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  1. In August 2020, Eduard is to release in August 2020 - just in time for the 80th Anniversary of the BoB - a new tool 1/48th Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I limited kit - ref. Source: https://www.eduard.com/out/media/InfoEduard/archive/2020/info-eduard-2020-01.pdf V.P.
  2. A question for those in the know - when was the yellow ring added to the C type roundel (to make it a C1) on the upper surface of the wings? And was it added to the lower surface roundels at the same time. Specifically I'm interested in Spitfire Mk XIVe's (highback and bubble) prior to VE day. The Extradecal sheet I have shows a C type on upper and lower wings, and the Airfix decals for the Spit XIVe show the C1 type in both positions. The Airfix markings are for a post VE day aircraft but I'm wondering if the would be applicable to pre VE day aircraft. Thanks, Colin
  3. Hello my modeling friends. 4th build this year and I think I wasted too much time on this one as I took nearly 4 months! Anyway, I was satisfied with the result although far from perfect. Got many experience handling the resin parts as they have to be cut and glued precisely. The fit and detail of the kit is excellent. Eduard's Brassin resin engine has the best details and enjoyed every moment assembling and painting it. The Variant of this Spit is Mk.VIII and the markings were the one flown by the Canadian pilot Paul Ostrander over Burmese skies. That's what pushed me to the finish line! Hope you like it. Enjoy and stay safe! TZW.
  4. Inspiration: jumps on you out of the blue from attic recoveries and lucky junk shop finds! I know I've recently spoilt myself rotten with a multitude of Eduard early war Spitfires, but I do have a weakspot for the odd nostalgia build - revisiting those kits built as a youngster when you find them up for grabs. I got the (boxed) 1/24th Spitfire MkIa at an auction a few years back before Airfix re-released them as part of their vintage classics range. I hadn't returned to model building at the time, but it was a silly cheap price as the decals are shot, but all the parts still sealed in the original bag. It was another "when I return to the hobby" purchase which has been sitting patiently in the wings ever since. I had previously built two examples. The first in the early 1980's is now long gone. The second built in 1988 when I was 16 survives and has been tucked away in various attics since the early 1990's. This weekend I got my hands on a mint 24th scale Spitfire Vb from a junk shop tucked away in the grounds of a small garden centre, just 15mins drive away from home. The box was still sealed, and for £35 I was quite happy. I was even allowed to open the box to check it was complete and not previously tampered with before handing the money over! So now my old surviving MkIa has been recovered and is now seeing daylight for the first time in many years. Considering it's been at the bottom of a box of built models it emerged remarkably complete: one prop blade snapped at the collar and the aerial mast broken off at the base (but still attached to the tail fin by a thread). Aside from a liberal coating of grime and paint/decal damage, the wings have lost their dihedral, and the rubber tyres have gone hard but are still in perfect shape. All the gun covers and engine cowling were fixed in place, but I'm sure I built, painted and installed the 303's and Merlin Well I think she deserves a new lease of life. My aim will be to do a full strip down and refurb, and rebuild her in line with with my two newer Spits. She will again don her markings as LO-B "Bogus" from 602sqn, while the other MkIa will become Al Deere's KL-B "Kiwi". The Vb will of course take the guise of Jan Zumbach's gun toting Donald Duck RF-D. Hopefully I'll do these three ladies justice in the long run! Overall not too shabby for something that was brush painted with enamels and no aftermarket materials 33 years ago. The original Spitfire MkIa has had a bath to remove most of 30+ years of dust and grime. The engine cowling is part removed and the engine is complete underneath - the 303's in the wings are missing however! Going through one of my spares boxes I've found the main landing gear tyres from my first 24th scale Spitfire that I built in the early 80's. They are in surprisingly good condition, no wear or degradation. They may we'll end up being used on the rebuild if the current one's prove troublesome! I'm keeping fingers crossed that the Browning's will appear in a box somewhere too, but it won't be a heartbreaker if they've gone awol. Well she came apart without any real issues! A few things became apparent - the rudder pedals in the cockpit were missing, as were the 303's and ammo boxes in the wings. The pitot tube under the wing was also gone. After digging out my second spares box, I found the pedals, all the ammo boxes and 7 of the 8 Brownings.... plus one that's survived from the very first one I built in the early 80's (hence the 7 in gun metal and 1 in matt black). A bonus was finding 'fresh' main wheel hubs, again surviving from the first 24th Spitfire I built. Bizarrely, one thing that had survived has now vanished - the main radio mast! Still a good step forward. Now to plan the clean-up, paint stripping, and get studying the build instructions alongside some photo references More photos and updates to come as the project progresses! Comments and suggestions always welcome
  5. I was very reluctant to post this as wip, having seen the quality of other people's work. But having joined the forum, there is no point in hiding in a corner! The Revell kit was bought based on no information at all; I've found the fuselage had distinctly raised edges and the wing and tailplane roots needed a lot of filling. I've made life hard for myself, but have accepted that this is a learning experience. Using Milliput to fill in long thin gaps I found to be difficult. I should have watched the YouTube videos first, after all, there's a ton of stuff out there. I made a complete Pig's Ear of the canopy. Unfortunately I used enamel, so cleaning it up to redo it using a better technique will be difficult. And lastly, the aerial snapped off when it was being moved. I'm just following the kit instructions, no attempt being made to use 3rd party addons or follow adopt the paint scheme for a particular plane.
  6. Hi. In 1948 Sweden purchased 50 Supermarine Spitfire PR.Mk.XIX from the Royal Air Force. The were in service until 1955 and were scraped after retirement. This is the nice little Airfix kit and the very nice decal sheet from Moose Republic Decals. The Spit was built oob, painted with Tamiya colors and only slightley weathered. Regards Daniel
  7. Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vc 1:72 Airfix A02108 The Spitfire hardly needs an introduction, an iconic war machine and graceful lines satisfying the technical theory that ‘If it looks right, it flies right’! With around 6000 aircraft produced across the various sites, the Mk.V was the most produced version of the 20,000+ built. Coming in to service in 1941, it incorporated many of the improvements developed in the Mk.III, however instead of using the planned Mk.XX Merlin which was in short supply, the Mk.45 with a single stage single supercharger was used as it could easily be fitted to the standard fuselage of the Mk.I/II. Three types of wing were available in the Mk.V range, the ‘A’ wing using the traditional 8 gun layout and the ‘B’ wing housing two 20mm cannon and 4 machine guns. The universal ‘C’ wing introduced shortly afterwards had a more flexible arrangement being able to house either the ‘A’ or ‘B’ configurations or 4 cannon and 4 machine guns. A key feature of the Mk.45 Merlin introduced in late ’41’ was the ability to cope with negative ‘g’ without cutting out significantly improving dogfight performance in an effort to close the gap on the newly developed FW190. As well as being used in the UK, the Mk.V saw considerable service abroad. The need to cope with hotter and harsher climates led to some of the ugliest and slowest Spitfires to be built (I say that in principal, but I actually like the tropical versions!). Tropical versions accommodated a deep chin Vokes filter, but the extra drag and reduced intake charge speed affected the performance by around 8mph and clime rate aby about 600ft/min. Later, in-field improvements led to a more streamlined ‘Aboukir’ tropical filter which went some way to restoring the original lines of the spitfire too. The Mk.V’s endured fierce combats with front line fighters of the Axis air forces across most theatres of WWII including Europe, the Mediterranean, Pacific and Russian. In an ironic turn of developments, the ‘stop gap’ MkV was gradually replaced by the next ‘stop gap’ version, the Mk.IX which became the second most widely produced variant. The key difference in the two aircraft was a notably longer nose to accommodate a two stage supercharger giving a much improved high altitude performance to deal with the FW190’s over Europe. The Kit The kit is a new tool kit from Airfix, and its good to see them returning to their root with their important British Aircraft. The kit arrives on four sprues of grey plastic and a clear sprue. The panel lines are recessed and seem finer to a degree than other kits, the plastic also seems better in that it is not as soft as previous new releases. It is noticeable from the sprues that the normal and clipped wings are in there, as are normal and tropical air filters, a slipper tank, and two types of propeller/spinner combinations. The only negative in the box is the overly thick main canopy parts. Construction starts with the cockpit, and for this kit Airfix have come up with a complete cockpit including sidewalls which when assembled will just fit into the fuselage. To the left side part the oxygen tanks are fitted, and then the rear bulkhead frame to which the seat will attach. Behind this goes another complete fuselage frame. In front goes the frame with the instrument panel in it. Instruments are provided as decals. The floor part containing the rudder controls goes in, and then the control column attaches to this. The seat attaches to its mount which has the seat armour on it also, this then goes into the cockpit. Some controls are fitted to the right side part and then this is attached to the rest of the structure. The gunsight is then fitted and at the very front another bulkhead is added. The complete cockpit assembly is then added into the fuselage and it can then be closed up, not forgetting to add in the prop mounting boss at the front. Next up we move to the wings. There is a single part lower wing with left and right upper. To the lower wing the wheel wells must be added. If fitting the slipper tank then holes need to be drilled for this at this stage. The wing can then be assembled. and added to the fuselage. At the rear the single part tailplanes are added along with the rudder. The at the front the volkes filter is added. On the wings the correct armament for the decal option needs to be added. Moving on to the underside of the wings the radiator and oil cooler are added Next up the undercarriage is added. Airfix as seems to be normal for them now offer separate parts for retracted and lowered undercarriage. If lowering this then single part legs are added with the gear door attaching to the legs. With either option the tail wheel is also added now. To finish off the exhausts and propeller are added at the front. The wing Pitot tube is added along with the main aerial mast. A pilot figure is provided if the modeller wish to us it, however he seems a bit underscale? The last item on is the canopy. There is a single part canopy and a multipart option available. The main part seems overlly thick for both options. Decals The decal sheet is from Cartograf so should post no issues, it has two options; ER180 - 307th Fighter Sqn, 12th Air Force, USAAF. La Senia, Algeria Nov/Dec 1942 JL115 - No.2 Sqn SAAF Gioia del Colle, Italy, October 1943 Conclusion This is is a great new kit from Airfix, overall recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. Supermarine Spitfire Starter Set 1:72 Airfix A55001 It is hard to think a more Iconic Aircraft to represent the Royal Air Force than the famous Supermarine Spitfire. Here Airfix have brought these two aircraft together in a "Best of British" boxing complete with paints, glue and paint brushes. The first thing to say about this boxing is that these kits are not full on model kits as you would expect looking at the box. These are simplified model kits. The Spitfire has only 26 parts including its display stand. There is nothing wrong with the quality of the parts, these all seem to be up to the standards of the new 1.72 Airfix kits I have seen lately. These kits are great in one respect they will act as a bridge between the click together Airfix kits, and full on model kits. They will assemble like kits, but the lower parts count and thought to the engineering will make it a lot easier for the younger modeller. I cant understand why Airfix are not making more of this aspect to encourage younger modellers into the hobby. Now a look at the kits in more detail. Spitfire The variant included here is a Mark Vc in markings for Pilot Officer Antoni Glowacki of No, 303 Sqn Based at Northolt in 1942. The kit has 26 parts including the Spitfire shaped display stand if the modeler wants to use this. The model can be built with the undercarriage raised or lowered. First off the two fuselage halves can go together with the tail wheel being moulded onto the left half. At the front the mount for the prop goes on and then the engine cover complete with moulded in exhausts goes on. The wings can then go together with a single part lower and left/right uppers. The pilots seat fits into the wing and then this is joined to the fuselage. The tailplanes then go on. Under the wings the radiator and oil cooler are fitted. Single part raised gear, or two part lowered gear are then fitted. The centreline carb intake is fitted. The pilot figure can then go into the seat if you want to use him, following this the aerial mast and single part canopy are fitted. At the front the single part prop and spinner are fitted. If the aircraft is to be mounted on the stand now is the time to do it. Markings A small decal sheet from Cartograf provides markings for Spitfire Mk.Vc AB174 of No, 303 Sqn Based at Northolt in 1942. There should be no issues with these. Conclusion This is a great set to bridge the gap between click together kits and models for the younger modeller. It a shame Airfix dont champion it as this, and make that clear on the box. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Hello All, Been working on the Airfix Spitfire Mk XIV since completing our move to a new home. You don't know how many kits, supplies or books you have until you have to move them. LOL In any case I hope you enjoy the pictures. The figure is not Airfix but will be displayed with the model when completed. All the Best! Don Don
  10. It's been a while since I posted anything on here but as @tonyot and @bigbadbadge have given me some encouragement here goes. I've made a lot of Spitfires in the last couple of years, there are about 50 finished in my loft, three in progress, and an unknown number to be built. Anyway, this thread is about the new Spitfire Vc. I bought seven on release and have done two already. A 185 squadron one: A 91 squadron one: This one may not be an RAF one. I'm tempted by the Italian and Greek ones on the Xtradecal Vc sheet. We'll see. I've made a start on the interior, obviously, photos to follow.
  11. Thread update, 21st June 2021 In the same way that my Hurricane thread has diversified, so has this thread. The special edition Sword 1/72 scale Spitfire PR.IV made for the Spitfire AA810 Sandy Gunn Aerospace Careers Programme charity makes its first appearance on Page 4, although it won't be built for a while. I'm sure as time goes on, other manufacturers' kits will crop up, and so some form of thread index for build starts would probably be useful. Ergo: Thread Index Page 1: Airfix 1/72 Spitfire Mk.Vc Original thread start, January 28th 2021 Hello all! Well, I was in two minds about posting a Work in Progress thread for this build, as it's a fairly popular subject right now. And rightly so, as its an eternally popular icon of aviation, this new kit from Airfix is really rather good, and this particular mark wore one of if not the widest variety of camouflage schemes applied to any given aeroplane. Inspired primarily by @tonyot's build thread here, I ordered not one but three examples (unheard of for me, and I've since ordered three more - just don't tell my better half!), and aftermarket decal sets by DK Decals, Xtradecal and Kitsworld all for Malta-based aircaft, and also by AML for the NMF 79 Sqn RAAF example. I've also got plans for one in post-1943 Italian Regia Aeronautica markings, also on the same Xtradecal sheet (although the camouflage scheme is distinctly suspect). This first build is going to be finished as a Maltese Spitfire, although I haven't yet quite decided which. I'll dispense with the usual box shots, as I think they're probably burned into every WW2 aviation modeller's psyche by now, and plough straight on. Here are the sprues: http:// And already with some paint applied: http:// Alongside is one of Airfix's earlier Spitfire Mk.I kits, which is going to be a Mk.II courtesy of 3D-Models conversion set and decals. Having painted its interior at the same time as the Vc, it's now been set aside for the time being. I've also started to take the cockpit parts off their sprues, and do a bit of detail painting. The eagle-eyed among you will have noticed that I've painted the inside of the upper wings in aluminium when only the undercarriage leg recesses should aluminium with the actual wheel bays being finished in undersurface camouflage colour. Also, I've stopped the interior grey green too far back in the cockpit; it should really extend to the front edge of the separate sidewalls: http:// http:// Ah, well, you can't see it when its all buttoned up..... And at that point, I decided that I would deviate a bit from Auntie's instructions and plough my own furrow. I decided to fix the separate side-walls to their respective fuselage halves instead of assembling the tub into a complete unit: http:// If anyone goes down this route, too, just a word of caution. You need to be a bit careful with the alignment of the cockpit sidewalls, otherwise the bulkheads/frames don't go in straight and the fuselage won't close properly, causing the frame behind the seat to compress and distort, which I thankfully spotted in time. How I went about it was to glue the port sidewall to its fuselage half first, then dry fit the frames and dry fit the starboard sidewall. Then I dry fitted the starboard fuselage half, and making sure the fuselage was properly closed, finally glued the starboard sidewall to the starboard fuselage half, being careful to not flood the whole assembly with glue. I hope that makes sense! By doing this, you do end up with a gap between the bottom of the two sidewall halves, so the locating block on the bottom of the "floor" is left floating, but the frames and "floor" still locate positively into their respective sockets in the sidewalls. I also ended up with perfect fuselage to wing joints, which I know some folk have had problems with, and which may be purely coincidental. A couple more views of the cockpit before the fuselage was closed up: http:// http:// The Sutton Harness is the Kitsworld 3D-Printed decal set. I must admit to being a bit sceptical about this, as harness decals look a bit too flat as a rule. These seem to look okay, though, although I had a bit of a job getting them to go where I wanted, and once there to stay put. The printed-on detail seemed to start to lift after a while, so perhaps I should have given the sheet a waft of flat clear before use. They'll certainly be fine under a closed canopy. By the way, the kit's instrument panel decal is quite effective and settled down well, but for future builds I'll be using the Yahu item. Cheers for now! Mark
  12. This is the latest Spitfire offering from Tamiya and is probably their best aircraft kit to date IMHO. The kit goes together very easily (as might be expected) and has some nice details, but considering that a pilot is included there isn’t an option to display the model ‘wheels up’. Unfortunately some careful cutting and fettling is required as frustratingly the wheel bays aren’t deep enough to accommodate the wheels ‘up’. Because of this the wheels need to be reduced to nearly half their thickness before the undercarriage doors will sit flush. The chrome metal stand is made by Geminijets and it’s only required to drill a suitable sized hole in the wing thus enabling the Spit to be safely mounted. Paints are Tamiya acrylics, various oils and final Matt varnish are Newton & Windsor, and the 3 aerial wires are Uschi van der Rosten thread. Overall I’m pretty pleased with the final result, but I’ve since realised that maybe the oleos needed extending slightly as they are probably moulded in a ‘weight on wheels’ guise.
  13. My Eduard Spitfire is complete. Being one of my favorite planes, I always try my best with Spitfires and this may be my best work yet. If you're interested you can check out my entire building process on Youtube at Of Models & Monsters.
  14. I believe the thread hit its maximum size so was automatically locked. I have had a few PM's. If you don't like the thread don't subscribe. For those who enjoyed the melting pot...knock yourself out HERE IS THE LINK TO THE 1ST THREAD WITH LOTS OF QUESTIONS, ANSWERS and PHOTOS - START here TIP: search from Google, enter the search parameters followed by site:www.britmodeller.com
  15. Good day. I present my finished model from the company Airfix A05126 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I 1/48. Prototype aircraft of the outstanding aces of the Battle of Britain P/O Eric Lock Spitfire N3162/EB-G, 05.09.1940 Airbrush: Harder & Steenbeck Evolution 0.2 Paint: Gunze Sangyo H12 Flat Black / Primary - Screw / Blackout Effect Gunze Sangyo H58 Interior Green / U.S. Army & Navy Aircraft WWII - Lightening Effect Gunze Sangyo H72 Dark Earth Semi-Gloss / Great Britain Aircraft WW II - Camouflage Gunze Sangyo H73 Dark Geer Semi-Gloss / Great Britain Aircraft WW II - Camouflage Gunze Sangyo H74 SKY Semi-Gloss / Great Britain Aircraft WW II - Camouflage Gunze Sangyo H 327 Red FS11136 Gloss - Signs Gunze Sangyo H 328 Blue FS15050 Gloss - Signs Gunze Sangyo H 329 Yellow FS13538 Gloss - Signs of Designation Tamiya XF-2 Flat White - Lightening Effect Tamiya XF-54 Dark Sea Gray - Color alphabetic code Tamiya XF-57 Buff - Brightening Effect Tamiya XF-64 Dark Brown - Blackout Effect Tamiya XF-71 Cocpit Green (IJN) - Cab Color Tamiya XF-76 Gray Green (INJ) - Blackout Effect Photoetched: Eduard 49006 Seatbelts RAF WWII Masks: Pmask Po48001 Supermarine Spitfire RAF 1/48. Very high quality manufactured kit, has both early types of characters and late ones. The letter code was made to order by a colleague UpRise, for which I express many thanks to him. I recommend as a very high-quality manufacturer of masks and decals. Top camouflage applied by hand without masks. I hope you will like it. \
  16. Supermarine Spitfire & RAF Red Arrows Hawk Gift Set 1:72 Airfix A50187 It is hard to think of two more Iconic Aircraft to represent the Royal Air Force than the famous Supermarine Spitfire, and the Hawker Siddeley Hawk used by the Red Arrows Aerobatic Team. Here Airfix have brought these two aircraft together in a "Best of British" boxing complete with paints, glue and paint brushes. The first thing to say about this boxing is that these kits are not full on model kits as you would expect looking at the box. These are simplified model kits. The Spitfire has only 26 parts including its display stand, and the Hawk 24. On seeing this boxing I must admit I was expecting two full sized model kits in the box. Apart from the parts count on the side of the box there is nothing at all which would lead the modeller to thinking otherwise, its only when you look at the contents that you get the idea they are not full kits. There is nothing wrong with the quality of the parts, these all seem to be up to the standards of the new 1.72 Airfix kits I have seen lately. These kits are great in one respect they will act as a bridge between the click together Airfix kits, and full on model kits. They will assemble like kits, but the lower parts count and thought to the engineering will make it a lot easier for the younger modeller. I cant understand why Airfix are not making more of this aspect to encourage younger modellers into the hobby. Now a look at the kits in more detail. Spitfire The variant included here is a Mark Vc in markings for Pilot Officer Antoni Glowacki of No, 303 Sqn Based at Northolt in 1942. The kit has 26 parts including the Spitfire shaped display stand if the modeler wants to use this. The model can be built with the undercarriage raised or lowered. First off the two fuselage halves can go together with the tail wheel being moulded onto the left half. At the front the mount for the prop goes on and then the engine cover complete with moulded in exhausts goes on. The wings can then go together with a single part lower and left/right uppers. The pilots seat fits into the wing and then this is joined to the fuselage. The tailplanes then go on. Under the wings the radiator and oil cooler are fitted. Single part raised gear, or two part lowered gear are then fitted. The centreline carb intake is fitted. The pilot figure can then go into the seat if you want to use him, following this the aerial mast and single part canopy are fitted. At the front the single part prop and spinner are fitted. If the aircraft is to be mounted on the stand now is the time to do it. Hawk The hawk is the standard Mark 1 as used by the Reds. Here we start in the cockpit, two single part seats are fitted into the main tub and this is fitted into the fuselage, and this is closed up. All bulkheads and instrument panels are built in. Two pilot figures are supplied if the modeller wants to use them. A pair of two part intakes fit to the completed fuselage. At the rear the tail planes go one. The main wing is a single part upper which the lower parts fits to, this can then be attached to the fusleage. Single part nose and main gear doors are supplied if the modeller wants them closed. For the gear down simplified assemblies are included. The nose gear leg is moulded as one single part with the wheel. For the mains each leg is a single part with a wheel, and then there is a single part with the inner gear doors. The outers being moulded onto the leg. A single part canopy completes the model. If wanted the model can be mounted to the Hawk shaped stand included in the kit. Markings A small decal sheet from Cartograf provides markings for XX310 from the Red Arrows and Spitfire Mk.Vc AB174 of No, 303 Sqn Based at Northolt in 1942. There shoud be no issues with these. Conclusion This is a great set to bridge the gap between click together kits and models for th younger modeller. It a shame Airfix dont champion it as this, and make that clear on the box. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Hello again. Seeing how much you approved of my previous post, this was my first scale model aircraft in adulthood. Painted tail end of 2019, it was done as a Christmas present (& is easily the most time I've spent on an Xmas pressie ever!) Nearly all of it is a OOTB build, with the exception of the pilot's seat, due to the in-box one being a bit rubbish. Painted by acrylics from Vallejo and Citadel, with AK enamel washes, & some use of weathering powders & pencils. Much of the weathering chips & scratches were hand painted. The camo lines were done by the use of blu-tack. I had a bit of a 'mare with the initial assembly, probably because I was only used to Games Workshop kits, which are childs play in comparison. Some of the bits on the cockpit are a bit wonky as you can see on the photos, but the rest wasn't too painful. Overall I think this turned out alright. A few things I would do differently (like the smoke streaks from the guns on the wings - far too chunky IMO!) I will be posting up some of my other stuff on the sci-fi boards in the next few days if you're interested. Otherwise thanks for looking!
  18. I really like the look of the new 1/72 Airfix Spitfire Mk.Vc, It’s negatives have been pointed out on here and I hope to rectify most of them when done, at least to a passable standard.. First task is to exchange the early style cannon bulges with a pair of narrow ones, and that’s quite a lot of plastic to remove. Here’s me wishing that the bulges were represented separately as in the older Vc model. Luckily I have the clipped wing parts to fall back on if I butcher the classic wings too much.f 1. Fill the inner sections of each bulge 2. Desperately trying to preserve the very smart engraved detail- I don’t want to re scribe too much, if at all. 3. Time to hit each bulge and decided to tackle each one differently. One with a file and sanding stick, the other I cut with a rounded blade then sanded the remainder, unfortunately the latter was probably the worst result (albeit the quickest removal) as I gouged more than I required from the very front of the panel, which will need filling again -doh! Will need to add some primer by hand and see where I need to remove more plastic to make the whole area smooth.
  19. Model 6 - Eduard ProfiPACK Kit No. 82153 - Spitfire Mk.IIa - my last build - treat this as a bit of an experiment - i added the Eduard Bressin Mk2 engine - the kit came with the etched metal detailing kits and canopy masks. this is the first time ive had a go at masking and stencilling in the invasion stripes and RAF squadron markings rather than use the decals - i'm not a purist and i'm aware that that the markings make no sense historically but hat wasnt really the point. kept the detailing kit to a minimum as well and concentrated more on the engine and paintwork. my old watercolour pencils came in very handy! The kit itself was very good, not quite that same level as the Tamiya kits but overall very well put together with plenty of good detail in the moulding - only had to use a little filler on the nose and fuselage (standard). my first attempt at adding the additional resin engine was difficult - getting everything to fit flush with the kit was hard, especially as you have to remove most of the nose - as they say you can take it off but you cant put it back on! ive seen examples of kits like this looking amazing, not quite on that level yet - but i had a fair crack!
  20. This girl is ready for inspection. Pix from the process dan be found here: In the photos it looks a tad bit grainy, but it's partly a trick of the light, partly that I finished it with Mission Models gloss varnish. I won't do that again on NMF. Till next time! Keep safe and healthyy! /Torbjörn
  21. Quite a quick built, a GCII/7 "Nice" French Spitfire. What I liked: overal shape of the parts, dimensions, decals (well just the stencils were used). What I replaced: the prop (Quickboost), cannon barrels (Master), wheels (Eduard resin), the canopy - the windshield is Airfix, the rest is Eduard from their Mk.IX What I added: the rearview mirror (Tamiya Mk.Vb), seatbelts (Eduard). Paints and varnishes by Gunze, different decals I had at home.
  22. On the anniversary of the Battle of Britain, I decided to make a model of the Spitfire Mk.I. The model is an Airfix, I enjoyed doing it. Here's the picture.
  23. Eduard Spitfire Mk.XVI Weekend Edition in 1:48 scale. Markings are for an aircraft from the No. 601 Squadron, RAuxAF in 1949. The Spitfire took part in the Cooper Air Races. It was build out of the box. The build went well until i started to fight myself, featuring a bad wash which nearly ruined it and a crushed propeller by my chair during the final assembly. The prop on the kit is a resin replacement.The silver color is a metal shade from Humbrol. Despite the lack of position lights at the wing tips i am calling it done. Hope you like it. Cheers ! Bernd
  24. There have been a lot of these lately so I am not going to bother with box & sprue shots, just pitch straight in...I had been thinking about this one for a while, so had a Plan. This meant starting by jumping ahead and assembling the wings and tailplanes so I could do some serious dry-fitting against the fuselage halves - it all seemed pretty good, excellent tbh with a cautionary note that a gap was possible at the wing root but very easily cured with a spreader, which in the event was not required. I decided early on that I wasn't going to fully prime this one - somehow the primer always seems to come off very easily anyway so isn't giving much advantage aside from revealing joint flaws - so put stage one of The Plan into action, a black wash into all the rivet detail, using the Vallejo wash. This worked pretty well, the wash was given hours to dry and re-activated easily with water to wipe off nicely. It did reveal one curiosity, namely that Revell is a bit inconsistent with the sizes of the recessed rivets - on the top of the tailplane they are nice and small, on the bottom, twice the size. Fortunately the underside is not going to be on show once its in the cabinet Next it was on to the cockpit; should mention here that part of The Plan was to use this set inside and out: First out was the Interior Grey Green for an overall spray over all interior surfaces; the rear of the fuselage halves was masked out and given a coat of silver, then on to detail painting and detailing - The Plan involved using the Barracuda snapshot upgrade for this kit and their resin seat, a very nice bit of moulding even if you do have to think about how exactly it will fit in with the kit parts. As with all the recent 1/32 kits from Revell, the detail parts are quite nice but need a lot of cleanup to make them fit perfectly - as it must be said do a lot of the parts, but once clean they are generally a good match. Barracuda include decals with the snapshot and some of these were used, but they were more awkward then I would have liked. I did not use their dial decals as they simply did not match the size of the dials on the kit IP, instead I used some from Airscale. The kit instrument decal is even worse, it doesn't even match the layout of the plastic and is unusable as far as I am concerned. A layer of Future/Klear and it was out with the Vallejo wash to bring out the details, and here I hit the first hiccup in The Plan; after just a few minutes drying the wash refused to budge. A quick test on the wings showed that there it was happy to re-activate and wipe off, so I am blaming the Future here, it has clearly reacted and absorbed the wash. I shouldn't be too surprised, I know some people find it be a near miracle fluid capable of uses far beyond its design, I am consistently disappointed with its results. I think we tend to forget that it is first and foremost designed as a floor polish not a varnish, its just cheaper than real varnishes. Anyway, I am now disappointed with my cockpit as it looks messy, but am not willing to strip it down and start from scratch, so pressed on. Next time, a proper lacquer varnish before washing. Seatbelts from Eduard, and the cockpit tub is glued to the starboard fuselage half Next it was time to get the fuselage together, and suddenly the fit didn't seem too good; I think this is down to me, somehow I must have not got the cockpit in perfectly and it was forcing the halves apart slight at the front. I trimmed it a bit to improve matters, but otherwise went with brute force and superglue, taking it one section at a time. I still ended up with a gap on the forward fueslage, but on the plus side no longer needed a spreader to close up the gaps at the wing root. A little pressure was needed to keep the fuselage properly bedded down whilst the glue set, but otherwise no filler at the wing roots apart from a very small amount at the trailing edge where the corners are a little short-shot Those rivets are looking nice and hopefully will show through the Lifecolor paints, which tend to be more transparent than Vallejo or Tamiya. On the underside I used the Barracuda oil cooler but did not have the confidence to do the major surgery on the other side for the radiator; I am also using the ailerons from the same set, though do wonder if my set suffered a little from shrinkage, everything seems a little undersized and indeed the oil cooler needed a sliver of plastic card to lengthen it so it would fit the recess. Which brings us up to date; a little sanding around those seams where I have used the trusty 3M glazing putty (highly recommended) and I will be only using primer along the main seams to confirm they are good and cover the red of the putty.
  25. Hi all, here is my Spitfire TR9 G-CTIX (PT462) which I converted from the 1:48 ICM Mark IX kit. Critiques are obviously welcome, but don't be too harsh . This kit was just a distraction from all my school work the past few weeks so it's not perfect! Overall the kit went together well, brilliant abundance of parts from ICM. For £13 you get not only a full 1:48 Spitfire (that you can make several versions of!) with an engine, but also the ground crew with benches, ladders etc. A brilliant base kit for conversions. Here is a link to the build progress post : Enjoy! Thanks
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