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Found 22 results

  1. Avia S-99 / C-10 (11122) 1:48 Eduard Limited Edition There must have been billions of words written on the Bf.109 over the years, which was the mainstay of the Luftwaffe's fighter arm, despite having been supposedly superseded by the Fw.190 and others during its service life. It kept coming back to prominence due partly to it being a trusted design, the manufacturer's substantial sway with the RLM, and the type's ability to be adapted as technology advanced. The G or Gustav as it was known was one of the later variants, and is widely regarded as one of the more successful, with improved armament that give some variants a distinctive pair of blisters in front of the windscreen, plus mounting points for the 210mm rocket tubes used to disrupt the bomber streams in long range attacks using timed detonation. The other minor changes were targeted at Defense of the Reich, removing the mounting points and hardware for long-range tanks etc. The G-10 was fitted with the new DB605D-2 engine that was later seen on the K, and became the de facto standard Gustav once introduced, often using as-yet unfinished G-14s as the starting point, which has confused some researchers in the past. It was fitted with the sleek Erla-Haube canopy and a deeper oil cooler under the nose that sets it apart from previous issues. Post war the Avia factory which had been making 109s for the Germans continued making them from parts they had designating the originals S-99. S-99 / C-10 is Czechoslovak post-war designation for Bf 109G-10 (WNF/Diana production) flown by Czechoslovak armed forces. Later production would be the S-199 using Junkers Jumo 211F engines due to lack of available DB engines. The Kit This boxing depicts airframes that were manufactured at Avia, it would seem that while Eduard released the G-10 MTT Regensburg as a Profipack and Overtrees the WNF has previously only been released as overtrees. In this boxing are the new sprues with photo etched parts and masks (not shown) There are 4 decal options as well. The build of course begins in the cockpit, with PE and styrene parts aplenty. PE seatbelts are included, and a choice of PE or styrene rudder pedals, depending on how dexterous you are feeling. The instrument panel is laminated from layers of pre-painted PE. The sidewalls too are decorated with more painted PE parts, after which you can close up the fuselage unless you're treating yourself to a resin engine or other goodies. Don't forget to trap the tail wheel between the halves, or you'll regret it later. The backplate for the spinner and exhaust stubs are installed, and the top cowling with gun inserts is glued into place along with the intake for the engine's turbocharger, a PE hinge section on the top of the cowling, and a choice of PE flame-hiders for the exhausts, which vary between markings options. The G-10 had an extended fin, which is separate from the fuselage on this boxing, breaking at a convenient panel line to ease the way. The elevator fins are each two parts and fit using pins, with separate elevators and a choice of two rudder types. The wings are only slightly different from the norm, with the usual (but new) full-width lower, main gear sidewalls and split upper wings, plus a gaggle of separate parts for the leading-edge slats (gravity deployed when stopped), ailerons, and the two-layer flaps that butt up to the back of the radiator bays, which have PE skins front and back, as does the extended chin-scoop that identifies it as a G-10. A scrap diagram shows the correct positioning of the flaps when they are deployed. The main gear is the same narrow-track stuff from earlier models, with separate tyres and hubs, plus captive bay doors, socketing into the bay using nice strong parts, and with hub masks for easy painting of the wheels. Horn-balances are fitted to the ailerons, a small raised panel under the wing trailing edge is added from PE, and a circular panel on the flank of the fuselage needs to be filled for authenticity's sake. As the build draws to a conclusion, the gunsight is added from a partially painted (by you) clear part, and if you add a little translucent green/blue to the edge to simulate the thickness of the glass, it will improve the look of the finished part. The windscreen has a couple of small PE parts added to it before you can glue it to the front of the squared-off cockpit opening, and the uber-sleek Erla-Haube canopy has a windowed head armour part that will need masking from the enclosed sheet and painting before it is fitted. If you have treated yourself to a set of Tface masks that allow painting of both interior and exterior surfaces of the canopy, the additional small parts added will gel nicely with this improvement. A stubby aerial fits to the top rear of the canopy, and you have a choice of PE or styrene DF loop antenna for the spine a little way back. The canopy can be posed open by using the thin PE restraint that's included on the fret, which allows you to set the correct angle when open. The prop is a single part, which has the two-piece spinner fitted around it, after which you can either glue it in place, or leave it loose for travel and impromptu spinning if you like. A trim actuator for the rudder and a tiny aerial under the fuselage are the last parts on the PE fret, which ends the construction. Markings With this boxing there are 4 decal options as used by the Czechoslovak armed forces OK-BYH, Czechoslovak Police Air Patrol (Red nose and leading edges) 1947 - 1950 EV-11 Command Flight, 2nd Air Division, Fighter Training Center, Czechoslovak Air Force 1947 OK-BYU, Czechoslovak Police Air Patrol (Red nose and leading edges) 1947 EV-14 Command Flight, 2nd Air Division, Fighter Training Center, Czechoslovak Air Force 1947, a borrowed Air Patrol Aircraft with their markings over painted but still retaining the Red Nose & Leading edges. All the decals are printed in the Czech Republic with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion Another great 109G kit from Eduard that has plenty of detail out of the box, and can be upgraded even further in the detail department if you're minded to add the extra resin and PE sets that are patterned for the kit and available separately. Its good to see these Czech aircraft in a double boxing from Eduard. Limited Edition Kit Overtrees (82161X & 82161-LEPT) If you have one of these new kits but wanted to do another decal option and lets face it these are nice options), you'll be pleased to know that you can get just the sprues from the Eduard site, and if you want to add some detail, you can also get a set of Photo-Etch to go with it. They arrive in a white box with a sticker on the end, with all the styrene in the one bag, and the clear parts bagged inside that for their safety during transport and storage. The Overtrees as they're called can only be bought directly from Eduard, so click on the button below to pick up yours. You can also download the instruction booklet if you don't already have one from the main kit page. Kit Overtrees Photo-Etch Overtrees Review sample courtesy of
  2. RS Models is to release a limited edition 1/72nd Avia Ba.422 kit - ref. 94003 Source: http://rsmodels.cz/cs/modely-letadel/limitovana-edice/1-72/94003/avia-ba-422 V.P.
  3. RS Models is to release a limited edition 1/72nd Avia Ba.322 kit - ref. 94002 Source: http://rsmodels.cz/cs/modely-letadel/limitovana-edice/1-72/94002/avia-b-322 V.P.
  4. RS Models is to release a limited edition 1/72nd Avia Ba.222 kit - ref. 94001 Source: http://rsmodels.cz/cs/modely-letadel/limitovana-edice/1-72/94001/avia-b-222 V.P.
  5. 1/48 Avia S-199 (post war Bf 109) is planed for next two or three years. source: http://modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95280&start=4005#p1897662 downscale to 1/72 is planed too (like all Eduard projects) but more years in future.
  6. SEM Model is to release a 1/72nd AVIA LM.02 (link) resin kit in prototype & trainer variants - ref. Source: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=1772568852794514&id=717692698282140 V.P.
  7. Avia Bk.534 ProfiPACK edition 1:72 Eduard The prototype of the B.534 flew for the first time in 1932. Much like other comparable aircraft of the period such as the Gloster Gladiator and the Curtis P-36, the B.534 represented a bridge between the traditional biplanes of the 1920s and the all-metal monoplanes of the 1930s. The aircraft was effective, however, and in April 1934 it gained the Czechoslovak national speed record of 227.2mph. The later IV series would feature an all metal propeller, tail wheel and enclosed cockpit, but the earlier versions still had the open cockpit typical of aircraft of the period. An order for 34 aircraft was increased to 147 with the prospect of war in Europe looming. In the event, the partition of Czechoslovakia meant that the B.534 never actually saw combat in the defence of its country. Slovakia was declared independent and their Air Force reformed using the B.534, and when Hungary invaded in 1939, two aircraft were lost to AAA fire and four more to fighters. Slovakian B.534s were used again during the invasion of Poland, escorting German Ju 87 bombers. These same aircraft later served with the Germans in the Ukraine in summer 1941, and returned in 1943 for anti-partisan duties. The last recorded use of the B.534 would be Slovak National uprising in 1944. One aircraft downed a Hungarian Ju 52, this being the last recorded aerial victory for a biplane. The BK variant was cannon armed and distinguished by a single gun trough on the fuselage rather than the double trough of the machine gun aircraft. The kit arrives on three sprues of grey plastic and one of clear plastic. The parts are well made with fine panel lines were needed, and realistic fabric effects. Unusually for Eduard a few parts are off the sprue (perhaps the kit had a rough journey from The Czech Republic!). Construction starts shockingly not in the cockpit but the lower radiator. The front and back parts are built up, with a decal provided for the rear face. Once the front and rear faces of the radiator are in construction can then move to the cockpit area. Internal framework parts are placed in both fuselage halves, along with other detail parts. The instrument panel is added (A decal provides the instruments). The pilots seat is made up, and along with the control column these are added to the cockpit floor. The floor has rudder pedals moulded in. Once complete the floor and instrument panel are added into the fuselage, and along with a rear deck parts these are sandwiched inside the two fuselage halves. Once the main fuselage is complete the top engine cover is then added. Next to go on are the tail parts. Each tail plane is a two part affair (front & rear) so they are fully positionable. The vertical tail is added along with a separate positional rudder. Once the tail is complete the construction moves onto the wings. A one part upper wing is supplied along with left & right lowers. The lower wings are added first and the kit gives a diagram to ensure the correct dihedral is obtained. The upper wing is attached by 2 sets of interplane struts joining the lower wing, and two sets of struts joining the fuselage. The finishing touched are to add the landing gear, propeller, underwing bombs (if needed) and the canopy. Rigging diagrams are provided if the modeller wishes to rig the finished model. CanopyThe clear parts arrive on a circular clear sprue those familiar to Eduard kits will recognise. There is a one part canopy and three part canopy, this gives the modeller a choice to use an open or closed canopy. Other canopies not for use with this model are also included. The canopies are clear and free from distortion. Decals Five options are included on the decal sheet: Avia Bk.534 1/72 - Air Regiment 4, Praha – Kbely, Czecho-Slovak Republic, March 1939 Avia Bk.534 1/72 - c/n 519, letka No. 13 Squadron, Spišská Nová Ves, Slovak Republic, 1941 Avia Bk.534 1/72 - Flugzeugführerschule A/B 115, Wels, Germany, June 1942 Avia Bk.534 1/72 - c/n 524, Jagdfliegerschule 3 or 4, Germany, 1940s Avia Bk.534 1/72 - c/n 592, Erprobungsstelle Travemünde, Travemünde, Germany, 1940/ 1941 Conclusion Eduard's Avia B.534 series is the definitive family of kits of the type by a country mile. The level of detail they have packed in is superb and the engineering is excellent. Add in all the extra bits that you get with the Dual Combo Profipack Edition and you have yourself a winning package. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Avia B.534 Early Series Dual Combo 1:72 Eduard The prototype of the B.534 flew for the first time in 1932. Much like other comparable aircraft of the period such as the Gloster Gladiator and the Curtis P-36, the B.534 represented a bridge between the traditional biplanes of the 1920s and the all-metal monoplanes of the 1930s. The aircraft was effective, however, and in April 1934 it gained the Czechoslovak national speed record of 227.2mph. The later IV series would feature an all metal propeller, tail wheel and enclosed cockpit, but the earlier versions still had the open cockpit typical of aircraft of the period. An order for 34 aircraft was increased to 147 with the prospect of war in Europe looming. In the event, the partition of Czechoslovakia meant that the B.534 never actually saw combat in the defence of its country. Slovakia was declared independent and their Air Force reformed using the B.534, and when Hungary invaded in 1939, two aircraft were lost to AAA fire and four more to fighters. Slovakian B.534s were used again during the invasion of Poland, escorting German Ju 87 bombers. These same aircraft later served with the Germans in the Ukraine in summer 1941, and returned in 1943 for anti-partisan duties. The last recorded use of the B.534 would be Slovak National uprising in 1944. One aircraft downed a Hungarian Ju 52, this being the last recorded aerial victory for a biplane. This is not only a Dual Combo edition kit, it's also part of Eduard's Profipack line. As such, you not only get two kits in the box, but also two lots of photo etched details, masks and a generous selection of marking options. The kit is spread across three sprues of grey plastic and one of clear plastic. The parts are classic modern Eduard; beautifully moulded, with fine, crisp panel lines and realistic fabric effect where appropriate. This kit includes parts for one Series I and one Series II B.534. We've already reviewed the separate Series III and Series IV version of this kit, so I won't plough through the earlier versions included here in great detail. This kit is much the same as the Series III, but with the subtle differences such as the propeller spinner all accounted for. The cockpit is very nicely detailed for the scale, and sets the tone for what should be a very pleasing model to build. There are lots of little options to choose from throughout the build, such as fairings for the undercarriage, so do pay attention to which of these are relevant to the aircraft you wish to build. A generous eight options are included on the decal sheet: B.534.31 I. serie, 34th Fighter Squadron, Air Regiment 4, Hradec Kralove, July 1937; B.534.47 I. serie, 34th Fighter Squadron, Air Regiment 4, Hradec Kralove, September 1936; B.534.49 I. serie, 36th Fighter Squadron, Air Regiment 2, Olomouc, June 1937; B.534 I. serie, Jagdfliegerschule 4, Luftwaffe, Fürth, Germany, 1940; B.534.102 II. serie, 31st Fighter Squadron, Air Regiment 1, Hradec Kralove, May 1938; B.534.139. II. serie, Aerospace Research and Test Establishment, Prague, 1936; B.534.141 II. serie, 38th Fighter Squadron, Air Regiment 3, Vajnory, August 1937; and B.534.129 II. serie, Jagdfliegerschule 4, Luftwaffe, Fürth, Germany, 1940. Conclusion Eduard's Avia B.534 series is the definitive family of kits of the type by a country mile. The level of detail they have packed in is superb and the engineering is excellent. Add in all the extra bits that you get with the Dual Combo Profipack Edition and you have yourself a winning package. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Kovozávody Prostějov (KP) is to release from February-March 2017 a family of 1/72nd Avia BH-5/-9 & -11 kits. Source: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235010228-kpaz-central-discussion-questions-answers/&do=findComment&comment=2606444 V.P.
  10. Next HobbyBoss 1/48th Schwalbe variant is the Messerschmitt Me.262B-1a/Avia CS-92 - ref. 80380 Release expected for late January 2016. Source: http://www.hobbyboss.com/index.php?g=home&m=article&a=show&id=55&l=en Box art Hobby Boss Schwalbe variants & boxing: - Messerschmitt Me.262 A-1a - ref.80369 - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234948927-148-messerschmitt-me262-a-1a-schwalbe-by-hobbyboss-released - Messerschmitt Me.262 A-1a/U1 - ref.80370 - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234965082-148-messerschmitt-me262-a-1au1-schwalbe-by-hobby-boss-release-october-2014 - Messerschmitt Me.262 A-1a/U3 - ref.80371 - http://www.hobbyboss.com/index.php?g=home&m=product&a=show&id=523&l=en - Messerschmitt Me.262 A-1a/U4 - ref.80372 - http://www.hobbyboss.com/index.php?g=home&m=product&a=show&id=551&l=en - Messerschmitt Me.262 A-1a/U5 - ref.80373 - http://www.hobbyboss.com/index.php?g=home&m=product&a=show&id=448&l=en - Messerschmitt Me.262 A-1a/U2 (V056) - ref.80374 - http://www.hobbyboss.com/index.php?g=home&m=product&a=show&id=430&l=en - Messerschmitt Me.262 A-1b - ref.80375 - http://www.hobbyboss.com/index.php?g=home&m=product&a=show&id=330&l=en - Messerschmitt Me.262 A-2a - ref.80376 - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234971808-148-messerschmit-me262-a-2a-schwalbe-by-hobby-boss-released - Messerschmitt Me.262 A-2a/U2 - ref.80377 - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234987781-148-messerschmitt-me262-a-2au2-schwalbe-by-hobby-boss-box-art-release-october-2015/ - Messerschmitt Me.262 B-1a - ref. 80378 - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234954190-148-messerschmitt-me262b-1a-schwalbe-by-hobby-boss-released - Messerschmitt Me.262 B-1a/U1 - ref.80379 - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234953218-148-messerschmitt-me262b-1au1-schwalbe-by-hobby-boss - Messerschmitt Me.262B-1a/Avia CS-92 - ref. 80380 - http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234992900-148-messerschmitt-me262b-1acs-92-schwalbe-by-hobbyboss-released/ V.P.
  11. The old Hobbycraft Avia makes into a decent model, even if it's starting to get a bit old. I added the SC 50 bomb rack with bombs out of another model as the kit gives you a drop tank, which is inaccurate. I also replaced the 20mm barrels with those from a Hasegawa Bf 109, as the kit supplied ones were far too thick. Decals came from Aeromaster, as I've had previous negative experiences with Hobbycraft decals, however, the fuselage band and the fin flash decals were not even close to fitting, so these were masked and painted. It really is time for a new mold 1/48 Avia.
  12. a new scaled-down kit of AVIA B.534 was today released by Eduard it is secret kit fo this year EDAY modelshow included in a Special Giftset:
  13. Avia B.534 IV Série - Weekend Edition 1:72 Eduard Avia first flew a prototype single engine fighter biplane designated the B-34 in 1932. The first prototype was powered by a Hispano-Suiza 12N V12 engine. A second prototype the B-34/2 was flown with an Avia Rr29 radial engine, however this had overheating and vibration problems. This aircraft was then re-engine with a Hispano-Suiza 12Ybrs V12 engine. This second prototype was re-designated the B-534/1 in Spetember of 1933. In April 1934 this aircraft gained the Czechoslovak national speed record of 227.2mph. An order for 34 aircraft followed, which was increased to 147. At this time the aircraft was ahead of other countries with contemporary's such as the Gloster Gladiator and Curtis P-36 only being flown as prototypes or just entering production. The later IV series would feature an all metal propeller, a tail wheel, and enclosed cockpit. The aircraft was developed this far as the Air Force was reluctant to abandon the climb rate and manoeuvrability of bi-planes over the new monoplanes. The partition of Czechoslovakia meant that the B.534 never actually saw combat in the defence of the country. Slovakia was declared independent and their Air Force reformed using the B.534 but weakened as there were no Czech pilots. When Hungary invaded in 1939 two aircraft were lost to AAA fire and four more to fighters. Slovakian B.534s were further used during the invasion of Poland escorting German Ju 87 bombers. These same aircraft later served with the Germans in the Ukraine in summer 1941, and returned in 1943 for anti-partisan duties. The last recorded use of the B.534 would be Slovak National uprising in 1944. One aircraft downed a Hungarian Ju 52, this being the last recorded victory for a biplane. In addition to the Czech/Slovak use Bulgaria purchased 78 aircraft in 1939. These were used in a variety of combat roles including intercepting USAAF B-24 aircraft on the Ploiesti raid. No B-24 losses were attributed to B.534s but some of these aircraft did receive damage from the B-24s. After Bulgaria switched sides in 1944 B.534s were used to attack German troops. Some aircraft even engaged in combat with German 109s but due to the low altitude and the B.534s manoeuvrability combat was broken off, though one B.534 was shot down. The Kit The kit arrives on three sprues of grey plastic and one of clear plastic. The parts are well made with fine panel lines were needed, and realistic fabric effects. Unusually for Eduard a few parts are off the sprue (perhaps the kit had a rough journey from The Czech Republic!). Construction starts shockingly not in the cockpit but the lower radiator. The front and back parts are built up, with a decal provided for the rear face. Once the front and rear faces of the radiator are in construction can then move to the cockpit area. Internal framework parts are placed in both fuselage halves, along with other detail parts. The instrument panel is added (A decal provides the instruments). The pilots seat is made up, and along with the control column these are added to the cockpit floor. The floor has rudder pedals moulded in. Once complete the floor and instrument panel are added into the fuselage, and along with a rear deck parts these are sandwiched inside the two fuselage halves. Once the main fuselage is complete the top engine cover is then added. Next to go on are the tail parts. Each tail plane is a two part affair (front & rear) so they are fully positionable. The vertical tail is added along with a separate positional rudder. Once the tail is complete the construction moves onto the wings. A one part upper wing is supplied along with left & right lowers. The lower wings are added first and the kit gives a diagram to ensure the correct dihedral is obtained. The upper wing is attached by 2 sets of interplane struts joining the lower wing, and two sets of struts joining the fuselage. The finishing touched are to add the landing gear, propeller, underwing bombs (if needed) and the canopy. Rigging diagrams are provided if the modeller wishes to rig the finished model. Canopy The clear parts arrive on a circular clear sprue those familiar to Eduard kits will recognise. There is a one part canopy and three part canopy, this gives the modeller a choice to use an open or closed canopy. Other canopies not for use with this model are also included. The canopies are clear and free from distortion. Decals A smallish main decal sheet is supplied, along with a correction sheet. The decals appear in register, and are colour dense. Two options are supplied; Air Regiments No.4, 40th Flight, Prague (Kbley) April 1938 Dogan No.31, 2/2 Orlyak, Vrazhdebna airfield, Bulgaria, November 1944 Conclusion This is an excellent kit of an important Czechoslovak aircraft. Credit to Eduard for the one. In its weekend edition with two decal options this kit is great value for money.Highly recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  14. No new tools but a bunch of new boxings/variants from RS Models kits (http://rsmodels.cz/). ref.92182 - Avia Ba.122 Source: http://rsmodels.cz/cs/modely-letadel/plastikove-modely/1-72/92182/avia-ba-122 ref.92183 - Flettner 282 B-0 Source: http://rsmodels.cz/cs/modely-letadel/plastikove-modely/1-72/92183/flettner-282-b-0 ref.92184 - Flettner Fl.282 B-2 Source: http://rsmodels.cz/cs/modely-letadel/plastikove-modely/1-72/92184/flettner-282-b-2 ref.92185 - Avia B.534 I. version Source: http://rsmodels.cz/cs/modely-letadel/plastikove-modely/1-72/92185/avia-b-534-i-version ref.92186 - Avia Bk.534 Source: http://rsmodels.cz/cs/modely-letadel/plastikove-modely/1-72/92186/avia-bk-534 V.P.
  15. RS Models is to re-release its 1/72nd Avia B.35.2 kit - ref.92175 First boxing - ref.92032 http://rsmodels.cz/en/modely-letadel/plastikove-modely/1-72/92032/avia-b-35-2 Source: http://rsmodels.cz/en/modely-letadel/plastikove-modely/1-72/92175/avia-b-35-2 V.P.
  16. Avia S-92 / CS-92. Avia continued to build the Me 262 A-1a as the S-92, and the Me 262 B-1a as the CS-92 following the end of WWII. Avia basically built these from those which were left in the factory and parts available. The Czech Air Force operated them upto 1951. Pics thanks to Dave (Shar2) taken at the Prague Aviation Museum, Kbley. S-92 Pics thanks to Mike taken at the Prague Aviation Museum, Kbley.
  17. Kovozávody Prostějov is to release new 1/72nd Arado Ar.96B/Avia C-2 kits - ref. KPM0014 et KPM0011 Source: http://www.aeroscale.co.uk/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=17643 Boxt art Source: http://www.kovozavody.cz/en/produkt/arado-ar-96b/ Source: http://www.kovozavody.cz/en/produkt/avia-c-2/ V.P.
  18. Kovozávody Prostějov (http://www.kovozavody.cz/) is to release a new tool 1/72nd Avia S-199 kit - ref. M72?? & M72??. Source: http://modelweb.modelforum.cz/2014/06/09/kovozavody-prostejov-novinky-cerven-2014-2/?lang=CS Two boxing. Release expected June 2014 V.P.
  19. Built for the Training Types group build. Build thread.
  20. I bought this on eBay a while ago, unfortunately one of the main gear legs was broken and the lower part of it was missing and the nose wheel leg was also AWOL. So I'm going to build this one in flight which means I'm going to have to make some pilots Should be interesting. Czechoslovakia operated nine S-92 fighters and three CS-92 fighter trainers, these equipped the 5th Fighter Flight 1948 - 1951.
  21. Well, this is the first of my builds that I have posted on Britmodeller. I'm aware that it does not come up to the standard of most of that posted here but I feel that building it has brought me on as a modeller, and we all have to start somewhere! The kit I chose to make is by Czechoslovakian (as they were then) manufacturers KP (Kovozávody Prostejov) and represents an Avia B.534* fighter aircraft which was one of a small number which, as part of the Slovak Insurgent Airforce, provided air support to the 1944 Slovak National Uprising. A fine fighter in its day (in fact, I have seen it described as the apogee of bi-plane fighter design), following the Nazi dismembering of Czechoslovakia it had largely become a second-line aircraft by 1944 when Slovak patriots rose up against the puppet Slovakian Government. In default of more modern types becoming available, owing to large parts of the Air Force remaining loyal to the regime, the B.534s were nonetheless pressed into service. Based at Tri Duby (now Sliač) airfield in Central Slovakia, white S-12 was one of four B.534s which, alongside an initial complement of a couple of Letov S.328s and Emils, made up the full complement of the Combined Air Squadron. From comparison of the box art with that on Scalemates, I would say that this was probably a 1980s boxing. The state of the decals would certainly seem to support this! The moulding had quite a lot of flash on it too and in a couple of cases I had to make a call as to whether an aperture had been flashed-over, or part of the moulding had failed. I'm not sure in all cases I got that right! I loved the Slovak National Uprising markings; unfortunately the decals were very fragile and a bit yellowed. I decided to tolerate the latter if i could sort out the former. It took two coats of Hu49 varnish, but I managed it! This was my first foray into rigging (and stretched sprue more generally), but I wanted to give you all something to look at, so I thought I would give it a go. I have skimped slightly, but I think the overall effect is there. It was also my first foray into the use of vacform parts (in the form of the cockpit transparency, the kit one being missing). Overall, I think it went reasonably well, although my painting could certainly be better, and the positioning of some of the struts leaves something to be desired. But I enjoyed the build! Thanks for looking. * A IV I believe
  22. Avia BH-22 Czechoslovak Training Aircraft 1:72 Fly The BH-21 was a single-seat fighter aircraft designed by Pavel Beneš and Miroslav Hajn of Czech aircraft manufacturer Avia. Entering service in 1925, the aircraft became the mainstay of the Czech Air Force in the interwar years. A number of examples were license built in Belgium and used by the Belgian Air Force as well. Powered by a 304 HP V8 engine developed by Hispano Suiza, the BH-21 was capable of 152 mph and could achieve a service ceiling of over 18,000ft. Armament was comprised of a pair of .303 inch Vickers machine guns mounted in the front fuselage above the engine. The Avia BH-22 was a trainer aircraft developed from the BH-21 fighter. The armament was deleted and replaced with a camera gun, whilst the airframe itself was strengthened to allow the aircraft to cope better with aerobatics. Thirty were produced, with a number of examples finding their way into private ownership. Although a relatively new name on the scene, Fly have already produced some interesting and much sought-after types, including a 1:72 Armstrong Whitworth Whitley and a 1:48 BAC Jet Provost/Strikemaster. The Avia BH-22 will probably be less familiar to you, but it is nonetheless good to see Fly continue their tradition of tackling some of the less obvious subject out there. Inside the sturdy, end-opening box are two sprues moulded in beige plastic, a small bag of resin parts, an injection moulded windscreen, a vac formed windscreen and a sheet of decals. The quality of the injection moulded parts looks very good. There is little or no flash and fine details and features such as the fabric wings have been captured very well. The cockpit is comprised of seven parts, including a floor, seat, control column, instrument panel, rudder pedals and rear bulkhead. The level of moulded detail is pretty good. Some basic structural details are moulded in place on the inside of the fuselage halves, and there is some basic raised detail on the instrument panel. The seat is cast in cream coloured resin with harnesses sculpted in place. It looks an excellent piece of work by Fly and should show the cockpit off the best effect. The radiator, mounted under the centre of the fuselage, is cast in resin too. Once the cockpit is finished, you have both a vac formed and injection moulded canopy to choose from. I like this approach as it encourages the builder to try the vac formed version, with the knowledge that should it go wrong, there is an injection moulded version to fall back on. The rudder is provided as a separate part, which means it can be finished in the deflected position if desired. The horizontal stabilisers are moulded as solid parts, as are the wings. The fabric effect is quite nicely rendered. The upper wing has locating points for the struts, but the lower wing just has raised bumps which will have to be drilled out in order to fit the struts in place. Diagrams are provided to help the builder line everything up properly. A choice of exhaust systems is included. One is a full length version which runs down the side of the fuselage, the other is a shorter version which is cast in resin. The undercarriage is pretty nice, and a choice of two different wheels is provided. From the look of the sprues a pair of skis is provided too, but these are not used for any of the aircraft depicted on the decal sheet. The decals themselves look pretty good, although there were a couple of very slight smudges on the sheet provided in my kit. Four options are provided: Avia BH-22, Prague-Kbely, finished in a green/brown/sand camouflage pattern; Avia BH-22, VLU Military Air Training Establishment, Prostejov, Early 1930s, finished in clear doped fabric; Avia BH-22, Cheb, 1933, finished in olive green; and Avia BH-22, Prague-Kbely, finished in olive green. Conclusion This is an interesting kit of an attractive interwar biplane which will bring something a little different to your display cabinet. If you’ve got a couple of similar kits under your belt and are prepared to take your time, this looks as though it should be a rewarding and enjoyable kit to build. Recommended. http://www.hannants.co.uk/product/YLF72016'> Review sample courtesy of
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