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Found 51 results

  1. German Road Signs WWII Eastern Front Set 1 (35602) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd During WWII German forces renamed and re-signposted their conquests, partly through necessity but also to stake their claim and remind the subjugated masses that they were in German hands now. This set is full of signs of this nature, and includes military signs to guide their troops to rally points, service areas and so forth as they didn't have the luxury of GPS and satnav back then, which is probably just as well. This is one of their range of sign sets, in the shape of German road signs from France here, and Russian signs here, and as the “Set 1” part in the title implies there will doubtless be others. The set arrives in a shrink-wrapped figure box with a painting of the contents on the front and brief instructions on the rear. There are three medium-sized sprues in grey styrene in the box, plus a decal sheet on thick paper that contains all the painted descriptive fronts of the signs. As the box art suggests, you also get a length of picket fence and a gate, a couple of posts and a ladder alongside the signs, of which there are thirty eight in total spread across two identical sprues. Each sign is either metal or moulded with a restrained wooden texture that will show through the decals if you use sufficient decal solution during application. Some of the larger signs are also made from a few planks, so the joins will also show through the decal. Conclusion Dioramas rely on the minutiae of the background to give that "lived in" look to the terrain, and signage is essential for all but the straightest of roads. The addition of the fence and bench gives extra depth to any road scene, and the painting guide helps with painting the plastic parts. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. Focke-Wulf Triebflügel Nachtjäger (40013) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd Toward the end of WWII the Nazis were desperately casting around for Wunderwaffe, or Wonder Weapons that would turn the overwhelming tide against their attempt to take over Europe and probably the world. This resulted in some distinctly left-field designs being considered, that under normal circumstances would more likely have been dismissed out of hand. One such project that has since gained traction in the minds of the Luft'46 community and beyond is the concept of the Triebflügel from Focke-Wulf, which was little more than a rocket-shaped body with a rotating set of blades tipped with ramjet engines providing the motive power. This arrangement was to enable it to take off vertically, which was of greater interest as the front lines got closer and air bases became bombed-out rubble, as was the use of the simple ramjet that was propelled up to speed by single-use rockets, all of which used little in the way of strategic materials or complex technology and metallurgy. It went nowhere in terms of production of course, and had some critical issues that would have needed to be addressed if it had gone further, such as the counter-rotation required to offset the rotational friction of the blades was supposed to be supplied by the cruciform tail pressing against the air, it would have to land vertically with the pilot facing forward and the rear view obscured by the still rotating aerofoils and engines to name but two. As usual with WWII German designs, they would have wanted to make it a jack of all trades, so a Nachtjäger variant was bound to have happened if it had gone into production. Post war the Convair Pogo was to attempt a broadly similar flight profile with similar issues raising their heads and helping ensure its eventual demise. If you've been following the Marvel Avengers film franchise (MCU), you'll have seen Red Skull absconding in a very Triebflügel-esque aircraft at one point, which although undoubtedly CGI could actually be attempted now with our computers and other technologies. We just need to find someone with too much money and who is just daft enough now… Elon? The Kit Until fairly recently there hasn't been a modern injection moulded kit in any of the larger scales, and now we have two plus this new boxing. This is the larger of them and should primarily appeal to modellers in 1:32 and 1:35 given the similarity in scales that should result in a "close enough" shrug from many, followed by the opening of wallets. The original interceptor went out of stock at Creative Models very quickly, so I would advise you to get your order in for this boxing before they run out again, as I can see it proving very popular. The kit arrives in a shrink-wrapped standard sized top opening box and inside are twelve sprues in grey styrene, a clear sprue, a small sheet of Photo-Etch (PE) in a small card envelope, a good sized decal sheet and the instruction booklet with a colour cover that includes all the painting and decaling profiles on three of the four sides. I have one of the smaller models as well as the MiniArt Interceptor kit (reviewed here), and this is a simple update with new parts added to an enlarged sprue containing an amended nose cone and two antenna masts for the nose with moulded-in dipoles. Detail is excellent, with lots of rivets and panel lines visible on the exterior, a nicely appointed cockpit and the cannon armament included in bays either side of the pilot, who was hopefully supplied with ear protection. There is also extra detail in the wingtip motors and the landing gear is substantial, partially from the increase in size, but also because of the design of the main leg. Construction is almost identical to the Interceptor boxing and begins with the cockpit with a floor part forming the basis and having rudder pedals, control column and bulkhead added, then the seat, pilot armour and a full set of PE seatbelts. The side consoles are attached to the upper section of the cockpit that is added from above and also forms part of the gun bays. To the consoles are added a number of PE levers to busy the area up, after which the instrument panel is fitted across them with decals provided for the instrument dials. The larger cannons are built up from a good number of parts and will look good if you pose them open, and benefit from hollow muzzles thanks to some sliding moulds. The smaller cannons are added after their bays are boxed in, again raising the level of the cockpit walls, which you'll need to take into account when you're painting things. These weapons are slightly less detailed and don't have hollow barrels, so break out the pin-vice when you're ready. The cockpit can then be surrounded by the nose, which is in two halves and has a short tubular section that helps support the spinning wing section. A rear deck is dropped in behind the pilot's station and the nose cone is added to the front, with careful alignment key to obtain the best join. The gun bay doors can be left off to display them or put in place for a streamlined look, in which case you don't need to install the cannons as nose weight isn't an issue. If you're closing up the lower bays, there is an additional barrel stub that fits to the back of its door to simulate the cannon being present. The canopy is a three-part unit with fixed windscreen and rear plus opening central section that hinges sideways if you're going to open it. There is an additional dome-shaped part included in the kit that makes one wonder if there will be another night fighter version with a radar operator's blister in the aft section? The wings spin perpendicular to the direction of flight on a short section of the fuselage, which is built up with three sockets for the wings on a toroidal base, over which the rest of that section is installed and left to one side until later when the assemblies are brought together. The simple ramjet engines are built up on a pair of stator vanes and have multiple fuel injectors moulded into their rear with a rounded cap in the centre. These are installed inside the cowlings that are moulded into each wing half so it would be wise to paint this and the interior of the engine pods a suitably sooty colour before you join each wing. There are three and all are identical. The final main assembly is the aft of the aircraft, and the four retractable castor wheels are first to be built. Each single-part wheel sits in a single piece yoke, which in turn slides inside a two-part aerodynamic fairing. One half of this is moulded to a strut, which slides into the trough within the fins in one of two places to depict the wheels retracted or deployed. If showing them retracted you ignore the wheel and yoke and install the clamshell doors, turning the assembly into a teardrop shape, but if using the wheels you glue the fairings folded back exposing the wheel. The main wheel is in two halves, as is the yoke, and should be capable of taking the weight of the model when finished unless you intend to load it up with motors or other silliness (go on, you know someone will!). The aft fuselage parts are brought together with two of the castor assemblies trapped between the moulded-in fins, and the other two trapped within the separate fins that fit at 90o to the seamline. The main wheel then slides into its bay if you are going wheels down and has the clamshell doors fitted open, or you use just the doors for an in-flight pose. It's good to see that some detail has been moulded into the interior of the doors, as they are quite visible on a landed display. The three sections are brought together at the end by placing the wing-bearing part onto the upstand on the aft fuselage then adding the nose, with its upstand sliding inside the lower one. This traps the rotating portion in place, and hopefully allows the aforementioned rotation to continue after the glue has dried. All that remains is to plug the three wings into their sockets, add the PE D/F loop and the aerial on the spine, then install the two commendably fine antennae into the small slots in the nose cone. Markings There are six decal options provided on the sheet, and they vary from each other and their smaller competitor quite substantially with some plausible and just plain silly options given for your delight. From the box you can build one of the following: Nachtjagdgeschwader 1. Germany 1945-46 Nachtjagdgeschwader 200. Germany 1946 Nachtjagdgeschwader X. 2nd Battle of Berlin, Germany 1946 Nachtjagdgeschwader 310. Germany 1946 Decals are printed by DecoGraph and have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. The instrument decals have just the dials to place within the painted panel, outlined on the sheet for your ease, and there are split Swastikas there if you want to use them and your locality doesn't have laws preventing displaying such insignia. Note that this excellent build shows the top cannons omitted, whereas the instructions show both used. Check for interference with the antennae and make your own mind up. Conclusion This is a really nice rendition of this weird aircraft design with some interesting decal options and those antenna "whiskers". I'm sure some purists would still have preferred to see it in 1:32, but the size difference isn't too severe to stop you from adding one to your stash. We already have a winner in the Interceptor with this one probably following in its footsteps. The intriguing additional clear blister hints at more versions to come, which will be fun. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. TACAM T-60 Romanian Tank Destroyer (36230) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd The T-60 was a Soviet light tank design, and the Romanians pressed captured examples into service, hacking some about to create the TACAM, which was a shortening of the Romanian for Self-Propelled Anti-Tank Gun, and frankly much easier to say if you’re English. The design was rushed through in a very short space of time, literally days, and on a small chassis such as that of the T-60, the compromises were many and varied. Using yet more captured Soviet equipment in the shape of the F-22 field gun with a three sided splinter-shield and recoil guard to protect the crew from incoming fire and the rapidly moving gun breech respectively. Only a handful of these were made due to the less-than stellar performance that gave it quite the reputation as a poor fighting vehicle, mainly due to the reused technology and the engineering challenges that arose from the increase in weight and the stresses placed upon the chassis by firing the relatively oversized gun. The Romanians switched sides in 1944 and after that the exploits of the two armoured regiments that were equipped with the type are vague, and it is entirely likely that the Soviets retook their hardware, although what use it was to them is unclear. You’d think that would be the end of the TACAM type, but there were other variants on different chassis and using alternative guns. The Kit The kit comes in a shrink-wrapped top opening box, with an artist’s impression of the vehicle ploughing through snow on the top. Inside are thirty eight sprues of grey styrene, a fret of Photo-Etch (PE) brass, a decal sheet and instruction booklet with integrated painting guide at the rear. As with most MiniArt kits there is a huge amount of detail contained on the sprues of various sizes. A lot of the sprues contain common T-60 parts and others hold TACAM specific parts, with a few new ones for the different wheels and other parts on this boxing. The kit is a full-interior edition which explains the high parts count, and should keep you busy for a while. Construction begins with the lower hull floor, to which the drivers position is attached, complete with detailed gearbox, levers and brake drums. Then there is the comprehensively detailed engine, the two batteries and battery tray are added to the left hand side of the hull adjacent to the drivers position, followed by the right side panel which is fitted with a fire extinguisher and four support brackets. The rear bulkhead is decked out with several parts on the outside before it is attached to the lower hull, as is the lower glacis plate. The engine assembly is then glued into position and connected to the transmission via a drive shaft and auxiliary hand-starter shaft behind an armoured cover. The interior is slowly built up with bulkheads, ammunition racks with spare drums, boxes and another fire extinguisher. The left hull panel is then attached, along with the final drive covers, idler axles, internal engine compartment bulkheads and several pipes and hoses. The hull roof is assembled from several panels before being glued into place while the five part driver’s hatch and his vision block is made up from six parts. Both assemblies are then glued over the driver’s position, and can be posed with the flap either open or closed for comfort or protection. Additional ammunition is stowed along the interior hull sides for access by the crew, plus even more in the extra stowage box on the rear deck next to the separate engine cover. The suspension arms are then glued to the hull, followed by the road wheels, return rollers, drive sprockets and idler wheels. The tracks are each built up from eighty six individual links that are of the glue-together type, which must be wrapped around the road wheels while the glue is still supple. Each link is attached to the sprue with three gates, has hollow guide horns, and a complete absence of ejector pin marks, which is nice. The sprue gates should be quick to clean up, but due to the small size of each link and their delicate moulding, it will be important to treat the parts gently both during clean-up and construction, taking care not to over-glue things and risk turning them into a melty goo. The track fenders are fitted with a number of triangular PE brackets, as well as large storage boxes, pioneer tools and other small parts. The 76mm gun, its breech and its mounting carriage is then built up and fitted with the barrel having a hollow tip thanks to a little slide-moulding. The part count here is high, and every aspect of the gun is supplied, some of which are PE and all are highly detailed. The inner splinter shields for the gun are then fitted along with the elevation mechanism and its manual controls, with this assembly fitted to the mount that bisects the lower part of the crew compartment, then shrouded with the external splinter shields that wrap around the sides of the emplacement to further protect the crew from flanking fire. A selection of PE brackets and straps are applied around the hull and splinter shield, then the large “bed frame” antenna is assembled and added to the upper hull around the gun position and engine deck. This, the different road wheels and additional ammo with crates are the main differences between this and the earlier boxings. The small decal sheet contains markings for three of these peculiar and unloved (at the time) vehicles: Romanian Army, Autumn 1944 Presumably 2nd Tank Regiment Romanian Army, Eastern Front, February 1944 Presumably 1st Armoured Division, “Greater Romania” Army Group “Veler”, Lasi District, August 1944 The decals are predominantly black, with a few white ones, and two red stars on a white circular background, which have been printed to look as if they were hand-painted, complete with runs where too much paint has been applied. They’re printed by DecoGraph, and have good registration where it counts (only on 2 decals), sharpness and colour density, so should cause no problems. Conclusion This is another excellent kit from MiniArt, bringing more of the lesser known military vehicles to the mainstream modelling community. With the high part count and detail, this kit is really aimed at the more experienced modeller and should build up into a superb model that is absolutely full of detail, so much so that there shouldn’t be much need for aftermarket parts. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Soviet Railway Wagon "Teplushka" (35300) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd Railway trucks/wagons have been a major way of getting goods, livestock and even people around the countryside, and as the Soviet Union was geographically huge the railway was a primary mode of transport for goods and materiel come wartime. During Operation Citadel and the Soviet push back, many battles over stations and marshalling yards took place, and such wagons (Teplushka means boxcar) were often part of the backdrop. This four-wheeled unit was capable of carrying 8 tonnes and had a sliding door on both sides, with a small stove against the back wall for when live cargo was carried. The Kit Arriving in a standard-sized shrink-wrapped MiniArt box, the first thing that strikes you is how heavy it is. There are 37 sprues of grey styrene inside which accounts for most of the weight, a card envelope with two sheets of Photo-Etch (PE) parts inside, a decal sheet and the instruction booklet with a glossy cover and first page carrying the painting guide and some interesting posters and placards to put on your model. Construction begins with the underpinnings, starting with the central brake assembly in an H-frame which later forms the middle cross-rails of the chassis. The two axles are next with their wheels each end and leaf-spring suspension prepped for when the chassis is ready for them. The H-frame is joined with four more cross-rails to the main chassis rails, then stiffened by four diagonal cross-braces and a pair of end beams that accept the buffers and shackles later on. Firstly, the sides of the body are widened with a row of stand-off brackets on each side with a finishing rail and doorstep added to the sides after those are set up. Now you can put the suspension assemblies on the chassis-rails and push them slightly apart to accept the axles, which spin freely in depressions within the suspension assembly on their conical ends. The flat bed is fitted next in two sections, while the side and end panels are stiffened up with bracing and windows that can be posed open or closed, leaving the doors in the centre of each side open at this time. Before the roof it made up, the inside is decorated with three simple wooden platforms at each end, the top one of which is half depth and tilted upwards, possibly for luggage. The stove is also made up from a single body part and additional doors, grilles, top and smoke stack, then it is put to one side while the rest of the wagon is built up. More stiffening braces are added to the top of the side panels and the outer corners, plus a rail for the doors to slide on later. The roof is a long assembly made up from two sections that have wooden planking moulded on the inside, and a panelled roof with raised edges externally, braced from the inside by seven curved cross-rails. There's a small pre-engraved circular cut-out in each panel but you only need to cut one out to accommodate the smoke stack, with the stove sitting on a PE plate with a small scoop to top it up with fuel. That and the roof go on together, as the position of the stove is determined by the roof panel. It's up to you whether you decide to fill the other engraved hole, as it's unlikely to be seen unless you have eyes on stalks. The doors on each side have two layers, the inner side having a planked lower section and a diagonal bracing across the top. The pulley-like wheels are fitted onto the door frame while it is being laminated, and PE furniture and styrene handles are made up to complete them. A PE drip-rail is also attached over the door and its slide rail after it has been folded to an L-profile, then the doors are popped into place top first with the bottom edge dropped into the lower guides. Then it's just a matter of making up four three-part buffers, the brake rods with hooks on the ends, and the couplings that attach to them. That's the truck done, but now you need something to sit it on. There are four sprues filled with rail parts including 20 track-ties/sleepers, four sections of rail, linking parts and number of track spikes. The spikes on the inner edges of the rails are moulded-in, so the inner flange on the rails are inserted there first and secured by the separate pin on the outer edge. Do this 40 times (2 per sleeper) and you have a decent length or rail to put your truck on, and the beginnings of a diorama or vignette. Finally, you need to acquire a short length of chain to attach the last two hooks to the ends of the boxcar. There are also a pair of triangular mounts in the box that act as braces for the patriotic posters if you are using them. Markings There are seven sets of markings on the decal sheet with green and shades of brown the background colour onto which you apply the decals and some of the 28 posters and patriotic slogans that are included in the colour pages of the instructions. South-Western Railway. The train car with demobilised soldiers of the Red Army, 1945 Kuibyshev Railroad. Railway carriage as part of a military train 1942 Orenburg Railroad. Railway carriage as part of a military train 1943 Sanitary railway carriage of unknown military train, 1943-44 Deutsche Reichsbahn (imperial Railway Administration) occupied territory of the Soviet Union, 1942-44 South Ural Railway. The train car with demobilised soldiers of the Red Army, 1945 Railway carriage of unknown military train, 1942-45 The decals are printed by DecoGraph and they are all either red or white with no registration to worry about, but good sharpness and colour density. You can also decorate your carriages with some of the posters by cutting them out and pasting them to the sides either as indicated on the examples, or by making up your own arrangement. Conclusion This detailed kit is perfect for either adding to a train/loco, or as a participant in a diorama using the included rails. The painted example from MiniArt's website above shows the truck with a bunch of demobilised soldiers aboard, as per one of the markings options, although you'd have to source those yourself. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Soviet KMT-7 Mine-Roller (37045) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd. Mines are a problem for AFVs, softskins and foot soldiers alike, and there are different types used for different circumstances to inflict maximum damage to man and machine. Mines intended to disable tanks generally have larger charges to penetrate the thinner underside armour and tear off tracks and drive wheels, with a higher pressure required to trigger them. The resulting explosion can cripple or destroy a tank, leaving crew dead or injured, a valuable tank out of action and sometimes blocking the way. Most Soviet and Russian tanks are fitted with attachment points for mine-rollers that can be fitted as needed and clear a path for the tank's tracks to allow them to proceed. Other tanks without a mine-roller must follow in their tracks exactly or risk detonating mines that are outside the cleared paths. It's not an ideal solution, more of an expedient one that probably requires a more complete detection and cleaning later when the enemy aren't shooting at them. The KMT-5 saw service until the 60s and was used until the T-64 after which it was replaced for newer vehicles with the improved KMT-7. It operates by breaking the ground up with toothed rollers of substantial weight to simulate the footprint of an AFV, ploughing up the ground and detonating any mines it finds. Its rugged construction means that it can survive explosions, although they do take their toll on the hardware eventually. The improved KMT-9 eventually replaced the 7 in use. The Kit The KMT-5M and KMT-9M have already been seen individually and included with various MiniArt kits, but if you need a 7 to fit to another suitable kit you already have, now's your chance! It arrives in a figure-sized top-opening box in shrink-wrap with nineteen sprues in grey styrene inside plus a length of chain in shiny silver. The instruction booklet is like that of a complete kit, which is for good reason as it's a fairly complex build and there are plenty of steps. Construction begins with the toothed rollers, which each have three two-part wheels on a central axle plus two shallow T-shaped end-caps. These are joined by short tubes that have small sections of chain attached in strategic places for later fitting at the end of the suspension arms. These are next to be built and each has a pair of pads at the tank end and a hinged arm that is long enough to keep the tank away from the brunt of the blast, as well as absorb some of the upward momentum and reduce damage to the rollers. The arms spread apart near the hull so that the rollers are placed at exactly the same spacing as the tracks, and there are parts supplied to fit the roller to MiniArt models, and other parts if it's another manufacturer's kit. There are a couple a styrene cable parts in the box to further secure the assembly, with another momentum-absorbing spring at the roller end. The bogies are attached to the arms via the short lengths of chain fitted to hooks fore and aft, acting as a further damper for asymmetric detonations. If your model has a bow-wash panel on the glacis plate, you will need to leave that part off the model as they were not fitted with the mine-roller. Markings There are none! There aren't any decals and you're not even given any clues as to what colour to use other than the boxtop colours. Use your Google Fu or references to check before you start spraying your tank's main colour on it, just in case. Conclusion A useful addition to make your mid Cold War Soviet AFV stand out from the crowd, to add in the background of a diorama, or even as a stand-alone – maybe being repaired after a big bang? Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. German Gas Station 1930-40 (35598) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd With the proliferation of the internal combustion engine in the early 20th century, petroleum/petrol or gasoline/gas stations began popping up over most of the developed world to meet the demand of the newly mobile populous. Germany was one such nation, and the now familiar sight of a building with branded petrol pumps and equipment on the forecourt have become the standard indicator of a gas station. The Kit This set contains the likely accessories and equipment found on the forecourt of a German gas station in the 30-40s, and leaves you to source or create the buildings yourself. The kit arrives in a shrink-wrapped small top-opening box (think a little larger than a figure box), and inside are ten sprues in grey styrene, two in clear, a small fret of Photo-Etch brass, and a decal sheet. The package is completed with an instruction booklet, and all the sprues are closely packed in a heat-sealed bag, but the majority of the elastic bands had snapped in transit, so perhaps MiniArt should source some more durable bands for the next batch? Three sprues hold parts for two fuel barrels, with a hand-pump included and some small cans of varying shapes and sizes that you may have seen in other sets so far, plus a five-shelf storage unit to stash tools and the cans on. The major parts are used to create two pumps that stand on pillars, with the mechanicals hidden away in a cylindrical housing that can be posed open for business or closed, thanks to the two clamshell doors and PE clapping-plate that fits to the inside lip of one of them. Two clear halves of the brand sign are added either side of a circular frame and fitted to the top, and as these were often a semi-translucent white with a logo painted or etched on the front and back, there is an opportunity to put in lighting if you're adept with those types of thing. You'll need to provide a little wire to represent the hose from the body to the nozzle, so make sure you have some to hand. The remaining parts are used to create a stand-alone petrol or diesel compressor with a large receiver tanks underneath that has wheels at one end to allow repositioning wheel-barrow style. A set of handles and a spray gun are included, the latter needing more wire to act as the air hose of whatever length you choose. Markings The decals are printed by Decograph on a small sheet with good registration, colour density and sharpness, plus a part of the colour instruction sheet is devoted to printed replicas of typical signage, posters and so forth that would be found on the walls of stations at the time. No, the posters don't really look like that - I blurred them a little to make them unusable. Fair's fair. Conclusion Building a fuel station is a task, but not as difficult as making the hardware to go with it. This set takes all the hard parts out of the finishing touches, then it's up to you to hunt down a suitable building or build your own using your diorama skills if you have them. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. US Fuel Drums 55 Gals (35592) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd Can you hear the sound of drums? 55 gallon drums used by the US in WWII. This is another set in MiniArt's range of diorama accessories, and as usual (fairly usual) it arrives in a shrink-wrapped figure box with eighteen sprues in grey styrene plus a decal sheet containing a bunch of stencils for you to use. The instructions are kind-of simple and printed on the rear of the box, showing how you build up the two types of drum, one with simple ribs and the other with corrugated top and bottom sections. The end-caps are both covered with manufacturer's marks inappropriate to this set, but you are advised to fit those with the writing facing inward so it won't be seen. The twelve drum sprues contain one of each type of drum, so you can make a total of 24 and have six hand-pumps to add as you see fit with the addition of a little wire to play the role of the hose between the hand-cranked pump and the nozzle. Below the instructions are the painting and marking options with various colours and stencil options from the sheet. Under those are the paint codes in Vallejo, Mr. Color, Life Color, Tamiya, AK, Mission Models and Hataka, plus the colour names in English and Ukrainian (at a guess). Conclusion Lots of US fuel drums. If you're in the market, then go and buy some for your next diorama or to fill up the back of your wagon etc. Now what on earth is FOG oil? I didn't know fog needed oiling? Review sample courtesy of
  8. M3 Lee Late - Exterior Kit (35214) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models In the years before WWII America realised that they were lagging behind in respect of armour, a fact that became especially clear when Germany came out from under the Versailles treaty to show off and then use their new tanks and Blitzkrieg tactics. The M3 Lee was conceived in 1940 as a medium tank carrying a powerful 75mm gun, partly for manning by their own crews, but also because Britain had requested a large number of tanks to make good their losses from Dunkirk. The Lee was a decent tank but suffered from a high silhouette and limited traverse of the sponson-mounted 75mm gun, but was still widely used. In British service it was known as the Lee if it was fitted with the original American turret, or the Grant when using the lower-profiled British specification turrets. The Lee was used primarily in Africa and the Pacific theatres where the 2nd line equipment seemed to be fielded (for the most part) by the enemy, and against the Japanese who were far behind with their tank designs and tactics. Another major user was the USSR under lend lease, the Soviets did not like the tank and its nickname was "a coffin for 6", not surprising in a way as at the time they were facing panthers and Tigers with it. The tank underwent some substantial changes including cast, welded and back to riveted hulls plus changes in the power pack and loss of the side doors to stiffen the hull. The riveted hulls suffered from rivets popping off and becoming projectiles when hit, which could be just as lethal as a penetrating round and was never fully eliminated. The Late version deleted the side doors and left only one pistol port, it also had different wheels and drive sprockets. The Kit MiniArt began 2019 with a new tooling of the M3 Lee and are expanded their range by adding new parts as they go along. The full interior kit of the Early Lee was reviewed here. This boxing now comes without an interior. The box is standard MiniArt fare with an attractive picture from their usual artist, and inside are a huge number of sprues of varying sizes with 60 sprues in grey styrene, a single sprue in clear, a fret of Photo-Etch (PE) brass, decal sheet and the instruction booklet with painting guide at the front and rear completing the package. Construction begins with the vehicle floor onto which the transmission and final drive assemblies are fixed. The rolled lower glacis part is also added, and the final drive bell housings that are incorporated into the sidewalls mate with these to complete the shape of that area. The side plates are added and then the top sponsors. To the rear the engine compartment is built up, the doors are fitted along with the exhausts. At the front additional plates over the drive shafts are added. The big 75mm gun and substantial casemate are built up next for fitting into the hull front and the curved splinter shield that allows 14o of traverse to either side to counter any errors in position from the driver or enemy movement. The breech is surrounded by a shield. The various hatches can be posed open or closed, however as there is no interior best close them up! The bow machine gun is actually a twin mount with two .30 cal M1919s firing through a hatch near the port sponson. The rest of the hull is then built up in much the same manner as the real thing, but with glue and the rivets only there for show. Two large bins for the rear are then built up. When we reach the engine deck there are two large panels, the smaller of them having PE grilles and more filler caps, with both of them covered in small PE tie-down lugs. At the read the exhausts are added with their protective plates and the rear mudguards are added. The completed deck is then covered with pioneer tools and their PE tie-downs, plus the towing cables that you need to source yourself to go with the plastic eyes at each end. A scrap diagram shows their location and how to fix the PE straps to the tie-downs and eyes, with a length of 145mm suggested. The lower hull is finished off with a pair of short plates over the drive wheels and a host of additional equipment filling up the interior with more shell storage, tanks and auxiliary generator. The big 75mm gun and substantial casemate are built up next for fitting into the hull front and the curved splinter shield that allows 14o of traverse to either side to counter any errors in position from the driver or enemy movement. The breech is surrounded by a shield. Before it can be installed the super-structure must be built up to accommodate it, including the sidewalls, the curved surround and the angled front panels of the glacis. The various hatches can be posed open or closed, and an instrument panel is fitted to the inside of the glacis. The rest of the hull is then built up in much the same manner as the real thing, but with glue and the rivets only there for show. Fuel caps are added along the way, and when we reach the engine deck there are two large panels, the smaller of them having PE grilles and more filler caps, with both of them covered in small PE tie-down lugs. The rear of the deck overhangs the hull and armour plates protect the tops of the exhausts from stray rounds where PE brackets are used to hang the aft lights. The completed deck is then covered with pioneer tools and their PE tie-downs, plus the towing cables that you need to source yourself to go with the plastic eyes at each end. A scrap diagram shows their location and how to fix the PE straps to the tie-downs and eyes, with a length of 145mm suggested. At this stage the majority of the hull is built, but it is likely to fill with rain until the roof is fitted.. The stiffening plates to the lower glacis are also glued to the hull and then the roof is made up from a large main part that is stiffened with a number of ribs, and an extra section is attached to the side with a small periscope in the middle. The three square access doors for the crew can all be posed open or closed with latches and small viewing hatches within that can also be posed open. After fitting the armoured cover to the main gun's periscope and a few grab handles, you get to build up the running gear. Aren't you lucky? The Lee's suspension is very similar to the Sherman's with two fat wheels on a bogie with a return roller at the top, and there are three of these assemblies per side. The wheels with their moulded-in tyres are attached to the bogies via swing-arms that pivot inside the cast bogie with an additional arm linked to the compressible rubber towers. Before the front of the bogie is fitted the return roller is installed so it is trapped between its two bearings. Repeat that six times and then make up the idler wheels, which have PE edges and separate hub caps. The bogies are attached to the sides of the hull on their mounting plates, and two stiffeners are added to the top of each one, while the idler wheels are attached to their axles on the adjustable tensioners. At the front the drive sprockets are made up from two parts with an internal collar allowing them to remain mobile if you're sparing with the glue. A short break has you fitting the driver's hatch and optional clear window with a PE wiper blade, plus a couple of towing eyes with shackles under the glacis and some truly tiny parts in plastic and PE between them. Tracks. Love 'em or loathe 'em, they're a necessary part of most tanks and you have to do them eventually. There are 79 track links per side, and each link is made up from four parts. The pads are split to accommodate the links between them, and this is a little fiddly. Mike built a test section up fro the previous reveiw. That said, each link is good looking with fine detail at the ends, and they are flexing nicely as per the real thing. It'll take some time to complete them, but they will be excellent as long as you're careful with preparation and the glue. The rest of the pioneer tools are bracketed to the hull along with the front headlights and their PE protective cages, the former having PE tie-downs and brackets holding them down. You will need to find some thin wire to link the headlamps to the gland that takes the cable inside the hull. Now you can start the turret, most of which is held within the upper part, and that has some very nice casting texture moulded into it that should look great under a few coats of paint. The frames for the small hatches are first to be added, then the hatches themselves are fitted in the open or closed position with small stays holding them at the correct angle for the former. The breech is started by joining the two main parts together, adding the surround, the coax machine gun, then setting it aside while the mantlet and elevation mechanisms are made up. The barrel fits to the mantlet and the turret ring is added. Next up the US machine gun turret is added to the top of the main one. The small turret is built up with the gun and it mantlet being added, the lower ring is added as the main two part hatch. This is then fitted to the main turret, and the main turret then added to the hull. Markings There are a generous eight options provided for the modeller on the decal sheet, all but one of them in green, one being overpainted with a coat of white distemper winter camouflage, and one with some kind of brown. Considering this is an armour kit the sheet is relatively large due to the number of options including captured tanks. From the box you can build one of the following: US Army, 752 Tank Battalion, Perham Down, UK 1942. US Army, 1st Armoured Division, Northern Ireland 1942. Unidentified Soviet Unit, Rzhev District, Winter 1942-43. Red Army, 91st Separate Tank Regiment, Karelian Front, Summer 1943. Red Army, 193rd Independent Tank Regiment, Central Front, Battle of Kursk, July 1943. Red Army, Presumably 193rd Separate Tank Regiment, Central Front, Battle of Kursk, July 1943. Unidentified German Army Unit, Eastern Front 1943-44. Red Army, 244th Independent Tank Regiment, 4th Ukrainian Front. Crimea, April 1944. Decals are by DecoGraph, and have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion This is a wonderfully detailed kit of the Lee as it was supplied to the US, Canadian and Red Army, plus a couple the Germans pinched. The detail incorporated in styrene is phenomenal and the addition of the PE parts gives the modeller all the shackles for their pioneer tools, which are usually included in aftermarket PE sets. A really impressive piece of plastic engineering that's going to be echoed with the Grants and further Lees very soon. Extremely highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. T-34/85 Sea Star Wheels Set (37033) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd The T-34 tank was a bit of a surprise for the Germans on the Eastern front, but as is often the case in wartime, the tank's main gun was found lacking when it came to cracking the heavier armoured Tigers, so was upgraded to a bigger 85mm unit. The vehicles underwent constant minor and major upgrades during the war to resolve problems, provide performance improvements or manufacturing short-cuts. One such aspect was the design of wheels used in the running gear. Initial units left the factory with dished wheels in early or late styles, which were joined by the "star" style wheels again with two types. Very late in the war a new sea-star or starfish wheel set was introduced, but there is very little proof of their use in combat, as they didn't reach factories in large numbers until after the war. It is fairly common to see different types in use on one vehicle, so this set from MiniArt gives you the option to portray an unusual combatant in very late WWII, or a vehicle from post war operations. Just take care with the latter that you also update the rest of the details to match. The Kit Arriving in a shrink-wrapped figure sized end-opening box, there are fourteen sprues in grey styrene within, and instructions printed on the back of the box. All the wheels are made up in pairs with all but the drive sprocket having separate central caps. You make up 10 pairs of road wheels, two idlers and two drive-sprockets, leaving all the other little parts on the sprues, which usually form part of the larger kit that these sprues have been culled from. There is also a two-entry painting guide with Russian Green for the metal parts and rubber for the… well, rubber parts. This is MiniArt, so you can be assured that moulding is very crisp, and within the box the parts are cocooned in a shrink-fit bag, with elastic bands further preventing chaffing during transit. Conclusion If you're in need of some sea-star patterned wheels for a T-34/85 then look no further. Even if the kit you're putting them on isn't MiniArt, they'll probably fit with the possibility of needing to adjust the size of hole or axle a little. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Leopard C2 MEXAS Canadian MBT 1/35 HOBBYBOSS via Creative Models In 1978 the Canadian Army selected the Leopard 1A3 to be its new Main Battle Tank. These would be called the Leopard C1 in service. In 2000 it was decided to upgrade these tanks with the fitment of surplus German Leopard 1A5 turrets. At the same time armour protection was increased, and a new fire control system was added. In 2006 some of these tanks were sent to Afghanistan where they would be fitted with an additional upgrade, the MEXAS system. This stands for Modular Expandable Armour System which was developed n=by IBD Deisenroth Engineering in Germany. This is a new composite armour system which can be added to many vehicles include tanks to increase survivability in these modern conflicts where IEDs and RPGs feature heavily. The Canadians also fit a version to their LAVs. The Kit This kit from HobbyBoss is a re-boxing of the standard Leopard 1 with different parts for the Canadian MBT. Its worth noting the kit does not feature the thermal blanket and cooler fitted at a later date by the Canadians in Afghanistan. The kit looks good on the sprues with lots of detail parts. Moulding is first rate. Construction starts lower hull. Various suspension components are fitted, and the ends of the main torsion bar system and its arms are fitted. The wheels can then be built up and attached, followed by the tracks which are individual links. While at first glance thy look good and there is a jig provided in the kit to make short runs of track however it will take some work to get them right; and the end connectors are moulded to the links so will not articulate like the real ones when the runs go round the end sprockets. The next step is a surprising one in that it looks like a full power pack is provided. While the engine has many parts and looks quite detailed there is no detailing for the engine bay, and the actual block is missing all of its hoses and connector, though there is nothing stopping the modeller going to town here if they want to do an open engine bay. Then the rear bulkhead is made up. There is virtually no moulded on parts here with a lot of small detail parts making up this bulkhead. The rear mud flaps are fitted to the bulkhead at this point. The bulkhead can then be fitted. Moving to the top main hull the engine deck hatch is added, along with some side parts and the drivers vision blocks, the rear exhausts are then added along with quite a few detailed parts such as tools , mirrors etc. The lower and upper hulls can now be joined and the rear bulkhead fitted. PE parts for the engine deck are then fitted. The additional MEXAS armour packs are added to the sides of the hull and the front. The rear tow cables are then added. Work now moves to the turret which has good casting detail moulded in. The mounting points for the MEXAS armour are all moulded to the turret. After the turret is together the large rear mounted turret storage bin is made up and added to the turret, Next up the roof mounted machine gun and its mount can be added. The ECM system and MEXAS armour units can then be assembled and added to the turret. Next up the hatches and aerial mounts are added. The gun and its additional armoured mantlet are built up, There are two guns in the kit and the one with the mounting straps for the muzzle referent mirror on it. These are then added to the turret after it is assembled There is a canvas mantlet cover to add, this is a basic representative of the real thing and aftermarket detailed one are available to replace this one, in addition to would seem the Canadian's replaced the original covers with one of their own making. Like a lot of Leopard kits the kit barrel is not entirely accurate due to the complexities of the real thing and the limits of plastic moulding technology. The smoke dischargers are added to the turret and its then ready to be mounted to the hull Decals Decals are provided for 4 tanks in Afghanistan though there is no information on these provided at all in the instructions. Conclusion This is a great looking kit from HobbyBoss and their attention to detail is to be commended. Overall Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Yak-28P Firebar (81767) 1:48 Hobby Boss via Creative Models Ltd. First flying in the late 50s, the Yak-28 was an early Soviet swept wing design that began life as a bomber but was adapted to fulfil other roles such as interceptor, reconnaissance and electronic warfare. The Firebar was the long-range interceptor variant and gave up its weapons bay to accommodate more fuel and carried offensive missiles to complete its role when it had arrived on station. Over 400 of this variant were produced between 1960 and 1967. The interception radar that made its task possible was placed at the front of the aircraft in a long radome, which was extended for the later improved radar installation. It carried the Kaliningrad R-98 missiles on stations under the wing between the engine pods. There were numerous attempts to improve on the P, but none proceeded past prototype, although the PM did achieve a speed record while the Yak-28-64 had wing root mounted engines giving it a more modern look, but again was cancelled before it reached production. The Kit This appears to be the later version with the longer radome from mooching around on the web, and it's a new tool from Hobby Boss but with a moulded-in radome it would take a whole new fuselage to change it to an early model, or one of the other variants that are probably more sensibly done that way anyway. It arrives in a longish box due to the size of the fuselage in this scale, and inside are nine sprues in grey styrene, one in clear, a sheet of decals and the instruction booklet with a sheet of glossy A3 folded inside it that shows the painting and decaling options. Detail is good and there has been a fair amount of slide moulding used to improve detail without increasing the part count, especially around the engine pods and their many auxiliary intakes, and there is plenty of detail to be seen in the cockpit tub and wheel bays, including the wingtip stabilisers. Construction begins with the cockpit, which revolves around the long tub with instrument panels (with decals), bulkheads, control columns and seats added before the sidewalls are installed. The seats have good detail and each consist of seven parts each but no lap-belts visible on the cushions. Like the Harrier, the Firebar has bicycle undercarriage with a nose wheel and one main gear leg toward the aft of the fuselage with each bay boxed in with good detail, and struts with retraction jacks added along the way. While they can be left off until later the supporting jack on the nose wheel could be difficult to put in later, so check this in advance of applying too much glue. With these three sub-assemblies completed the fuselage can be closed up around them, and there are good supports and tabs within to assist with positioning. As mentioned earlier the nose cone is moulded into the fuselage so there's one seam top and bottom to deal with, and as the majority of the Firebar fleet was bare metal or painted silver, you'll need to take care with the handling of seam hiding, as these colours show up the slightest of blemishes. The gear bay doors are added around the sides next, and the rear tail cone is fitted in either open or closed positions adding a couple of antennae top and bottom, and you are also invited to install the canopy at this point, which requires the coaming to be fitted first before you add the fixed windscreen and the separate canopy. The drawings show a seamline down the centre, but on the sprue there isn't one which is nice, as no-one really enjoys removing these seams whether we're good at it or not. The engine pods bear a passing resemblance to extended Me.262 pods and each one has two main cowlings with a rear blanking plate, stator blades and nose cone enhancing that feeling. The intake is close enough to the cone that more detail isn't really visible to anyone with normal levels of inquisitiveness especially when the intake lip is added to the assembly, so there aren't any blades depicted on the plate. At the rear a four part exhaust is provided with blades visible at the end of the trunking, and a nice tapered exhaust tip. Tons of small slide-moulded intakes are added to each side along with clear vision ports toward the front, and of course this assembly is repeated in mirror image for the other wing. The weapons are next and include four of the R-98 missiles mentioned earlier or two K-13A Atoll short-range missiles, depending on your tastes. The wings are simple assemblies of two parts with holes needing drilling depending on which weapons fit you intend to use, and they incorporate the tops of the engine pods that the main sections are added to during their construction. The pylons and weapons are added at this time too, as are the short wingtip mounted stabilisers that fit into their bays with two doors, retraction jacks, wheels and yoke. There are also wing-fences and more intakes on the engine cowling, plus a small flap between the fuselage and engine pods and a pointed fairing near each wingtip that attaches to a small cut-out in the wing surface. The tail is separate from the fuselage and consists of two parts for the fin with another for the rudder, then two single part elevators half-way up the fin are fitted on two pins each. Adding the wings to their slots in the fuselage and fitting the pointy probe on the nose completes the build. Markings As is often the case with Hobby Boss kits, only one decal option is included in the box and very little information about it is given to assist with accuracy. From the box you can build Blue 01 which is painted silver, although many Firebars were left in bare metal, so check your references before you paint. The main decals are supplied plus a few stencils, many of which are for the missile complement, and the sheet is completed by the two instrument panel decals. The decals are printed anonymously, and have good registration, sharpness and clarity so are suitable for the task if you elect to use this option and not go off-piste and use one of the aftermarket sets available. Conclusion This new tool from Hobby Boss has plenty of detail from the box and includes the weapons you'll need to complete the job. The decals are perhaps a little lacking in choice but that's a minor inconvenience and if you're looking for other options they are available. This kit should also be more readily available than other brands, which is always handy. Review sample courtesy of
  12. KMT-9 Mine-Roller (37040) 1:35 MiniArt Mines are a problem for AFVs, softskins and foot soldiers alike, and there are different types used for different circumstances. Mines intended to disable tanks generally have larger charges to penetrate the thinner underside armour and tear off tracks and drive wheels, with a higher pressure required to trigger them. The resulting bang can cripple or destroy a tank, leaving crew killed or injured, a valuable tank out of action and sometimes blocking the way. Most Soviet and Russian tanks are fitted with attachment points for mine-rollers that can be fitted as needed and clear a path for the tank's tracks to allow them to proceed. Other tanks without a mine-roller must follow in their tracks exactly or risk detonating mines that are outside the cleared paths. It's not an ideal solution, more of an expedient one that probably requires a more complete cleaning later when the enemy aren't shooting at them. The KMT series of ploughs/plows have been in service since the 60s and were used with all Main Battle Tanks with newer vehicles using the improved KMT-7 and KMT-9. It operates by breaking the ground down with tough, sectioned rollers of substantial weight to simulate the footprint of an AFV, ploughing up the ground and detonating any mines it finds. Its rugged construction means that it can survive explosions, although they do take their toll on the hardware eventually. The Kit We'll be seeing the plastic from this box in a number of kits, the new BMR-1 with plough being one of them, which will be reviewed shortly by my colleague. It arrives in a shrink-wrapped top-opening box and inside are nine sprues in grey styrene, a small Photo-Etch (PE) sheet in a card envelope, and the instructions printed in greyscale. Construction begins with the rollers with two-part centres to which all the individual plates are fixed with equal spacing. The short axle threads through the centre and is supported by a three-piece yoke that is extended by another two parts that are in turn fixed to a central axle with one roller on each side, making a total of four sections, each free-wheeling. The end caps allow the rear axle to rotate freely if you don't glue them up, and then you start again on the other roller. Each roller assembly has a set of suspension arms added to each side and a cross-brace that links the suspension together. They are put to one side while the main chassis frame is made up, adorned with hydraulic rams that make up a large, heavy assembly with seriously thick parts depicting the sturdy design. Cleats are included to fit the plough to a BMR-1, consisting of a number of parts for the lower glacis plate and two main attachment pads for the upper glacis. Brackets are fitted to the lower plates and the frame is hinged from those with strong cables attached to the upper plates and linked to the frame to support it further. The two roller assemblies are suspended from the arms facing back toward the vehicle with the long rods sticking up in pairs. Conclusion The roller would look fine sitting in a yard, or alternatively attached to near to anything from a T-55 to a T-90 in the tank department, or a BMR-1/2 or BTS-4 in their roles, which often takes them into harm's way. It's a very well detailed kit, and put together well with a sympathetic and probably battered paint job it would add plenty of interest to any suitable model. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Soviet KMT-5M Mine-Roller (37036) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd. Mines are a problem for AFVs, softskins and foot soldiers alike, and there are different types used for different circumstances. Mines intended to disable tanks generally have larger charges to penetrate the thinner underside armour and tear off tracks and drive wheels, with a higher pressure required to trigger them. The resulting explosion can cripple or destroy a tank, leaving crew killed or injured, a valuable tank out of action and sometimes blocking the way. Most Soviet and Russian tanks are fitted with attachment points for mine-rollers that can be fitted as needed and clear a path for the tank's tracks to allow them to proceed. Other tanks without a mine-roller must follow in their tracks exactly or risk detonating mines that are outside the cleared paths. It's not an ideal solution, more of an expedient one that probably requires a more complete cleaning later when the enemy aren't shooting at them. It has been in service since the 60s and was used until the T-64 after which is was replaced for newer vehicles with the improved KMT-7 and KMT-9. It operated by breaking the ground up with toothed rollers of substantial weight to simulate the footprint of an AFV, ploughing up the ground and detonating any mines it finds. Its rugged construction means that it can survive explosions, although they do take their toll on the hardware eventually. The Kit The KMT-5M has already been seen when included with various MiniArt kits, but if you didn't get one with yours or need one to fit to another suitable kit, now's your chance! It arrives in a figure-sized top-opening box in shrink-wrap with sixteen sprues in grey styrene inside plus two lengths of chain of differing widths. One of the sprues has been nipped in half to fit the box, and a number of elastic bands have been used to group sprues of the same type together and reduce chaffing. The instruction booklet is like that of a complete kit, which is for good reason as it's a fairly complex build and there are plenty of steps. Construction begins with the toothed rollers, which each have three wheels on a central axle plus two end-caps. These are fitted into short bogies that have small sections of chain attached in strategic places for later fitting at the end of the suspension arms. These are next to be built and each has a pair of pads at the tank end and a hinged arm that is long enough to keep the tank away from the brunt of the blast, as well as absorb some of the upward momentum and reduce damage to the rollers. The arms spread apart so that the rollers are placed at exactly the same spacing as the tracks, and there are parts supplied to fit the roller to MiniArt models, and other parts if it's another manufacturer's kit. There are a couple a styrene rope parts in the box to further secure the assembly, with another momentum-absorbing spring at the roller end. The bogies are attached to the arms via the short lengths of chain fitted to hooks fore and aft, with another chain linking the two together with a bobbin-like part loose along its length, acting as a further damper for asymmetric detonations. Markings There are none! There aren't any decals and you're not even given any clues as to what colour to use other than the boxtop colours. Use your Google Fu or references to check before you start spraying your tank's main colour on it, just in case. Conclusion A useful addition to make your early Cold War Soviet AFV stand out from the crowd, to add in the background of a diorama, or even as a stand-alone – maybe being repaired? Highly recommended. At time of writing, this is on heavy discount at Creative, so strike now! Review sample courtesy of
  14. T-55A Early Mod 1965 Interior Kit (37016) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd. The T-54's gestation and transformation into the T-55 was long-winded and complicated by constant changes to an as yet unsatisfactory performing vehicle, which began at early as the end of WWII. Production of the T-54-1 was halted due to production and quality issues, and recommenced as the re-designed T-54-2, with the turret design changed to closer resemble the eventual domed shape of the T-55. The -2 didn't last all that long before the -3 replaced it, and the requirement for survival of tactical nuclear blasts led to the eventual introduction of the similar looking, but significantly different T-55 that we know so well. As the heavy tank fell out of favour, the T-55 became part of the burgeoning Main Battle Tank movement, with thousands of them being produced over the years in various guises. In the early 60s the T-55A was developed, providing more adequate NBC protection that required a lengthening of the hull and coincidentally added anti-spall protection for the crew. It also sounded the death-knell of the bow-mounted machine gun, which was removed to improve ammo storage, and hasn't been seen on MBTs for decades now. The Kit Part of the ever-expanding range of early Cold War armour from MiniArt, who seem to be kitting every conceivable variant from the earliest T-54 to the latest T-55, which will hopefully include some of the more unusual marks as well. The toolings are all essentially brand new, and have been designed in a modular format to ease the way toward new variants, which makes for a high sprue count. Some of the kits have been released in augmented Interior Kit boxings, with all the extra details to open up your model as much as you please. This is one of those boxings, and it arrives in their current orange themed box, with a painting of the tank in question on the front, and the stylised "Interior Kit" branding on each face of the box. Lifting the kit gives the feeling of how much is inside, and I may have emitted a minor expletive when I saw how packed with sprues the box was, and when I say packed, I mean it. There is almost no room for anything else in the box, and I'm dreading putting it all back in. There are 94 sprues in mid grey styrene, many of them quite small, and some of the larger ones linked together in pairs, a clear sprue, two sheets of Photo-Etch (PE) brass, three decal sheets (one larger, two small), and the instruction booklet. It seems that I was wrong about putting it back in too, as I have managed it although I wouldn't like to put anything else in there! Detail is everywhere, and is crisp, with judicious use of slide-moulding to improve details further, and make hollows where needed. The inclusion of PE helps further, allowing parts to be given a more scale-effect. Construction begins with the water-cooled diesel engine, which is built up from a substantial number of highly detailed parts for later insertion into the hull, which is next to be made up. The hull floor has cut-outs for the suspension mounts, hatches and access panels, all of which are supplied as separate parts. The suspension is torsion-link, so the bars are inserted with the axles at their ends, then the lowest parts of the interior are added on top, including the base for the turret basket and the driver's position. Ammo is festooned wherever the designers could fit a round, with a large store next to the driver's station in the position formerly occupied by the bow machine gunner. The hull sides are separate, and are well detailed parts, which have further detail layered on both sides before they are added to the lower along with engine bay firewall, the engine and its mount, plus sundry other details that make the T-55 quite cramped for its occupants. Externally, the T-55A could be fitted with a mine-roller, and although one isn't included with this boxing, the fitments and bracketry is included for the upper and lower glacis alongside the standard light clusters, lifting hooks and pioneer tools. The main lights have a choice of clean lenses, and fit inside a multi-part cage to protect them from damage, which will take some care to glue together neatly. With the glacis and the turret ring "bat wings" added to the hull sides, the wheels are handled next, with five pairs per side with separate hubs, plus the idler wheel at the front, and drive sprocket at the rear. Tracks are left until a little later and are of the individual link type, requiring 90 links per side, each of which have four sprue gates, but no ejection pin or sink marks to worry about. What is there however is stunning detail, which includes the casting numbers inlaid into the hollows of each track link, and close-fitting lugs that should make the building an easier task. The turret ring is fitted behind the glacis, and the fenders are build up alongside the engine access hatches, which are all then added to the hull, completing the engine deck first with some rather neat PE grilles and mesh backed louvers that have PE slats for realism. The fenders have additional fuel tankage fitted with hosing between them, and lots of PE fixtures, handles and such, with even more PE bracing inside the sprung mudguard parts, tools, toolboxes and the exhaust on the port side. The kit includes plastic towing eyes, but you are going to have to provide your own cables as none are include in the kit, but given the sheer volume of parts it's excusable. At the rear an unditching log is lashed to the bulkhead with PE straps, and the extra fuel drums so often seen are also lashed to curved brackets that overhang the rear of the hull. Between them the deep wading funnel is attached by a couple of pins to the bottom of the brackets, and it has its own group of PE brackets for the bracing wires that are seen when it is in use. The turret itself is a busy assembly, having a semi-automatic breech loading mechanism that is built up first, then the lower turret is fitted out with radio gear, shells, before the breech is installed on two mounts at the front, which have the breech guard and a rack of box mags for the coaxial machine gun attached on the right and underneath respectively, and the sighting gear on the left side. The upper turret has its anti-spall lining added in sections, and is then decked out with a number of small assemblies, after which the turret roof is fitted with hatch, vents and vision blocks. More anti-spall lining is attached to the inside of the roof, and yet more ammunition is stowed as ready rounds for immediate use on the wall. Externally the grab rails, forward mounted searchlight, commander's cupola and a blast-bag around the mantlet are all added, and the single piece barrel with hollow muzzle slips through the centre and keys into the breech. The blast-bag is finished off around the edges with PE strips, and a large camo net is attached to the back of the turret by more PE straps. An armature links the gun barrel and the searchlight together so they move in unison, and an ancillary searchlight is fitted to the commander's cupola, with a choice of the driver's poor weather hood built up in either the collapsed or deployed format, with the former stowed on the turret bustle, while the latter fits over the open driver's hatch. Markings Although on first glance it looks like there are three markings options, there are in fact nine, which is nice to see. Every single one is Russian Green, but there are some nice variations in operator and differences in the application of serials etc. From the box you can build one of the following: Romanian Army 90s – Romanian roundel and white 5049 on the turret sides. Soviet military parade colouring 60-70s – white accents on rims, fenders & Soviet medallion on the turret sides. Somali Army Ogaden War, 1977 – no markings other than small flags front and rear. Marine Infantry of the Soviet Navy 1970 – White 512 and Soviet naval flag on turret sides. Soviet Army 60-70s – White 423 on turret sides. Hungarian People's Army, Operation Danube, Prague, Czechoslovakia, Aug-Sept 1968 – White cross over turret and sides. 55th Marine Infantry Division, Pacific Fleet of the Soviet Navy, Ethiopia 1980 – White 116 and Soviet naval flag on turret sides. Yugoslav People's Army, 80s – White 18131 on turret sides. Hungarian Army 90s – Hungarian pennant and white 122 on turret sides. The decals are printed on bright blue paper, and have good register, sharpness and colour density, with a closely cropped thin, matt carrier film. Conclusion These Interior Kits are amongst the most comprehensive kits I have seen in a long while, with even the tiniest details catered for, down to the tiny nuts holding the snorkel to the rear of the tank. They're certainly not for everyone, as some folks don't want interiors for whatever reason, but as a T-55A with interior, it is a fabulous kit and will keep you modelling for hours and hours. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Panzerschreck RPzB.54 & Ofenrohr RPzB.43 Set (35263) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd. The German Panzerschreck is rumoured to be a larger copy of the American made Bazooka, possibly captured from a delivery made to the Russians on the Eastern Front. It had an 88 caliber, and could penetrate over 100mm of armour at close range in its first incarnation the RPzB.43, which due to the smoke and heat it created was nicknamed the Ofenrohr, which translates to "Stove Pipe", requiring the operator to wear a protective hood to avoid the smoke and blast. The improved RPzB.54 had a shield fitted in front of the user, which was necessary due to increased power of the rocket motor and the smoke and heat that it generated on ignition. This later rocket was able to penetrate 160mm of armour, making it an almost certain one-hit-one-kill weapon in the hands of a skilled operator. This accessory set from MiniArt comes in a figure sized box, with the instructions and painting guide on the backside, and lots of little sprues inside, neatly held together with a couple of elastic bands. Inside the box are six larger sprues, twelve smaller sprues all in grey styrene, a card envelope with a sheet of Photo-Etch (PE) brass inside, and a small sheet of decals for stencilling. From this mass of sprues you can make the Ofenrohr or Panzerschreck, or any mixture of the two up to the maximum of six. The smaller sprues each contain four rockets with separate stabilising rings, where you have a choice between the original ring which had the prominent wooden grip for the loader's use at the rear, or change 12 out to depict the later design that had the grip shortened and fitted inside the ring. You also get six crates that can hold two rounds each, and six backpack-style carriers of which you can only build three due to the amount of PE finishing parts that have been included, unless you fancy scratch-building extras. Building the Ofenrohr is simple, and involves gluing the two halves of the barrel together, adding the PE muzzle guide, trigger and sight brackets in PE, and then fitting a long sling, which is also made of PE. If you wanted to depict it in use however, your soldier would need the usage hood or he'd end up a bit crispy. The Panzerschreck adds a front ring, the protective shield, a shorter shoulder-strap, C-shaped barrel rest and the clamp that holds the shield to the barrel. The boxes are constructed from four bevelled sides, floor part with three brackets to hold the rockets, the lid, and a pair of PE clasps for the locks. There are stencil decals applied to both sides of the lids, plus the sides of the rocket in black and white. The shoulder packs have a support slotted in half way up the back that has 5 holes (one per rocket), a lower frame with PE waist comfort band, and a pair of straps that fit onto the soldier's webbing belt. There are also two small clips that fit to the tops of two separators within the pack, which will be really easy to lose so be careful when you're handling them, as there are no spares. Conclusion A useful set for adding background equipment to a scene, a truck or other vehicle, or for integration with a figure you have or are adapting. The Ofenrohr is less useful in the latter circumstance unless you plan on fabricating the hood on your operator. The inclusion of PE parts gives additional realism to the set, but take care to anneal those straps to get them malleable enough to drape realistically. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  16. New Revell Master Series Star Wars Kits Are In Stock Now RV15091 This is the Revell 1:48th scale X-Wing Fighter from Star Wars. It is part of the Master Series range which is based on the famous Fine Molds kit, the most accurate kit ever built of this subject. Kit Features include: Molded in white and clear plastic Scale Figures and Droids Landing Gear in up or down positions Display Stand Length - 271mm, Width - 222mm, Height - 141mm Description: This is the most important rebel alliance fighter and one of the most powerful single-seat space ships ever produced. The T-65 X-wing Fighter owes its name to the double wings one above the other that form an X in combat in order to increase the firing range of the pilot. In addition to four high-energy laser cannon the X-wing Fighter has proton torpedoes, deflector shields, hyper drive and a navigation droid. Luke Skywalker prefers this type of fighter. It was used by the young Jedi to destroy the first Death Star in the Battle of Yavin. The X-wing Fighter quickly proved to be one of the most effective military aircraft in the galaxy. The unusual wing design of the T-65 is frequently regarded as the success formula of the space ship. The pair of twin wings remains closed during normal flights under the speed of light. In combat and on entry into the atmosphere of a planet, they can be extended. On the wing tips are high-energy laser cannon that can be fired singly, simultaneously, in pairs or in other combinations. Construction kit for the advanced modeller. RV15092 This is the Revell 1:48th scale TIE Fighter from Star Wars. It is part of the Master Series range which is based on the famous Fine Molds kit, the most accurate kit ever built of this subject. Kit Features include: Molded in white and clear plastic Pilot and Imperial Figures Full Cockpit Interior Display Stand Length - 133mm, Width - 130mm, Height - 157mm Description: Darth Vader used this prototype as the basis for the terrifyingly effective TIE interceptor in the Battle of Yavin. Unlike all other TIE fighters this prototype has a deflector shield generator and a simple hyperdrive. Vader's TIE Advanced is armed with heavy twin blaster cannon on fixed mounts but has no life support systems. The TIE Advanced is characterised by a hull made of duralloy steel, an extended after deck and unique solar cell wings. The Tie Advanced quickly became one of Darth Vader's favourite ships. Like all the TIE ships the prototype has a drive system consisting of twin ion engines. Its solar ionization reactor is reputed to be much more powerful than that of the standard TIE fighters. The TIE Advanced has proved itself in battle, as it is capable of withstanding many direct hits. In addition the pilots' chances of survival were considerably enhanced by the incorporation of a hyperdrive system, which enables the ship to escape from hopeless battle situations. Construction kit for the advanced modeller. RV15093 This is the Revell 1:72nd scale Millennium Falcon from Star Wars. It contains 904 parts. It is part of the Master Series range which is based on the famous Fine Molds kit, the most accurate kit ever built of this subject. Kit Features include: Molded in white and clear parts Scale Figures, seated and standing Landing Gear in up or down positions Display Stand Length - 456mm, Width - 311mm, Height - 76mm Description: This Corellian tranporter is reputed to be one of the fastest and best-equipped ships in the galaxy. The Millennium Falcon may look old and broken down, but continual modifications have made it into something special. The crew has for years consisted of the reckless pilot and smuggler become hero of the rebel alliance, Han Solo, and his co-pilot and technician, the trusty Wookiee Chewbacca. A long time ago Solo won the ship from Lando Calrissian in a game of sabacc. The Corellian transport type YT-1300 played an important role in the destruction of both battle stars and is probably the most famous ship in the galaxy. Inside the ship there is a hyperdrive that gives it almost double the speed of any imperial star cruiser. The heavily armoured Falcon has an illegal bank of sensors that can track distant imperial ships before they are aware of its presence. The ship goes into battle with the most up-to-date imperial deflector system, two quad laser cannon and two disruptors. Construction kit for the advanced modeller. Follow us on Facebook for all the latest news https://www.facebook...eativeModelsLtd Click on the link to see the weekly specials http://www.creativem...ials-c-205.html Thank you Creative Models Ltd
  17. New Revell Monogram Kits Now In Stock RVM0394 - Revell Monogram 1:72 - Gato Class Submarine £99.99 RVM1987 - Revell Monogram Snaptite 1:24 - Ford GT £13.99 RVM4197 - Revell Monogram 1:25 - 72 Olds Indy Pace Car w/ Figure £29.99 RVM4329 - Revell Monogram 1:24 - Porsche 918 Spyder £24.99 RVM4361 - Revell Monogram 1:25 - '59 Cadillac Eldorado Hardtop £22.99 RVM4370 - Revell Monogram 1:25 - 2013 Camero ZL-1 £23.99 RVM4378 - Revell Monogram 1:25 - Porsche 914/6 2n1 £24.99 RVM4379 - Revell Monogram 1:25 - 2014 Mustang GT £24.99 RVM4397 - Revell Monogram 1:25 - Corvette Stingray £24.99 RVM4398 - Revell Monogram 1:25 - 2013 Challenger SRT8 £24.99 RVM6732 - Revell Monogram 1:25 - Rat Fink w/ Diorama £22.99 RVM6899 - Revell Monogram 1:24 - Jinx Express £20.99 RVM7824 - Revell Monogram 1:32 - Lacrosse Missile and Truck £34.99 RVM7861 - Revell Monogram 1:32 - Panzer IV Tank £19.99 RVM7863 - Revell Monogram 1:32 - Sherman A1 Screamin' Mimi £23.99 Visit the website for more Information. www.creativemodels.co.uk Follow us on Facebook for all the latest news https://www.facebook...eativeModelsLtd Thank you Creative Models Ltd
  18. NEW FROM VALLEJO NOW IN STOCK Model Air Paint Sets. VAL71144 - RAF Colours Special Battle Of Britain This set has been developed for painting the RAF fighter aircraft which participated in the major air battle of all times, “The Battle of Britain”, from the beginning in July 1940 to the final phase or “Night Blitz” in May 1941. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71323, VAL71404, VAL71324, VAL71057, VAL71302, VAL71126, VAL71009, VAL71305 VAL71145 - RAF Colours Bomber and Training Air Command 1939 - 1945 This set has been developed for painting all the bombers (light, medium and heavy) of the Bomber Air Command of the RAF from 1939 until the end of WWII. This set also includes “Trainer Yellow” which, combined with the other colours or by itself, can be used for most of the training aircraft and prototypes. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71323, VAL71302, VAL71324, VAL71305, VAL71057, VAL71126, VAL71307, VAL71078 VAL71146 - RAF Colours SEAC (Air Command South East Asia) 1942 -1945 This set has been developed for the painting of all types of aircraft of the RAF in the SEAC (Air Command South East Asia) based in the British colonies in the Far East. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paint Included VAL71323, VAL71302, VAL71324, VAL71306, VAL71273, VAL71057, VAL71307, VAL71279 VAL71147 - FAA (Fleet Air Arm) Colours 1939 - 1945 This set has been developed for the painting of the aircraft of the Fleet Air Arm (FAA) of the British fleet, for land-based aircraft as well as for aircraft, British or American, embarked on carriers from 1939 until the end of the War. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71110, VAL71407, VAL71309, VAL71302, VAL71405, VAL71057, VAL71406, VAL71279 VAL71148 - RAF Colours Coastal Command 1939 - 1945 This set has been developed for painting the aircraft of the RAF Coastal Command , for land based aircraft as well as for seaplanes, from 1939 until the end of the war. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71323, VAL71302, VAL71324, VAL71306, VAL71110, VAL71057, VAL71309, VAL71279 VAL71149 - RAF Day Fighters Pre-War To 1941 This set has been developed for painting the RAF fighter camouflage scheme “Temperate Land” in its different colour combinations from the years before WWII (starting in 1937) and the beginning of the conflict in 1939, with the first battles in Norway, Netherland, France and England, until August 1941. The set also includes the colours for the “Shadow Compensation” colour scheme used in biplanes of all models and deployment. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71323, VAL71302, VAL71324, VAL71279, VAL71291, VAL71057, VAL71403, VAL71062 VAL71162 - RAF Colours Day Fighters 1941 - 1945 & P.R.U. This set has been developed for painting the RAF day fighter aircraft from August 1941 until the end of the War, as well as the HF Interceptors (High Fighters). The set also includes the colours for the PRU (Photographic Reconnaissance Unit ) aircraft. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71273, VAL71109, VAL71324, VAL71408, VAL71307, VAL71057, VAL71302, VAL71279 VAL71163 - RAF Colours Desert Scheme & M.T.O. 1940 - 1945 This set has been developed for the painting of all types of RAF aircraft with the colour patterns “Tropical Land Scheme”, “Desert Scheme”, “Special Coastal Scheme”, etc. from June 1940 until the end of the War, in North Africa and the Mediterranean theatre. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71306, VAL71324, VAL71108, VAL71323, VAL71113, VAL71302, VAL71313, VAL71031. Follow us on Facebook for all the latest news https://www.facebook...eativeModelsLtd Check out the website for all new releases www.creativemodels.co.uk
  19. NEW FROM VALLEJO COMING SOON Weathering Effects range All of them formulated with permanent pigments and water based acrylic resins, have been developed to represent the effects of time and weather on models and dioramas, so that they will look as once their originals in the field. This range of effects includes the spilled fuel runnels, the splashed mud, the lichen and moss on wood, the crushed grass stuck to the metal links of the chains of a tank, all the traces of wear and destruction on vehicles in harsh and hostile climate. VAL73801 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - European Splash Mud VAL73802 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Russian Splash Mud VAL73803 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Industrial Splash Mud VAL73804 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Light Brown Splash Mud VAL73805 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Brown Splash Mud VAL73806 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Black Splash Mud VAL73807 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - European Thick Mud VAL73808 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Russian Thick Mud VAL73809 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Industrial Thick Mud VAL73810 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Light Brown Thick Mud VAL73811 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Brown Thick Mud VAL73812 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Black Thick Mud VAL73813 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Oil Stains VAL73814 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Fuel Stains VAL73815 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Engine Grime VAL73816 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Engine Grime VAL73817 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Petrol Spills VAL73818 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Brown Engine Soot VAL73819 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Rainmarks VAL73820 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Snow VAL73821 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Rust Texture VAL73822 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Slimy Grime Dark VAL73823 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Slimy Grime Light VAL73824 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Streaking Grime VAL73825 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Crushed Grass VAL73826 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Mud and Grass Effect VAL73827 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Moss and Lichen Effect VAL73828 - Vallejo Weathering Effects 40ml - Wet Effects Follow us on Facebook for all the latest news https://www.facebook.com/CreativeModelsLtd Check out the website for all new releases www.creativemodels.co.uk
  20. New Moebius Kits Now In Stock A-MMK901 - Moebius 1:24 - Lost In Space 'Space Pod' Plastic Model Kit A-MMK913 - Moebius - Jupiter 2 A-MMK920 - Moebius 1:25 - Batman Dark Knight Pod A-MMK965 - Moebius The Derelict - From Lost In Space Visit our website for more information. www.creativemodels.co.uk Keep upto date with us on our Facebook Page https://www.facebook...ativeModelsLtd/
  21. We have had today a restock of Miniart Models and the New Releases for this month. MIN37002 - Miniart 1:35 - T-44M Soviet Medium Tank MIN35225 - Miniart 1:35 - U.S.Tractor w/Towing Winch & Crewmen (Spec Ed) MIN38007 - Miniart 1:35 - Tram Crew With Passengers Visit the website for all new releases www.creativemodels.co.uk
  22. We have had in the New Releases from Masterbox. These include the following kits. MAS35164 - Masterbox 1:35 - The 101st light company. US Paratroopers & British Tankman, MAS24007 - Masterbox 1:24 - World of Fantasy - Graggeron & Halseya MAS24008 - Masterbox 1:24 - World of Fantasy - Kit No. 2 Follow us on Facebook for all the latest news https://www.facebook...eativeModelsLtd Click on the link to got to our website www.creativemodels.co.uk Thank you Creative Models Ltd
  23. New Hobbyboss Releases Due In April HBB83870 - Hobbyboss 1:35 - IDF APC Nagmachon(Doghouse II ) - £34.99 HBB81752 - Hobbyboss 1:48 - SAAB J-32B/E Lansen - £43.99 HBB83828 - Hobbyboss 1:35 - Finnish T-50 Tank - £26.99 HBB83839 - Hobbyboss 1:35 - Soviet BA-6 Armor Car - £29.99 HBB83867 - Hobbyboss 1:35 - Leopard 2A4M CAN - £39.99 HBB80380 - Hobbyboss 1:48 - Me 262 B-1a/CS-92 - £16.99 HBB81750 - Hobbyboss 1:48 - BF 109G-2 - £14.99 HBB83859 - Hobbyboss 1:35 - French Saint-Chamond Heavy Tank - Medium - £29.99 HBB83878 - Hobbyboss 1:35 - Vickers Medium Tank MK I - £34.99 HBB80140 - Hobbyboss 1:35 - German 2cm Flak 38 Pz.Kpfw .38 (t) - £29.99 HBB83817 - Hobbyboss 1:35 - German Sd.Kfz.223 Leichter Panzerspahwagen (1st Series) - £28.99 HBB83855 - Hobbyboss 1:35 - Soviet T-28 Medium Tank (Cone Turret) - £34.99 HBB83866 - Hobbyboss 1:35 - Hungarian 39M CSABA Armored Car - £29.99 HBB81736 - Hobbyboss 1:48 - Hawk T MK.127 - £27.99 HBB83882 - Hobbyboss 1:35 - Soviet BA-20 Armored Car Mod.1937 - £24.99 Check out the website for all the latest new releases. www.creativemodels.co.uk Follow all our latest news on our Facebook page https://www.facebook...ativeModelsLtd/
  24. IN STOCK NOW, NEW TAKOM We have had in today the new releases from Takom Takom 1:35 - AMX-13/75 Light Tank IDF 2 in 1 Takom 1:35 - AMX-13/90 French Light Tank Takom 1:35 - AMX-13/75 French Light Tank with SS-11 ATGM 2 in 1 Follow us on Facebook for all the latest news https://www.facebook...eativeModelsLtd Check out the website for all new releases www.creativemodels.co.uk
  25. NEW FROM VALLEJO COMING SOON Model Air Paint Sets. VAL71144 - RAF Colours Special Battle Of Britain This set has been developed for painting the RAF fighter aircraft which participated in the major air battle of all times, “The Battle of Britain”, from the beginning in July 1940 to the final phase or “Night Blitz” in May 1941. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71323, VAL71404, VAL71324, VAL71057, VAL71302, VAL71126, VAL71009, VAL71305 VAL71145 - RAF Colours Bomber and Training Air Command 1939 - 1945 This set has been developed for painting all the bombers (light, medium and heavy) of the Bomber Air Command of the RAF from 1939 until the end of WWII. This set also includes “Trainer Yellow” which, combined with the other colours or by itself, can be used for most of the training aircraft and prototypes. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71323, VAL71302, VAL71324, VAL71305, VAL71057, VAL71126, VAL71307, VAL71078 VAL71146 - RAF Colours SEAC (Air Command South East Asia) 1942 -1945 This set has been developed for the painting of all types of aircraft of the RAF in the SEAC (Air Command South East Asia) based in the British colonies in the Far East. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paint Included VAL71323, VAL71302, VAL71324, VAL71306, VAL71273, VAL71057, VAL71307, VAL71279 VAL71147 - FAA (Fleet Air Arm) Colours 1939 - 1945 This set has been developed for the painting of the aircraft of the Fleet Air Arm (FAA) of the British fleet, for land-based aircraft as well as for aircraft, British or American, embarked on carriers from 1939 until the end of the War. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71110, VAL71407, VAL71309, VAL71302, VAL71405, VAL71057, VAL71406, VAL71279 VAL71148 - RAF Colours Coastal Command 1939 - 1945 This set has been developed for painting the aircraft of the RAF Coastal Command , for land based aircraft as well as for seaplanes, from 1939 until the end of the war. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71323, VAL71302, VAL71324, VAL71306, VAL71110, VAL71057, VAL71309, VAL71279 VAL71149 - RAF Day Fighters Pre-War To 1941 This set has been developed for painting the RAF fighter camouflage scheme “Temperate Land” in its different colour combinations from the years before WWII (starting in 1937) and the beginning of the conflict in 1939, with the first battles in Norway, Netherland, France and England, until August 1941. The set also includes the colours for the “Shadow Compensation” colour scheme used in biplanes of all models and deployment. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71323, VAL71302, VAL71324, VAL71279, VAL71291, VAL71057, VAL71403, VAL71062 VAL71162 - RAF Colours Day Fighters 1941 - 1945 & P.R.U. This set has been developed for painting the RAF day fighter aircraft from August 1941 until the end of the War, as well as the HF Interceptors (High Fighters). The set also includes the colours for the PRU (Photographic Reconnaissance Unit ) aircraft. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71273, VAL71109, VAL71324, VAL71408, VAL71307, VAL71057, VAL71302, VAL71279 VAL71163 - RAF Colours Desert Scheme & M.T.O. 1940 - 1945 This set has been developed for the painting of all types of RAF aircraft with the colour patterns “Tropical Land Scheme”, “Desert Scheme”, “Special Coastal Scheme”, etc. from June 1940 until the end of the War, in North Africa and the Mediterranean theatre. Model Air set with 8 colours developed on the basis of intensive research and precise colour matching with the Federal Standard 595 and British Standard Colours BS381C colour specifications. The sets include the colours for the air plane profiles and camouflage patterns drawn by Mark Rolfe. With the collaboration of “Pieza a Pieza. Paints Included VAL71306, VAL71324, VAL71108, VAL71323, VAL71113, VAL71302, VAL71313, VAL71031. Follow us on Facebook for all the latest news https://www.facebook...eativeModelsLtd Check out the website for all new releases www.creativemodels.co.uk
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