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Found 211 results

  1. Hey! I'm really sorry for not posting anything for a while.... I finished Eduard's spitfire with ton's of extras. If you are interested, here is the Build log, but I think you are more interested in seeing photos of the finished build. Some of You might have noticed that this build was published in Meng Air Modeller. Here they are, enjoy!
  2. Hello, Thought I'd start building something a bit more relaxing after the Flanker, so at the Moson show in Hungary I've bought this beautiful eduard's kit - with all the extras. I am planning to build it as opened as possible - engine, cockpit, radio, gunbays, misc. panels and so on. So, starting with the cutting, cleaning and thinning all the resin bits and pieces and dryfitting them over and over again. So, this is my Moson show loot, most of the parts here are for Spit. Too much of them really... So, brassin radio compartment with Aires cockpit test fitted... brassin parts just slot into the position, they fit the eduard kit perfectly. And Aires gunbays (just dryfitted, not glued yet) I think I will thin the plastic a bit more...
  3. SUU-30B/B Munitions Dispenser (648444) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Used in Vietnam before the Cluster Bomb Unit (CBU) was banned by many countries, the SUU-30B/B and variants were the first in-flight munitions dispenser used by the US and could carry hemispherical fragmentation or incendiary submunitions. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. Inside are four bomb bodies plus a choice of FOD cover or snub nose cone. The fins are PE, and are made up from a single half-thickness etched part folded over and with the finlets folded out to 90o to the fin. They then fit into grooves in the body and you must align them carefully. There is also a rear cover that fits over the cut-off mark where the pour stub was removed. Painting and decaling is covered on the front of the instructions with Gunze codes and the various stencils numbered for your ease. Review sample courtesy of
  4. K-13M/R-13M Missiles (648445) 1:48 Eduard Brassin This confusingly named missile shares a name (R-13) with a great big sub-launched ICBM, but there the similarity ends. It is a reverse-engineered Sidewinder missile that went home stuck in the back of a PLAAF Mig-17, and was rushed into service to counter the surprise introduction of the AIM-9 Sidewinder by the US. The K-13M was an updated variant with an infrared seeker head that was introduced in the 60s and was dubbed Advanced Atoll by NATO. It had a longer range, was more agile and had a more accurate seeker head with better proximity fuse that improved its chances of success. As usual with Eduard's larger resin sets, they arrive in the oblong Brassin box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions wrapped around, providing extra protection. Inside are three bags of resin parts and a small fret of Photo-Etch (PE) with a sheet of decals on the other side of the stiffener card. There are sufficient parts for four missiles, four adapter rails and a choice of clear or covered seeker head apertures. The missile bodies have the rear stabiliser fins moulded-in, and four separate steering vanes, with a PE exhaust ring, and either a clear resin seeker head, or if adding the FOD cover, the tip of the missile is cut off as per the diagram, then the cover is glued on instead. If the missile is to be in storage, a small PE tag is fitted to the top proximity "bump", which is removed before it is wheeled out to an aircraft. The adapter rails are single parts, and have lots of stencils applied after paint. The missile is painted and decaled as per the diagram on the front page, which shows the location of each stencil, and the colours called out in Gunze codes. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Spitfire Mk.I Upgrade Sets & Masks (for Tamiya) 1:48 Eduard & Eduard Brassin Tamiya have retooled their Mk.I to modern standards in 1:48, although their old kit wasn't half bad, it just had a few shape issues. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Resin Wheels (648455) Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. This set includes two resin main wheels with separate front hubs, and a tail wheel on a long leg that slots into the rear of the fuselage. A sheet of wheel masks accompany the set (not pictured) in Eduard's usual yellow kabuki tape, with a pair of additional Pac-Man shaped masks for the tail wheel in case you mess the first application up. Update Set (49960) Two frets are included, one nickel plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side wall equipment are the primary parts on the painted set, with new rudder pedals; seat mounted flare pack; compass; head armour; radiator and oil cooler mesh with cooling flaps; bay door skins, tie-down brackets and hoses for the main gear; a replacement crew access door and rear view mirror inside the hood. Zoom! Set (FE960) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. Seatbelts STEEL (FE961) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived depth to the buckles and other furniture by clever shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. You get a full set of four-point crew belts, which thread through the back of the seat and attach to the next frame aft. landing flaps (48987) Eduard landing flaps use an ingenious technique to achieve excellent true-to-scale flaps using few parts, and requiring the modeller to simply remove the retracted flaps from the lower wing, plus scrape the upper wings to accommodate the thickness of the completed bays. Each half of the two flap sections (bay and flap itself) is constructed in the same manner, by twisting and folding over the attached ribs to create a 3D shape, with extra parts added along the way. The bays glue to the inside of the upper wing and the flap attaches to the rear wall of the new bay with a length of 0.3mm wire that you will need to supply. The short inner section also has a deeper bay interior giving the impression of seeing inside the fuselage. Repeat this for the other side, and you're almost done. There are also parts included for the pop-through flap indicator "stalk" that gives the pilot a visual indication he hasn't cleaned up his flying surfaces before parking, thereby saving him an alleged fine of a few of shillings. This needs a small hole cut where the panel line is engraved on the top wing half. Masks (EX643) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition you get a set of hub masks for the main wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX644) Supplied on a bigger sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. Review sample courtesy of
  6. B-43-0 & B-43-1 Nuclear Weapons w/SC43-4/-7 Tail Assembly (648447 & 648448) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The B-43 was an early unguided air-dropped nuclear bomb used from 1961, reducing down from the mid 60s until the final withdrawal in the early 90s. Following the initial design, improvements were made in the -1 and later dash two to allow for different explosive yields to be carried and various fuses and deployment options. It was never used in anger (thankfully), but was carried by numerous US and some NATO airframes during the period. As usual with Eduard's larger resin sets, they arrive in the oblong Brassin box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions wrapped around, providing extra protection. There are twenty resin parts, a sheet of Photo-Etch (PE) brass and decal sheet, with enough parts to construct two weapons. The construction steps are identical between the sets apart from the shape of the nose cone, which is more pointed for the -1 weapon, and the decal sheets. The body has a shaped depression in the front, which the nose cone slots into, then at the rear a small strip of PE is wrapped around the circumference, then the four tail fins are slotted into their depressions, while the small lugs fore and aft are fitted, taking care to align them correctly as per the scrap diagram. Painting and decaling is covered on one diagram, with the body painted either grey or white and various stencils applied along the sides. Colour codes are called out in their usual choice of Gunze Sangyo paints. B-43-0 Nuclear Weapon w/SC43-4/-7 tail assembly B-43-1 Nuclear Weapon w/SC43-4/-7 tail assembly Review sample courtesy of
  7. Resin Small Arms – MP40, AK47 & M16 (Vietnam era) 1:35 Eduard Brassin Good quality small arms are becoming more commonly included in figure sets, but even then the injection moulding process can't achieve the fidelity of good quality pressure-cast resin such as Eduard are capable of, and their STEEL Photo-Etch (PE) facilities are second to none, so painted rifle slings and etched fittings are easy to include, improving detail yet more beyond that of lowly plastic. Their new(ish) range is widening, and this latest batch fills some gaps that should prove popular. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. There is likely to be some wafer-thin flash around the details as a function of the moulding process, but clean-up will be short with the help of a sharp blade. MP40 Machine Gun (635008) The dreaded MP40 was an efficient killer used by the Germans in WWII, and much sought after by the Allies as a battlefield pick-up due to its effectiveness and availability of the 9mm ammo as more of Europe was liberated. Incorrectly referred to as a Schmeisser for most of my youth, this came about due to the Schmeisser company being responsible for manufacturing many of the stick magazines, with their name stamped into the metal. The set includes eight weapons, four of which have their distinctive stock folded under the receiver, while the remaining four have separate stocks that are added during construction. Four slings of each in black and red leather are supplied on the PE fret, plus short additional sections to depict the threaded ends and adjustment straps. Colour call-outs are in Gunze codes as usual, and you can paint the Bakelite portions of the grip and lower receiver in either black or a russet red, which was a raw Bakelite with a marbled finish to it. M16 Rifle Vietnam War (635009) Although the M1 Garand lasted through WWII, morphing into the M14 by the addition of a larger magazine and automatic fire capability, the US forces were looking for a brand-new solution, settling on a derivative of the Armalite AR-15, which was itself scaled down from the AR-10. Chambered at 5.56mm it fired supersonic round and had a similar wounding power as the previous .30 rounds. After a mainly political battle with the M14, the new M16 as it became known won out and has been in service with US and other NATO forces ever since in different forms as the lighter M4, although there is a movement back to a larger cartridge for more stopping power. They now use a STANAG mag that ensures better interoperability between all NATO members, allowing rounds to be shared with your allies on the field. The set contains eight of the Vietnam era M16s, which were the A1 variant with smooth forward grips and full stock of the original, with the carry-handle attached to the top of the receiver. The Vietnam era rifle was outfitted with straight 20-round mags with a sloped base, and a simple sling that runs from the front sight block to the rear of the buttstock. An additional four of these mags are included on a separate casting block, and the slings are supplied in tan or khaki PE, with separate black sling-loops to attach to the rifle and accept the sling material just like the real thing. AK47 Assault Rifle (635010) The almost ubiquitous AK47 was developed by the Russians after WWII, and as it was partly based upon the German STG/MP44, there are certain family resemblances. With its robust construction and distinctive curved mags, it went on to become a must-have accessory for every militiaman and insurgent over the years, with a myriad of variants muddying the waters. Again, there are eight full-stock "vanilla" AKs in the box, all magged-up and ready for their two-part slings in either tan or khaki, with an additional four spare mags to add to your diorama or vignette. Review sample courtesy of
  8. AN/AVQ-26 PAVE Track Pod (648449) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The Pave track pod was developed for the US Air Force by Ford Aerospace. It is an electo optical targeting pod. It uses forward looking infra red to find the target and a laser to designate it for laser guided weapons. The sight picture from the POD is fed back into the aircraft to a cockpit display. The head with the sensor rotates to hide the sensors when not in use. While it was developed in the 1970s it only became widely available in the 1980s. It was first used in operations against Libya and the in Gulf War I. This version is of the pod is one used on the F-4 as opposed to the semi recessed one used on the F-111. Due to its size crews referred to t as PAVE DRAG. As well as the USAF the Korean Air Force also used the pod on their Phantoms. The pod comes as three resin parts with an additional mounting pylon. A sheet of decals is also included. All part are cast to Eduard's high standards. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Fw.190D Fuselage Guns (648439 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin More goodies from Eduard's Brassin line for their Fw.190D kits in 1:48. As usual with their resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. It contains six resin parts and a small fret of Photo-Etch (PE) brass for the small parts. This set takes the kit's blank internal gun bay floor and replaces it with a super-detailed alternative, to which the rear bulkhead, guns with full breeches, ammo cans and additional cowling fasteners are attached. There is also a fine PE part that depicts the network of windscreen clearing mechanism, which fits against the bulkhead and wraps around the lower front of the already installed windscreen. Other than cutting the resin parts from their casting blocks and removing a lug from the top of kit part X38, it is a drop-in replacement set. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Fw.190A-5 Undercarriage Legs BRONZE (648436 for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Eduard have produced a line of Fw.190 kits that are peerless in 1:48, and as that range expands, so does the variety of aftermarket sets, tailored to their kits, and with exceptional detail that makes them a worthwhile investment if you're after the perfection. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. There are two cast bronze legs in the box, with two gear bay doors, consisting of two captive main and two inner doors that hinge along the aircraft's centreline. The casting of the bronze is superlative, and far better than white metal, as well as being much stronger and less flexible. If you are planning on loading up your model with resin cockpit, engine, gun bay, etc., these may be just the ticket to support all that extra weight, as well as improving the detail and scale fidelity substantially. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Liberator GR Mk.VI Update Set & Wheels 1:72 Eduard for Eduard Kit Eduard now bring us a couple of updates for the new Liberator Mk.IV kit, Update Set (73647) This package includes pre-painted details for the crew compartment and fills in some of the details on the flight deck that were not covered by the etch provided with the kit. Details are provided for radio and other electronic equipment, as well as rudder pedals, ammunition hoppers and belts for the machine guns, as well as cooling sleeves for the gun barrels. Wheels Set This contains a full set of replacement set of wheels and the mud guard on the front gear leg. Masks are included for painting (not shown). Review samples courtesy of
  12. Messerschmitt 109G-6 Resin Upgrades (for Tamiya) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Tamiya have joined in with the recent spate of retooling of 1:48 109Gs, and their G-6 is now readily available. Eduard have a number of resin and Photo-Etch (PE) sets for these kits, and here come two more. As usual with Eduard's larger resin sets, they arrive in the oblong Brassin box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions wrapped around, providing extra protection. The BIGSIN sets are supplied in a larger top-opening tray box with the same interior protection and layout. Bf.109G-6 Advanced (SIN64847 for Tamiya) This is an amalgamation of three sets for the Tamiya kit that have previously been released separately, with a healthy discount for purchasing them in one handy package. It contains the following three items: Bf.109-G Engine (648406) Consisting of four bags of resin in two shades of grey, a single sheet of Photo-Etch (PE) brass in a separate bag with backing card, and the instruction booklet, which in this instance is fairly substantial consisting of nine sides of folded A4. The set includes the gun bays in the nose, and begins with the construction of the main engine block, which has an amazing number of PE and resin parts added, even before you have left the first page of the instruction. The oil tank, engine mounts and turbocharger are installed too, with the gun bay next, linked with various hoses and bracketry. Looked on as a whole it seems quite daunting, but if it is like any other Eduard engine set, it will fall together once you have gone through making up sub-assemblies and painted them. The level of detail present and the care taken to explain it all thoroughly in pictorial format is stunning, with additional wiring needed from your stocks to do the whole thing justice and mimic the layout of the real thing. The installation requires the removal of the front part of the fuselage, which is where the magnets are housed that allow the stock kit to have removable panels. I find that a bit of a gimmick myself, as I can barely handle any of my kits without breaking the small parts off, so wouldn't want to be fiddling with the model after completion anyway. With the new resin engine showing off so much detail, I wouldn't want to hide it away anyhow! The rear of the gun bay latches neatly onto a couple of depressions on the kit, and then it is a case of wiring it in, and replacing the kit cowling parts with new resin ones that depict the parts in-scale, and with greater detail. The lower cowl is depicted unlatched on one side and swung down, which is held in place by PE tongues, while the upper cowling is opened on both sides gull-wing style, with a 19mm wire prop (from your own stock) holding them in place. An optional resin tropical filter is included if it is required, which has some detailed PE mounts to affix it to the cowling in front of the intake. This will not be a "quick slap it together" upgrade, but if you take the time to paint and assemble it correctly, it will provide your model with mind-blowing detail that simply isn't possible in styrene. Radio Compartment (648404) The radio bay comprises a two C-shaped 3cm internal sections of the fuselage plus a front bulkhead with radio gear, complete with ribbing and wiring detail. To this is added the gear on the floor of the fuselage within a small frame. You will of course need to remove the radio bay access panel from the fuselage and the moulded-in framework, and Eduard have sensibly provided a replacement made from two PE parts - the outer skin, and strengthening framework. Seatbelts (FE892) In case you don't already know, these belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. Bf.109G-6/U4 Engine (648427 for Tamiya) Essentially the same engine as that described above in the BIGSIN set, this is meant for the /U4 sub-variant with the 30mm cannon firing through the prop, and having pored over the instructions for both, I can find very little in the way of differences other than a couple of part numbers in the centre of the gun bay mechanics as you'd expect, and a couple of hoses that are altered to accommodate the new layout. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Hawker Tempest V Resin Upgrades (for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin We've just finished the review of the gorgeous brand new tooling of the mighty Tempest Mk.V in 1:48 from Eduard here (very much worth a look if you've not seen it already), and Eduard have very sensibly released a host of PE and resin sets to coincide with the launch for those that just can't get enough detail. This review covers the resin sets minus the new Löök instrument panel, which is a bit of hybrid, so it's in with the PE sets on the basis that it shares the same packaging format. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box or a rectangular cardboard box for the larger sets, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. As always with resin, take the precaution of wearing a mask when cutting or sanding resin, as the tiny particles are harmful to your health if breathed in. Washing the parts in warm water will also improve the adhesion of paint, as there may still be some moulding release agent on the parts when you receive them. There are five Brassin sets, as follows: Wheels Early (648420) & Wheels Late (648421) Kit wheels are generally in two halves, which means you have the resultant joins to deal with, possible mould-slip and sink mark issues on single part wheels, and sometimes less than stellar detail due to the moulding limitations of styrene injection technology, especially in the tread department. That's where replacement resin wheels come in, with their lack of seamline and superior detail making a compelling argument. They are also usually available at a reasonable price, and can be an easy introduction to aftermarket and resin handling, as they are usually a drop-in replacement. The early wheels here have a smaller diameter hub and larger balloon tyres, while the later ones have the opposite. Both sets include main and tail wheels, plus a set of masks (not pictured) to make painting the demarcations a breeze. Early (648420) Late (648421) Exhaust Stacks (648418) These simple drop-in replacements have deep hollow exists and rolled lips with much more crisp and finely moulded detail that lifts it head and shoulders above the already good kit parts. Just razor saw them off the blocks, glue them in and paint (or paint them first – your choice). Cockpit Set (648416) On opening the box you are greeted with a huge collection of fine resin parts in a number of bags, plus instrument decals, PE seatbelts and a small sheet of clear acetate film with the shape of the gunsight printed on multiple times. Due to the cockpit's location between the fuselage framework, there are a lot of delicate parts, but they have been sensibly moulded with flash supporting them where necessary, and clever use of pouring block locations that make liberating them a fairly easy task. The build begins with the framework parts for each side, to which lots of resin controls and panels are added along with the angled side consoles, which are detailed with more levers and controls as appropriate. A large portion of the main spar is provided and this spaces the two sides apart along with other framework parts, some of which are used later to support the floor, which isn't quite as solid as the kit floor would have you believe. The foot "trays" are fitted on top of the mechanics of the rudder and control column parts, with those parts added respectively, both having PE parts used to detail the yoke and pedals for the ultimate in detail. A pair of diagrams show the correct location of the assembly when joined with the framework, and you'll need to decide in advance which bits to attach together and when to apply paint. The seat is supported by two cross-braces, and has a set of pre-painted seatbelts to go with it that you can apply after painting. This is then inserted into the cockpit framework and is hemmed in by a bracketed piece of back armour, and the rear cockpit frame, so you'd better hope that you don't knock anything off inside after this stage. A fuel tank is plonked in front of the pilot (yikes!), with the highly detailed resin instrument panel laid in front of it, with decals provided for all the instrument faces, and separate compass part. The kit cockpit insert that is fixed into the aperture after the fuselage is closed gets a piece of resin head armour and a Y-shaped length of belt, over which another rail is glued. This is then fitted with the gun-sight with clear film glazing to the front, and set aside while the interior of the fuselage is detailed. The moulded-in detail is retained, and the equipment is augmented by resin and PE parts with much more detail squeezed in. The fuselage can then be closed around the cockpit, using the kit front bulkhead and remembering to put in the other kit parts that are encased in the fuselage, with the cockpit insert installed along with the shoulder straps of the seatbelts, hiding most of the awesome detail away. Gun Bays (648419) The gun bays on the model are moulded closed, so the first thing you'll need to do it cut the wing apart, making a T-shaped hole in each upper panel, following the panel lines shown in the instructions. You'll also need to chamfer the inner side of the landing light blister inside the lower wing, or your bays won't fit. The whole bay frame is moulded as a single part per wing, and is given a PE floor with the lower wing internal structure depicted. The two ammo boxes fit into the top of the T each side of the cannons, which are added after, and plumbed in with some small resin parts. The rear of the bay is a mixture of resin and PE parts to obtain the correct thickness of the trailing edge once the bay is offered up to the underside of the upper wing. It fits within the hole, recessed to give a more realistic look and thickness to the bay edges, which are then lined with PE parts that replicate the lip and fastener locations, with the front sections inlaid with more PE to depict the hinges so that the new resin bay doors can be attached folded forwards, while the aft section is loose and usually laid upside down on the wing when removed. A CAD image shows their correct orientation, and Mr Hobby paint codes are called out throughout construction to aid paint choices. Review sample courtesy of
  14. Spitfire Mk.IX Four Spoke wheel sets for Tamiya Eduard 1:32 The Tamiya 1:32 Spitfire Mk.IX is a beautiful kit throughout, but there are always ways of improving even a Tamiya uber kit, or at least that’s how Eduard think. These two sets provide the modeller the option for fitting different styles of tyres to their model. Both sets include a full set of wheels, including the tail wheel, which is a one for one replacement. The main wheels are split into three parts, the wheel and tyre, plus the inner and outer hubs, the inners having well produced brake detail. They also both feature the four spoke pattern wheels, the differences are the tyres themselves. Set 632 129 features smooth tyres, while set 632-130 features a treaded pattern tyre. All the parts are very nicely moulded and are easily removed from the moulding blocks due to the thin webs holding them to said block. A quick clean up after removal and you’re ready to glue the hubs in place, paint and glue to the kit undercarriage legs and your work is done. For ease of painting the sets also come with a sheet of masks to help give that clean paint job. 632 129 632-130 Conclusion As with any modelling it is best to check your references and build your Spitfire accordingly. With these sets you now have the option of building your model with the correct tyres if the ones in the kit aren’t suitable. The masks are a very handy addition too, just to make life that little bit easier. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Karabiner Kar 98K 1:35 Eduard Brassin More commonly known as the Kar 98 (to me at least), this was the staple bolt-action rifle of WWII for the German infantryman, although the MP40 gets all the attention in the movies. It entered service in the mid-30s and stayed in use until the end of the war, using a 7.92mm cartridge on a stripper-clip that made it easy to load up to five rounds into the rifle at a time, although it could also be fed manually if time wasn't of the essence. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. Inside are six rifles on three casting blocks, plus two more casting blocks with eight super-delicate bayonets. There is also a fret of Photo-Etch (PE) steel rifle slings, which have been pre-painted in leather and black colours on both sides. The smaller parts are for the opposite side of the stock where the sling pulls through and locates, and the front sling-loop where the length is adjusted for the comfort of the user. The rifles are attached to their pouring stub via the buttstock, which is easy to sand back to flat after removal, and a wafer thin flash extends up the rest of the stock next to a nearby, but disconnected, cylinder of resin to give them strength. This flash should be removed, which will be very easy due to its extremely thin nature. If you're feeling particularly brave you can also remove the small quantity of flash around the trigger, which is easier to do with a sharp knife than you'd imagine. Along with the six rifles are eight bayonets, and eight sets of slings, which is good to know, as those parts are very small and prone to pinging off or getting lost. Review sample courtesy of
  16. Mig-23ML/MF Resin Update Sets (for Trumpeter/Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Eduard have reboxed the Trumpeter kit of this aircraft as a special edition "Bedna" boxing with Czech markings, allowing you to build either an ML or MF airframe. Eduard's new sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner, and we reviewed the PE sets and masks here if you fancy a squint. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. The larger sets are safely ensconced in card boxes and use the same foam to protect the resin, Photo-Etch (PE), masks and decals where applicable. As usual with resin, take the precaution of wearing a mask when cutting or sanding resin, as the tiny particles are harmful to your health if breathed in. Washing the parts in warm water will also improve the adhesion of paint, as there may still be some moulding release agent on the parts when you receive them. Mig-23MF/ML Ejection Seat (648429) This is a drop-in replacement for the kit seat, comprising two resin parts, and nickel-plated, pre-painted parts for the crew belts, pull-handle and armrest. Mig-23MF/ML Engine Air Intakes (648434 & 648438) More drop-in resin parts that replace the intakes (not the splitter plate), adds PE blow-in doors, and a choice of two clear lenses on the top of the port intake, with a mask for each into the bargain. The difference between them? A small panel engraved into the rear of the ML. Mig-23ML 648438 Mig-23MF 648434 Mig-23ML Wheels (648431) With two resin main and two nose wheels, plus hub inserts for the outer sides, wafer-thin captive gear bay doors and a mudguard for the front leg, plus PE brake hoses, the protective cage that fits to the "knee" of the main gear legs, and masks (not shown) for the tyres to help you achieve a nice neat demarcation between rubber and hub. Mig-23ML Main Wheel Bays (648428) Replacing the kit bays with ultra-fine detailed resin parts, and adding extra internal parts for realism, resin inner and outer doors and jacks, plus an array of small PE parts for hoses, wiring etc. to create an impressive glimpse into the heart of the machine. Mig-23ML Exhaust Nozzle (648430) Yet another drop-in replacement for the kit exhaust, which is made up from seven resin parts for the ultimate in detail, and should look awesome when painted sympathetically, using the Gunze codes provided as reference. R-23R Apex Missiles for Mig-23 (648432) The pointy-nosed (technical description) R variant of this missiles is the Semi-Active Radar Homing (SARH) version, and you get two missiles in the box with separate steering vanes at the front, larger stabilisers at the rear, and a PE exhaust ring at the back, plus adapter rails. They can be posed with their FOD covers on by cutting off the front of the missiles and adding the supplied covers, plus a ring of PE protectors for the proximity sensors. Decals are provided for the stencils, and the colour call-outs are given in Gunze codes as normal. R-23T Apex Missiles for Mig-23 (648433) The blunt-nosed (another technical description) R variant of this missiles is the Infrared (IR) version, and you get two missiles in the box with separate steering vanes at the front, larger stabilisers at the rear, and a PE exhaust ring at the back, plus adapter rails. They can be posed with their FOD covers on by cutting off the front of the missiles and adding the supplied covers, plus a ring of PE protectors for the proximity sensors. Decals are provided for the stencils, and the colour call-outs are given in Gunze codes as normal. I know. Déjà vu all over again! Review sample courtesy of
  17. GBU-32 Non-Thermally Protected 1:72 Eduard 672207 The GBU-32 is a 1000lb air-dropped weapon that is part of the JDAM (Joint Direct Attack Munition) family of GPS-guided bombs. The weapon is relatively modern and was deployed in combat in Afghanistan. In common with most other 1:72 scale brassin weapon sets, the set of eight GBU-38s arrive packaged into the usual Eduard blister pack, complete with decals and a tiny fret of photo etched parts. Each bomb comprises the main body of the weapon with the ballistic tail cast in place, a choice of four heads are provided for both USN and USAF variants. The casting is flawless and smooth, with minimal cleanup required thanks to the positioning of the pouring stubs at the tail-end of the weapon. Colours and stencil positions are marked in a colour diagram, with Gunze Mr Color paint references as usual. Review sample courtesy of
  18. GBU-38 for B-2A (672208) 1:72 Eduard Brassin The GBU-38 is a 500lb air-dropped weapon that is part of the JDAM (Joint Direct Attack Munition) family of GPS-guided bombs. The weapon is relatively modern and was deployed in combat in Afghanistan. This set has been created with the B-2A Spirit stealth bomber in mind, and contains twice as many bombs as were seen in the standard set we reviewed here. There are eight bomb bodies attached in pairs to pour blocks by their fins, plus a choice of either covered or bare USAF head units, depending on what phase of mission you are planning to model your B-2. painting instructions and stencil positions are marked in a colour diagram, with Gunze Mr Color codes as usual. As the B-2A can carry a theoretical maximum of eighty (yes, 80!) 500lb bombs using the Bomb Rack Assembly (BRA), you'd be better off depicting it partially loaded if you don't want to go bankrupt! Review sample courtesy of
  19. Wellington Mk.Ia/c Engines & Bomb Bay set 1:72 Eduard for Airfix Kit The new Wellington from Airfix is most welcome, and Eduard continue to bring update sets out for it. Engines (672200) This set contains two complete engines for the Wellington. There are two radial engines, their mountings, exhaust collector rings, and engine cowls. A mixture of resin & PE parts which should combine to bring two excellent looking engines for your wellington. Bomb Bay Set (672200) This set contains two sheets of PE for a complete bomb bay for your wellington. This area is complex structure on the aircraft and the PE accurately recreates this. As well as the internal structure there are new doors and their mouthing points included. Review sample courtesy of
  20. AGM-158, R-23R & AIM-9X Missiles 1:48 Eduard Brassin A new raft of 1:48 Missiles from Eduard, and as usual with Eduard's larger resin sets, they arrive in the oblong Brassin box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched wrapped around, providing extra protection. AGM-158 (648425) The AGM-158 is a stand-off or cruise missile, which combines small size with stealthy exterior to minimise chances of interception before it reaches its target and detonates the 1,000lb warhead. They are currently in use with the US, Poland, Australia and Finland, with extended range variants also developed. There are parts for two missiles in the box, with two wings per fuselage, a vertical tail and small parts for shackles, an antenna and a clear part for the rear of the fuselage. The wings and tail can be modelled folded for carriage, or deployed during flight, as shown in a scrap diagram. Decals are included and their location is shown in the painting diagram that uses Gunze codes as call-outs. R-23R Missiles for Mig-23 (648432 for Trumpeter) Designed specifically for the Mig-23, this version uses Semi-Active Radar Homing to seek its target, and has the ability to climb to a target if necessary, with a range of up to 22 miles. There are parts for two missiles in the box, with the large rear fins and smaller steering vanes provided as separate parts that fit into recesses in the missile body. A PE exhaust ring is fitted to the rear, and a pair of pylons are supplied for attachment to the airframe. If you want to show the missiles before flight, the nose needs to be removed with a saw and replaced by the resin covers that are moulded in lighter resin. A set of small PE covers for the proximity sensors are also included, and these are shown in position on a scrap diagram. The little rods on the very tips of the missiles are there to prevent formation of bubbles in the nose-cone, and should be cut off during construction. Decals are included and their location is shown in the painting diagram that uses Gunze codes as call-outs. AIM-9X Sidewinder Missiles (648435) The latest in a long line of Sidewinders, designed for modern air combat in an effort to leapfrog the unexpectedly superior performance of Russian missiles over previous incarnations, and built in collaboration with other Allied countries. This set has parts for four missiles with moulded-in rear stabilisers, separate forward steering vanes, exhausts and clear seeker heads. Decals are included and their location is shown in the painting diagram that uses Gunze codes as call-outs. Review sample courtesy of
  21. BL755 Cluster Bombs (672194) 1:72 Eduard Brassin The BL755 was the main RAF & RN Cluster bomb between the early 1970s until 2008 when it was removed due to the UK signing the Ottawa Treaty on Landmines. Each bomb contained 147 sub munitions and externally was shaped like a standard 1000Lb bomb. Each sub munition contained a shaped anti armour charge surrounded by wound tessellated square wire which produced upto 1400 anti personnel fragments. The unit was used by some NATO allies and some UK partner nations. They continue to be used recently by Saudi aircraft in the Yemen. Typically the units were kept in canisters prior to use so dont normally show the weathering which can be seen on bombs. This set contains four resin bombs, and a set of decals. Review sample courtesy of
  22. GBU-38 Non-Thermally Protected 1:72 Eduard The GBU-38 is a 500lb air-dropped weapon that is part of the JDAM (Joint Direct Attack Munition) family of GPS-guided bombs. The weapon is relatively modern and was deployed in combat in Afghanistan. In common with most other 1:72 scale brassin weapon sets, the set of four GBU-38s arrive packaged into the usual Eduard blister pack, complete with decals and a small fret of photo etched parts. Each bomb comprises the main body of the weapon with the ballistic tail cast in place, a choice of two heads are provided for both USN and USAF variants, both with optional protective caps. The casting is flawless and smooth, with minimal cleanup required thanks to the positioning of the pouring stubs at the tail-end of the weapon. Colours and stencil positions are marked in a colour diagram, with Gunze Mr Color paint references as usual. Review sample courtesy of
  23. SPS-141 ECM pod for MiG-21 (672195) 1:72 Eduard Brassin The SPS-141 ECM pod was a Soviet designed POD for protection from both air and ground threats. The POD was designed to automatically affect the missile guidance head once it had launched and locked on to the aircraft. The pilot had to manually select the most probable threats in order of priority. It is reported that the Iraqis used the pod in numbers during the Iran/Iraq war and that no aircraft carrying it was lost. This set contains the 2 part pod, pylon, and two horn antennas. Also included is the pods control panel to fit in the cockpit. The casting is up to Eduard's high standards. A small decal sheet is provided for the markings. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Fw.190A Resin Upgrades (for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard Eduard's newly issued early Fw.190A has been released in ProfiPACK and Royal Class boxings, and now we have another brace of new resin sets for those of you that love to add extra detail to their models, and aren't always satisfied by the ability of injection moulding to satisfy your needs. The earlier sets dealt mainly with the A-4, which you can read about here. As always it's a modular approach, and you can choose what you use, with a guarantee that it'll fit your model just so, as it's by Eduard for Eduard. As usual with Eduard's resin sets, they arrive in the familiar Brassin clamshell box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched between the two halves, doubling as the header card. The larger sets are encased in an oblong box, with the resin parts safely cocooned on dark grey foam inserts, and the instructions sandwiched wrapped around, providing extra protection. Fw.190A-3 Cockpit (648357) Consisting of resin, PE, decals and a small sheet of clear acetate film, the largest part of which is the cockpit tub with the aft decking and side consoles already moulded in. The separate seat is prepared with its cushion and a set of pre-painted PE seatbelts, and fitted to the tub after the removal of some moulding flash that is indicated in red (already removed in the pics). Resin control column, resin and PE rudder pedals, and the instrument panel are made up next, with the latter having the choice of using the PE panel with pre-printed dials, or a detailed resin part over which you apply a decal of the instruments. Your choice! The panel fits on ledges at the front of the side consoles, and the resin gunsight with PE and acetate parts slides into a groove in the upper panel. The cowling fits over the top, and it too has cut-outs that need clearing of flash beforehand. To fit the new cockpit inside the fuselage a pair of plastic wedges are removed from the inside, to be replaced with a detailed PE and resin trim wheel. The assemblies should then fit neatly within, alongside the kit bulkhead, assuming you aren't taking advantage of any of the other sets I'll be mentioning in this review. The set includes the opening mechanism and the pilot's head armour, which has a warning decal added to it after painting. The interior roll-over frame is resin, and has delicate PE bracing wires linking to the rear, all of which fits inside the canopy after painting. The canopy then installs as normal. Fw.190A Propeller (648366) In order to fit this prop, you'll just need to shave the front off the housing at the front of the kit engine, before creating the prop on its jig, with separate central boss and blades, which fit snugly into the jig and should just lift out once the CA is dry unless you've overdone it. A PE template fits to the back of the boss to mark the centre-point for you to mark and drill a 2mm hole, after which the PE is discarded. The adapted kit part has a small resin pin added, and the prop with a choice of two types of cooling fan (large blades & small) is fitted to the tip of the pin protruding from the engine. If you wanted to portray a maintenance diorama there is a resin prop-shaft included with a detailed spindle that fits into either the kit engine, or one of the new resin engines that are out (648352 & 648335). A new spinner finishes off the set. Fw.190A-2 (648379) and Fw.190A-3/4 (648367) Undercarriage Legs BRONZE These two sets are functionally identical, but differ in the design of the inner gear bay cover detail. There are two cast bronze legs in each box, with four gear bay doors, consisting of two captive main and two inner doors that hinge along the aircraft's centreline. The casting of the bronze is superlative, and far better than white metal, as well as being much stronger. If you are planning on loading up your model with resin cockpit, engine, gun bay, etc., these may be just the ticket to support all that extra weight. Take your pick based on the variant you're modelling. Fw.190A-2 (648379) Fw.190A-3/4 (648367) Fw.190A Control Surfaces Early (648371) This is simply a new set of control surfaces with tab fitting that drop in place instead of the kit parts, benefitting from the fine detail that resin is capable, as well as super-fine trailing edges. There are elevators, ailerons and a rudder unit in the box, with attachment points for casting running along the leading edge, which will mostly remain unseen after construction. Fw.190A Pitot Probes Early (648373) This inexpensive set contains three resin pitot probes on a single casting block with a pair of rails on the sides to protect them from damage. The resin is quite flexible, and provides excellent detail, which is achieved by the addition of a small extension past the end of the probe to ensure complete filling of the narrow cavity and avoid bubbles. You can see that section in the photo at the tip of the arrow I have added. They're not as strong as a metal one, but you're also not likely to skewer yourself with a resin one. Having three on hand will be useful if you have a Royal Class boxing, or just for spares. Review sample courtesy of
  25. Spitfire Mk.IX wheel sets for Tamiya Eduard 1:32 The Tamiya 1:32 Spitfire Mk.IX is a beautiful kit throughout, but there are always ways of improving even a Tamiya uber kit, or at least that’s how Eduard think. These two sets provide the modeller the option for fitting different styles of tyres to their model. Both sets include a full set of wheel, including the tail wheel, which is a one for one replacement. The main wheels are split into three parts, the wheel and tyre, plus the inner and outer hubs, the inners having well produced brake detail. They also both feature the five spoke pattern wheels, the differences are the tyres themselves. Set 632 127 features smooth tyres, while set 632-128 features a treaded pattern tyre. All the parts are very nicely moulded, with correctly spelt sidewall deatil and are easily removed from the moulding blocks due to the thin webs holding them to said block. A quick clean up after removal and you’re ready to glue the hubs in place, paint and glue to the kit undercarriage legs and your work is done. For ease of painting the sets also come with a sheet of masks to help give that clean paint job. Smooth Tyres 632-127 Pattern Tyres 632-128 Conclusion As with any modelling it is best to check your references and build your Spitfire accordingly. With these sets you now have the option of building your model with the correct tyres if the ones in the kit aren’t suitable. The masks are a very handy addition to the sets, just to make life that little bit easier. Review sample courtesy of
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