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Found 33 results

  1. Well, thank goodness I came through that. I haven't built a biplane for over 40 years and I still remember the nightmare of attaching the top wing; 'It can't still be that bad, surely.' I thought... Well it nearly hit the round filing cabinet a number of times, and I'm still unhappy that the top wing is set too far back, however I am happy that I have developed (Plan F) a workable method to affix the top wing, in addition to that I have come across a number of issues, such as : Humbrol Clear gloss acrylic dries like thin porridge, Humbrol Clear matt dries like a ploughed field - probably all down to me but I will approach with care in future. On the plus side I have survived my first attempt at rigging, used a whole pack of 0.02 MIG Rigging as I climbed the learning cliff, but got there in the end. I had my first attempt at simulating wood, thanks to a brilliant tutorial on Youtube by Dave's Model Workshop, I am pretty pleased with my first go. I also have the SE5a in my stash but I feel that it may wait a little while before I can face starting it.
  2. Time to start another WWI lovely. Pics of the bits and box art. Thanks for looking. Stephen
  3. Eduard is to release a new tool 1/48th Sopwith Camel kit - ref. Source: http://www.kitreviewsonline.de/eduard-pressekonferenz-in-nuernberg/ 3D render V.P.
  4. 'Wonga Bonga' Sopwith Camel F.1 1:32 Wingnut Wings. The Sopwith Camel hardly needs any introduction, as one of the most successful fighters of the First World War and the mount of may aces. This is the superb Wingnuts Wings kit 32074 Sopwith F.1 Camel "Clerget", Reviewd here which comes with five different finishing options. It is a difficult choice as they are all so good and I ended up buying another kit as I couldn't decide on just one! In the end I went for this one as it had a natural metal cowl area, varnished ply cockpit area, and the fin with the Sopwith factory markings on, plus the name Wonga Bonga' on the side. The 'Wonga' refers to the Gotha bombers that apparently made that engine sound 'wonga-wonga-wonga' etc, and the 'Bonga' is the Camel itself, knocking the Gothas out of the sky. It was based at RNAS Manston from July to August 1917. It is a lovely kit, to the usual exceedingly high standard that Wingnut Wings set. I would not say that it is one of the easier kits to build, the cabane struts are vulnerable to being knocked off during the build, so care is necessary. Fortunately I kept all four of mine intact, and the danger is passed once the top wing is on. A few 'In progress' pictures to give some idea of how much interior detail is included. The cabane struts are moulded integrally with the fuselage side frames. The rigging is stretched sprue. Wooden areas are Griffin Alkyd oil paints over Tamiya 'Deck tan'. This is my second WnW Camel build, and I like this kit so much I still have three more in the stash! Thanks for looking John
  5. A short break from other projects. The one who takes care of the Sir William Stevenson display at the Air Command HQ here in Winnipeg's 17 wing asked me to repair a few models for display. Sir William Stevenson has an interesting story and history and became the inspiration for the writing of James Bond, he is also from Winnipeg and the airport is named after him. I actually never read much on him which I guess is pretty bad for me. The models are two 1/48 Hawk Lysanders and an unknown maker of a Sopwith Camel. One Lysander is a repair that someone else made. The other needs to be built complete except the fuse and cockpit were put together already. The Camel arrived broken during shipping. It's a great model, pre built and lots of detail, the wheels are actual wire spokes. It's covered in an actual fabric. Guessing it's 1/32. I will have a Lancastrian and a Mosquito to make soon to go with these on display. These are to be representative of aircraft used by William Stevenson. I was told of some of his firsts and adventures but can't remember them well enough to write them here, so I'll let you look into it. Here's what was given to me. I painted the Lysander with Humbrol 26 and didn't like it, seemed way to dark, so I went with Humbrol 29. The green is Humbrol 119. I kind of did roughly my own masking for the camo. I saw so many variations and the models not the greatest either. The little tabs coming off the canopy to the wings broke on both planes. I made two new spars from 1/8" brass rod, notched the top canopy till it fit over them and epoxied it all in. I also made a small brass pin in the landing gear base where the bottom of the struts attach. I can't see this model going together without that. Italeri's Lysander is the same kit I found out. Other than those needed repairs it's straight from the box. Here it is with some Future floor wax sprayed on for the decals. The brown sure looks different with gloss on. Not used to 1/48 kits and not used to camo painting, been awhile. Because my airbrush won't do a super clean edge without a lot of overspray(maybe it's just me), the edges of the tape were left peeled up just a bit so the paint would leave a slight feathered edge.
  6. I've finally finished the Camel. Full details are at my blog but here's some images build thread is here
  7. Really got to finish a couple of other builds I'm doing, but thought I would throw this in. Once I get started should be a fairly trouble free build, I'm doing a D.VII at the moment, my first WnW, and it is going together quickly and easily. Going to do B7270, the 'famous?' Arthur Browns' mount, initially with 9(N) squadron RNAS, but was renamed 209 SQN RAF in April when the RFC and RNAS were combined to form the new air arm of the British forces. Going to be out the box as really it needs nothing else. Hope I a) do it justice and, b get it finished!
  8. My latest build - Forder`s Camel built OOB for a friend of mine. I`ve used elastic thread to imitate RFC wires. It was a pure joy apart from the cowling.
  9. Sopwith F.1 Camel 'The Duellists' 1:32 Wingnut Wings The long awaited series of 1:32 Sopwith Camels finally started to arrive towards the end of March 2017, with no less than six different boxings. Five of them are individual kits covering Bentley, le Rhone, and Clerget powered variants, with another for the 2F.1 'Ships Camel', and finally a United States Air Services boxing. The Sixth boxing is 'The Duellists' vesrion shown above, containing a Clerget Camel and an LVG C.VI, depicting an actual event that took place on 9th October 1918. The LVG was brought down and captured virtually intact by members of 4 Squadron Australian Flying Corps. It is great to see the LVG kit available again, as it has been sold out for several years now, fectching huge prices on auction sites. The full kit is featured in an 'in box' review here with the individually boxed 'Clerget' version 'in box' reviewed here. This is one of those kits that makes you shove all current projects to one side of your workbench, and get right on with building it. As the Camel is the new release and of most ineterest to modellers, I have started with this one, and will follow up with the LVG at a later date. Construction begins with the cockpit, and the first thing I did was to anneal (heat it and allow it to cool slowly) the etched brass fret containg the seatbelts for both the Camel & LVG. This softens it a little and makes it more bendable for fitting around the seats. A coat of Halfords grey primer was followed by airbrushed Tamiya Khaki, a dark wash, and details picked out in silver and other shades. I did the LVG ones at the same time, the Camel ones are the 2 wide straps on the top left. The fuselage halves need painting in Aluminium, wood, and clear doped linen, not forgetting the centre section between the lower wings. The 2 cockpit side frames are mostly wood, with various metal details picked out in silver, black, copper, and brass.Note that the cabane struts are moulded integralll with the fuselage frames. This should automatically line up the top wing later on when it is fitted. Also, thay are a darker wood colour than the rest of the cockpit area. The wood paint is Tamiya 'Deck tan' (a pale sand colour) coated with Johnsons kleer, and then given the grain effect by brush, using tube oil paints. Lots of people complain about the long drying times of these oil paints, but I use 'Griffin Alkyd' which will be stone dry in about 4 hours. This stuff. it is reasonably priced, and a tube will last about 10 years. With a basic set of 3, raw umber, light red, and burnt sienna, you can blend a wide range of wood colours. Increase your range as finances permit. Wicker seat with etched belts attached Instrument panel, shown here about 2x actual size. All instruments are readable. All parts prepared and ready for assembly; I then realised that a bit of advance preparation would make it easier to attach the control wires before any assembly takes place . Dry fit test; The Clerget engine has aslo been prepared and is ready for asembly. The cylinder section is in 'front' and 'back' halves. I fount that by running Tamiya extra thin cement on the top of each cylinder onny, capillary action took it down each side and gave an almost seamless fit. The join is very hard to see. Next up is to fit all those cockpit components together and put in some wire rigging on the side frames. Thanks for looking, John
  10. Hi, Academy Sopwith Camel 1/32 OOB. The model is made for the customer. Cheers, Martin
  11. This is the second one of Hasegawa's 1:8 Scale Museum Series Camels that I have built. The kit remains the most enjoyable that I have assembled and the multimedia aspects of it call on a lot wider skills than I tend to employ on polystyrene kits. The aircraft is completed in the colours of one flown by the American RFC pilot Elliot White Springs, after he transferred to 148th USAS. I've built it as an 'engineering example' so deliberately haven't gone in for any weathering or chipping. Likewise the aircraft isn't a 100% copy of EWS' as he had the upper wing cutout enlarged as well as a few other mods. The model has actually been built for a guy in America who liked my first build, detailed on my blog, and asked if he could buy it. Instead I agreed to build the Hasegawa kit he had in his stash for him. Close up the second model has come out quite a bit better than the first, dammit. I thoroughly enjoyed the build though, even second time around, and at least I don't have the storage problem to worry about. Space on the modelling desk can become a bit tight towards the end of the build. And here it is with its temporary stablemates. The other half wouldn't have gone for a third hanging up in the lounge anyway!
  12. In April this year Wingnut Wings released 'The Duellists' double kit depicting an actual incident that took place in the Great war, when 2 pilots from 4 Sqn Australian Flying Corps shot down and captured an LVG C.VI. The review is here. RFI of the Camel is here. One of those 2 Australian pilots was Harold Kerr, and his great grandson Andrew recently saw the review and got in touch, sending me the following account; "I am the great grandson of pilot Harold Kerr. I just wanted let you know that you got it a little bit wrong, the account of the duel is in the book titled 'The last great air battles', there was not that many in ww1. Harold Kerr was the pilot that hit power lines, he shot down the LVG and upon doubling back to confirm he had 2 Germans on his tail and he dove to get them off, couldn't pull out of it and hit the power lines. When he crashed he headbutted the mounted Vickers machine gun and compress fractured a big part of his skull and broke everything. He ended up being in hospital until long after the war finished and strangely enough next to the 2 Germans from the LVG he shot down. His mates took his gold cigarette case and fob watch as he was left to die from all his injuries but he got better and lived till he was almost 90. I have a clock which his mates made out of the centre piece of the propeller from the sopwith as the blades were snapped off, also his leather flying cap it is very frail and was damaged during the crash. I also have a photo of him in the plane if you would like it. I like to think of him as I have broken all bones a couple of times in horrific accidents and am still kicking on. Harold was in the light horse earlier in the war and was in heavy fighting at Quins post in Gallipoli, I have a letter he wrote home and he was very positive talking about all his friends that had been killed in the previous couple of days as most of them died. Harold was shot through the chest just above his heart, he survived and was discharged after which he joined the RAF and became a Sopwith Camel pilot." Would we like to see the pictures?, you bet we would! Huge thanks to Andrew for sending the following photographs; Harold Kerr in his Camel; Harold Kerr; Harold's wings; His medals; Leather Helmet; The prop boss 'clock' And the LVG after capture; Fantastic to see these and what brilliant family heirlooms to have. Priceless! Again huge thanks to Andrew, nice one mate! Cheers John
  13. Tupolev Tu-104, NATO reporting name Camel. Pics taken at The Ukraine State Aviation Museum Zhulyany, Kiev. Pics thanks to Dave Haskell.
  14. Sopwith F.1 Camel "The Duellists" (Part 1) 1:32 Wingnut Wings This is the Sopwith Camel from the recently released 'Duellists' boxing from Wingnut Wings, reviewed here which also contains the LVG C.VI. Construction of the LVG is now underway and will appear in a seperate 'Work in progress' thread soon. <Edit> WIP thread for the LVG is started! LVG C.VI "The Duellists" (Part 2) - 1:32 Wingnut Wings </edit> WIP thread for the Camel - Sopwith F.1 Camel "The Duellists" (Part 1) - 1:32 Wingnut Wings It is a beautiful kit with Wingnut Wings customary precision engineering and outstanding fit. Total, complete, and exceptional modelling pleasure in a box! The write up with the kit gives the following information; 'On the morning of 9th October 1918 two Clerget powered F.1 Camels from B flight of 4 Squadron Australian Flying Corps took off on a ‘special mission’ patrol. 26 year old Harold Norman Kerr was in Camel E7190, accompanied by Vincent Harry Thornton in Camel E7241, They were to attack targets of opportunity with their bombs and guns, in much the same way that more than 20 years later in the second world war,the RAF crossed the Channel to conduct ‘Rhubarb’ missions. The combat report states “..we saw a 2 seater machine over Merville which opened fire on us. We both immediately dived on the enemy aircraft from the side. 2/Lt Thornton fired about 200 rounds from a range of 50 feet. 2/Lt Kerr then fired about 100 rounds from 50 feet. E.A. continued diving until practically on the ground being followed by 2/Lts Thornton and Kerr both firing. Landed near Nieppe.” Lt Thornton attempted to land alongside the 2 seater, but unfortunately hit telegraph lines and was severely injured, not being released from hospital until well after the Great War had ended.' On with the photos; And paired with something else, Wingnut Wings Sopwith Pup; If you have never seen or built a Wingnut Wings kit, you really need to! Thanks for looking, John
  15. Sopwith F.1 Camel "Clerget" 1:32 Wingnut Wings [EDIT] Review build of 'The Duellists' Camel underway in 'Work in Progress' [/EDIT] [EDIT] Finished model of this kit 'Wonga Bonga' in Ready for Inspection [/EDIT] For the past 12 months or so, Wingnut Wings have been very quiet in terms of new releases. As was apparent from visiting their website they clearly had their ‘heads down’ while they concentrated on producing a Sopwith Camel. This is probably the most eagerly awaited model that WNW has ever released. Anticipation and expectations were very high, due to their reputation for meticulous research and total accuracy, combined with flawless fit and ease of build. The wait was probably longer than most wanted, but it is well known that Wingnut Wings do not release their models according to any pre-prepared schedule. They release them only when everything, and I mean everything, is at the supremely high standard they set themselves. When all was ready for release, there was a big surprise in store. It wasn’t just a single release but Six different kitsets 32070 Sopwith F.1 Camel “BR.1”. 32071 Sopwith F.1 Camel “Le Rhone”. 32072 Sopwith F.1 Camel “USAS”. 32074 Sopwith F.1 Camel “Clerget”. 32076 Sopwith 2F.1 Camel “Ship’s Camel”. 32803 Sopwith F.1 Camel &LVG C.VI “The Duellists’ Wow, no wonder it took so long to research and produce the Camel. Pause for a moment and consider the massive task of project managing all this to Wingnuts exacting standards. All the subtle (but very important) differences between versions, applicable colour schemes, the breakdown of parts and allocations to various sprues, getting the moulds right, and on and on, the list of things that had to be achieved, and decisions made, must have been colossal. The Sopwith Camel. Developed in 1916 as a successor to the single gun Sopwith Pup, the Camel got its name from the ‘hump’ in the forward fuselage that enclosed most of the twin Vickers guns. Entering service in May 1917 and serving right up to then of the Great War in November 1918, the Camel served with many air forces, and was the mount of a large number of allied aces. Initially the aircraft suffered from the poor quality of its Clerget 9B engines, so other engines were tried. The RNAS preferred the Bentley BR.1, and the RFC settled on both the Le Rhone 9J and the improved Clerget 9Bf. The United States Air Service (USAS) received 5 Squadrons of Camels as their forces built up through 1918. A further development was the 2F.1 ‘Ships Camel’ which featured a shorter wingspan and detachable rear fuselage. All these versions are available from the Wingnut Wings range, it only remains to be seen if the F.1/3 ‘Comic’ night fighter joins them. I certainly hope so, and notice that kit number 32073 sits unused between the ‘USAS’ and ‘Clerget’ releases. Could it be for the F.1/3? Fingers crossed everyone! The Kit There is nothing quite like the thrill of a new Wingnut Wings kit, the silver gilt edged box with its fabulous Steve Anderson painting, draws you in to lift the lid and see the latest wonder from our friends in New Zealand. Shown in action here is a very dramatic scene with Camel B3834 ‘Wonga Bonga’ shooting down a Gotha under a moon lit sky. Inside are 5 individually wrapped sprues, all of which are further wrapped in a larger bag, a large decal sheet by Cartograf, and an etched brass fret with seatbelts and gun sights. Also contained is one of Wingnut Wings instruction books, which is way more than just a guide to the assembly sequence. The drawings are very clear and logical, with colour call outs to every step, accompanied by more detailed painting guides at various points. The ‘icing on the cake’ is the inclusion of photographs, both original and modern, to help the modeller understand how everything should look. Want to see how the fuselage interior should look? There are a couple of colour photographs of an original Camel under restoration, before the cockpit area was covered with fabric. Assembly begins naturally enough, with the cockpit area. A full set of instrument decals are provided for the panel, each of which is readable under a magnifying glass. The cockpit side frames are moulded in one piece with the cabane struts. Care will be needed during construction not to knock them, but they will ensure that the top wing will just click accurately into place during final assembly. (The same system was used on their Sopwith Pup model, and having built 2 of them I know that it works a treat). The cockpit is fully fitted out with all the fine detail you could possible want, the only things to add are the bracing wires between the fuselage frames, and the control wires from the stick and rudder pedals. Stretched sprue or rolled fuse wire is ideal for this. The two Vickers guns are fitted in two stages. The main stocks go in during the cockpit assembly, with the barrels to be fitted later on from the outside. This will make painting both them and the cockpit coaming area a much easier job. Who needs resin when you have plastic moulding like this? Another nice feature of Wingnuts thoroughness is that one of the marking options has an extra bit of stitching on the starboard mid fuselage. Rather than supply it as a part to be glued on, Wingnut Wings provide you with 2 complete starboard fuselage halves. One with and one without - a great example of their dedication to doing things right. Lesser companies would have provided 1 fuselage part with the extra stitching on, and instructed the modeller to scrape it off if not required. Note in the photo above, the lower wing is moulded as a single piece including the dihedral, contributing to what should be fool proof assembly and line up of the biplane wings. The wings themselves feature nicely moulded inspection panels, with the lines and pulleys inside. These have clear panels to attach once the details are painted. Also on the clear sprue is a choice of three different windscreens used by the different marking options. The upper wing is a three piece assembly, as per the real aircraft, with beautiful rib and stitching detail, and fine trailing edges. Two different centre sections are on sprue B, with only the small cut out version being applicable in this release.The completed wing should lock into position on those pre set cabane struts, and line up easily with the interplane struts. The etched fret provides details for the gunsights, even including William Barkers little ‘red devil’ in fine detail. Two types of undercarriage are available, the early aerofoil steel tube version and the later round steel tube with wooden fairings. The wheels themselves are from one of the two complete sets provided. More evidence of attention to detail by Wingnut Wings, as I bet few of us would know that different wheels were used on Camels. Final items are the Cooper bombs on their beautifully moulded rack, and the Clerget engine. Different crankcase/pushrod mouldings are supplied to enable either the 9B or 9Bf version to be modelled, all but marking option F using the 9B. Wingnut Wings engines are always a highlight of their kits for me, and I often start my builds with them because they are such fun to build. This little rotary is comparatively simple but no less detailed than some of the bigger in-line engines. Assembled and painted it should look gorgeous. And to help you, there is a colour photo of the real thing on the restored Camel B5663. I know we should be wary of taking information from restorations, but TVAL (Wingnut Wings sister company) do such meticulous work, that there is definitely value in seeing it. Where else are you going to get detailed colour photographs of a Sopwith Camel? The engine is covered by one of four cowlings on sprue A, the other three not being applicable to this version. Finally one of two propellers completes the construction phase. A detailed rigging diagram shows where everything goes. There are a couple of double wires, but on the whole this is a fairly straight forward rig. Not the simplest, but certainly not very complicated either. Interestingly the instructions point out that the Camel was not rigged with turnbuckles, so that is one less thing to have to do. Marking Options. Rather than Wingnut Wings standard five different finishing options, here we get six! It is always a difficult but pleasurable decision as to which one to choose. I’m afraid that it is almost impossible here as they are all absolutely stunning. Many modellers are going to be unable to resist obtaining more than one copy of this particular kit, in order to satisfy that urge. The decals are perfectly printed, with sharp edges and accurate colours. Dozens of fine details are provided, from ‘Sopwith’ logos for the struts to markings for the little Cooper bombs. The big sheet is by Cartograf, your assurance of top quality. A -Sopwith F.1 Camel B3834 “Wonga Bonga”, RH Daly (7 victories) & AF Brandon (1 victory), Manston War Flight RNAS, July-August 1917. B - Sopwith F.1 Camel B3889 “B 1”, CF Collett (11 victories), B Flight 70 Sqn RFC, August 1917. C - Sopwith F.1 Camel B3893, AR Brown (10 victories), 9(N) Sqn RNAS, September-October 1917. D - Sopwith F.1 Camel B6289, HL Nelson (1 victory), WM Alexander (23 victories), A Flight 10(N) Sqn RNAS, January 1918. E - Sopwith F.1 Camel B6313, WG Barker (50 victories), 139 Sqn RAF, late July 1918. F - Sopwith F.1 Camel B7406, HG Watson (14 victories), C Flight 4 Sqn AFC, March 1918. Conclusion. Every Wingnut Wings kit I have seen has been special, but this is something else. It has all the things we have come to love about their kits: the way they present them, the quality of the moulding, the instruction manual, the marking options, etc. Open the box and you will happily spend an hour or two going through the contents, admiring the mouldings, reading the booklet, mentally building it, and best of all, trying to shortlist which option to build. Since last year Wingnut Wings have changed the way they supply their kits. No longer do you order directly from them in New Zealand, and await the arrival of your kits with a Customs and VAT charge. You can now purchase from their partner Weta Workshop, or numerous smaller (often fairly local) retailers, some of which are members on Britmodeller. It seems that all six of the Camel boxings are proving to be very popular and selling like hot cakes. There has been an ongoing thread here on Britmodeller, showing how popular it has been and also how one of our member/traders, Duncan, has been winning praise for his service! See here You don’t even have to start actually building it to get your money’s worth. A good mug of tea (or a decent single malt if it is later in the day), your favourite armchair, and a spare hour with one of Wingnut Wings new Camels will wash away all the cares of the world, and put a huge smile on your face. I know, and I’ve already dipped my hand in my pocket and bought three more! Very highly reccomended. Review sample courtesy of
  16. Wingnut Wings is to release a 1/32nd Sopwith F.1 Camel kit - ref.32070 Sources: http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/news http://www.aeroscale.co.uk/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=19678 V.P.
  17. 'The Duellists' Sopwith F.1 Camel & LVG C.VI 1:32 Wingnut Wings [EDIT] Review build of the Camel underway in 'Work in Progress' [/EDIT] Released at the same time as the five individual boxings of the Sopwith Camel is this latest addition to the Wingnut Wings ‘Duellists’ series of two kits in a box. These are carefully chosen to depict the actual machines that met in combat on a known date and time. On the morning of 9th October 1918 two Clerget powered F.! Camels from B flight of 4 Squadron Australian Flying Corps took off on a ‘special mission’ patrol. 26 year old Harold Norman Kerr was in Camel E7190, accompanied by Vincent Harry Thornton in Camel E7241, They were to attack targets of opportunity with their bombs and guns, in much the same way that more than 20 years later in the second world war,the RAF crossed the Channel to conduct ‘Rhubarb’ missions. The combat report states “..we saw a 2 seater machine over Merville which opened fire on us. We both immediately dived on the enemy aircraft from the side. 2/Lt Thornton fired about 200 rounds from a range of 50 feet. 2/Lt Kerr then fired about 100 rounds from 50 feet. E.A. continued diving until practically on the ground being followed by 2/Lts Thornton and Kerr both firing. Landed near Nieppe.” Lt Thornton attempted to land alongside the 2 seater, but unfortunately hit telegraph lines and was severely injured, not being released from hospital until well after the Great War had ended. The ‘2 seater’ was LVG C.VI 7243/18 piloted by Sgt. Greyer with Lt. Köhnke as observer. 7243 landed intact and both were taken prisoner. The aircraft was salvaged 4 Sqn AFC and flown to Britain by the CO. Eventually it went to Australia as a war prize, but some time after 1941 it disappeared and its final fate is unknown. All this sets the fascinating context in which this kitset is presented. One of the things that really interests me about military aviation is the stories of the crews involved, particularly those from the Great War period. It adds an extra dimension and interest to a model building project. The kit. As a double kit this one has been presented in a different way to the previous ‘Duellists’. Instead of a deeper box we have a double width box, rather like 2 standard boxes side by side. Inside the Camel occupies one side, with the LVG in the other. The box is thus quite large, but it does means that Steve Andersons superb artwork is really large, depicting the incident as it starts. The standard Wingnut Wings instruction booklet is provided, containing as it does contemporary and modern photographs to help show how everything should look, plus more photos that are just too interesting not to include. The assembly sequences are illustrated with crystal clarity, and paint colours are called out for each item at each stage. I always appreciate the drawings that show completed sub assemblies in colour, they are immensely useful. Confirmation that the Wingnut Wings crew are modellers and builders themselves, as this is a very thoughtful touch. Sopwith F.1 Camel The Clerget Camel has already been reviewed with full details here, so I’ll restrict this section to a brief summary of the main points. Assembly begins with the cockpit area. A full set of instrument decals are provided for the panel, each of which is readable under a magnifying glass. The cockpit side frames are moulded in one piece with the cabane struts. Care will be needed during construction not to knock them, but they will ensure that the top wing will just click accurately into place during final assembly. The cockpit is fully fitted out with all the fine detail you could possible want, the only things to add are the bracing wires between the fuselage frames, and the control wires from the stick and rudder pedals. Stretched sprue or rolled fuse wire is ideal for this. An etched brass fret contains parts for both the Camel and the LVG, these being mainly seat belts and gun sights, with a slotted jacket for the LVG’s Spandau. The two Vickers guns are fitted in two stages. The main stocks go in during the cockpit assembly, with the barrels to be fitted later on from the outside. This will make painting both them and the cockpit coaming area a much easier job. The lower wing is moulded as a single piece including the dihedral, contributing to what should be a fool proof assembly and line up of the biplane wings. The wings themselves feature nicely moulded inspection panels, with the lines and pulleys inside. These have clear panels to attach once the details are painted. The upper wing is a three piece assembly, as per the real aircraft, with beautiful rib and stitching detail, and fine trailing edges. The completed wing should lock into position on those pre set cabane struts, and line up easily with the interplane struts. Final items are the Cooper bombs on their beautifully moulded rack, and the Clerget engine. Different crankcase/pushrod mouldings are supplied to enable either the 9B or 9Bf version to be modelled, option A Lt Kerr’s E7190 uses the 9B, while Lt Thornton’s E7241 could have used either the 9B or 9Bf. Parts are provided for both so you have the choice. A detailed rigging diagram shows where everything goes. There are a couple of double wires, but on the whole this is a fairly straight forward rig. Not the simplest, but certainly not very complicated either. Interestingly the instructions point out that the Camel was not rigged with turnbuckles, so that is one less thing to have to do. Marking Options. There is the choice of Either Kerr or Thorntons machines. A = Sopwith F.1 Camel E7190, HN Kerr (1 shared victory), B Flight 4 Sqn AFC, 9 October 1918. B = Sopwith F.1 Camel E7241, VH Thornton (2 victories, 1 shared), B Flight 4 Sqn AFC, 9 October 1918. The LVG C.VI. The LVG C.VI was a 2 seat observation aircraft first flown in early 1918, and entering front line service by the middle of the year. It had a fixed forward firing LMG 08/15 Spandau, and a LMG 14/17 Parabellum on a flexible ring for the observer. It was popular with crews, having a good rate of climb, speed, and maneuverability. Many of us in the UK will remember the Shuttleworth Collections C.IV 7198/18 , that was restored and flown for many years from the early 1970’s. It has now ceased flying and been returned to the RAF museum, its official owners. I saw it flying many times, it is a bit of a shame that it won’t be seen in the air again, but it is a very precious survivor and needs to be carefully looked after. The kit. As one of Wingnut Wings first four releases, it sold out rapidly and has not been available for many years now, so it is great to be able to get hold of it again. The quality of moldings and ease of assembly are up to the high standard that Wingnut Wings set from the very beginning. We have the same wonderfully illustrated instruction manual shared with the Camel, the LVG simply occupying the second half of the booklet. Assembly begins with the cockpit, most of which depicts the abundant woodwork in this area. The pilots seat is mounted directly on top of the large petrol tank, a prospect which must have been terrifying if you thought about it too much! Decals are provided the small instrument panel, and seatbelts for both pilot and observer come from the etched brass fret. The observers cockpit is fitted with a bench seat and wireless set, with a couple of spare Parabellum ammo drums. The fuselage halves are just the side and rear top panels, with the underside being supplied as complete part. I rather like this method of assembly as it does away with the join line that normally runs down the centre of the underside and can take a fair bit of effort to eliminate on a flat panel like this. I’m sure I’ve mentioned this before, but I really like building the engines for WnW models as they are real little gems. The Benz Bz IVa provided here is a real beauty, with sharp moulding and detail. The only addition I usually make is to use fine copper wire to ‘wire up’ the magnetos to the spark plugs. If doing so here, you will need to scratch up a couple of flat channels that run along both sides of the cylinders, from which a wire to each spark plug appears as it runs past each cylinder. With the engine completed, the forward cockpit coamings and cabane struts are fitted. On the original release of the LVG no etched jacket was provided for the Spandau, just a ‘solid’ version. Happily this release does provide one, along with a ‘roller’ to form it around. The fuselage is painted in a bare plywood finish. Wingnut Wings website provides a useful little tutorial on creating a wood grain finish. Look under ‘Hints & Tips’ on the original LVG kit release number 32002. The fuselage corners were reinforced with orange/brown linen tapes, a full set of which are supplied on the main decal sheet. The lower wings are single pieces per side, while the upper wings are made from 2 pieces per side. This is due to the uppers having a deeper airfoil section, and consequently are much ‘thicker’. Moulding them as single part like the lowers would have been impractical and made them extremely heavy. The wings and tail are covered with 4 colour lozenge, plenty of which is provided on the decal sheets, with the upper lozenge being the darker of the two sets. It is essential to pre paint the wings and tail, and not to assume that you can apply the lozenge decal to bare plastic. I usually paint the uppers in olive drab, and the lowers in pale blue. After a coat of Johnsons kleer (or gloss varnish) the lozenge decals can be applied. The paint gives them something to ‘bite’ onto and weld themselves to the surface. A rigging diagram shows clearly where all the wires go, using whatever method you prefer. Marking Options. Only one choice here, as befits the nature of the incident being depicted by this Duellists kitset. It is a fairly plain LVG, devoid of any unit markings. This suggests that the aircraft may have been fairly new and pressed into service right away. C = LVG C.VI 7243/18, Sgt. Greyer & Lt. Köhnke, Flieger Abteilung 13, 9 October 1918. Decals. The main A4/Letter sized sheet covers the Camels and LVG. There is very little difference between Kerr and Thorntons Camels, only their ‘B’ flight numbers. It is not certain which numbers they wore, so you are provided with numbers 1 -8, and I assume that the ‘6’ would make a ‘9’ if rotated 180. The LVG is provided with all its national markings and stencils, but as mentioned before 7243/18 was not wearing any unit markings when it was shot down. 3 more A4/Letter sheets cover the upper surface 4 colour lozenge, the lower surface 4 colour lozenge, and a set of pink, blue, and plain linen rib tapes, of which only the plain linen ones are applicable to this aircraft. Printing is by Cartograf, so is sharp, clear, and to industry leading standard. Enough said. Accessories. Includeed is Wingnut Wings standard set of German Accessories, covering a wide range of diorama friendly items from ladders to cameras, oxygen tanks, photo plate boxes, pigeon boxes etc, even a teddy bear! Here's some I prepared earlier; Conclusion. This is a fabulous and unexpected release of the new Wingnut Wings Camel by pairing with the LVG. Both kits are superb, and represent the best of modern standards being achieved. Although the LVG is one of the older WnW releases, don’t think that it is an any way a lesser model. It has the same high standard of moulding and fit as the latest releases, and having built the original kit I can vouch for the fact that it is a joy to build, and trouble free (See Below). And it looks absolutely gorgeous when finished. Get one while you can! I really like these Duellist sets that tell a story of real incidents that took place. Knowing the dates, times, units, and names of those involved makes them seem more real. I am just as interested in reading about great war aviation as I am on modeling it, so this range neatly bridges the two. When completed these two are going to make a great pairing alongside each other in anyone's cabinet. Very highly reccomended. Review sample courtesy of Kit 32002 LVG C.VI, the second Wingnut Wings kit I built, back in 2009.
  18. Hi all, I've seen some thoughts for and against how useful Haynes manuals are for modellers. Has anyone tried the new Sopwith Camel book, and is there anything specific that you would want to see in a future manual? All thoughts welcome...
  19. windmill 193

    Wingnut Wings

    The Camel is up on their website. 5 different kits. F1, 2F1 and duellist kit.
  20. Following on from my 1/72 scale WW1 fighters, I decided to up the scale a little with this kit that I found for £12.50. Hope you like it, still learning but starting to get a little better.
  21. This is my first proper post on here and looking at some of the work on show, I can't help but feel a little daunted. More so for the fact that I haven't made a plastic model kit for about 30yrs. I do make Scratch built ships that I set up with RC to sail on the lake, but having two young boys has brought me back to my childhood passion, for their benefit entirely of course I decided that my first foray back would be a cheap and simple kit that I could practice on. I do like WW1 aircraft as they had great character so I picked up a Revell 1:72 Sopwith Camel and intended to do it straight out of the box with no modifications and in the livery as flown by Lt L.S Breadner, No.3 Naval Sqn, Royal Naval Air Service, Walmer, Dec 1917. So here's how its gone. Hope it helps the total beginner's and any tips from more experienced modellers are most welcome indeed.
  22. This is my first proper post on here and looking at some of the work on show, I can't help but feel a little daunted. More so for the fact that I haven't made a plastic model kit for about 30yrs. I do make Scratch built ships that I set up with RC to sail on the lake, but having two young boys has brought me back to my childhood passion, for their benefit entirely of course I decided that my first foray back would be a cheap and simple kit that I could practice on. I do like WW1 aircraft as they had great character so I picked up a Revell 1:72 Sopwith Camel and intended to do it straight out of the box with no modifications and in the livery as flown by Lt L.S Breadner, No.3 Naval Sqn, Royal Naval Air Service, Walmer, Dec 1917. So here's how its gone. Hope it helps the total beginner's and any tips from more experienced modellers are most welcome indeed. Just need to figure out how to post photos ;-)
  23. Hello, First, excuse me for my mistake english, i am writing from France. I want to build the Cpt Arthur Roy Brown’s plane. Brown who is a possible candidate to have involved in the Manfred Von Richtofen’s death. Here are the photograph of the men and the plane (find on the net) : « Rentrons dans le vif du sujet » !, Here is the work i made on the two alf parts of fuselage: I completed the structure behind the seats with squarred plastic profiles. I used aluminium alclad painds for the metallics parts, the fabrics parts are paint in Gunze H85 and the wood parts in H37 Gunze. For the wethering i used some black oil paint on the metallic parts. For the wooden parts i used differents shade of yellow and brown oil paints. I build some reinforcement cable with streched sprue. I painted them with gunmetal from aeromaster. For the instrument panel after paintjob on the wooden part, i used the decals from the box, some rhodoid cut with a punch and die and instrument dials from Aeroclub. The seat’s structure received the same painjob as the two parts of the fuselage. The seat from the box as been replace with a Barracuda studio one.L That’s all folk for this day. Best regard’s from France.
  24. Merit is to release 1/24th Sopwith Camel kits. - ref.62404 - Sopwith Camel F.1 - ref.62405 - Sopwith Camel 2.F.1 Source: http://www.ipmsdeutschland.de/Ausstellungen/Nuernberg2016/Nuernberg_2016.html V.P.
  25. Hi all, was going through some old photo's earlier and found these, a model I have actually finished! This was a birthday present from my brother a couple of years ago... Enjoy! Al
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