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Found 3,530 results

  1. Corsairfoxfouruncle

    Bolo

    Hello everyone ... Im posting this for now, as I am still planning on joining in. That will be delayed to some degree due to a temporary loss of modeling space. Im hoping to be back at it in 3-4 weeks. This kit was a gift from a fellow member who had seen a post by myself about wanting to build one. He decided due to the complexity of Special Hobby kits, it would be best to give it to an established modeler. Rather than a new builder who may be frustrated and turned away from the hobby. I give you the interesting and quirky looking B-18 Bolo. Im still of two minds as to markings I would like to do this in. Originally I was planning on an early war Submarine hunter like this one. The plane in the center of the formation is the same as this Plane. another example of an early war Bolo. However doing research for this i found a few in Neutrality patrol markings, such as in this photo. That is now starting to pique my interest. Here are the remainder of sprue shots. Not a duplicate photo just a duplicate sprue. The kit is the RCAF Digby version thus the British markings. I could still opt to do that as a markings option as well ? The kit has a small fret of etch and resin as well. This is all the decals collected to do any of the versions i am undecided on. My plan is to move and rebuild my office asap, then get back to building. Dennis
  2. Stupid Boy

    HMNZS Achilles

    Just over 6 months into 1/72 scale build of HMNZS Achilles, What a Stupid Boy!!, Based on drawings from Polish print Leander book and my Dads photos and anything else I can glean from anywhere. When I figure out how to post images I will do so. This project has a lot of detail issues not easily resolved so in the odd place I have had to go with gut instinct.
  3. Good evening! My latest model and the first in a series of three Hurricanes: a IIc of 213 squadron in the Western Desert. As you can see, the a/c carries just two cannons. This seems to have been almost a standard configuration for the Hurricane IIc in the Mediterranean. As long as they were still used in the daytime air-to-air role, agility was more of a concern for the Hurricane than firepower. I used the Revell kit and Tamiya paint. This is not the best kit I have seen so far, but with some work it turned out ok. Thanks for looking and every comment welcome! Brothers in arms. Which one would you have preferred as a pilot? (Yes, I know - a Spitfire, please...)
  4. Hello everyone, this was a very special build for me, as it was a present for my dad. He was a pilot from 1980 till the end of the German Democratic Republic and flew first on Mi-8 and then on Mi-24. The Airframe depicted is the one from his very last Flight on September 20th 1990. Here's a photo of the original The Build: [WIP can be found here] I used the Hobbyboss 1/72 Mi-24V kit along with the Italeri Mi-24D kit (Parts used from Italeri: Pitot tube and Decals) Also used some Tom's Decals for NVA Insignia and Stencils The Base is made from Plastic sheet on a wooden board and some grass mat here are the pictures: Thanks for watching! All comments welcome Cheers Konrad
  5. theplasticsurgeon

    Tim's Jet Provost JP4

    New generation Airfix JP3 kit that you've all seen. Camo JP4 markings from spares etc - that looks remarkably similar to that being released by Airfix later this year. 79 Squadron RAF, trainer for Phantom and Buccaneer etc back seaters I believe. My first build of this kit, which cost me £8 from SMW2016. Two more in the stash thanks to Aldi. Here are the parts.
  6. It's been a while since I've done a WIP, as I've been busy with non-Spitfire builds, but, having recently purchased DK Decals Spitfire V aces sheet and some KP kits from MJW Models, it's time to do one. This is the decal sheet: I'll be doing the Bader Va, using an Airfix kit, and five (or six) Vbs before progressing to MkIXs, MkVIIIs, MkXVIs, Mk22s and a Mk24 (there may even be a MkVI, MkXI, MkXII and Mk21). My problem is that I can't decide which ones to do so I've decided to ask you good people to suggest some (what could go wrong with a referendum?). Please let me know which ones you like and I'll do the most popular.
  7. I have come to realise that as I grow older, my modelling output is declining in inverse proportion to my years. I have also come to the reluctant conclusion that I own far more kits than I shall ever build, or, realistically ever want to. So, what to do? I have imposed on myself sort of pre-new-year’s resolution. I shall not buy more kits than I finish next year. Since I haven’t finished a model all 2017 I think, I shan’t be buying much. Having made this resolution, I promptly failed, since I acquired one of the Aldi bargain Gnat’s, and have ordered some extras (masks, pitot) to help finish it. But it’s not the New Year yet! I have also realised that I have an incredibly irritating habit of starting build threads and then getting, distracted, bored or side-tracked and not completing them. So, while I shall continue my currently active builds on their own threads, any I start from now on will go here (if its 1/72). I’ve had a couple of days off work as I have been unwell. Lacking the energy or concentration to model I consoled myself with reading, and an exploration of the stash. image by jongwinnett, on Flickr As well as the Gnat, two tentatively started builds muscled their way to the top. Harrier, my favourite childhood fast(ish) jet; Hawk, because one can never have too many; and the aforementioned Gnat. Alongside the royal Apache, I have decided to try and progress these. image by jongwinnett, on Flickr They will not be brilliant, but hopefully actually getting on and making something will restore some of my enthusiasm and confidence, which have waned over the past months. The Harrier had seen the most progress, and the box contained, alongside the Airfix plastic, a Freightdog corrected tail, Master pitot, and decals which should enable me to do one of the No. 1417 Flight birds stationed in Belize (with the long term aim of doing a matching Puma of 1563 Flt) So this was this evenings gentle warm up: image by jongwinnett, on Flickr image by jongwinnett, on Flickr image by jongwinnett, on Flickr Hope the idea of a portmanteau WIP is ok, hopefully more progress tomorrow.
  8. Reading back through the chat I realised I originally signed up for GB in 2013 with the plan to build a Hudson. My entry for this GB is Italeri 1/72 Lockheed Hudson, will be finished a 500 Squadron aircraft in the classic Dark Sea Grey / Dark Slate Grey over White.
  9. Hi everyone, I have just started the Zvezda easy assembly kit of the Me Bf 109 F-2. I am actually quite impressed with this kit, as it is light years ahead of the HobyBoss Easy Assembly kits. I know, as I started quite a while back a Dewoitine D 520, and I lost my motivation while attempting to create a credible cockpit. No such problems with Zvezda, who delivers a rather exciting cockpit. Here is a photo after I sprayed a coat of aluminium paint to help with creating some scuffing/scratches after the RLM 66. I did add some PE rudder pedals, but I am wondering why , as nothing will ever be visible again. I guess I will sleep better knowing it is there. A set of PE seat harness is waiting in the aisle as well. The only problem to date is about the fit, which could be better under the wings and on the tail. Any puttying and sand papering has to be done painstakingly slowly in order not to destroy the delicate panel lines and rivets. Not sure everything will be left unscathed, but so far so good. Photos on the next post. Re the paint scheme, I think the kit's decal sheet is of very average quality, so I am doing a scheme from an Xtradecal sheet. It is the second from the top. Since I built the ancient Airfix Me Bf 109 G-6 as a kid, I have always wanted to do another JG 53 Messerschmitt, better built than the first one! Only problem: I cannot find a photo of that particular aircraft... So will extrapolate and do the same aircraft, earlier in its career, with most of the area forward of the cockpit painted yellow! It is suitably garish, and I can't wait! So if any of you has any tips concerning this build or my chosen paint scheme, please let me know! Cheers. JR
  10. For my next build I’m trying something a little different, a WW1 biplane, but still keeping with my Australian Fleet Air Arm theme. I’ll be building the Rodin 1/72 Sopwith 2F1 “Ship’s Camel” and the subject will be N-6823 from HMAS Sydney, 1918. I find the use of these aircraft quite intriguing as by all accounts they were single use, taking off from a short runway on top of a gun turret and then ditching beside the ship for recovery. The first step is to make the end-opening box into top-opening! Then here’s the contents. And the current state of play, all items for the first 3 assembly stages snipped off the sprues and tidied up. I’ve separated the elevators from the tailplane, firstly as I’d like to pose them slightly dropped, and also as I’ve read somewhere that the tailplane is a little undersize and so I’ll make it around 2mm longer. Here’s the kit parts alongside a diagram from the Wingnut Wings kit and you can indeed see some size and shape differences in the tailplane and upper wing. That’s enough for now. Some new challenges for me in this build. I’ll need to learn painting wood effects and brush up on rigging in order to build this one.
  11. Hi folks, Not one to rest on past laurels -- or pratfalls -- as I was nearing the end of my 1/72 Hasegawa F-110A Spectre model just finished, and, as is my custom, when nearing then end of such builds, I immediately began work on another model, a 1/72 Revell F-101B, to add to my collection of U.S. "Voodoo" named aircraft. But, after some major painting, and while removing the masks, I found a major problem! I had been having problems with an airbrush, and having shot Alclad II grey primer all over, I discovered that I had not gotten the primer over all areas of the model. The primer and model's plastic are nearly the same color, and my aging eyes failed to detect the missing spots. Then of course, I sprayed the model overall grey, masked it, then began painting the bare metal rear end parts and the darker areas on the nose. Anyway, the paint started lifting here and there with removal of the masks and, long story short -- I decided to strip all the paint from the whole model and start over. For what it's worth, Testor's ELO stripper ALSO removes Perfect Plastic Putty!! Anyway, that project has been moved to the back shelf for now. Maybe one day, I'll mention it again. So, that left me with a conundrum on what to do next. I've had several ideas in mind, but with troubles on my last two modeling attempts -- both of which were more or less OOB. I decided to fight back! If I was going to have major aggravation with more or less easy builds, this time, I decided to do a real barn burner, and REALLY challenge the modeling gods by building a YF-105A prototype, from before the time when the F-105 became "wasp-waisted"... Now many of us builders of U.S. aircraft, or builders of prototypes have long wanted a model to play with. No such luck. Even our friends at Anigrand or the many great vacuform makers of yesteryear ever saw fit to grace us with this beauty -- or at least none of which I'M aware! As with my P2V-3 Neptune of a couple of years ago, I waited and waited, and then finally had to do it myself.; In this case however, the driving force was a great Japanese modeler over on a site called "X-Plane Model Museum" out of Japan, I found where a Japanese modeler had done a YF-105A, in 1/48" scale -- which of course is an abomination to all that's Holy and Right.... Anyway, for those interested, here's a picture of his final result (grabbed from the website): and here's a link to his building thread, which of course is all in Japanese: Corrected 1/48 YF-105A Link Now if you go there, you will find that the build consists of 29 articles, each with 4 - 12 pictures, and each with it's own Japanese language commentary. Over 100 pictures in all, and most are very informative. I used Google Translate to translate each one of those articles to English, which as is prone to happen, was in some cases, not very meaningful. Sometimes, things really are lost in the translation! One of those thing that I could never figure out was the modeler's name. I think he just used a 'nym of just letters and numbers. I tried to contact him to say great job, but I found out you had to join the blog to get even close to a member's list or e-mail, and I did not relish the idea of translating everything I might encounter there. Anyway for the purposes of my build, I shall refer to the original modeler as TGO (the Great One) from now on. If anyone reading this knows him (or her) please pass along my appreciation for his efforts. After poring over what I found in his build thread, I began to examine ways that I could repeat his success, albeit with perhaps just a hair less work -- as I am actually quite lazy. He did a lot of stuff that I won't do, such as dropping the flaps and the slats. Since many 'Thud drivers state that they never left the flaps and slats open on the ground, and this will not be a "maintenance scene" type build, I won't be going there. Feel free to look and see how TGO did it, however. For my efforts, I'll use the old standard Revell F-105D, as well as the nose from a Hasegawa F-105B, taken from a Thunderbirds set I bought decades ago: It was a bagged kit, so no box art there... Having failed to find any usable 3-views, I will use TGO's pictures and a side view from the book "Famous Aircraft of the World #4": This is as close to a flat view as I could get. Please note the 3 inch and 10 centimeter markings atop the page. If you copy this photo and size it where either of those lines are exactly as stated, you'll have a 1/72 scale side view without having to spend a fortune, as there is really nothing much else in the book that is helpful to this effort. Having armed myself with this wealth of material, I'll now press forward. While TGO started off with the fuselage, I will not. I will start instead, by answering a question that comes up on-line from time to time: Will the Hasegawa F-105B nose fit on the Revell - Monogram F-105D? Please understand we are not talking about the really ancient old "box scale" Monogram B model, but the newer, I guess 80's version. I began by taping the Hasegawa "B" fuselage halves together, and laying a strip of tape around the nose just behind the kit's front gear well edge: After making certain the tape was straight all around the curve of the nose, I used the X-Acto knife to scribe a line alongside the front edge of the tape. I then used that line to guide a Trumpeter panel line scriber for around three passes, to define a clear line for the razor saw to follow. Below, you'll see one side cut and one side left to do: Above right, you'll see the same procedure done to the Revell F-105D. The tape has been pushed back a little on the right side to indicate the three verticle vents, the rearward side of which I used to help line up the tape vertically for the marking, scribing and sawing procedure. I also fudges this cut a little in front of the landing gear well, to have some sanding room, if needed, As you can see below, after a little sanding the fit was pretty good: This procedure was so precise, I probably could have cut both noses exactly on the front end of the gear well and saved some sanding. This however calls attention to the fact that if I had cut the B nose further back, the fit would have been about perfect. However, previous measurement had shown that then the nose would have been too long to be as accurate, because the difference between the B and D models' length was about the same as the different nose lengths, plus removing the overly-long part of the Hasegawa front gear bay. For what it's worth, both the Hasegawa and the Revell kit were dead on for the correct lengths for their particular versions. Well, at least it's a start. Hang around if you dare for some old-school, kit-bashing conversion action... Ed
  12. Hello Folks, this WIP is somewhat special to me, I normally do floating things. But there's a story behind this build. This is going to be a present for my father's birthday. He was a helicopter pilot in the east german army from 1980 untill there was no more east germany. He flew the Mi-24D and I always loved hearing the stories he had to tell about this time. So I decided that he deserves to have a nice model to remind him of that time. I will be modelling the machine he flew on his very last flight in September '90. This is how it looked: I originally wanted to use the Italeri Hind D Kit for this as it already has german markings... but the markings included are wrong... those are for a helicopter taken over by the bundeswehr after the reunion. so I got some NVA markings and stencils. I then started the italeri kit and found it to be very crude... So I got the HobbyBoss kit which is very nicely molded and has a far more accurate interior... So I will be using the Italeri decals and the pitot tube on the hobbyBoss kit. (The HobbyBoss pitot is the wrong shape and as I need to finish this until sunday evening I don't have the time to order the master model replacement.) So here's the boxes and the decals I'm using... Oh and I also got the eduard masks for the hobbyboss canopies. In order to get the right shape I had to fill this antena / lump of plastic... whatever it is it has to go I then started with dryfitting the interior and getting the first colors on the cockpit. nothing glued jet! To get the cockpit color close to this typical russian turquoise I painted it with light blue and applied a green wash to it. not perfect but I will leave it as it is. Some more detail painting to follow. Heres the paint scheme I'll try to achieve: The model will be placed an a small base of concrete airstrip. Thats it for today, hopefully I'll get some good progress tomorrow! Thanks for watching Any comments welcome Cheers Konrad
  13. This will be my effort for the Group Build: It's an attractive scheme for the early MiG-15, representing an aircraft that flew with the Forţele Aeriene ale Republicii Populare Română, or Romanian Air Force. As you can probably make out from the text in the picture, the blue arrow was painted on the aircraft for a film. The kit and decals come from this boxing from Eduard: I've had it for quite some time now so I'd do well to get on with it. The box is comprehensively packed with a Mig-15, 2 x MiG-15bis and a two-seater MiG-15UTI: I'll sort out what sprues/etched parts etc. I need nearer the start date. Since I bought the kit I have also accumulated a little aftermarket which I shall use for this build: These from Eduard - I believe the 'solid-hub' wheels are the early type and the 'spoked-hub' wheels the later type, so obvs I will be using the early ones. I also have this: Presumably I bought that on the assumption that I was too lazy or clumsy to drill out the kit gun barrels myself, which I am not*, but what's done is done. Anyway, that's me - back next week Cheers, Stew * Actually I might be
  14. Here's my 1/72 SAAF C-47TP 'Turbo Dakleton', built for the Maritime Patrol and Coastal Command group build. Build thread is here: It's the Airfix kit with an Alleycat conversion. You get everything you need in the conversion - resin forward fuselage, engines, props and a replacement starboard wing root, clear resin windscreen and extra windows, PE aerials and decals. Quite a nice conversion but the resin forward fuselage needed a lot of sanding to get it down to the same diameter as the Airfix fuselage. thanks for looking Julian
  15. Stash clearance and seeing as how I enjoyed my Tomahawk I thought I'd try to keep an Airfix build on the boil as I tackle more complex builds for therapy? This was a Christmas present last year. Santa brought this this year A little research on the interweb led to this and this They came in the same box so they're getting built together. Plus it will help clear out the 1/72 kits in my stash. (I'm going 1/48th for all my main builds) Now seeing as how I'm under a ban on German (ahem) tail markings (which is quite ironic as I'm the one with the Jewish ancestry) and how I like to bring in the slightly esoteric if possible, I've decided to convert the Stuka to an A model in either Spanish Civil War colours or possibly Japanese (hence the K, the designation for all export models), the Gladiator was always earmarked for an Aircorp build, just not sure which of the two possible schemes I'd do, but I'm veering towards the green and silver one. Comparing the Stuka to the plans, it will need new spats, some work on the rear decking a new canopy and some remodelling of the chin radiator with perhaps some other small work. the Gladiator will just need a paint job. The cartoon pig on the spats is Jolanthe btw, this was actually the Luftwaffe nickname for the Stuka So to work, first order of business is to make a blank to mold some spats. Here it is prior to some filling to close the woodgrain. It's a sandwich of Balsa and card with the centre pieces double sided taped together so will be easy to split for molding once I get the shape right.
  16. Hi all, below a Sabre which, while not quite a shelf of doom/KUTA candidate, took me far too long as it had perched at one corner of my workbench for an age From the Academy double boxing with a P-47. Both really simple, clean models to build so there is no justification for dragging the build out so long I realise the decals over that yellow wing flash has cracked on the bend (despite liberal microsol) but wanted to share pictures before I botch retouching those bits
  17. And for my first post I give you something you've all probably seen a million times over A bit of background, I got the modelling bug when I was about 8, received my first kits, an F-5 and an ME262, both Airfix, back then I produced some pretty nasty pieces of work, although it's to be expected at that age. I then stopped for a bit after the age of 11, dabbled with certain kits at certain times as and when I felt like it, and the bug came back to me when I was 16, just over a year ago. The particular kit I am about to show you is one which I have had for most of this time, and I'm thankful that I did. because I don't think I could look back on such a model, but enough drivel about the past, lets get on with the kit, and the project: I am intending to create a lineup of at least 3 F-16 models, I only have one for the moment, however I will get more when the time comes, hopefully the gap between each build isn't too long, however I suppose you never know until it happens... The first of the models is this one: It's Revell's boxing of the F-16AM, in Tigermeet 09 livery, which I've always been too scared to touch because I want it to be perfect, however it seemed the perfect model to practice airbrushing with as the paintjob itself is pretty simple, the rest is just decals. The boxart is quite nice... Obligatory sprue shot, note the bent decal sheet as they didn't actually fit in the box... (You're going to have to excuse the sideways shot there) Unfortunately it had some loose parts too: I started building with the tail, seems like a good place to start, What got me was how where the small pointy bits were (If anyone could shed some light as to what they are that would be wonderful), there were, what appeared to be scratches which looked slightly like lightning... Only on one side however... The instructions stated to put this bit in where the L shape is inside the chute pit (I'm really bad with the whole terminology thing you're going to have to excuse me here), however I found that putting it above the L shape made it more accurate, otherwise it would seem too low: And the final picture for today, the main gear well has been constructed, fun times. (The flash exposed the ejector pin marks, I shall clean them up in just a bit) That's all for today, hopefully I've got everything right with regards to forum standards and everything Any comments, criticisms, advice, you name it, is welcome, and I look forward to getting involved with this forum. Thanks for reading.
  18. theplasticsurgeon

    Tim's Fiat G-91R

    Joining you with this kit, Airfix Fiat G91 light-fighter. This option 103 Gruppo, Treviso San Angelo, 1959. Parts. I think this is the correct sequence - speak up if it's wrong. This kit and an Airfix Avenger joined my stash in 2011, swapped for an Italeri B-25 Mitchell with Dermo245. Transaction was a result of a BM wanted posting, and the swap took place at Telford. RoyM brought the kit over, as Dermot wasn't attending that year. Outside - and shortly after this GB, this model will be converted to a US Army trials aircraft.
  19. Hi all. After watching this YouTube video I find myself deficient of a Fighter Bomber Sabre in my growing collection of Sabres in 1/72. Firstly, can anybody tell me where the bomb pylon would be located as I have heard/ read and seen different things. I've read that due to fuel tank plumbing, the bomb pylon is located further outboard but the video shows it located inboard of wing tank? Does anybody have a better image of the bomb pylon? Does a decal sheet exist for Fighter Bomber Unit from Korea, for an F-86 Sabre? Hopefully @Sabrejet, @Tony Edmundson and other helpful fellows will bale me out. Stuart
  20. So, seeing that quirky/inspirational thread titles are all the rage recently I thought I'd join in... However having been told a few times about my sense of humour, I myself will keep this thread serious with no banter. What you guys do is out of my control. Nor will I distract or diverge with history as I am no expert in that area. So will just keep it modelling JKIM. Anyways back to why we are here... (JKIM) I had planned these spring build spitfires for a while, with some overtrees to use up the foreign options from my Royal Class boxing. (Anyone who has seen my stuff lately will know I like doing things in bulk - the tomcats got ignored/postponed for the Christmas wip, then F-16's and now these) The quattro I had planned from the Royal Class decals was going to be the US/French/Soviet and Israeli ones. However the french and soviet ones were done very recently by @Procopius and the US and Israeli ones are quite common too... So I trawlled the net for lesser spotted spits and found some interesting decals. The project then grew from a quattro to a sextet. (Also because I had more paint shades to try) So the builds planned are 3 C wing and 3 E wing planes. C's Serb - Mr Paint Greek - Ak air US and A - Mr Color E's Norse - Hataka Lacquer Line Turk - Colourcoats Russian - xtracrylix The builds will be pretty basic as they are overtrees with no etch and no stencils etc. I have a couple ideas to compensate for etch and the like. Also not worried about lack of stencils as they are all foreign or postwar so most stencils will be worn or possibly not replaced after a repaint... I did get some techmod ones to do the odd one here and there. I will be using some masks too for the paint jobs to speed up the project, apart from the serb and yank which will be freehand as they have non standard patterns or areas of repainting. The paint manufacturers chosen have been allocated to help this work best. Lets get to it. Note, American and Russian decals still inbound. Mr Color and xtracrylix not shown. I only have the day fighter colours from @SovereignHobbies, no interior shade so will use some alcald paint to keep that build enamel themed. Also can't wait to try the orange line by @HATAKA OFFICIAL, and the blue line (brush) bottles will used to detail paint all builds. Thanks for looking!
  21. So... With the Sea King done (still need to update the build report with final images) and the A-26B done as well (here too some update of the build report is due) I'm off to my next build. The Hasegawa Typhoon is still stuck - looking for a missing part (PART J4, right side panel, front of cockpit is missing - if you have a spare J4, or can send me a photo with scale I will be very very happy) So - next build will be a new one. As my father's 77th birthday is coming up, I had an idea. My father was a mechanic with Squadron 119, IAF back in the end of the 50's and beginning of the 60's. He spent time working on the squadron's Vautour II N's. One day he was showing the cockpit to one of the new mechanics recently assigned to the squadron. The new guy was sitting in the front seat while my father was perched on the ladder showing him the different dials and knobs. At one point he was pointing to the Landing Gear lever telling the guy - 'You see this - never ever touch this one' and while saying that - accidentally moved it. All of a sudden this hissing noise was very noticeable and the front MLG started to retract. Luckily there was only a small amount of hydraulic pressure in the system and the MLG only retracted part of the way and not completely. As it happens with many aviation related mishaps - there were a number of malfunctions that contributed to this event - hydraulic pressure left in the system, rear MLG (the Vautour had 2 MLGs one behind the other) had a faulty WOW switch (that switch should have shut down hydraulics on the ground completely). The only damage to the plane was due to a tow bar that was connected to the front MLG and raise up as the MLG collapsed - to hit the front of the A/C. My dads punishment was to be re-assigned to the depot maintenance team - to help them fix the A/C. So, my idea was to build a Vautour II N as a birthday present. I had this idea quite a while ago so I already have the Azur 1/72 - the only one I can find. Its the IDF package - so I have markings of his squadron: I knew it a short run and I'm just returning to the hobby - this is why the project was not started for his 73/74/75/76th birthday I was not sure if I'm ready for a short run, and following the Sea King I was not eager for another 1/72 - but he is not getting younger. So I started some two weeks ago. I'm sure its not the worst short run you can find, and it does have resin and PE, but - its a pain. Plastic is soft. Gate are HUGE and looks like someone had gone into a lot of effort to make sure they are located at the worst possible location on the parts. Part breakdown is also something that induces a lot of 4-letter-words. I could not find a spare canopy or a vacuform one - so the kit will be presented with the cockpit closed. A bit of a shame considering the story above - but considering the detail level of the cockpit - not that bad. I started with the cockpit - no pins, for most parts - no location guides and hardly any useful information on where exactly to locate parts - A short run !@#@#$@$ Cockpit painted with Tamiya X-18 Semi-Gloss Black, Seats with Mr. Color 320 Green FS34092 which I eye balled from ref. pictures. Harness were painted Tamyia X-14 Sky blue - also eye balled from ref. images. The engine nucleus has a small balancing wheel - the wheel well part is too short and leaves a hole which I filled with putty. Wheel well doors have hinges - small, not identical and easily broken - I had to re-manufacture one. I cut a thin piece of a spruce (the oval one on the left) then cut it in half and cut some parts to create a kind of crescent. I opted to skip the micro sized resin hinges of the side doors. Of course all hinges have to glues with minimal to no location guides - did I say Short RUN @#@#$@#. Good reference is not that easy to come by - but I think the IAF birds had a yellow chromate paint for wheel wells. I used Model Master 4851 Yellow Zinc Wheels were glues (no that easy with this plastic) and painted black. I then used a new technique I learned for painting the hubs. After studying the structure of the wheel and the ref pictures (the rim between the tyre and core is painted silver/aluminum) I covered the black part with Microscale Micro Mask. Doing so I used the surface tension of the liquid mask to hug the rim. The different parts that comprise the cockpit and front MLG wheel well have to be glues ONLY AFTER a massive dry fit exercise- otherwise there is no chance to nail the exact location. So - that's it for now. Comment, war stories about this kits (or others) are welcomed as always. Best Ran
  22. AZ Model is to release 1/72nd Supermarine Spitfire Tr.8/.9. - Ref. AZ7478 - Supermarine Spitfire Tr.8 Source: http://www.azmodel.cz/product_info.php?products_id=741 - Ref. AZ7479 - Supermarine Spitfire Tr.9 In Dutch service Source: http://www.azmodel.cz/product_info.php?products_id=742 - Ref. AZ7480 - Supermarine Spitfire Tr.9 IAC & RIAF Source: http://www.azmodel.cz/product_info.php?products_id=743 V.P.
  23. My build will be a Dart engined Dakota and i am going to use the following set.. http://www.aim72.co.uk/page159.html the decals won’t be used as i have a very nice screen printed set for this aircraft wich is more correct from liveries unlimited.. pictures will follow... cheers, Jan
  24. “They were so weak- they allowed everything to happen – to be done to them. They were people with whom there was no common ground, no possibility of communication- that is how contempt is born. I could never understand how they could just give in as they did.” -- SS-Brigadefuhrer Franz Stangel, second commandant of Trebelinka "Six men with tommy-guns were posted at each pit; the pits were 24 m in length and 3 m in breadth - they had to lie down like sardines in a tin, with their heads in the centre. Above them were six men with tommy-guns who gave them the coup de grace. When I arrived those pits were so full that the living had to lie down on top of the dead; then they were shot and, in order to save room, they had to lie down neatly in layers. Before this, however, they were stripped of everything at one of the stations - here at the edge of the wood were the three pits they used that Sunday and here they stood in a queue 1½ km long which approached step by step - a queuing up for death. As they drew nearer they saw what was going on. About here they had to hand over their jewelry and suitcases. All good stuff was put into the suitcases and the remainder thrown on a heap. This was to serve as clothing for our suffering population - and then, a little further on they had to undress and, 500 m in front of the wood, strip completely; they were only permitted to keep on a chemise or knickers. They were all women and small two-year-old children." -- "Major General Walter Bruns’s Description of the Execution of Jews outside Riga on December 1, 1941, Surreptitiously Taped Conversation (April 25, 1945)", National Archives WO 208/4169, Report SRGG 1158 A mountain of footwear was pressing down on me. My body was numb from cold and immobility. However, I was fully conscious now. The snow under me had melted from the heat of my body. ... Quiet for a while. Then from the direction of the trench a child's cry: 'Mama! Mama! Mamaa!'. A few shots. Quiet. Killed. — Frida Michelson, I Survived Rumbula, describing the events of the second Rumbula Massacre on 8 December 1941 "Meanwhile Rottenfuhrer Abraham shot the children with a pistol. There were about five of them. These were children whom I would think were aged between two and six years. "The way Abraham killed the children was brutal. He got hold of some of the children by the hair, lifted them up from the ground, shot them through the back of their heads and then threw them into the grave. "After a while I just could not watch this any more and I told him to stop. What I meant was he should not lift the children up by the hair, he should kill them in a more decent way." -- Testimony of SS-Mann Ernst Gobel at the SS trial of Untersturmfuhrer Max Taubner for ordering the "unauthorized" killing of 459 Jews in late 1942; the court ruled that "[t]he accused shall not be punished because of the actions against the Jews as such. The Jews have to be exterminated and none of the Jews that were killed is any great loss." "We are going to scourge the Third Reich from end to end. We are bombing Germany city by city and ever more terribly in order to make it impossible for her to go on with the war. That is our object; we shall pursue it relentlessly." -- Air Marshall Sir Arthur Harris, 28 July 1942 "The first thing we can see now is a wall of searchlights, not the thirties we saw as we came in over the coast, but they're in hundreds, there's a wall of light with very few breaks, and behind that wall, there's a pool of fiercer light, glowing red and green and blue, and over that pool there are myriads of flares hanging in the sky. That's the city itself." -- BBC reporter Wynford Vaughan-Thomas, recording an op against Berlin by Lancaster ED586/EM-F "F-for-Freddie" from 207 (City of Leicester) Squadron on 3 September 1943 During the long, hard period from 1941 to 1944, when nowhere outside of Russia were the Allied armies in action against the main might of the Third Reich, which fell across the continent like a great funeral shroud, the only way to strike back was by air. In 1909, when Bleriot's fragile monoplane had first crossed the Channel, the Daily Express's headline had blared "BRITAIN IS NO LONGER AN ISLAND", and the entire underpinnings of Britain's splendid isolation had seemed to totter, but in 1940, Shakespeare's "precious stone set in a silver sea, which serves it in the office of a wall, or as a moat defensive to a house, against the envy of less happier lands," held once more, when the RAF's fighters bought the nation and the world time to prepare for the titanic battles that would be needed to free Europe. Until the moment when the Allies fell from the sky at night or stormed ashore at dawn, the great burden of the offensive would fall upon Bomber Command. There has long been a contention that the Bombing Offensive did little to effect German war production, because output continually rose despite the thousands upon thousands of tons of bombs dropped over Germany by day and night. Economic historian Adam Tooze, however, in his magisterial history of the Nazi war economy The Wages of Destruction writes that: "In the summer of 1943, the disruption in the Ruhr manifested itself across the German economy in the so-called 'Zuligieferungskrise; (sub-compnenents crisis). All manner of parts, castings, and forgings were suddenly in short supply. And this affected not only heavy industry directly, but the entire armaments complex. Most significantly, the shortage of key components brought the rapid increase in Luftwaffe production to an abrupt halt. Between July 1943 and March 1944 there was no further increase in the monthly output of aircraft. For the armaments effort as a whole, the period of stagnation lasted throughout the second half of 1943. As Speer himself acknowledged, Allied bombing had negated all plans for a further increase in production. Bomber Command had stopped Speer's armaments miracle in its tracks." This was what 16,229 Bomber Command personnel died for in 1943. Not, as Arthur Harris hoped or believed, to win the war outright, but to buy the time for breath to be drawn and the war to be won. Night after night, the bombers went out, each aircraft its own entire universe for the seven men inside, who had only each other to count on against the terrifying power of the German air defences. Laden with fuel and bombs, they stood little chance of survival if hit. But in the great black bellies of their aircraft, they carried with them the great sledgehammers that would shake the firmaments of the Nazi Empire. The aircraft I'm building is a "Ton-Up" Lancaster, one of only thirty-five aircraft to survive over a hundred ops, in this case EE139, "The Phantom of the Ruhr", which flew 121 missions, including Hamburg, the V-Weapon research site at Peenemunde, and a staggering fifteen trips to Berlin before being taken off operations on 21 November 1944, by that time utterly clapped-out. EE139 flew with both 100 Squadron and, when 550 Squadron was formed out of C Flight in November 1943, EE139 went with, which is where she finished her war. I'm using the rather elderly Xtradecal RAF Bomber Command Part 2 sheet, which has her in her guise as HW-R with 100 Squadron in November of 1943, shortly before her transfer to 550 Squadron. Notably, in this photo she lacks the circular yellow gas detection patch frequently seen on other 1 Group aircraft, though this would be added later on (and is present on the Xtradecal "Ton-Up Lancs" sheet, go figure -- and if anyone has the 1/72 Ton-Up sheet, let me know, I suspect the nose art may be better rendered). I also have a small assortment of aftermarket: Eduard photoetch set for the interior, canopy mask, seatbelts, and Quickboost's hollowed-out intakes for the Merlins, which I think should be a great improvement. The kit's just come out of a soak in soapy water, so we can hopefully get started soon.
  25. "Hauptmann Tietzen, my Staffel commander alone has nineteen [sic] [aerial victories]! I witnessed most of his kills. It is fantastic, the way he shoots. He is the boss, he moves us into position and selects the victims, and we have to do little more than cover him...During the last few days the British have been getting weaker, though individuals continue to fight well. Often the Spitfires give beautiful displays of aerobatics. Recently I had to watch in admiration as one of them played a game with thirty Messerschmitts, without itself ever getting into danger; but such individuals are few. The Hurricanes are tired old 'puffers'." -- Leutnant Hans-Otto Lessing, II.JG/51, 17 August 1940 When they finally come to destroy the earth They'll have to go through you first I bet they won't be expecting that -- OK Go, "Invincible" On 18 August 1940, the Battle of Britain's hardest day, when the losses for both sides were heaviest, seven Hurricanes of 501 (County of Gloucester) Squadron and eight more from 32 Squadron attempted to break through German fighters escorting 58 Dornier 17s of KG2 over Herne Bay. It was an unequal contest. Four jagdgeschwaders of Bf 109s swept in to attack the RAF fighters as they climbed to meet the enemy; Flight Lieutenant George Stoney, leading 501 into action, was separated from his comrades and shot down and killed, one of nineteen members of 501 to lose their lives during the Battle of Britain, more casualties than any other participating squadron. Severely outnumbered, the other Hurricanes were unable to cut their way to the bombers. But they did not leave empty-handed. Pilot Officer Pawel Zenker, who had flown fighters in defence of Poland in 1939, where he had shot down a Henschel 126, headed straight for the escorting German fighters and got behind a Bf109. In his combat report, he wrote that the Messerschmitt "turned back towards France and I chased him as he climbed firing from 300 [yards] and closer ranges and about 10 miles over the sea I saw smoke and fire come from the fuselage and he rapidly lost height. The Me 109 did not adopt evasive action but flew straight on until it crashed into the water somewhere near the North Goodwin Lightship." Hauptmann Horst Tietzen, Staffelkapitan of 5./JG51, the fourth-highest scoring pilot in the Luftwaffe, with seven victories over Spain and twenty more claimed since the start of the war, was dead. Pilot Officer Stefan Witorzeńć, who had been a flying instructor in Poland in 1939, was flying as Red 2 on F/L Stoney's wing when he was bounced by two 109s. Throwing his Hurricane about the sky, he outmaneuvered both of them in a diving, turning fight that dropped in altitude from 14,000 feet to 10,000 feet. As he regained height, he found himself below and abeam a 109; he gave it a long burst of fire from the Hurricane's eight machine guns, at 150 yards. The 109 tried to turn away in a shallow dive, a fatal mistake against a Hurricane. Witorzenc followed hot on its heels and gave it another long burst from dead astern; it burst into flames and crashed near Wingham, where it exploded. Leutnant Hans-Otto Lessing, with four victory claims, had written a letter to his parents the day before, describing the RAF's Hurricanes as "tired old puffers". Now he was dead. Pawel Zenker was last seen chasing a an enemy aircraft out to sea on 24 August, 1940; aged twenty-five, he never returned to grow old. Perhaps he waits in Avalon with Arthur to this day. Stefan Witorzeńć survived the war and, after a period of imprisonment, served with the postwar Polish Air Force; he died in 1994. I'll be building three Hurricanes from 501 Squadron using the new kit from Arma. Unfortunately, decals for Zenker (possibly P3208/SD-T) and Witorzeńć's (L1868/SD-D) machines on the day aren't available, but there was a fair degree of mobility in the squadron, and it's likely that of the three decal options I have for 501 (two in the kit and one in the excellent set of Stanislaw Skalski decals), Zenker and Witorzeńć probably flew in at least one of them once. In any case, the aircraft in question have distinguished pedigrees regardless, having been flown by the Polish aces Stanislaw Skalski DSO DFC (18 victories and offficially Poland's highest-scoring ace) and Antoni "Toni" Głowacki DFC DFM (8 victories), who famously became an ace in a day after shooting down three 109s and two Ju88s on 24 August 1940. Skalski died in 2004 in Poland; Glowacki, in 1980 in New Zealand. It would perhaps be foolish to think that building what is after all a plastic toy could be in any way a meaningful tribute to the men and boys who flew the Hurricane in the Battle of Britain, whether they were a thousands miles or more from home or whether their parents saw them fight and die in the skies above their childhood homes. But howevermuch an act of love and admiration it can be, let this build be that. If you wish to hear George Stoney's voice seventy-nine years after his death, he gave a short talk for the BBC on 3 August 1940: He was twenty-nine and had fifteen days left to live. I just received my first order of kits from the mailroom here at work. Shall we begin?
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