Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Search the Community

Showing results for tags '1/72 scale'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Group Builds
  • Model Show Calendar

Forums

  • Site Help & Support
    • FAQs
    • Help & Support
    • New Members
    • Announcements
  • Aircraft Modelling
    • Military Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Civil Aircraft Modelling Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Aircraft
    • Ready for Inspection - Aircraft
    • Aircraft Related Subjects
  • AFV Modelling (armour, military vehicles & artillery)
    • Armour Discussion by Era
    • Work in Progress - Armour
    • Ready for Inspection - Armour
    • Armour Related Subjects
    • large Scale AFVs (1:16 and above)
  • Maritime Modelling (Ships and subs)
    • Maritime Discussion by era
    • Work in Progress - Maritime
    • Ready for Inspection - Maritime
  • Vehicle Modelling (non-military)
    • Vehicle Discussion
    • Work In Progress - Vehicles
    • Ready For Inspection - Vehicles
  • Science Fiction & RealSpace
    • Science Fiction Discussion
    • RealSpace Discussion
    • Work In Progress - SF & RealSpace
    • Ready for Inspection - SF & RealSpace
  • Figure Modeling
    • Figure Discussion
    • Figure Work In Progress
    • Figure Ready for Inspection
  • Dioramas, Vignettes & Scenery
    • Diorama Chat
    • Work In Progress - Dioramas
    • Ready For Inspection - Dioramas
  • Reviews, News & Walkarounds
    • Reviews
    • Current News
    • Build Articles
    • Tips & Tricks
    • Walkarounds
  • Modelling
  • General Discussion
  • Shops, manufacturers & vendors
  • Archive

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 54 results

  1. Friends, Here is my latest project, the Airfix Mig-17 Fresco. I was fortunate to receive this as a gift as the kit`s availability in the U.S. is very limited thus far. My thoughts and notes on this offering from Airfix............. 1. I used the following colors and brands to dress the Fresco : A. Tamiya Deep Green XF-26 B. Tamiya NATO Green. XF-67 C. Mission Models Aluminum D. Cockpit : Model Master Medium Gray E. Landing gear wells : Tamiya Titanium X-32 F. Landing gear struts : Tamiya Flat Aluminum XF-16 G. Wing Tanks : Model Master Metalizer Aluminum ( spray can ) 2. Master metal wing pitot tubes and gun barrels 3. Photo etched seat belts from a generic set. 4. Buffed wing tanks to give the appearance of new replacement tanks. 5. Detailed with washes ( Vallejo light rust, black, blue-gray, and Flory Dark Dirt ) 6. Perfect Plastic Putty for all seams. 7. Dirt streaks with pastels ( black and medium gray ). 8. Plumbers putty, lead fishing sinkers, and Delux “Liquid Gravity” for ballast. I discovered that this kit presents it`s own fair share of challenges. There are some gaps that require putty and the nose section can be tricky to add weight so that the kit is not the dreaded “tail dragger”. I had to apply the ballast inside the cavity of the intake splitter and around the splitter just inside between the cockpit and front section of the intake. The engineering for the landing gear was a bit problematic. There is a small stub on the gear for the wheel to align with. The entire assembly was a bit flimsy and after spending much time aligning the parts correctly, I inverted the Fresco and let sit for 24 hours using the strongest glue I have. Even the front gear strut can be a bit tricky getting aligned properly. I was disappointed with the Mission Models Aluminum paint. I have had nothing but a positive experience with MM brand paint so I decided to try the Aluminum. The paint did not react well when I inadvertently rubbed a cloth across it and it only became worse when I applied the National insignia decals. The paint, for the lack of a better term, “boiled” ( bubbled and changed color ) when I slid the decals off of the backing paper. Fortunately, the paint somewhat returned to normal but I did some touch ups around the affected area to lessen the potential disaster. My thoughts are that this is a kit for a more experienced modeler. One has to be careful when assembling the tricycle landing gear and mindful of the nose weight required to ensure a proper stance once complete. The decals were very good. If you choose a natural metal version, be prepared to put in plenty of effort into the finish before applying paint. Thank you in advance!!!!!! Respectfully submitted, Mike
  2. Just arrived - the latest kit from the Ukrainian enterprise of Modelsvit... the Myasischev M-55 'Geophysica' high-altitude observation aircraft. With each new release, Modelsvit are raising the bar for moulding quality - the crispness and engraved surface detail is simply stunning. Page 3 of the 12-page instruction booklet - note the 22-part K-36 ejection seat construction. Page 10 showing the painting and decal-placement guide. The superbly printed decal sheet - those sponsors logos are all perfectly readable! The parts are crisly moulded in light grey plastic - with stunning engraved surface detail. Modelsvit have captured the shape of the double-curvature laminar-flow long-span wing superbly. Open or closed canopy options are included - note the parts for the K-36 ejection seat. Self-adhesive masks for the canopy and wheel hubs are provided - as is this etched-brass sheet of parts. More photos of the rest of the sprues are here:- http://www.flankers-site.co.uk/model_m-55_modelsvit.html This close-up photo shows off the delicate engraved panel detail perfectly... Finally, to whet your appetite, here's the real thing I photographed at MAKS 2012.... I can't wait to get started on this kit - it will make an interesting companion to Modelsvit's previously released M-17 'Stratosphera'... Ken
  3. Inspired by a conversation on another discussion group about building a Su-37 - I thought I'd have a go.... The discussion suggested combining the back end of the 1/72 scale two-seat Zvezda Su-30SM with the front end of the Zvezda Su-33 to make the single seat Su-37. A new longer (and slightly fatter) nose is needed - along with taller, square-tipped fins - plus a few other minor changes - but the whole thing looks do-able. I have both kits in my stash, so I got both out for comparison - and liked what I saw.... so here goes.... As they are both from the same manufacturer, the panel lines match up - the Su-30SM is on the left - with the Su-33 on the right. The fuselages butchered / separated....... Note how the airbrakes differ. .... and swapped over (the left hand one will be the Su-37, the right-hand one will become a Chinese J-17/J-15D) Plastic card strips used the strengthen the joint. Now, I just need to work out how to do the fatter Su-37 radome. More later.. Ken
  4. Hello friends, My apologies for the long period between postings. As you all are well aware of, life tends to get in the way of our hobby. Here is my latest project, the F-15I Ra`am from Great Wall Hobby in 72nd scale. Here are my thoughts of the kit......... 1. Built entirely out of the box. 2. Used acrylic paints for the airframe and weapons. 3. Used AK Interactive Extreme metal paints for the exhaust and natural metal sections. 4. Weapons ( GBU-31 JDAM, GBU-38 GPS guided, GBU-12 laser guided, AIM-120, & Python air-to-air missiles used from the kit ) 5. Tamiya tape for the seat belts. 6. Weathered using chalk pastels, washes, and paint. 7. The fit was very good apart from some serious issues with the front windscreen. Perfect Plastic Putty was used extensively to help correct the misaligned part. 8. The kit supplied decals were thick and I experienced some of the dreaded “silvering”. Much time was spent correcting the mishap. 9. Mold seam on the center of the both sections of the windscreen needed to be eliminated. 10. “F-15I Ra`am in IAF Service” ( IsraDecal Publications / Ra`anan Weiss ) used as reference. Hopefully my time between postings and visiting this excellent website will not be as long. Thank you in advance for all of your comments. Respectfully submitted, Mike
  5. Hello friends, Here is the Hasegawa G4M2E “Betty” bomber with Ohka Kamikaze. I had completed this kit earlier in the year but now I finally got around to posting the pictures. My observations of this kit are as follows........... 1. Used “Hair Spray” technique to weather the subject. A. Mission Models IJN Deep green on the upper surface B. Tamiya Flat Black for the undersurface C. Alclad paint for the base silver / metal D. Used a moistened cloth rag to “peel” the paint. The Mission Model green came off easily but the Tamiya flat black took more of an effort. 2. Built straight from the box. 3. Used Eduard canopy masks for the clear parts 4. Model Master IJN Grady for the Ohka. 5. Used Uschi bobbin thread for antenna wire. 6. Used contrasting colors to replicate replacement propeller ( starboard / right side ), slightly darker green for a replacement panel on starboard wing, masked off a panel on the lower starboard wing, and lighter green on the fabric control surfaces. 7. Other weathering by using pastels, washes, and paint. 8. Tamiya tape for cockpit seat belts. References indicated that Japanese maintenance crews were required as a source of pride to keep all national markings and squadron insignia in a clean or pristine state. I tried to reflect this with this kit. I found the kit straightforward and simple. Masking the many sections of the clear parts was very time consuming but the results are worthwhile. I would recommend this kit to all. Thank you in advance for all of your comments. Respectfully submitted, Mike
  6. Hello! I am going to attempt to build this kit as one of the early ragwings that arrived in Canada in Spring 1939. Here is a link to some questions I had and the answers I received: I have started by removing a few major components and cleaning/sanding edges. I have thinned down the insides of the wing trailing edges, hoping to avoid the thick edges that Airfix gives you. So far so good. It's been awhile since I last sat at the table and worked on styrene. Man, that can be hard on the back when you're old and out of shape. Anyhoos, here a picture to prove I am working on an actual real kit. A warning to any followers! My progress can be best described as glacial. I hope to do just this one kit in the next year. Chris
  7. The last of the 'BiG MiG' kits from the Ukrainian company of Modelsvit - the record breaking 'E-166'......... The plastic is exactly the same as the E-152M kit - wiith appropriate differences (no missiles, canards etc..) The box art shows the E-166 on public display at Domodedovo airport..... The eight-page instruction booklet is clear and well-printed with easy to read construction diagrams The colour painting guide is keyed to Humbrol paints. The big difference is the new decal sheet - the blue flash for the fuselage is included, but the similar blue flash on the fin has to be painted on - although Modelsvit do provide a vinyl mask for it. I won't include photos of the sprues - they are exactly the same as in the E-152M build - here. I have already done the 'sister ships'...... E-150, E-152, E-152-1 and E-152M - so this latest kit should complete the lineup of MiG's on steroids. The E-166 web page where the WIP will take place is here. Ken
  8. Friends, After posting two WWII era aircraft, here is something more modern, the F-4G Wild Weasel version of the Phantom. I used the Hasegawa kit and posed in the early stage of Operation Desert Storm circa January, 1991. Early in the conflict, Phantoms toted four AGM-88 Harm missiles. This provided a bit of a difference for Phantoms usually carried 370 gallon external drop tanks on the outboard wing pylons. I added resin ejection seats and the AGM-88`s, AIM-7`s, and ECM pod came from the Hasegawa weapons set. Despite some “fiddly” challenges to this kit, I would recommend it to all. Thank you in advance!!!!!! Respectfully submitted, Mike
  9. This new resin kit from ABM represents the sole prototype of the Beriev R-1 jet-powered flying boat. Beautifully cast in flawless cream coloured resin, this is resin casting at its best. It is a comprehensive kit - excellently packaged - with fantastic service - 7 days from order to delivery (over the Christmas period). The box art depicts the R-1 flying over (presumably?) Beriev's base at Taganrog.... The comprehensive instructions are on two A3 sheets folded into a four-page A4 'booklet'.... Note that the colour references are generic - Green, Leather, Steel Grey etc - with the whole airframe in 'Ghost Grey'. The parts are superby cast in a cream coloured resin with no hint of air bubbles or casting flaws.... The wing is one piece incorporating the main engine nacelles...... The intakes and jet exhausts are separate - with a nice representation of the Klimov VK-1 (RR Nene) turbojet to go inside the intake.... The decal sheet is by Begemot, so quality is assurered - two copies are included...... Note the decals for the instrument panels - an alternative film negative is also included for items 1 & 2. The canopy and clear parts are vacformed - with two copies being supplied in case of accidents. A few more photos are here. This really is a quality kit - reflected in the price - but IMHO it is worth every penny. I'll be starting it soon.... Ken
  10. CAD images just arrived - ready to start moulding plastic....... I have no further information on actual release date - other than soon. Ken
  11. I have attached a link to the Caracal 1/72 decal sheet list; you can scroll down to see the FJ-2/3 sheets that will be released soon....can't wait! (I'm shafted, as my favorite FJ-2's are the natural metal VMF-235 Furies, so I will have to rely on the decals that come with the Sword kit for the most part), but I am betting many of you will be happy with the choices on the two sheets!) Mike http://www.caracalmodels.com/72scale.html
  12. Just finished - after a bit of a fight - the latest 'BIG MiG' from Modelsvit........ the MiG E-152-1.... Usual fare from Modelsvit - excellent panel detail, large sprue gates, superb decal sheet, canopy masks and etched fret - a complete package. I had trouble getting the fuselage halves to close up around the cockpit/intake trunking - but won in the end. The dummy K-9 missile are painted to look like AIM-7 Sparrows. Business end of the massive Tumanskiy R-15-300 turbojet. This latest MiG joins my others in this range of huge MiG interceptors from Modelsvit.... More photos and the parts sprues are here.. Ken
  13. As I am building the latest iteration of the Sukhoi Su-34 - I thought I'd have a go at the earliest version - the T-10V1 Su-27IB. I originally thought of just grafting the original Su-27 tailboom onto the Italeri Su-34 kit - but the biggest problem I faced was filling in the mainwheel wells - they are huge on the Su-34 and cut into the intake sides - the whole area is totally different between the Su-27IB and production Su-34. So I have adopted the method that Sukhoi used - grafting the new side-by-side cockpit section front fuselage onto the rear of a tandem two-seat Su-27UB trainer...... Here's what I mean - the Italeri Su-34 is on the left, the Heller Su-27UB on the right - the blue tape shows where I am making the cuts.... Underside view showing the major difference in the main landing gear wells..... The Italeri Su-34 front end grafted onto the Heller Su-27UB rear end - note the discrepancy in the shape of the spines - fixable with generous applications of Milliput (I hope) Undersides ....... Now all I have to do is graft the Italeri wings onto the Heller fuselage (the Italeri wings are better), fix the intakes (the scallop for the well on the Heller intake is now correct for the Su-27IB - but the intake lower edges are too 'square' and lack the slot in the bottom)....... More later.. Ken
  14. Hello All, I am posting this here on the assumption that some of you might not read the civil postings. I am considering converting a 1/72 Britannia to a CC-106 Yukon (aka CL-44-6), but I’m not sure how the 12’-4” stretch in length is split fore and aft of the wing. If there are any ex RCAF britmodellers who can help, I would greatly appreciate any input you care to provide. regards, TW
  15. Look what Santa brought.... the latest 1/72 scale kit from Ukrainian manufacturer Modelsvit... the Sukhoi T10 Flanker prototype. Excellent box art showing Bort 'Yellow 10' - one of two options in the box. Top and bottom fuselage halves - with delicate engraved detail.. Ogival shaped wing parts - totally different to the production T10S 'Flanker-B'. Plus fins and tailplanes. Engine nacelles for the Al-21F engine fitted to the prototypes. Nose gear, mainwheel bays and cockpit parts. The sprues now have part numbers moulded on next to the part - a useful development. Main undercarriage parts and wheels. Jetpipes, compressor faces and afterburner flameholders - all neatly moulded. 2 X R-27ET plus 2 X R-27ER missiles - as fitted to these prototypes. Crystal clear canopies - both open and closed options. Early K-36 ejection seat - made up from 26 parts !!!! Decal sheet - note the two instrument panels - one for the plastic panel, one for the etched brass option. Etched parts - plus the plastic IRST ball. The clear perspex is for the etched HUD !!!! I didn't photograph the self-adhesive masks - which contains masks for the wheel hubs as well as masks for both inside and outside of the canopy !! Back page of the 12-page construction booklet. This is a fantastic kit from Modelsvit - crisply moulded with delicate engraved panel detail, plus etched brass parts and canopy masks - a truly comprehensive package. Ken
  16. Following the 'comparison' thread - I have made a start on building the Trumpeter 1/72 scale Su-34..... I won't post pics of the sprues - they are available elsewhere and here - just progress photos of the build. The cockpit is quite comprehensive - with a separate door in the rear bulkhead..... but note those ejection pin marks in the structure behind the seats. Similarly, the nosewheel bay looks accurate - complete with two-parts for the sliding access hatch..... The K-36 ejection seats are quite simplified - I would replace them if the cockpit was open - but they are acceptable given the closed cockpit... Trumpeter even provide the rudder pedals and very nice control collums - decals are provided for the front and side instrument panels - although the starboard panel curled up on me and I couldn't get it straight... Note the rear door - which I have posed open. The nosewheel bay in place - although not mentioned in the instructions, the front access hatch can be clicked in place and made to slide open..... Open.... Closed.... View into the wheel bay.... note the sliding front hatch. Top and bottom fuselage halves glued together..... I have made an attempt at re-profiling the nose to make it sharper - with moderate success...... It isn't 100% - but it looks much better - I might shave a bit more off to make the 'beak' sharper - but without going through the plastic!!... Re-shaped Trumpeter nose compared to the Italeri nose.... More later... Ken
  17. Just finished - the excellent Trumpeter Su-34 kit in 1/72 scale........ Trumpeter missed a few things - the curved fillet between the wing L/E and the ESM pod (when fitted)..... ... the Blind Flying curtains inside the cockpit..... .... and the APU exhaust outlet on top of the tailboom... Ken
  18. I just got the new Valom DH91 Albatross kit, number 72129, today and it looks very, very good! I don't know much about the airplane, except that it is a classic DH design and is one beautiful airplane; there isn't a lot on the internet that I could find as far as cockpit/wheel bay/interior details are concerned, but my intention is not to superdetail it, but to do a decent job on one of the impressed examples or one of the two flown by 271 Squadron on courier duty. Therein lies my question: The kit color profiles show two marking choices, both BOAC courier aircraft; G-AFDM, "Fiona" and G-AFDK, "Fortuna" I also like one of the 271 Squadron aircraft, G-AEDW, "Franklin" coded BJ-W and with the serial, according to one written source, AX904. The kit color callouts list DM's colors as dark green/dark earth/aluminum and DK's colors as extra dark sea grey/dark slate grey/aluminum. Another source also stated that these two were finished with aluminum dope on the undersides, but that the civilian examples that were impressed had trainer yellow undersides. What were "Franklin's" colors? Does anybody know whether the Valom color references for the two choices in their kit are correct? Can anybody confirm the colors for AX904? I am assuming, from the few photos that show the undercart fairing doors and wheel bays of DH-91's, that they are also aluminum? Sure would be grateful for some light to be shed on this subject! I have attached a link to some useful Albatross information. Mike
  19. This is a special commission build for Ian at Wee Friends Models, It will be a complete rolling chassis and cab for which there will be a variety of back bodies made available in kit form. The request was for a brand new scratch built master of an Austin K6 in 1/72 scale, using original chassis drawings I prepared a GS length chassis, there will also be different chassis lengths made to accommodate some of the back bodies.... Once that was done it was on to the hard bit.... The cab... this is my first ever attempt at anything quite so ambitious so I was a little daunted at the prospect of having to scratch-build one of the hardest cab shapes.... This was my first attempt at it..... The yellow resin cab behind is a Road Transport Images Austin K3 cab in 1/76 that sports the same crew cab as a K6 and is what I started to use as a reference for cab roof shaping..... And with a part built Airfix Austin K6 cab from their Rescue set also used as a shaping reference.... It was while I was looking at this image that I had a "Eureka " moment..... To make the cab easier and faster to make why not use the Airfix cab as a Vac-Form mould??.... With it being 1/76th scale and my requirement was for 1/72 it made sense to use the smaller as a former to make the bigger..... And so..... I set about making a Vac-form machine out of my mould making Vacuum chamber and pump..... I then converted the Airfix cab into a mould block, and got forming, to get the thickness of plastic and also build up the scale I had to laminate repeated layers of plasticard on top of one another, after my third attempt at it I came out with this..... A bit of shaping went on using a file, sanding sticks and needle files to get this..... And with its first test shot of primer to show up pits, blemishes and faults..... during this project I also invested in some new machinery to make like a little easier, not knowing how much actual use it would get I bought the cheap copy of the Unimat1 6in1 tool, so far its been a god send, although the 3 jaw lathe chuck was total poop straight out the box, literally seizing solid on me the first time I used it, no big drama as I now use a Dremel arbor to hold wheels,...... here I have it set up as a milling machine to face up the windscreen angles...... Yet more shaping and sanding..... Things moved on quite quickly after that, here it sits in its second test shot of grey primer to show up the blemishes, and now also windows are cut in and shaped, the engine and radiator are fitted and in the last few pics the start of the interior base plate that will also locate the cab to the chassis..... Stay tuned for more, which will include the radiator grill and engine covers, and then the chassis and suspension..... ATB Sean
  20. Latest i a long line of projects.... Scratchbuilt Ford/Fordson WOT6/8 cab and WOT6 Machinery truck. The cab and associated parts... The start of the back body..... That's all for now.... ATB Sean
  21. Finished the first of 3 configurations of my 100% scratch built 1/72 scale Austin K6 with Type 13/14 Radar. This configuration is 'Stowed, ready to move'..... This will be released as a Very Limited Edition resin kit at the end of this month, PM me for further details if you are interested. For those that have not seen the other 2 configurations they can be seen here..... ATB Sean
  22. Always a sucker for the oddball, I recently purchased this latest kit from Ukrainian manufacturer A&A Models... It is a kit of the German design for a VTOL fighter - the EWR VJ-101 - with four engines in swivelling wing tip nacelles backed up with two more mounted vertically behind the cockpit - making SIX in all. Moulded by Modelsvit on behalf of A&A Models the kit represents the second prototype and is neatly moulded in mid-grey plastic with fine engraved detail... Fuselage sprues. Parts for the swivelling wingtip nacelles - which can be made to work (though not in unison!) Wings and things. Boarding ladder, ejection seat and two choices of clear canopy - open or closed. Canopy masks, etched harness and decal sheet. Paint and decal guide for the second prototype - quoting Humbrol numbers. This looks to be a very nice comprehensive kit, well moulded and packaged with different display options - the inclusion of canopy masks and etched brass now appears to be the norm with these kits from the Ukraine - western manufacturers please take note! The box sides indicate that A&A will be kitting the first prototype VJ-101C-X1 - plus the VAK-191 VTOL strike aircraft I can't wait to get started........ Ken
  23. Just finished the A&A Models EWR VJ-101C-X2 German VTOL fighter testbed.... The main engines are in VTOL mode - with the translating intakes extended and the front lift engines intake and exhaust doors open. The main engines horizontal in CTOL mode (when the translating intakes would be retracted and the forward engine doors closed) CTOL..... VTOL. Build and finished model photos here..... Ken
  24. I am working on three scratch-builds, all of which have un-cowled motors. Since a bare motor is a natural focus, and making motors in 1/72 is a project in itself, I am treating the motors as a stand-alone project, getting the trickiest bits out of the way of the builds at the start. One of these projects is a pioneer era pusher machine, which was powered by an early Curtiss V-8 engine. After a couple of false starts, I have finally got the basic item in hand. I had to do something resembling precision work on the cylinders, which I don't like and try to avoid. My instinct is to employ the old sculptor's maxim, suitably altered for plastic modeling --- take up a piece of plastic and remove everything which is not the part you want. But with the varying rings and steps, this was not going to be a good method for the cylinders of this motor. I used 'flying jigs' to get the pieces uniform. The pieces were measured against, and in some instances attached to, stock strip pieces of known thickness, and sanded down to match these standard pieces. This shows the principle, though it is from an earlier run. From left to right: finished cylinder, dressed cylinder piece on the 'flying jig', raw cylinder piece on the 'flying jig', and raw cylinder assemblies. On this run, the upper step was 2.5 mm, and the lower 0.75 mm. This did not allow for the irreducible thickness of the base ring, and so on the finished item I reduced the lower step to 0.5 mm. This necessitated boring all the way through the lower piece, and fixing the wire pin in the upper piece. On my first run at this, I made the block too thin. On my second I spaced the cylinders too wide. Further, in both of these, the block was patterned on the OX-5 motor's block. The commercial success of the Curtiss OX-5 motor drowns the earlier V-8 models Curtiss produced, and while the various permutations from the model O on are basically similar, there are a lot of detail differences. OX-5 material can be used as a guide, but by the end-stage, period photographs have to be employed, and given the vagaries of such things, I have had to employ a certain amount of creative gizmology in here. When I began the final run, I started by making the cylinder mount. It is hollow, with a base piece of 15 thou card, 11mm long and 5mm wide, a spine piece 2.5mm high down the center, and side pieces tented in. Shaved discs of 2 mm rod are attached. Here are the new cylinders with the some of the receiving holes bored in the cylinder base. Here are the cylinders attached. Here is the cylinder assembly mounted to the second OX-5 pattern block. The block is 3 mm wide, made of three pieces of 1 mm sheet laminated together. Here is the start of detailing. A further disc of shaved 2 mm rod tops each cylinder, with a head piece of slightly thinned 2 mm rod atop this. Curtiss cylinders were held down by four long bolts and an 'X' fitting over the cap. The block has been re-shaped to the earlier pattern. Here are the fuel feeds and rocker arms in. Here is the current state, with water lines and exhaust ports in, as well as sundry other 'works' shown in photographs.... Further work on this motor must await mounting on its trestle above the lower wing, so it can tie in with the radiator and fuel tanks and wing assembly. Putting together two Armstrong-Siddeley Jaguar motors for a brace of Fairey Flycatchers has proved quite a project. There have been several false starts, some of which can be seen here in this earlier thread: Going back to those in that thread after some work on the Curtiss V-8, I was not satisfied with them. The cylinders were too fat, and shaping the heads of the cylinders was not going well; the rear row interfered with getting tools onto the front cylinders. I checked available materials against the Grainger drawings, and found that while the Evergreen 2.4mm rod I usually use was indeed too thin, some Plastruct 2.5mm matched perfectly the widest part of the cylinders in the drawing --- the difference of 7 thousandths of an inch mattered. It was also clear that here, too, I was going to have to be precise in making the cylinders (all twenty-eight), because the heads were going to have to be shaped before the cylinders were attached. I made new crankcases, again of two circles of 2mm sheet. I discarded the idea of indicating the base rings. They are not prominent in photographs of Jaguars, and would make it harder to calculate cylinder length. I marked them for cylinder locatuons from one of the earlier motors, and drove large locating holes, to allow for a bit of wiggle and adjustment of spacing and alignment as things progressed. The cylinders I made as before, putting a taper in the end of the rod, scoring 'fins' in with the blade of a razor knife, and then cutting at, or close to, anyway, the proper length (in this case, 4mm). Cooling fins are one place where I take refuge in scale fidelity --- these are always grossly over-stated in motors on models, especially in 1/72 (if properly scaled, the fins would have a thickness of three thousandths of an inch or less, well under a tenth of millimeter). To get the cylinders to the same length, I employed an improvised jig, made of two pieces of 2mm sheet laminated together, with a shelf on which the tapered end of the cylinder piece could rest, while the cylinder piece is tacked into place against the 'height' guide with a dab of CA gel. Once in place, they are trimmed down, with knife and sanding sticks, to match the height guide. Since the item accommodates seven cylinder pieces, each row of cylinders is done at one go. To prepare the tops of the cylinders, half of which must be cut down, a groove is sawn into the cylinders with a razor saw, once height is uniform. It is no trouble to crack the pieces off the jig by working a knife-point into the seam. Here is one rune with two remaining cylinder pieces on the jig.... The rear half of each cylinder top is removed once the piece is off the jig. A pin of 20 guage steel beading wire is put in the open end of the cylinders. Here is the front and rear of one of the assembled motors.... Next step is shaping and attaching the crankcase fronts. Circles were made of 3mm sheet, and their centers marked and pierced, with the rear face being attached to a toothpick for working.... They are then popped off the toothpicks and attached to the front of the motors. Next steps here will be adding a 'collar' at the rear, and putting in the fuel feed lines at the rear, followed by valves and associated 'works' in front, and finally the exhaust stubs.
  25. I have now got both of the existing 1/72 scale kits - the new one from Trumpeter (2017 release) - and the old one from Italeri (released in 1995) - so I thought I'd do a comparison.... these are just my personal opinions BTW..... The Trumpeter kit is typical from them - excellent packaging, crisp moulding and loads of weaponry and very expensive - but also some shape errors. It also represents the latest configuration - whereas the Italeri kit is of a Su-34 from about 20 years ago... Trumpeters excellent box art....... .... and superb packaging. But the nose is way off !!! .... compared to the real thing Italeri got it much better - all those years ago..... Italeri upper fuselage mated to Trumpeter lower.... Italeri lower fuselage mated to Trumpeter upper. Note the strakes on the Trumpeter kit (an addition since Italeri kitted their version). Trumpeter moulded the fuselage and wings as one part...... (but got the wingspan wrong - they measured the span WITHOUT the wingtip launch rails - so it works out at 208mm instead of the correct 204mm - Italeri is nearer at 205mm) Note also the sharp edge to the curved engine nacelles..... Italeri's nacelles are blended in better - much more subtle. Italer got their fins wrong - the early Su-34 prototypes had a taller fin taken from the Su-27UB - it was later replaced with a shorter fin taken from a single-seat Su-27. Trumpeter's fin (on the left) is better. Trumpeter provide the latest tailboom - with a built-in APU - but it is a half-hearted attempt - you have to cut out a recess and fit the intake grille into it. And.... they don't provide the APU exhaust flaps at the top rear of the tailboom.... Trumpeter (top) and Italeri tailbooms - Italeri is too long. More later Ken
×
×
  • Create New...