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Found 11 results

  1. It all started with me buying a Volvo B11 fire truck from Editions Atlas. It is from a 1/72 fire truck collection they had. It has a die cast cab while the rest is plastic. I had an idea that I could convert it in to a LV94 truck so I let the saw loose. First the cab was shortened. I had problems getting the new rear wall of plastic car to sticking to the metal. Next was to cut the chassis and add some plastic to get it longer. It doesn't look pretty. A cargo bed had to be scratch built. A wooden gasifier from an ACE model Renault was donated by a fellow modeller. It will be a civilian truck that was pressed in to military service so it will be more colourful than the usual military vehicles. I had to move the steering wheel to the left in the cab. While planning for this build I noticed the First To Fight had a Fiat 621 truck and I was curious if they were present in Sweden. While looking into that I just got a feeling that I was looking at an old Scania Vabis. Comparing data of the Fiat and Scania showed them to be very close in size so I thought that I should try to convert it. But when I got the kits and started to look into the Scania I became confused. The nose looked shorter on most of the pictures but reading more I found that there were a four and six cylinder truck so that was why some pictures were off. So I started on the six cylinder Scania Vabis 324 as the nose in the kit looked as it had the right length. I found a picture of a truck with a slightly larger cab so I moved the rear wall back further. The door will be smaller so the rear line was filled. I looked at some of the surviving trucks and most of them had a 3700 or 3800 mm wheel base and I opted on the longer one for this build, the front axle had to be moved so I rebuilt the front of the chassis. This will not be an exact model, more of a "look a like" I find the FTF plastic to be very soft and since there is no top of the window frame one door had been bent. The other kit will be a Scania Vabis 325. It was the four cylinder truck so I had to shorten the nose. I choose a different way to alter the chassis in the front. The front axle had to be moved on this one as well. I will keep the cab without any big changes. As I will build this with the shorter chassis I can use the cargo bed as well.¨ When I looked closer to the trucks I realized that the front fenders needed to be converted. I got the basic shape on the front fenders done. I thought that it would be a minor job turning a Fiat in to a Scania Vabis but it was more work than expected. I needed to see if any more putty was needed so some painting was done, as expected more putty are needed. Some wood gasifier parts has been scratch built. While in a truck spree I decided to to do another one. I wanted an Opel Blitz with a wood gasifier so I opted for a kit from MAC. It will also be a civilian truck pressed in to military service, so I needed another cab for it. An old Esci wreck will be stripped of paint ad adapted to this kit. This one will be green. Some debris got stuck in the paint so I need to repaint the cab. I think I will paint the wheels black instead.
  2. WWII British Trucks (DS3511) 1:35 ICM via Hannants Lets face it trucks will never be as widely like or respected as other armoured vehicles used by the Army, however no Army could do without them for moving men and material around. Tanks can not move without fuel and ammunition and guess what, the trucks deliver them. Infantry often march long distances but will always find it easier to hitch a ride. Here ICM bring together three of their recent new releases in one box. Leyland Retriever The British Army remembered the usefulness of mechanising transport that it learned from WWI, so when war became likely British companies such as Leyland were tasked with creating a modern truck chassis to be used in the forthcoming conflict. The Retriever was a six-wheeler chassis that could be outfitted with truck bodies, cranes, or even command wagon bodies such as that used by Monty during his campaigns in Europe and the Middle East, which now resides in the Imperial War Museum. It was a flexible type, and thanks to its 6-litre, 4-cylinder petrol engine outputting over 70hp, it could carry a healthy 3 tonne load almost 200 miles before refuelling. Around 6,500 were made in total before the end of WWII, and many were put to good use after their military service in civilian use. This is a brand-new tooling from ICM, and the first of a series of kits using the same chassis, which already includes the later General Service (GS) cargo body that will be with us soon. This is the Early type GS Cargo version. For this kit there are seven sprues in grey styrene, a small clear sprue, seven flexible plastic tyres, a postage-sized fret of Photo-Etch (PE) and a similarly small decal sheet. Slide-moulds have been used to add detail to the chassis rails, with the steering wheel having a delightfully crisp set of finger grips on the inside of its circumference. Construction begins with the ladder chassis, adding cross-rails, front suspension and the mounting point for the powered double rear axle, after which the Leyland engine is made up from a substantial number of parts along with the four-speed (and reverse) transmission and ancillaries. With the block mounted between the chassis rails at the front, the exhaust downpipe and muffler are installed from below, with a scrap diagram showing the location of the downpipe once in place. The rear axles are mounted either end of a pair of large leaf-springs that pivot around the centre, and these are joined to the motor with drive-shafts as they are slotted into the springs from above, then a number of linkages are inserted in two stages to complete the bogie. The front wheels are free-wheeling, and have brake drums at either end of the steering rack, which is then joined to the underside of the front springs and again linked to the chassis and steering wheel by rods. The rear hubs have their brake drums added to the backs of them before they have their well-moulded tyres slipped over the rim, while the front wheels have a flat back that joins to the drums already on the axle. Finally, the spare is fitted onto a two-part hub and fixed to a bracket with a turnbuckle holding it in place, then it is further attached to a larger set of bracketry for stowing between the cab and load bed. The cab starts with the firewall to which the instrument binnacle is added on the right (correct) side, then the floor halves are installed, with the driver’s controls attached to the right hand footwell. The delicately moulded steering wheel and column with brace are slid in through the small hole in the footwell, and the engine cover is constructed from a fixed central section and two L-shaped inspection panels that allow maintenance without removing the whole cab. What initially looks like a pair of stowage boxes at the rear of the cab are in fact the crew seats, which have short back “rests” on the rear bulkhead that is joined by a pair of short sidewalls. A pair of mudguards are attached underneath the floor, then the lower cab is glued to the chassis over the engine compartment, with the radiator assembled from styrene with a PE grille and a pair of PE name badges top and bottom. With the chassis flipped over, the outlet for the exhaust is slipped through a bracket and joined to the back of the muffler, then it’s time to make up the fuel tank, which has separate end caps, and twin mounting brackets that allow it to fit onto the space between the cab and load area alongside the spare wheel. This kit is the cargo version and has a flatbed built up with low sides, bench seats and loading gate at the rear. Underneath the bed are two longitudinal beams with cross-braces slotting into the engraved grooves along its length. To each outer side of the beams are stowage boxes and diagonal mudguards, after which the sub-assembly can be mated with the chassis, then a pair of running boards are attached on brackets between the wheels. The crew are protected by a canvas roof that has sides and back fitted before it is joined to the cab, leaving the front and sides open to the atmosphere – lucky drivers! The front is fitted out with two headlamps with clear lenses, and an odd “shelf” on the left side of the radiator, then side-lights are installed outboard and a hand-crank is slotted into the front of the radiator at the bottom. The wagon has a canvas cover in real life, but in the model you get the frame, which consists of four lateral inverted U-shaped supports and seven longitudinal ribs that slot into the grooves moulded into the hoops. That’s the model finished, unless you want to add two small supports to the front of the roof, which are shown in a drawing at the end of the instructions. These aren’t supplied, but can be made from styrene rod or wire quite easily if your references show they were fitted to your example. Markings It’s a truck in the British Army, so it’s going to be green. They also didn’t wear much in the way of decoration other than number plates and the occasional unit markings. From the box you can build one of the following: Europe 1945 Europe 1944 Decals are by ICM’s usual printers, which is a guarantee of good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Model W.O.T. 6 Truck During WWII, Ford UK built a great many vehicles for the British war effort, as well as some 34,000 Merlin engines for Spitfires, Lancasters and Hurricanes. The WOT.6 was a 4x4 light truck (3 ton capacity) with a short cab that housed a 3.6L V8 engine pumping out a fairly paltry 85hp that could get it to 75mph eventually. The engine's location under the cab gave the load bed plenty of space on the chassis rail, and also gave the truck a sit-up-and-beg look. The heat from the radiator had to be redirected by a fairing to prevent it being ingested by open windows, thereby cooking and possibly even poisoning the crew if it wasn't in the best of health. Over 30,000 were built in a number of configurations, and they were in service from 1942 to the end of the war, with those in good enough shape carrying on into the early 60s. This is another new tooling from ICM. The kit has seven sprues in medium grey styrene, a clear sprue in its own bag, four flexible black plastic tyres and a sheet of Photo-Etch (PE) parts, each in their own bags, plus a small decal sheet. British WWII softskins aren't much of a priority for many companies, so it will be happily anticipated by many for that reason, and due to the vast improvement in ICM's tooling in recent years they will be pleased to see that they have packed in a lot of detail to this release, and you can almost bank on there being other versions forthcoming in time if this one sells well. Perusing the sprues shows plenty of detail all over, with the occasional ejector pin that's unavoidable if you're expecting top quality detail on both sides of parts. Common sense has prevailed however, and all the marks are in areas where they either won't be seen, or where they're relatively easy to make good. The construction phase begins with the chassis, which is made up from two main rails, with sub-rails and spacers holding things together, and front suspension moulded into the outer rails. With the chassis completed by adding the rear end, attention turns to the engine, which is a complete rendering, and made up from a good number of parts for detail, including the block, pulleys, transmission and a short drive-shaft that threads through the holes in the cross-members. The two long exhaust pipes with mufflers go under the chassis on each side, and the rear suspension is fitted, which is a substantial set of leaf-springs, then the axles and drive shafts are attached to the suspension and transfer box. Brake drums, fuel tanks, steering arms and struts are all installed before the wheels are built-up around the rubbery black tyres, which have tread details moulded-in, and are finished off by the addition of the hubs, which attach from both sides, and are then detailed with additional parts before they are slotted onto the axles. The undercarriage is almost done, and it's time for the upper surfaces, beginning with the engine bay, which has the front wheel-arches moulded in, and is then detailed with lights, front rail, radiator and some additional ancillaries to keep the engine running. You even get a pair of lower hoses for the radiator to mate it to the engine, and two more longer ones diving diagonally down into the topside of the engine from the top of the rad. There's going to be a bit of painting needed, as the engine can be seen from the underside, even though access is limited. The bay sides are planted, and are joined by internal covers and instrumentation on top, which have a few decals to detail them up. Some of the driver's controls are added on the right side (the correct side) of the engine, and a pair of seats are built up and added to the square bases installed earlier, then the front of the cab is detailed with clear parts and window actuators, before the sides are attached to the edges and lowered onto the chassis, then joined by the simple dash board and steering wheel on its spindly column. The doors are separate parts and have clear windows, handles and window winders added, then joined to the sides in either the open or closed position or any variation of the two. The cab is a bit draughty at the moment, until the rear panel and the roof are added, the latter having a pop-up cover on the co-driver's side, with a couple of PE grilles then added to the front radiator frames after being bent to shape. Now for the truck bed, beginning with the sides, which have two stiffeners added, then are covered with bumpers along the top and bottom edge of the outside face. The bed floor fits into a groove into the bottom, and is kept square by the addition of the front and rear sides. Under the bed are a number of stowage boxes and racks for additional fuel or water cans, which are happily also included, then they are joined by the two parts per wheel that form the wheel arch that are braced on the outside with two small struts. Then it's the fun part! Adding the bed to the chassis, which is kept in the correct place by two ridges under the bed that mate with grooves in the chassis rail. At the front, two light-hoods are fitted above the lights, and the prominent pedestrian unfriendly hood that deflects the rain and hopefully redirects the engine heat from being sucked back into the open front windows on a hot day. The cab is detailed with additional lights, horn, wing mirrors, grab-handles and even some pioneer tools, then the windscreen wipers. Moving backwards, the four c-shaped hoops that support the canvas tilt are applied to the outside of the bed sides, reaching roughly half-way down the sides to obtain a strong join in both 1:1 and 1:35. The final act is to add seven rods along the length of the roof section of the tilt frame, which will need some careful alignment to ensure all the hoops are vertical and correctly spaced. Now you can paint it, but you've probably got a lot of that done already in truth. Markings It's a softskin, so British green is the colour you'll be using the most of. There are four decal options in the box, and all of them look very similar to the casual observer as there are minimal markings due to the subject in hand. The decal sheet is pretty small as a result, but it's also quite colourful due to the unit markings that are included. From the box you can build one of the following: France, Summer 1944 L5496558 France, 1944 Great Britain, Summer 19445 30YX68 Great Britain, Summer 1945 Decals are printed in-house, and have good register, colour density and sharpness, which include those useful instrument dials with black backgrounds. Model W.O.T.8 Truck Made by Ford UK under the Fordson brand, the WOT 8 was the last of a long line of vehicles using similar nomenclature in service of the British Army. Introduced in 1941 there were approximately 2,500 built, with a number of those sent to Russia as Lend/Lease vehicles of which a few were converted to carry Katyusha rockets. In British service they were used as a prime mover for artillery, particularly in North Africa and Italy. Its large fuel tank gave it a healthy range and a reasonable top speed thanks to the Ford V8 engine that put out 85hp, which wasn’t terrible for the day. This is another new tool from ICM. The kit arrives as eight sprues in grey styrene, five black wheels in flexible plastic, a clear sprue, a small fret of Photo Etch (PE) brass and a tiny decal sheet. Construction begins with the chassis ladder and the front sub-frame with cross-members and leaf spring suspension, plus a full V8 block made up from a good number of parts. The exhaust has a silencer near the rear and exits the underside at the rear of the aft suspension springs to which the rear axle and differential are fitted, then joined to the central transfer box by a driveshaft with the front axle having a similar reversed layout plus steering box. The drum brakes are hidden behind the wheels, which are made up from the flexible “rubber” part that is sandwiched between the inner and outer hub, plus extra detail parts on both sides, eventually slotting onto a long axle front and rear. The underside is mostly complete, and attention turns to the body beginning with the engine compartment between the two curved front wings. Radiator, air filter and fan are added along with a hand-crank for manual starting, then the radiator hosing is installed so that the side plates that isolate the power plant from the crew cab interior can be added. In the right foot well the driver’s controls are added, with a handbrake further to the rear, and a central instrument panel sits almost on top of the engine. The crew seats sit atop boxes and have separate cushions for back and base, after which the cab can be boxed in, adding detail parts and glazing panels as you go. The sloping cab is trimmed with a dash panel and steering wheel, then separate doors with handles and more glazing are put in place either open, closed or anywhere in between at your whim, then closed in with the rear cab and finally the curved-sided roof. The PE radiator grilles have to be bent to match the contours of the sloped front, and these are later joined by a rain “porch” that prevents ingress of water in the winter, and probably helps divert engine heat from the open cab windows in the summer. The spare wheel and the substantial fuel tank are built next, and positioned behind the cab wall and in front of the flatbed. This is made from a large floor, detailed sides, front and tailgate, with stowage boxes between the front and rear angled mudguards, which have braces holding them at the correct angle to the floor. The bed's cross-rails mesh with cut-outs in the chassis rails, then the wing mirrors, wipers and grab handles are added to the cab, with the tilt hoops glued across the flatbed, and joined by shortened rails that support the tilt lengthways. You can also build the model with the tilt deployed by using the five parts provided on the sprues, but these don’t show the tubular framework inside, so won’t withstand close scrutiny unless you add some detail in there in the shape of wire or half-round rod. Markings There are two decal options for the vehicle, both of which are olive green with a khaki tilt. Despite being a British vehicle the white star was adopted later in the war as the universal Allies marking, which one option uses. WOT 8 1st Czech Armoured Brigade, Germany, Spring 1945 WOT 8 France, Summer 1944 The decals are printed in the usual ICM style with good register and clarity, but the yellow circles seem a little translucent, so it may be wise to prepare for them with a white base layer. Conclusion ICM have been filling a lot of gaps in the British WWII softskin range, and this will likely be very welcome, finding a place in a lot of stashes, boxing all three of these in one package is very welcome indeed. Very Highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Wehrmacht 3 Axle Trucks (DS3508) 1:35 ICM via Hannants Ltd. While tanks and fighting vehicles maybe the more glamorous side of vehicles used by armies it is often forgotten that the humble truck is the back bone of logistics; without which no army in the world can unction. This set from ICM brings together three of their 3 axle German truck models under one box lid. Henschell 33 D1 German Truck (35466) During the re-armament of German forces it was recognised mechanisation would be a key aspect, and trucks would be needed with a 3t tuck. Henschell, Krupp and Bussing would develop these. The Henschell 33 B1 was first delivered in 1928. In 1929 the D1 was developed with a better engine. From 1933 the truck was again improved with a single carden drive shaft, the axles were moved slightly further apart & the rims went to simplex units with 6 spokes. These trucks were manufactured in large numbers with over 22000 being made. They served in all theaters with the German Army right upto the end of WWII. This comprehensive kit from ICM arrives on 6 sprues of grey plastic and a clear sprue. The parts are very well moulded and the kit comes complete with the engine and all the running gear. Construction starts with the main chassis which is built up like the real thing. The main longitudinal members are joined by the cross members, at the front the engine is assembled and added in, large side running boards are added, and the front axle is made up and added under the engine. The rear air tanks go on along with the full length exhaust. Next up the complex drive train with the gear box, prop shafts and rear axles is made up and built onto the chassis. The rear suspension components are added, along with all the wheels. The cab and engine covers are the next major parts to be built up and added to the vehicle along with the front mudguards and radiator. The truck bed is up next with nicely wood grained components. This is made up as a single piece complete with mud guards and spare wheel carriers. To finish up the front bumper and lights are added along with various tools and the hoops for a rear cover (though no cover is provided). Markings The small decal sheet gives 4 options; France 1940, Russia 1941, Italy 1943, and France 1944 Krupp L3H163 German Truck (35461) Developed at the same time as the Henschell only about 2000 of the Krupp truck were built. It was a more complex vehicle with a high/low range gear box for road/off road driving and lockable rear differentials, Tracks were able to be fitted to the rear axles for use in snow and heavy mud, and the truck features a motor driven winch. These trucks were also license built by Raba in Hungary. This complete kit from ICM arrives on 7 sprues of grey plastic and a clear sprue. The parts are very well moulded and the kit comes complete with the engine and all the running gear. Construction starts with the main chassis which is built up like the real thing. The main longitudinal members are joined by the cross members, at the front the engine is assembled and added in, The large side running boards/front mud guards are added along with air tanks and side lockers. The complex front and rear suspension units are made up and added in. This is followed by the equally complex drive train. The wheels can then be added. The cab and engine covers are the next major parts to be built up and added to the vehicle, with the radiator also going on the front. The truck bed is up next with nicely wood grained components. This is made up as a single piece complete with mud guards, equipment lockers, and spare wheel carriers. To finish up the front bumper and lights are added along with various tools and the hoops for a rear cover (though no cover is provided). Markings The small decal sheet has markings for 4 trucks in Poland 1939, France 1940, Germany 1940, and Ukraine 1941 Mercedes-Benz Typ LG3000 German Army Truck (35405) The Typ LG3000 was Mercedes version o the 3 axle truck for the German Military. Over 27000 of the Type 3000 were produced in various versions. The truck had a diesel engine and proved extremely reliable and robust. It was used extensively by the Afrika Corps. Here construction starts with the large engine and main transmission block. This is added into the chassis which is built up like the real thing. The main longitudinal members are joined by the cross members, Small side running guards are added then the main suspension units are built up along with the axles and transmission components, once complete these go onto the chassis. All the wheels are then assembled and added. The complex main cab is then built up with the engine covers as well going on here. The truck bed is up next with nicely wood grained components. This is made up as a single piece complete with mud guards, equipment lockers, and spare wheel carriers. To finish up the front bumper and lights are added along with various tools and the hoops for a rear cover (though no cover is provided). Markings There are four markings options on the small sheet; Poland 1940, France 1940, Ukraine 1941, and Russia 1941. Conclusion This is a great combination set that offers a lot in the box that would keep you busy for quite a while. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Wehmacht 3t Trucks (DS3507) 1:35 ICM via Hannants Ltd. While tanks and fighting vehicles maybe the more glamours side of vehicles used by armies it is often forgotten that the humble truck is the back bone of logistics; without which no army in the world can unction. This set from ICM brings together three of their 3t German truck models under one box lid. Typ L3000S German Truck (35420) Standardising from 1940 on the Mercedes Benz design in order to simplify spares and maintenance, the L3000S was one of many variants of the truck to see service. Powered by a 4 cylinder 4.85 litre diesel engine with four-wheel drive and able to carry up to 3 tonnes of cargo, it was a workhorse that saw service in almost every theatre of WWII where there was a German presence with almost 30,000 made. Consisting of three large sprues, a clear sprue, three pairs of rubberised tyres, decal sheet and instructions, this is a full engine kit with detailed chassis, multi-part engine assembly, cab and truck bed. Construction begins with the chassis and engine, suspension and exhaust, then moves to the front fenders, driveshafts attaching the rear axle in place, and steering arms at the front, both attaching to the leaf suspension. The wheels have two-part hubs that the rubbery tyres slip over, with two at the front and two pairs on different style hubs on the rear axle. The crew cab is made up with floor, instrument panel with decals, bench-style seat, then the various external panels that box in the crew. There is a small window to the rear, and the main windscreen aperture is moulded into the roof and firewall cowling, while the doors are separate mouldings that can be posed open or closed with separate winders and handles, plus clear panels all round the cab. Before the engine bay is boxed in the cab is joined with the chassis, then the front bumper/fender is glued to the end of the chassis rails and the three-part cowling with separate radiator is dropped between the front wings to complete the chassis. If you were minded, you could score the top panel of the cowling to display the engine, and if the thickness of the part bothered you, you could cut a new one from brass using the original as a template and rolling the edges. The smaller parts such as lights, number plate holders and windscreen wipers are fitted after the cargo bed has been made up. The cargo bed is built on the floor, with upstands latching into their hinge-points and the addition of front fixed panel and the rear door giving it some rigidity. Five cross-braces are added underneath and are joined together by two additional longitudinal rails where they join with the chassis. A spare wheel, stowage boxes and spare fuel cans in cages are then fitted to the underside with the rear mudguards suspended from boxed in sections. The bed fits onto the chassis by a quartet of pegs that locate in corresponding slots in the chassis rail, then the aforementioned lights, pioneer tools and windscreen wipers are glued in place around the model. Markings There are four options on the decal sheet, only two of which are theatre specific to this boxing and painted grey. Not everyone will stick to the theme though, which is fair enough as it's your model. From the box you can build one of the following: WH-272 104 Ukraine, Summer 1941 WL-34548 Russia, Summer 1942 WH-858 842 North Africa, Summer 1942 WH-76836 Italy, Summer 1944 KHD S3000 German Truck (35451) From 1940 onward the German army, by standardizing and simplifying the numerous types of trucks, tried to improve the procurement of spare parts and facilitate repairs. The result was the standard 3 ton truck, which all German manufacturers now used as a basis for construction. This was also the basis on which the motor manufacturer Klöckner Humboldt Deutz AG, (KHD) of Cologne produced the A3000. Various bodies and sets of equipment were available, including a half track, “maultier”. A typical recognition feature was the oval radiator grille and one-piece windscreen. In total about 5960 examples were built between 1940 and 1944. The 4 wheel drive A3000 came to be used on all fronts in the Second World War and was indispensable for supplying the troops with goods of all kinds. The build starts with the nicely detailed engine with the block and gearbox halves glued together followed by the addition of the rocker covers, starter motor, alternator, front engine mounts, cooling fan, air filter, and other sundry items. The instructions then move on to the complicated transfer box, with its input and output shafts and cross member frame that fits onto the chassis rails with the addition of four other cross members and rear chassis end piece, to which the towing eye, cover and pin are added, along with the front mudguards and engine are attached. The front and rear leaf springs are pre moulded to the chassis rails, the front and rear axles and transfer box are then fitted. Turning the rails over the engine can now be fitted plus the exhaust system, which comprises of four parts, and looks particularly fragile so it may be an idea to build in situ rather than as a separate assembly the instructions call for. The two driveshafts are then be added, as are the radiator/front chassis end piece. The steering rack assembly is built up using the four parts provided and, if the modeller chooses can be built up so that the front wheels are pose able, although this may make it rather fragile, particularly the rear tie rod. After fitting the various brackets and supports as well as the front bumper, it’s onto the wheels, these come as single piece tyres plus inner and outer hubs. There are seven provided, singles for the front, doubles for the rear and a spare which fits on the chassis behind the cab and under the bed, along with the four piece fuel tank. The building of the cab begins with filing off the ejection pins marks on the underside of the floor, before fitting the pedals, steering column, steering wheel and handbrake handle. The seat support and cushion is fitted to the floor, whilst the windscreen, instrument panel, (with decal instruments), are fitted to the roof/front part of the cab. Onto the rear panel of the cab the seat back and rear screen are attached. The next assembly for the cab is the bonnet, which is made up of left and right hand parts, bonnet and radiator grille. The completed bonnet cannot easily be made to be posed either open, which is a shame. To finish off the foot plates are attached along with the doors, which are made of the external panels, door cards, clear parts, and door handles. Last details are the wing mirrors, lights, wipers; grab handles, spade, triangular roof marker, jerry can and its support bracket. The last assembly is the truck bed, with the bed itself being fitted with the side, rear, and front plank sections. On the underside, four lateral strengthening beams, plus the two wheel arches are fitted with their attachment struts. The kit comes complete with four tilt rails that attach to the outsides of the truck bed sides. To complete the build the windscreen wipers, wing mirrors, grab handles, headlamps, and width markers are glued into their respective positions. Markings There are two markings on the sheet; A. KHD S3000 Ukraine 1942 in overall Grey B. KHD S3000 France Summer 1944 in Yellow/Green camo. V S3000 (1941 Production) German Army Truck (35411) From 1940 onwards the German army, by standardizing and simplifying the numerous types of trucks, tried to improve the procurement of spare parts and facilitate repairs. The result was the standard 3 ton truck, which all German manufacturer snow used as a basis for construction. This was also the basis on which the motor manufacturer in Cologne produced the "V3000S" from 1941 onwards. Various bodies and sets of equipment were available. A typical recognition feature was the oval radiator grille and one-piece windscreen. In total about 25,000 examples were built. The "V 3000 S" came to be used on all fronts in the Second World War and was indispensable for supplying the troops with goods of all kinds. The build starts with the nicely detailed engine with the block and gearbox halves glued together followed by the addition of the rocker covers, starter motor, alternator, front engine mounts, cooling fan, air filter, cooling pipes, gear stick and other sundry items. The instructions then move on to the chassis rails with the addition of five cross members and rear chassis end piece, to which the towing eye, cover and pin are added. To the top of the main rails the two sub rails are added. These are then further secured to the main rails by six ties and clamps. The front and rear leaf springs are fitted along with the rear axle and transfer box. Turning the rails over the engine can now be fitted plus the exhaust system, which comprises of seven parts, and looks particularly fragile so it may be an idea to build in situ rather than as a separate assembly the instructions call for. The two driveshafts can then be added, as can the radiator/front chassis end piece. The steering rack assembly is built up using the four parts provided and, if the modeller chooses can be built up so that the front wheels are posable, although this may make it rather fragile, particularly the rear tie rod. After fitting the various brackets and supports as well as the front bumper and tow hooks, it’s onto the wheels, these come as single piece tyres and outer wheels. There are seven provided, singles for the front, doubles for the rear and a spare which fits on the chassis behind the cab and under the bed. The inner wheels are glued whilst an middle part is not, to enable the wheels to turn when fitted to the axles which most modellers probably wouldn’t be bothered with. The building of the cab begins with filing off the ejection pins marks on the underside of the floor, before fitting the pedals, steering column, steering wheel and handbrake handle. The seat support and cushion is fitted to the floor, whilst the windscreen, instrument panel, with decal instruments, are fitted to the roof/front part of the cab. Onto the rear panel of the cab the seat back and rear screen are attached. The next assembly for the cab is the bonnet, which is made up of left and right hand parts, bonnet and bonnet ornament strake. The completed bonnet can then be posed either opened or closed. The final part of the cab is the engine bay which is built up of the left and right hand sides, radiator grille, and rear bulkhead. These five sub assemblies are then fitted together to make the full front assembly, which is then fitted to the chassis. To finish off the front, the mud guards/foot plates are attached along with the doors, which are made of the external panels, door cards, clear parts, and door handles. Last details are the wing mirrors, lights, wipers; grab handles, spade, triangular roof marker, jerry can and its support bracket. The last assembly is the truck bed. This is built up with the bed itself, five strengthening beams on the underside along with two storage containers and rear number plate. There are four supports for each of the rear mudguards and the mudguards themselves to be fitted before flipping the assembly over and attaching the front sides and rear panels. On the front panel, two brackets are attached, into which the hoops for a canvas cover, which is not supplied. The whole assembly is then attached to the chassis, completing the build. Markings There are four markings options on the small sheet;; A. V3000S Russia Summer 1942 (Overall Grey) B. V3000S Russia Winter 1942 (Overall white) C. V3000S Italy 1943 (Overall Grey) D. V3000S Sicily June 1943 (Two tone grey camo) Conclusion This is a great combination set that offers a lot in the box that would keep you busy for quite a long time, and for the price of one large tank model (i.e. almost half its individual RRP). Two vehicles and eight figures plus weapons in total, and lots of lovely detail that just begs to be made into a diorama. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Giddey to all! Here another design, a muffler for the Italeri 1/24 MAN F90 kit. This detail is missing in the model, they have only the rather unusual sidepipes! It was not easy to design with tinkercad, but easy to print by shapeways. Regards Andreas Edited 5 minutes ago by Andreas.R
  6. AEC 'Matador' Early, Model (0)853 Kit: AFV Club (AF35236) Started: Tuesday 12th January 2016 The Associated Equipment Company (AEC) also produced: AEC Armoured Cars Mk's I, II & III Armoured Command Vehicles All are covered by either AFV Club or MiniArt Way back in April 2014, Terry Ashley on the PMMS website highlighted all the major issues with this kit which are mostly Parts Numbering Errors! For all those of a sensitive disposition: No Tracks or Track-links will be harmed during the making of this model However, we may get a little Tyred! Section 1 refered to as 'A' and the start of another new kit. No Engine in the kit but at least the sump can be seen underneath. Half-way through Section 3 and the chassis need to be jigged up so, I've dug out my Picador Milling Blocks. It should be noted here that this kit has a degree of Sprue 'flash' and is of a brittle type of plastic. Almost certainly there will be a bit more clean-up involved - which is something I hadn't expected! There are also sink holes and injection pin marks as well as some lumps of excess plastic, all of which will need attention so have your filler too hand during construction. Next Time: the remaining Chassis & Suspension Units
  7. In our Sale we've got amazing Black Friday/Cyber Monday discounts on some of Revell's Newest Kits! There's a great selection from Armour to Aircraft and Buses to Big Rigs! Stocks are very limited so get your order soon in to avoid bad news! Watch out for more deals, discounts and news from Wonderland Models! For full details, please see our newsletter here.
  8. This October AFV Club are releasing a great 1/35 Bussing NAG L4500A German Kfz 100 with a Bilstein 3T Plastic Model Kit to add to your collection. This great kit includes new injected crane parts, fantastic detailing and some precision photo-etch parts! Well worth a look! For full details, please see our newsletter here.
  9. We've got a few new kits from ICM and IBG in stock now, including two trucks, a figure set and one aircraft. IBG have one model for us: A 1/35 scale WWII Era US Chevrolet C60S Petrol Tanker, whereas ICM have 3 offerings: a 1/35 German KHD S3000 Army Truck, a 1/35 Italian Infantry WWI Era Model Figures Kit and last but not least a 1/48 RAF Beechcraft C18S Expeditor II C45F model kit. For full details, please see our newsletter here.
  10. Laaaadies and Gentlemen Gather round, gather round... Its time for those of us from the dark side of modelling to come to the fore, with a GB of magnanamous proportions! Yes, alone, we fight against the dragons with a mere toothpick , but together, we can nuke the buggers!!! A Civilian Motor Vehicle GB, is just the answer we need. You name it,we want it in here, as long as its a Civilian Vehicle Cars, Bikes, Trucks, Racing Cars, and yes, even buses (gasp) The aim is to bring ALL the dark side genre's together, for one big mega GB This is your chance chaps, you never see enough car, bike, truck, racecar GB's?, well this one is for EVERYONE! Any kind of Car, including Racing Cars, Any kind of Bike, including Racing Bikes, Trucks, Buses, you name it. As long as it is a Civilian Motor Vehicle, its welcome here. Somebody is bound to ask, what about civilianised military vehicles like trucks etc, as long at they are not in military colours, they are allowed (Wheeled Vehicles only) And someone is bound to ask as well, what about civilian aircraft??? What part of Motor Vehicle did you not understand? Very Simple guidelines - Cars, Bikes, Trucks, Buses, Race Cars of any description - No Miltary vehicles allowed unless they have been civilianised (for example, big Scammel trucks after the war) - Any kit, any medium, any scale from any era, and as much aftermarket stuff as you'd like. - The usual standard GB Rules will apply. I'll volunteer as Host, but I think we might need a Co host on this, have a feeling this might be a big one... We need the usual 30 bodies, to be put through for consideration for next year. The List, has been started 1) Mad Steve (Host) 2) hgbn 3) Caution Wake Turbulence 4) Black Knight 5) Milktrip 6) Paul J 7) Rob G 8) Dazdot 9) Cliff B 10) Doug Rogers 11) iJones 12) Bonhoff 13) Bootneck 14) Andy C 15) Mark 16) The Cameraman 17) Shermaniac 18) Chimpion 19) Richellis 20) Aimees Dad 21) Rich G 22) 06/24 GO FOR IT!!! Steve
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