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  1. My first WIP thread. So lets see how this goes. When I got back into modelling last year (Covid/Lockdown/Furlough......argh!), I made a couple of "Egg planes". Always wanted to add the Tiger Spitfire to that collection. So....... On top of the standard kit, I wanted to try and add a bit more detail, so I bought the Retro wings Cockpit detail kit to add to it. So with the box opened and sprues laid out i have this to play with. Note - You get stickers and decals with this kit, I will be using the decals. Now, as you can see from the pictures above, this Spitfire is designated a RF-K code. Nothing strange there, however my late Dads initials were RKF. This got me thinking, do I make this Spitfire a small tribute to my old man. The man who got me into Modelling, and my love of Aircraft, which has then me to the job I have? Seems too much of a concidence to miss. Not decided to keep it as RF-K which would have been assigned to 303 Squadron......... Or, change it to RK-F, while the RK squadron code prefix was assigned to 131 Squadron in 1939, it was never actually used. When they were reformed in 1941 and had Spitfires, they used the NX Sqaudron Prefix. Saying that, a bit of poetic licence always helps us. So, will see how this build goes, and try and share it with you all, while being something that bit different than the normal aircraft build. Thanks for looking
  2. Now as we all know, the nazi tiger tank was probably the greatest tank built in WW2. Here is probably my best build yet. Now okay this is just a starter set and yes I am only 13 whilst doing this sort of stuff. But I am happy with it. Great kit overall, and I had a go at some homemade washes using a dark brown and black washes over the details of the tank. Now I did forget to put a Matt varnish layer on before the washes and this did lead to a little peeling of the paint but nothing too severe. Please feel free to suggest any things that I could change or make better as I plan to do another of the same kit soon Please check out the Link to Flickr images below- https://www.flickr.com/photos/193567223@N05/albums/72157719704272992
  3. I know it’s an oldish kit, but does anyone know whether you can still get replacement metal barrels to fit Tamiya’s late Tiger 1 (35146)? I think Aber’s is 35L028 but I can’t seem to find any UK suppliers that have it. Thanks in advance
  4. I recently finished up a quick build of Tamiya's 1/48 scale Tiger I (late). I don't typically build German subjects, but it was a fun distraction and I enjoyed it overall. I upgraded the base kit with a Monroe Perdu zimmerit set, an RB metal barrel, and some PE screens my friend donated to me. It was painted with AK Real Color and Tamiya paints and weathered with Ammo enamels. Comments and criticism welcomed as always!
  5. Tiger I Starter Set 1:72 Airfix A55004 Everyone that’s even a little bit interested in tanks will know the name of the dreaded Tiger tank from WWII, which was at the forefront of German armoured might, and if it wasn’t for the limited numbers on the battlefield coupled with their unreliability, plus Hitler’s meddling with his General’s decisions, the invasion in 1944 might have been much harder fought than it already was. Designed to replace the Panzer IV but often fighting alongside it, the Tiger added extra armour and a larger 88mm gun similar to that of the successful Flak 37 artillery piece, and became one of the most dangerous tanks on the field in the later stages of WWII. The drive-train was stressed to the max due to the huge weight of the gun and armour, which caused many vehicles to be lost due to breakdowns and subsequent abandonment and scuttling of the hull. The Kit This is a new tool from Airfix and is 1.72 unlike some other small scale armour kits which were 1/76 scale. As you can expect from a new tool the moulding are crisp and clean, the plastic also seems to be a bit harder than some of the modern aircraft kits. In a departure from previous kits the rubber band tracks have gone. In the initial boxing both link and length tracks and single part tracks moulded with the wheels/bogies are included, this is now a "Simplified" version of this kit with only the single part tracks/wheels included. As well as paints, glue and a brush the instructions have also been re-worked to show where all the parts are on the sprues, and a small guide to tools is included in the kit. First up the lower hull is built. The sides are attached to the base and the front and rear bulkheads are added. The main top of the tank is then added and the side plates with track guards go on. At the rear the engine exhausts with their covers, and the rear mud guards are attached. At the front the bow machine gun and drivers vision port are added. To finish of the hull the tow cables are added. Construction now moves to the turret. The gun mantlet is built up and then placed in between the tow side of the turret. No glue is used here if you wish the gun to elevate. Hole are drilled in one side of the turret for attaching additional track links. Once the side are together the turret roof can be added along with the rear storage locker. Hatches and vision blocks can then be added also. Next up the single part barrel goes on, the muzzle brake is in tow halves one moulded in and the other half now going on. To finish up the track assemblies are added to the hull along with the turret. Decals The small decal sheet is from Cartograf so should post no issues, it has only one scheme Tank 334, schwere Panzer-Abteilung 503, Russia July 1944. Conclusion As well as Airfix's drive into 1/35 scale armour it is good to see them sticking with their roots and producing new kits for the small scale armour modeller. The kit looks really good in the box and their should be an appeal to the younger modeller with the simplified track details, or even a market for war gamers? Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Classic Conflict Gift Set Tiger I / Sherman Firefly Vc 1:72 Airfix A50186 This new set seems to be Airfix's Dogfight Doubles set for Armour. This new box brings together the the new Tiger and Sherman Firefly kits with paint, glue & brushes added. Everyone that’s even a little bit interested in tanks will know the name of the dreaded Tiger tank from WWII, which was at the forefront of German armoured might, and if it wasn’t for the limited numbers on the battlefield coupled with their unreliability, plus Hitler’s meddling with his General’s decisions, the invasion in 1944 might have been much harder fought than it already was. Designed to replace the Panzer IV but often fighting alongside it, the Tiger added extra armour and a larger 88mm gun similar to that of the successful Flak 37 artillery piece, and became one of the most dangerous tanks on the field in the later stages of WWII. The drive-train was stressed to the max due to the huge weight of the gun and armour, which caused many vehicles to be lost due to breakdowns and subsequent abandonment and scuttling of the hull. The Sherman was one of the most widely used Allied tanks during WWII, named after an American Civil War general when it entered service in the early part of the war. It was the mainstay of Allied armour, and was a reliable and rugged vehicle, but initially suffered from weak points and thin side armour that allowed a carefully placed shot to penetrate it an set the tank afire. Once identified appliqué armour was added to the vulnerable spots to improve survivability. It became one of the most produced tanks of WWII, with over 50,000 produced, 17,000+ of which were destined for British service. Originally fitted with a 75mm gun, the arrival of the Panther and Tiger tanks in the European Theatre led to tests for improving firepower to penetrate the thicker armour of these new foes. The American tests weren't as successful as the British forays into heavy armament, and it was the redesign and installation of the Ordnance QF 17-pounder gun in a standard turret that resulted in the Firefly, lead by W.G.K. Kilbourn, a Vickers engineer, that succeeded in adding the gun to the Sherman. It was capable of knocking out a Panther and Tiger at combat ranges from then on. Although the Firefly concept was initially rejected, it was pushed ahead and the improved Shermans started reaching the front just in time for the work-up before D-Day where it accredited itself well. To hide the extra firepower the length of the barrel was sometimes disguised by adding a wavy camouflage to the underside in the hope the enemy would confuse it with the weaker 75mm gun and be less cautious. By war's end around 2,000 Fireflys had been produced, and had been used effectively as part of the larger Sherman force, evolving new tactics to protect the valuable Fireflies while making good use of their heavy hitting power. Tanks with 17-pounder guns were usually known as "1C", "1C Hybrid", or "VC", depending on the basic mark of the vehicle. The "C" indicated fitment of the 17 Pounder Gun. The Firefly nickname is said to be a response to the bright flash of the gun firing. The Kit - Tiger I This is a new tool from Airfix and is 1.72 unlike some other small scale armour kits which were 1/76 scale. As you can expect from a new tool the moulding are crisp and clean, the plastic also seems to be a bit harder than some of the modern aircraft kits. In a departure from previous kits the rubber band tracks have gone. In this boxing both link and length tracks and single part tracks moulded with the wheels/bogies are included, it would seem Airfix are also going to release a "Simplified" version of this kit with only the single part tracks/wheels included. The first thing to do when starting construction is to select which track types you want and follow the instruction steps for that one. First up the lower hull is built. The sides are attached to the base and the front and rear bulkheads are added. The main top of the tank is then added and the side plates with track guards go on. At the rear the engine exhausts with their covers, and the rear mud guards are attached. At the front the bow machine gun and drivers vision port are added. To finish of the hull the tow cables are added. Construction now moves to the turret. The gun mantlet is built up and then placed in between the tow side of the turret. No glue is used here if you wish the gun to elevate. Hole are drilled in one side of the turret for attaching additional track links. Once the side are together the turret roof can be added along with the rear storage locker. Hatches and vision blocks can then be added also. Next up the single part barrel goes on, the muzzle brake is in tow halves one moulded in and the other half now going on. If using the simplified tracks these can be glued together and attached to the tank, though this will leave a central seam. If not using the simplified tracks then you dont have to worry about the multitude of interleaved wheels. Airfix have moulded these as one major part onto which the faces of the second row wheels are separate and now go on. The outer wheels are all individual parts. The drive sprockets are made up and then these attach to the front of the completed wheel assembly which also contains the return roller. The link and length tracks then go around the whole assembly. To finish up the track assemblies are added to the hull along with the turret. Decals The small decal sheet is from Cartograf so should post no issues, it has one scheme, the Tiger commanded my Michael Wittmann, The Kit - Sherman Firefly This is a new tool from Airfix and is 1.72 unlike some other small scale armour kits which were 1/76 scale. As you can expect from a new tool the moulding are crisp and clean, the plastic also seems to be a bit harder than some of the modern aircraft kits. In a departure from previous kits the rubber band tracks have gone. In this boxing both link and length tracks and single part tracks moulded with the wheels/bogies are included, it would seem Airfix are also going to release a "Simplified" version of this kit with only the single part tracks/wheels included. The first thing to do when starting construction is to select which track types you want and follow the instruction steps for that one. The main lower hull is the first step in construction. the two sides attach to the base and the front and rear parts go on. In addition at the rear the exhaust shroud goes on. Then at the front the drive housings go on. If you have elected for the simplified tracks these can now be added. If you are going for the full works then three sets of bogies for each side need to be built up, along with the drive sprockets and return rollers are added. The lenghts of track can then be added. We then move onto the upper hull. Some holes first need to be made and then the rear bulkhead with mud guards attached is added. Additional parts and tools can then be added to the upper hull . A cross beam is added to the front plate which was commonly used to store extra spares and equipment on. Jerry cans and extra ammo boxes are supplied in the kit for use in this area, or any where else the modeller wishes to use them. Additional track, and road wheels are also provided if the modeller wishes to add them to the hull in the form of spare links, and/or extra armour. Next up its the turret containing that all important 17 pounder gun. The mantlet is first added to the turret followed by the single part barrel. With careful gluing of the parts the gun will elevate. Only one half of the muzzle brake is moulded onto the barrel, with the other half needing to be added. The base is then added to the turret, and on top the large hatch and aerial mount is added. A side hatch complete the turret and it can be added to the vehicle. Decals The small sheet from Cartograf (no no issues there) provides markings for one tank; "BELVEDERE" Staffordshire Yeomanry, 27th Armoured Brigade, Operation Goodwood, Normandy June 1944 Conclusion As well as Airfix's drive into 1/35 scale armour it is good to see them sticking with their roots and producing new kits for the small scale armour modeller. The new box brings together their two newer kit. This should appeal to the younger modeller with the simplified track details, or even a market for war gamers? Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. DreamModel is to release (or has just released?) a new tool 1/72nd Northrop F-5E Tiger II - ref. DM720013 Source: https://www.facebook.com/DreamModelOfficial/posts/2008030002660916 Well... V.P.
  8. Wolfpack Design is to release new tool 1/72nd Northrop F-5E/F Tiger II kits. Source: https://www.facebook.com/wolfpackd/photos/a.554832374609972/2920066541419865 V.P.
  9. Tiger I 1:72 Airfix A02342 Everyone that’s even a little bit interested in tanks will know the name of the dreaded Tiger tank from WWII, which was at the forefront of German armoured might, and if it wasn’t for the limited numbers on the battlefield coupled with their unreliability, plus Hitler’s meddling with his General’s decisions, the invasion in 1944 might have been much harder fought than it already was. Designed to replace the Panzer IV but often fighting alongside it, the Tiger added extra armour and a larger 88mm gun similar to that of the successful Flak 37 artillery piece, and became one of the most dangerous tanks on the field in the later stages of WWII. The drive-train was stressed to the max due to the huge weight of the gun and armour, which caused many vehicles to be lost due to breakdowns and subsequent abandonment and scuttling of the hull. The Kit This is a new tool from Airfix and is 1.72 unlike some other small scale armour kits which were 1/76 scale. As you can expect from a new tool the moulding are crisp and clean, the plastic also seems to be a bit harder than some of the modern aircraft kits. In a departure from previous kits the rubber band tracks have gone. In this boxing both link and length tracks and single part tracks moulded with the wheels/bogies are included, it would seem Airfix are also going to release a "Simplified" version of this kit with only the single part tracks/wheels included. The first thing to do when starting construction is to select which track types you want and follow the instruction steps for that one. First up the lower hull is built. The sides are attached to the base and the front and rear bulkheads are added. The main top of the tank is then added and the side plates with track guards go on. At the rear the engine exhausts with their covers, and the rear mud guards are attached. At the front the bow machine gun and drivers vision port are added. To finish of the hull the tow cables are added. Construction now moves to the turret. The gun mantlet is built up and then placed in between the tow side of the turret. No glue is used here if you wish the gun to elevate. Hole are drilled in one side of the turret for attaching additional track links. Once the side are together the turret roof can be added along with the rear storage locker. Hatches and vision blocks can then be added also. Next up the single part barrel goes on, the muzzle brake is in tow halves one moulded in and the other half now going on. If using the simplified tracks these can be glued together and attached to the tank, though this will leave a central seam. If not using the simplified tracks then you dont have to worry about the multitude of interleaved wheels. Airfix have moulded these as one major part onto which the faces of the second row wheels are separate and now go on. The outer wheels are all individual parts. The drive sprockets are made up and then these attach to the front of the completed wheel assembly which also contains the return roller. The link and length tracks then go around the whole assembly. To finish up the track assemblies are added to the hull along with the turret. Decals The small decal sheet is from Cartograf so should post no issues, it has two schemes the Tiger commanded my Michael Wittmann, and a one in a white winter scheme, not very adventurous from Airfix on this one. Tank commanded by M Wittmann, schwere Panzer-Abteilung 101, Normandy, 1944 2. Kompanie, schwere Panzer-Abteilung 501, Byelorussia 1943-44. Conclusion As well as Airfix's drive into 1/35 scale armour it is good to see them sticking with their roots and producing new kits for the small scale armour modeller. The kit looks really good in the box and their should be an appeal to the younger modeller with the simplified track details, or even a market for war gamers? Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Doyusha is to repop in October 2020 the HobbyBoss 1/72nd Northrop F--5E Tiger II - ref. 401439 Release in October 2020 Source: https://www.1999.co.jp/eng/10725401 V.P.
  11. I've had this kit in the stash for about 20 years and never really gave it much attention. Recently though I had a second look at it and despite a few parts suffering some sink marks, it didn't look too bad. Construction is actually pretty good, I used little in the way of filler, the turret required the most clean up but it is not beyond the most basic modelling skills. The driving lights suffered badly with sink marks, thus I pinched one from my spares box and re positioned it from the front armour to the top of the hull. I also left off the top bar securing the spare track links to the front of the hull, I guess crews left this off as it's 6 less bolts to remove when you need to change some track out quickly. I did like the separate track links in the kit as they supplied the flat straight pieces for top and bottom as a single bit, making building the track easier. One issue I did encounter is Italeri have left out the bottom pieces of the spare track mounts around the turret, thus I just left the top mounts on without any track mounted. Decals came from the spares box along with the two figures and the flag. Camouflage represents a generic Tiger sometime around Operation Zitadelle.
  12. Panzerwaffe on the Battlefield #2 World War Two Photobook Series (9786155583323) Peko Publishing Panzerwaffe is German for tank or armoured weapon, which is a broad term that encompassed many, many homegrown and captured types in WWII, which may well have had a hand in their downfall, requiring specialist equipment and knowledge to maintain and repair their many types, which even included British and French types where they were captured in sufficient numbers to warrant pressing into service after modification to their requirements. This series covers many of those types, from the early Panzer Is through to the ubiquitous Panzer IV and the prestigious Tigers and King Tigers, with many more oddities in between such as the top-heavy Bison SPG, various foreign types with guns slapped on top, and other tank killers such as the Wespe, Marder and Hetzer, plus the awesome Jagdtiger. This is a new volume from Peko's World War Two Photobook Series, and as the name suggests it is primarily a book of photos, which isn't too difficult to divine. Although this is Volume 2 of the set it still covers the earlier vehicles with their relatively light armour and armament, detailing all the variations in fit and finish between the main factories that were engaged in construction of WWII German armour. It is hardback bound with 112 pages plus two blank inner leaves, finished in an overall white cover, and arriving protected by a layer of shrink-wrap that also helps prevent scuffs and keep out dirt during shipping and storage. The photos are almost without exception full page, with space left only for the captions, which are in Hungarian and English, each one adding valuable insight to the photo, which may not be immediately apparent without it, especially if your eyesight isn’t too good. For the modeller there are plenty of diorama possibilities, as well as opportunities to see how the crews actually stowed their gear on their vehicles (or otherwise) in real-world circumstances. Seeing how they come apart when blown up is also useful for diorama purposes, but thankfully there are no grisly scenes accompanying the destroyed vehicles. Where the photos are from private collections there are attributions in the top corner as appropriate, with a number showing soldiers standing in front of damaged or abandoned vehicles after the fighting is over, plus a number of groups investigating the wreckage after a cataclysmic explosion of the tank's magazine, or demolition by the escaping crew. There are also a number of maintenance scenarios with the hatches open for even more inspiration. While the contemporary photos are in black and white, the detail in which they are depicted would be an absolute boon to any AFV enthusiast or modeller, especially those wishing to go down the route of realism and authentic settings. Conclusion Whether you have models that you intend to use this book for reference, or have an interest in the subject, this book will give you all the reference pictures and some besides, as well as some realistic settings ideas for dioramas. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Hi all, One of my older "on the shelf" kits- The 1/35 Hobbyboss VK4502 (P) : a prototype King Tiger option. I was even more pleased to find out it came with a full turret interior. I decided to have a go at the 'Octopus Camo' and I'm pretty happy about how it all came out. Apologies about the quality of photos, still getting the hang of this.
  14. Scratchaeronautics is to release a 1/48th Grumman F-11F Tiger resin kit. Sources: https://www.facebook.com/Scratchaeronautics/posts/2636322836400757 https://www.facebook.com/jbeginesmanzorro/media_set?set=a.10157516508671382&type=3 First parts picture V.P.
  15. This is the Italeri F-5N as an ex-Swiss Air Force Tiger now serving as a USN Adversary. To be honest, there’s not too much to say about this nice little kit: it goes together really quickly and, other than the addition of an Eduard Zoom set, a Pavla ejection seat and a bit of work to give some sort of representation of the complex canopy opening mechanism, it is pretty much from the box including the decals, which also include some nice Swiss and Austrian markings.
  16. Tiger I Early version (A1363) 1:35 Airfix The Tiger tank was part of Hitler's obsession for bigger, heavier and stronger, which drove him to extraordinary and dizzying heights of impracticality later in the war, but in this case served him well. The goal was to mount the extremely successful and powerful 88mm cannon (used in the Flak 36) in a tank with sufficient armour to withstand any round then-fielded by the enemy, and this was achieved, but at the cost of reliability and a legendary thirst for fuel. It also made for some interesting bridge-crossing as the finished article weighed in at almost 60 tonnes, which was too much for many smaller bridges of the day. There was a competition with only two contenders, and it was the filmed breakdown of the Porsche designed prototype and subsequent fire that decided Hitler in the favour of the less ambitious Henschel design which became the Tiger, and then the Tiger I when the King Tiger came into being. When it first reached the front it caused panic and disaster for the Allies, being able to do almost everything it was designed to do, including knocking out tanks long before their enemy's guns were able to bring them in range. Even when the Allies could get into range, it wasn't until they got much closer that they had any significant chance of crippling or destroying the mighty Tiger, especially during frontal engagements. Many of the early Tigers were lost to mechanical breakdown due to the excessive strain on the transmission, and had to either be dragged off the field by half-tracks under the cover of darkness, armoured protection, or failing that, destroyed to stop them falling into the enemy's hands. The Tiger underwent many and constant changes throughout production to improve performance, fix problems and to simplify construction, but these are generally lumped together into early, mid or late productions for the sake of us modellers. If you want to get maximum accuracy of fit and finish, check your references for certainty. The Kit This is one of Airfix's new range of 1:35 AFV models, which is a scale that they have not entered until now due to previous management apparently (this could well be nonsense) swearing off the scale. Whether that's true or not the current management are much more switched-on to the hobby, so order to be able to hit the ground running, they have reached an agreement to rebox some Academy AFV kits with the Airfix touch, and we should eventually see new tools from them in due course with a little luck. This kit arrives in the familiar red-themed box with a Tiger engaged in combat in a furious rain storm, and inside are seven sprues of sand coloured styrene, three more in a medium grey, five sprues in black, a fret of nickel-plated Photo-Etch (PE) brass, a small decal sheet and a three-part instruction sheet, which is in the Academy style with Airfix additions to top and tail it. This boxing includes an interior, plus individual track links, which are a visual improvement on rubber-band style originally used on kit. The instructions are printed on fold-out glossy paper, which can get a bit unwieldy if you need to fold them all out together and you have limited space. Construction starts with adding the suspension arms to the lower hull with eight double sets of outer road wheels made up, followed by eight double sets of inner road wheels , sandwiching a ploy cap between to the two wheels (inner ones only) . The drive sprockets and idler wheels are made up, again sandwiching the poly caps between the halves, and fitting those last. The inner single wheels are added to the hull, followed by the interleaved main wheels (two sets), and lastly the outer singles. Once all the wheels are on the rear bulkhead of the tank is made up with the mud guards and exhausts being added. The aft bulkhead is next, with mud guards, exhausts and cast armoured covers fitted before it is installed in the rear hull, then tied in with inner exhaust trunking. Inside the hull the fake torsion-rods are added to the floor, and the Fievel filters are made up for each side, then attached at the rear on each corner. There are two types of filter on the early Tiger, one with two chambers, the other later one a single box. These were later removed to simplify production and if damaged were sometimes left off even on the early vehicles. Jack block, jack and towing hooks plus the outer covers for the exhausts are fitted, then the engine and transmission are constructed over the following steps. The radio gear is balanced on top of the transmission, and the crew seats, battery boxes and driver controls are glued in place then the engine, transmission and ammo stowage are dropped into the interior, the engine separated from the crew compartment and radiators by internal bulkheads. The radiator bays and fans are made up and more ammo is stowed on the lower surface of the sponsons, accompanied by some photos of the completed area to help and inspire you. There are plenty of photos of the real model throughout to show all the detail once painted, which is useful but would have been even better if they had been printed in colour. Next up the upper deck is assembled with photo etch screens are provided for the engine cooling vents. Full detailed hatches are provided which can be opened to show off the interior and the moulded styrene towing cables and filter hoses are added to the deck once in place. The angular glacis plate of the tank is also assembled at this time along with the ball-mounted bow machine gun and this has internal detail and the stock of the MG34 added. The tracks can then be assembled and added to the tank, and as mentioned earlier these are individual links, however no note of the number of links required is mentioned. A two-page cut-away drawing of the interior is given showing the layout and labelling it all for our information Construction now moves to the turret with internal detail moulded in, to which various detail parts and crew seats are added before the halves are joined together. Externally the two smoke grenade launcher packs are added to the front corners and shell ejection hatch fills the hole in the port side. The turret basket has a circular tread-plated bottom, which has three additional fuel canisters, the coax machine gun trigger pedal and the traverse motor fitted, and the breech is made up behind the mantlet then has the two-part barrel inserted into the shroud. It is split vertically, so if the thought of hiding the seam upsets you, you should be able to pick up an aftermarket metal barrel quite easily. With the various components now finished the turret is made up around the breech and the basket floor is suspended from the seat mounts. The two hatches are next to be made up, with the more complex commander's cupola taking up the majority of parts and able to be posed open or closed. The loader's hatch is much more simple, with just a handle on the outside, two on the inside and a wheel to close it up. These are added to the turret roof along with a vent, with internal parts fitted before it is glued in place on the turret. All that is left to do is twist the turret into place with its bayonet fitting, fit the side skirts, tow cable stays and a shovel on the glacis plate. Markings There are two decal options in the box utilising the small decal sheet, and from the box you can build one of the following: SS Panzergrenadier Division Das Reich, Normandy, May 1944 SS Panzergrenadier Division Das Reich, Russia, Spring 1943 These are different schemes on the same tank, but the codes might make you go cross-eyed or wonder if you've got a faulty sheet, but it's simply a case of a black 832 overpainted (somewhat lazily by the crew) with 823 in outlined white. It's surprising that even though they managed to completely repaint the tank, they still kept the icky overpainted code. Who'd have known they'd be confusing modellers 76 years later? Conclusion The Tiger is an iconic AFV from WWII, and the Academy kit under Airfix's auspices is a good compromise between ease of construction and detail. The addition of the interior is a bonus if you're planning on posing any of the hatches open too. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  17. I made this Tiger long ago. Kit are from Tamiya , very nice kit, fit very well and this is my favorite tank. Enjoy guys.
  18. Among numerous projects, anounced or not announced, Kitty Hawk is reported to have a 1/32nd Northrop F-5E Tiger II. Mike Benolkin from Cybermodeller has even reported words from Glen "Kitty Hawk" Coleman saying that the 1/32 F-5E is coming in March barring any logistics problems... Wait and see. Sources: http://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?s=5c2ff6e68ae17012c76054379ea11236&showtopic=66843&p=886701 http://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?s=5c2ff6e68ae17012c76054379ea11236&showtopic=66843&p=887578 - ref. KH32018 - Northrop F-5E Tiger II - ref. KH32019 - Northrop F-5F Tiger II - ref. KH32023 - Northrop RF-5E "Tigereye" V.P.
  19. Hi guys, here's my second attempt at model making, the Tamiya 1/35 Tiger 1 tank. https://flic.kr/s/aHsmggUQwj I initially intended to paint camouflage scheme used by panzer regiment in Italy September 1943, but couldn't perfect the fine airbrush technique for the two-tone colours. So I had to re-spray in desert scheme. I tried using Vallejo model air paint, but found this too thin to work with. The final finish was using Tamiya XF acrylic paints, which I found great to work with.
  20. Hello All, after an enforced layoff from modelling I have recovered these from the shelf of shame and completed the builds. Questions and comments welcome. Gee hope this works, not used to using Flickr after the photobucket debacle last year..... Happy Modelling Ian
  21. German Tiger-1 Ver.Early "Operation Citadel" 1:35 Academy via Pocketbond The Tiger tank was part of Hitler's obsession for bigger, heavier and stronger, which drove him to extraordinary and dizzying heights of impracticality later in the war, but in this case served him well. The goal was to mount the extremely successful and powerful 88mm cannon used in the Flak 36 in a tank with sufficient armour to withstand any round fielded by the enemy, and this was achieved, but at the cost of reliability and thirst for fuel. It also made for some interesting bridge-crossing as the finished article weighed in at almost 60 tonnes, which was too much for many smaller bridges of the day. There was a competition with only two contenders, and it was the breakdown of the Porsche designed prototype and subsequent fire that decided in the favour of the less ambitious Henschel design which became the Tiger, and then the Tiger I when the King Tiger came into being. When it first reached the front it caused panic and disaster for the Allies, being able to do almost everything it was designed to do, including knocking out tanks long before their guns were in range. Even when the Allies could get into range, it wasn't until they get VERY close that they had any significant chance of crippling or destroying the mighty Tiger. Many of the early Tigers were lost to mechanical breakdown due to the excessive strain on the transmission, and had to either be dragged off the field by half-tracks under the cover of darkness, armoured protection, or failing that, destroyed to stop them falling into the enemy's hands. The Tiger underwent many and constant changes throughout production to improve performance, fix problems and to simplify construction, but these are generally lumped together into early, mid or late productions for the sake of us modellers. If you want to get maximum accuracy of fit and finish, check your references for certainty. Operation Citadel was the German name of what became known as The Battle of Kursk. The German Army had planned an offensive operation against the Kursk Salient, however through various means including Allied Intelligence the Russian forces knew the attack was coming and were able to prepare an in-depth defensive of the area. The battle was to deplete both German Armour and Air assets. At the same time the Allies invaded Southern Italy and the German forces decided to withdraw from the action. This would be the last German offensive action on the Eastern Front. While there is some debate as to whether this was the largest tank battle ever, it is certainly up there in the top handful of. The Kit The Academy Tiger I is a middle-of-the-road kit that has an attractive price-point while giving plenty of detail to satisfy all but the most detail hungry modellers. This boxing also gives the Henschel turret, however no interior is included. Even thought the base kit have been around since the late 90s Academy have been improving it over time. The original two part split barrel is still in the kit, but there is a new multipart solid round barrel as well. Is worth noting that the new boxing now comes with link and length track instead of the previous rubber band ones. Construction starts with adding the suspension arms to the lower hull. PE fittings must then be made up and added to the lower hull as well. 8 double sets of outer road wheels are made up, followed by 8 double sets of inner road wheels , sandwiching a ploy cap between to the two wheels (inner ones only) . The drive wheels and idler wheels are made up, again sandwiching the poly caps between the halves. The inner single wheels are added to the hull, followed by the inetleved main wheels (two sets), and lastly the outer singles. Drive and idler wheels are also added. Once all the wheels are on the rear bulkhead of the tank is made up with the mud guards and exhausts being added. Next up the upper deck is assembled. Photo etch screens are provided for the engine cooling vents. Full detailed hatches are provided which can be opened, but given the commission of an interior unless you are adding crew figures most will leave them closed. The font bulkhead of the tank is also assembled at this time. The tracks can then be assembled and added to the tank. As mentioned earlier these are now link and length, however no track jig is included. Once the tracks are on the upper hull can be attached. Various tools and towing cables can then be added. Construction now moves to the turret. The multi part barrel and mantle are built up and placed into the turret sides, Smoke dischargers are added. along with stowage boxes and finally the roof; along with the hatches. Finally the turret is added along with the side skirts and a small length of track placed on the front of the tank. Markings As this boxing would suggest there are three marking options for Tigers which took part in Operation Citadel. 9th SS Panzer "Totenkopf" Yellow 921 8th SS Panzer "Das Reich" White S33 Black 211 Decals are printed in house by Academy and should pose no problems. Conclusion It is good to see Academy updating this kit as looking online the kit is quite competitive on price. Recommended Review sample courtesy of UK Distributors for
  22. Hi all, Recently picked up a Heng Long mk1 Tiger for £60, painted in Panzergrau. The previous owner was a bit hamfisted, by that I mean he put the stickers on lopsided, the wrong number on the turret and the mudflap securing clip was snapped off. So, my plan is to repaint it as "Semken's Tiger", the first tiger captured in Normandy by the Sherman of John Semken, commander of the Wiltshire Yeomanry. The tiger in question is Tiger 114, 2nd Kompanie, 101st SS Schwere Panzer Abteilung. So my question is, does anyone know how to get hold of the appropriate decals or painting masks? Found some masks online but the tank in question has two colours to it, looks like a dark red with white border, and the mask looks like only one single colour. Any suggestions?
  23. Hi, I want to built a kit as a prezzie for a tank mad friend, and my eye has fallen on this kit because of the full interior. There seems to be quite a discrepancy in the prices of the different versions, and as I'm always after a bargain, are the extra parts included in some of the other kits? I.e., can an early production Tiger I (kit 5003) be built from the others? (whichever one is cheaper?)
  24. I was planning on doing just the F15E with bombs but can't resist a bit of orange, so will be doing the Tiger meet too. I have the RetroWings goodies from Domi to enhance the cockpits & burners. Obligatory box shots ready to start.
  25. Hi all, i apologise if this has been asked before but I can't find anything after searching. I'm building the Tamiya mid production Tiger 1 and have decided to attempt to apply zimmerit. I am also planning on removing some of the side 'mudguards/fenders' as damaged. My question is would the zimmerit have gone all the way down the side to the bottom of the hull side, or would it have been applied behind the side mudguards, (the ones that stick out the side) so if I remove some of the mudguards would the area underneath be covered in zimmerit or not? thanks Al
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