby Boss) 1:48 Eduard We've been blessed with a huge range of new modern soviet fighters of late in 1:48, with Hobby Boss's Su-27UB filling a hole with a newly tooled kit superseding the ageing Academy one. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Interior (49922) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side consoles are the primary parts on the painted set, with new rudder pedals; ejection seat details; coaming instrumentation; HUD with acetate glazing, and canopy internal structure also supplied. Zoom! Set (FE922) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE923) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the two sets of crew belts, you also get a set of the pull-handles between the pilot's knees that gets him out of there in case of an emergency. Exterior (48964) This larger bare brass set contains some important upgrades, such as delicate new afterburner rings, with scrap diagrams showing how they should be arranged; an interior surface skin for the intake trunk, including the drop-down FOD guards; an interior skin to the air-brake; a substantial skinning and detailing of the main gear bays with additions to the nose gear mudguard grilles; static wicks on the wingtips and rudder, and various aerials and antennae around the airframe. Masks (EX613) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of masks for some of the other clear lenses around the airframe, plus a masking sheet that smiles at you when you look at it. Masks Tface (EX614) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism, which if used in conjunction with the canopy details from the interior set will ease painting substantially. Review sample courtesy of
  22. Eduard has just announced 1/48th MiG-23MF "Flogger-B" & MiG-3ML "Flogger-G" in Czechoslovak service. New tool? That's the question. Frankly I hardly imagine Eduard reboxing the Trumpeter's MiG-23 kits. But who knows. If they're new tool and from the same barrel as their 1/48th MiG-21 "Fishbed" Source: https://scontent.fbru2-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t31.0-8/22382055_1823842124297393_5421894630712582162_o.png?oh=3b46bbc2e5e4abf84b990a1a4b7b5aba&oe=5A403F00 V.P.
  23. Hello, after 20 years and some attempts to practice, I start with this classic. Fw 190A-3 ProfiPack Edition Eduard Nr. 82144 1/48 ( review ). To make it more pleasant , I also took Fw 190A-3 cockpit Eduard Nr. 648357 1/48 ( review ) I started from the cockpit, I will move the left pedals a little forward, to mount the rudder in a more plastic position, the same will do with the stick for the ailerons
  24. My latest project. Really nice fit. One of the best version of the machine if you like it a little bit fat ))
  25. Löök Resin Instrument Panels & Seatbelts – November 2018 1:48 Eduard You may have seen Dave's recent review of some of the 1:32 Löök sets that have begun to filter in from Eduard, and these sets are just the same, but in 1:48 Just like Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with red themed cover and a pale grey backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are found to the rear. Each panel and set of seatbelts are glued to the backing card, and while they look nice, the glue is pretty strong, and needs a blade or metal ruler to tease them away from the card without damage – especially true of the seatbelts. The instrument panels are made of black or grey resin as appropriate, and are likely the same parts that you can find in any of Eduard's cockpit sets, but with a crucial difference. The instruments, stencils and markings for the panel are printed onto the resin, with a glossy clear coat over the dials to give a realistic looking "glass" to finish off the parts. You can quite literally drop them into your finished cockpit once you've liberated them from the casting blocks, which are also colour printed with the Eduard logo. A massive time-saver for anyone that either doesn't have the skill to do good instrument panels, or just wants to crack on with the painting of the exterior. Different modellers have different skill sets and interests, so if you want to partake you don't need to feel guilty in any way, shape or form because it's your hobby. The seatbelts are the new thinner and more flexible STEEL belts, which In case you don't already know, are actually Photo-Etch (PE) steel (the title gives it away, doesn't it?), and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds additional perceived depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. The instructions are tailored to each set, showing any specifics for each model, and a set of diagrams that talk you through assembling the belts and draping them over the seat of your model. The first batch of sets are as follows: Bf.109G-6 Löök (644001 for Tamiya) Fw.190A-5 Löök (644002 for Eduard) Bf.109G-6 Löök (644003 for Eduard) Bf.109G-10 Löök (644004 for Eduard) Fw.190A-8/R2 Löök (644005 for Eduard) Spitfire Mk.IX Early Löök (644007 for Eduard) Spitfire Mk.IX Late Löök (644008 for Tamiya) Conclusion Detail is up to Eduard's usual standards in both departments, and is a great time-saver for anyone not wanting to spend too much time on the cockpit. The glue holding the parts in place could be a little less grippy, but I managed to get seven sets off their card without damage, so it's not really an issue, just a precaution to make note of. Of course they're not for everyone, and if the very idea mortally offends you, then why have you read this far into the review? Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
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