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Found 1,495 results

  1. Ready for inspection is my 1:72 Avro Lancaster Bomber Mk.III, by Revell. It is a straight from the box build, the only change being that I used Vallejo acrylics throughout, and have build my own stand so the aircraft can be displayed in flight. The kit went together well, the sprues were nice and clean and for once I managed to join the fuselage halves without breaking into an angry sweat. So I would have to say this has been one of my favourite kits to build, and I hope I have done an icon justice. Thanks.
  2. This is my take on the Revell 1/50 scale Viking Ship. I know next to nothing about Norse Long Ships, but the model looks a lot to me like the 9th Century Gokstad ship displayed at the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo, Norway. The kit matches that graceful design pretty closely, right down to the hand made look of the clinker-constructed hull planks. After the quick hull assembly was a lot of less-than-exciting parts clean up: 64 shields, 32 oars, a two-part mast and numerous other assorted bits... but this really is a nicely designed kit. The dragon head, for example, is apparently inspired by a real one from the 5th Century – pretty cool: Plus, Revell’s molded-in wood grain detail is phenomenal! I gave the “wood” parts a Tamiya XF-59 Desert Yellow acrylic base coat, and the only color is the Tamiya XF-63 German Grey for the “iron” bits – shield bosses, figurehead mounts, and mast hardware. I let the paint cure for a couple of days, and then did a streaky wash with Grumbacher Raw Umber artist's oil to bring out the wood grain. It was very straightforward project, and with nearly everything the same wood color things went pretty fast. Except for the rolled facial tissue sail, everything on the model was right out of the box – a great relaxation build!
  3. Here's my GR-1A that I made from Revell's IDS kit. After market was Eduard PE, Seans wing seals and RAF pylons, Flightpath tanks and pods set and Xtradecal for both markings and stencils. My subject was ZA373 H from 2 squadron. Here's one or two of the shots I was using for reference... And after 9 months of grabbing whatever time I could at the weekends and evenings, here's the result... It's not perfect, but it's better than it would've been thanks to the contributions of some BMers who pointed out some noob mistakes on the WIP thread, so big thanks to all of them. Thanks for looking.
  4. As 2018 draws to a close, I thought I'd give you the 'heads-up' for the first aircraft build of 2019. Originally, I bought this kit with the intention of building an FB.5 and got a decal set for it. Me being the 'numpty, I had completely forgotten that I already had one two FB.5 kits in the stash, so this will be an OOB effort with some PE thrown in. The box. The PE. I'm not a nuts n' bolts man but is there anything drastically wrong with this kit as an F.3? Stuart
  5. Evening all, here is my recently completed F.3 Vampire from the Revell box. From the off, I decided that this would be built OOB and would be destined for the ceiling and the only addition to the kit was a pilot who got drafted from a nearby F-86. The kit went together well enough but modellers should be aware that the wing/ fuselage join needs some attention to mate correctly. Once mating had been achieved, the wing roots and intake fillets needed a PPP/ sanding routine. Once built, the 'bat' was primed with Halford's primer, coated with Tamiya Silver AS-12 and coated with Klear prior to decals. Finished with the markings of 601 Sqn, Royal Aux Air Force, North Weald, England, July '52. WiP here: Stuart
  6. Hello All, About a week and we can start! My contribution is based on the Revells 1/48 C-47 Skytrain "Berlin Airlift" (box 04518). I think it will be a British green c/s but nothing is decide yet. The boxview: The sprues The clearparts And finally the decalsheet Everyone good luck and happy buildings Arno
  7. I've been dithering about my options, and finally settled for this ... A meteorological reconnaissance B-17 Mk II of 251 Squadron, Coastal Command based in Reykjavík, Iceland.
  8. One of two builds that I completed over the weekend. This one had been sitting on the shelf of shame for a little while and was one of my entries for the KUTA GB in November. It has been brush painted with both enamels and acrylic paints and I used the Xtradecal RAF Update 2013 - 2015 set for the scheme. Eurofighter Typhoon FGR.4 ZK353/BQ, RAF 29(F) Squadron, RAF Coningsby flown by Flight Lieutenant Jonny Dowen by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr
  9. Arado Ar 196B Revell 1:32 The Arado 196 is probably one of the most well known of the Axis floatplanes, and it certainly was one of the best of its class. But it is the twin float version that most people know about as it was the most popular with around 537 aircraft built. The single float version, of which only a maximum of ten were built is, obviously not so well known. In October 1936, the RLM asked for a He 114 replacement. The only stipulations were that it would use the BMW 132, and they wanted prototypes in both twin-float and single-float configurations. Designs were received from Dornier, Gotha, Arado and Focke-Wulf. Heinkel declined to tender, contending that the He 114 could still be made to work. With the exception of the Arado low-wing monoplane design, all were conventional biplanes. That gave the Arado better performance than any of the others and the RLM ordered four prototypes. The RLM was also rather conservative by nature, so they also ordered two of the Focke-Wulf Fw 62 design as a backup. It quickly became clear that the Arado would work effectively, and only four prototypes of the Fw 62 were built. The Ar 196 prototypes were all delivered in summer 1937, V1 (which flew in May) and V2 with twin floats as A models, and V3 and V4 on a single float as B models. Both versions demonstrated excellent water handling and there seemed to be little to decide one over the other. Since there was a possibility of the smaller outrigger floats on the B models "digging in", the twin-float A model was ordered into production. A single additional prototype, V5, was produced in November 1938 to test final changes. In February 1938 an Ar 196 V4 carrying the registration D-OVMB and serial number 2592 was trialled as a test aircraft. The aircraft was fitted with a ventral float in which the fuel tank, two smoke dischargers as well as emergency provisions and additional ammunition was carried. The further in-service testing of the Ar 196 B was carried out during 1940-1941. The Model The kit comes in Revells usual slightly floppy end opening box which really should be redesigned. The box art is very attractive with and artists impression of the prototype V4 in its element. On opening the box you're faced with a raft of sprues. 13 in light grey styrene, and one in clear styrene. The package is completed by the instruction booklet and decal sheet. The majority of the kit is the same as the twin float variant released by Revell back in 2011, with only the floats being produced as new parts. There is a lot of work to do before the modeller can close up the fuselage, as the 196 had a ladder-like framework within the fuselage, which is visible through the cockpit aperture, a large hole in itself. Construction starts with the pilot's position, mated to the bulkhead between him and the observer, with radio equipment festooning the backside. The ladder sections have various parts added before they mate to the solid floor section, and detail throughout is good. The radio and instrument panel faces are suitably detailed for this larger scale, although there are doubtless wires and additional detail that could be added with the right references. It is worth noting that the rear cockpit seems to have been lined with sheet plywood or similar to stop the spent casings from the rear armament from finding their way into the workings of the aircraft. Check your references for confirmation if you can, and grab some thin styrene sheet cut to shape if you plan on replicating this. Once the cockpit and "chassis" is complete and painted, the engine compartment bulkhead attaches to the front, and you can begin adding the fuselage around it. The BMW radial engine isn't added until later in the build, but the detail and part count here is high. With careful painting and weathering it should build up into an excellent focal point of the model. The cowling is made up from a number of parts, allowing the modeller to leave part or all of it open to expose as much of the engine as they wish. There is also a choice of prop with a spinner or without, so check your references. The wings come in the traditional upper and lower halves, and have a rather sturdy looking spar arrangement sandwiched between the halves, plus a full set of poseable flying surfaces. You can choose here to pose the wings folded for stowage, unfolded ready for flight or with one wing folded one extended to show off the model's features without taking up too much display space. Care is needed here, as the construction of the wings differs considerably depending on which version you choose. Ploughing on without looking at the little black explanatory pictures could limit your choice later in the build. The tail, with one piece elevator is built as a single unit and slots into the rear of the fuselage later in the build along with the movable rudder. The large single main float is made up from five parts, the float halves, top deck and two internal bulkheads. The instructions call for 50g of weight to be placed in the nose of the float to prevent it from sitting on the rudder at the end of the float, although if you’re going to use the stand this problem is alleviated by the way the supports are moulded. The modeller is provided with optional rudders, either deployed or retracted. Whilst the four support struts look pretty rugged, they probably won’t take too much handling to break, unlike the much stronger supports in the earlier kit. There is a fairly clear rigging diagram to follow, and where Revell state to use cotton, the modeller can use whatever they are most comfortable with. The small outrigger floats are provided in two halves with three support struts, one of which is bifurcated and these are then attached to the lower wings and rigged as per the instructions, although this particular diagram is less clear and you may want to use your references instead. Also under the wings there are two hardpoints to which the cradles and small bombs are fixed The transparencies are clear & crisp, but the various parts are assembled from flat parts separate from the cockpit aperture, and here you could run into trouble if you either get the angles wrong, or use traditional cement and cloud the parts. It would be advisable to use a non-solvent glue like GS-Hypo Cement and build the parts in-situ to ensure you get the angles right to give a good join with the cockpit sills. Masking before building the assemblies could also be a good idea, to avoid cracking the joints with excessive handling. Decals The decal sheet includes markings for just the V4 prototype, D-OVMB, but does also have a fair number of stencils, plus the instrument panel. The red band and swastika are not included, only the white circle on which the swastika would be placed, so you’ll have to paint this area and use aftermarket decals if you wish to display this. The underside registration letters are large and will need some softening/setting solution to help bed down properly as although the carrier film is relatively thin. This goes for the side registration letter too. Conclusion Much like the earlier twin float kit, this is a beautiful model and will make a great companion piece with the two shown side by side. It certainly looks different, and yet familiar at the same time. I really like this aircraft and it’s great to have it released in this scale as it offers so much more in the way of detailing possibilities. Very highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  10. YT-1300 Millennium Falcon Perfect Grade FruitPack (FP-03) 1:72 GreenStrawberry Bandai have had the license for all things styrene and Star Wars in the Far East since the reawakening of the franchise, and have produced some truly amazing snap-together kits that have more detail than many "proper" model kits, and these are now being licensed by Revell for wider distribution to us westerners. Their Perfect Grade Millennium Falcon is a tour-de-force in plastic engineering, offering a 1:72 dinner plate sized Millennium Falcon as it appears in the progenitor of the series, Star Wars A New Hope as it became known once it was joined by other entries in the original trilogy. GreenStrawberry are clearly SW fans, and have released a substantial number of sets for the various kits, including the big Falcon. Now they're offering the sets in a super-set, which gives you all three and offers a discount on the individual purchase price. If you're going to splash out on the big Falcon, you either go big or go home, so why not? The set arrives in a thick card envelope with the details on the front on a white sticker. Inside are the three individual sets in the usual GS themed dark grey, green and red, each with a header card, the Photo-Etch (PE), instructions and any ancillary parts hidden within a resealable clear foil envelope. The following sets are included: Exterior (06318-1/72) Contained on a single large fret, this set includes six double-layered grilles for the aft deck exhausts, plus detail parts for within the vents that can just be seen through the grilles. The two lateral docking bay tunnels have their vents augmented with new two-layer grilles, and the upper hatch that is used to retrieve Luke from under Cloud City on Bespin is given a new irising shutter, and two hand-holds to the sides. More vents and exhausts on these areas are also detailed with a covered fan and perforated panel beneath the grilles. On the margin between the cockpit glazing and tunnel, the prominent grating is replaced with a fine PE part; a curved part is added to the right mandible; the nav lights are drilled and given a surround on the tips of the mandibles and in the back of the space between them a pair of steering-wheel shaped parts replace the kit detail. Finally, the base of the dish is fitted with a new set of grab-handle shaped parts around its edges. Landing Gear (06418-1/72) Supplied on two sheets, this set replaces the styrene landing gear bay doors and those perforated "anklets" that each leg sports. It also includes bay door actuators, and details for inside the crew access ramp, plus a ceiling panel that is fitted after a hump inside that area is removed, and holes are drilled to accommodate the four pairs of ceiling lights in the panel. Cockpit & Gun Wells (06518-1/72) Consisting of a fret of PE plus a pre-printed self-adhesive representation of the rear of the cockpit, the upgrades begin with an overhead console attached to the canopy interior, with a number of those odd protractor-like controls you see Han and Chewie fiddling with, as well as more on the main console. The comfy front seats are given new PE tuck & roll panels in their centre, while the more Spartan rear seats are fitted with new details too. The rear bulkhead is a new PE part with a laminated door frame and a door fitted behind, plus the stick-on pre-printed detail for your use if you see fit. The bulkhead part is then attached to the rear of the cockpit area before it is inserted in the hull. The gun emplacements are given a fairly comprehensive refit, removing the seats from their inaccurate mountings and retaining the upper half, then putting a new four-part floor in the well, a raised gantry for the seat, which uses the previously removed seat base to prop it clear of the floor; new controls for the guns; cushion detail for the seat; foot pedals and control box below the controls; a hatch ring; access ladder disappearing into the ship; other controls on the wall and ceiling, and new ceiling panel insert to finish off the area. Conclusion Lots of goodies here for the detailer that takes an amazing kit and makes it even more amazing without any serious hacking away at the styrene, with a healthy discount on buying them separately thrown in for good measure. Review sample courtesy of
  11. After the Fw.190F-8 - ref. 04869 ( http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234969323-132-focke-wulf-fw190f-8-by-revell-released/) Revell is to release in July 2017 a 1/32nd Focke-Wulf Fw.190A-8/R-11 Nachtjäger - ref. 03926 Sources: http://www.kitreviewsonline.de/revell-neuheiten-fuer-das-jahr-2017/ http://www.revell-news.de/display.php?M=166356&C=3f057b9cf49fc7b39cd8722d3dac6145&S=587&L=36&N=239 V.P.
  12. Apart from the wheels, which I used the hobby design M3 dtm wheel set, it's stock. A pretty nice kit and fun to build.
  13. Answering @vppelt68‘s siren call I’ve rooted my B-17 kit out of the stash. Part of a Revell 8th AF set as A Bit o’ Lace (I’m not sure about the scheme though but that decision can come later) Innards all present and correct Due to me not checking back on here about the start date I may have in a fit of enthusiasm have flung some glue at 1 or 2 sub assemblies Still less than 25% though so I guess the GB gods will be merciful
  14. Well calling this done it is my interpretation of the Revell 1/144 scale LSM used by the US navy during the later part of the Pacific war to Island hop large amounts of men and armour The build was inspired buy a model from Julian Swallows(Gremlin 56) who sadly is no longer building with us but I hope he is looking down thinking not bad BUT? The only concern I had with the kit was the stanchions I had to replace because my clumsy hammer hands broke most of them trying to remove from the sprue I added the crew using the Shapeways 3D printed figures good but need to be handled with care during wash down of the wax residue again hammer hands It was a fun build away from all the extras of late so Thanks for looking in and even helping along with the build Well that is the third one completed this year so not doing to bad Now for that BPBC beefy
  15. This Eurofighter has sat around taped together for some time and is my second choice for this years KUTA. I started it during a lull between builds, but other things got in the way and little progress was made. I assembled the wings to the fuselage halves and did some minor work around the intake, but that was it. The plan back then was to finish it as ZK353/BQ as flown by Flt. Lt. Jonny Dowen of 29(F) Squadron RAF based at RAF Coningsby in 2015 So here is how things stand at present, along with the intended scheme. by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr And this shows the parts un-taped and the small amount of work done previously. by John L, on Flickr
  16. This will be my build of 'Outhouse Mouse' a B-17G that survived the war and was returned to the USA using the Revell 1/72 G kit: I know the decal instructions state both 1/72 and 1/48 its a typo the decals are at 1/72...phew I won't be using any aftermarket stuff but will try and add some additional detail from scratch. Haven't built a heavy for donkey's years so should be interesting. Cheers, Mark.
  17. Hello everyone! Here is my Revell 1:72 Fokker E.III, 340/16, flown by Joachim Buddecke with 5nci and 12nci Bölüks, Ottoman Air Force, in 1916-17. This was an old 1980s issue of the kit I found in a shop during the late 1990s and eventually built in 2004. It was painted by brush with only the varnish being airbrushed. The markings came from a Pegasus decal sheet and the serial number was hand-painted. Thanks for looking and all comments welcome Miguel
  18. Hi All, I hope I can build this subject this year. There are couple others before in pipeline and I have some questions related to topic. D-AFFT was quite special plane. It was operated by Hansa Luftbild and this was basically unit to get intel information outside Germany before war. This plane crashed in Helsinki Malmi airport 1.10.1939 and crashed plane was returned quietly back to Germany. My first question is: Was this plane carrying cameras and if so where those were located? Second is: Should I use Revell kit as a starting point or Kora conversion set? Scan is from Suomen ilmailuhistoriallinen Lehti 2/1996
  19. I wasn't going to post this one up until I started it properly, but here goes anyway. At the moment, I'm just doing the spray painting bits while the weather allows. The build will be later in the year, but with my spray booth in the garage I have to do the spraying while it's warm and dry enough. So first job is to decide on the colour. The instructions are for the car in beige, but I wanted to try another of the factory colours. Unfortunately, the choice of colours from Trabant demonstrate the wow factor you would expect from the Eastern Bloc - as well as beige the choice is Invalid Carriage Blue, Dirty Off White, Pale Grey, Baby Sick, and two shades of green, one of which resembles the glowing stick of uranium from the Simpson's opening and one of which resembles dying grass. I decided to go with the grey as I think it might suit the car. The kit is Revell's Trabant Universal. On first glance, and from what I've read, it looks a nicely detailed kit with lots of parts... and also lots of steps to the instructions (46!). The body looks pretty nice apart from some sink marks front and rear on each side so those have been filled, and the mould lines are hidden behind what will be a trim line from front to rear with only small lines on the front of the car. The door lines are also quite shallow so I scribed them too. There's quite a lot of bits which are body colour, which means quite a bit of spraying with this one. I'll only put up the chassis and the body for the spraying, the rest would just be repetitive. The pic below shows it very early on, and I've put the roof panel, bonnet and boot in place to give an idea of how it will look. This pic is after the scribing and the first attempt at filling the sink marks, the ones at the front needing quite a bit of filling. The spoon in the foreground shows what I hope to be the final colour - this one is Revell's USAF Light Grey, which being a matt paint will need a couple of goes with the clear where there are decals. As usual, the primer showed that this wasn't the best filling job, so all the sink marks needed filling and sanding again before it got another coat of primer. And here we are with the body finally complete and wearing it's coat of primer. Meanwhile, the chassis paint was running in parallel to the body. This one is mostly in matt black and I managed to get it painted relatively easily. However, the rear wheel arches should have the finish in body colour, so I had to break out the foil and the masking tape in preparation for colour coating them. Two weeks later, after adding the colour coat (directly over the black), I added the clear coat and then removed the masking. I have to say that I am quite pleased with the result. There is some detailing required to parts of this (principally the handbrake cable), but that will come when I reach that stage of the build. And then my paint woes hit. First of all, that can of spray paint which was fine for the chassis wheel arches decided to lose pressure two weeks later. And the other can I had ran out very quickly only doing a few larger parts and a mist coat and a half on the body before running out. So this is where it is now: So I'm out of spray paint and have a very unfinished car. Fortunately, I've just got myself a new, but cheap, airbrush which I was only planning on using at first on areas where it wouldn't be that visible. Having managed to extract about 20ml from the low pressure can I guess I will have to try with that. Would I be right in thinking that the paint from a spray can will go straight through the airbrush ok without thinning? And has anyone any experience of spraying with Revell acrylic paints from the tub if I need to go down that route? Would I be better off just getting another spray can if so required?
  20. Here is my first finished build of 2019 its Revell 1:24 Volkswagen T1 Samba Bus "Flower Power". Actually I built it with my daughter over the Christmas and we just finished it last week. It was a co-production and she actually did a fair amount of building, the airbrushing and the simpler decal work . I have to say she did a good job but I have a new found respect for model car builders ; trying to get a smooth finish on these things is though and I still have a lot to master here. Great kit and colourful result and I would actually build another one ...in a zombie apocalypse theme regards Brian
  21. German A4/V2 Rocket 1:72 Revell (03309) The Vergeltungswaffe 2, commonly known as the V-2, was the first ballistic missile to be used in combat anywhere in the world. Although relatively simple by modern standards, it laid the foundations for the space programmes of the USA and the Soviet Union in the postwar period. The V-2 was a liquid-fuelled, single-stage rocket, steered by rudders placed on the tail fins and graphite vanes at the exhaust nozzle. Guidance was provided by two gyroscopes (one for horizontal and one for vertical) and an accelerometer providing inputs to an analogue computer. From September 1944, over 3,000 V-2 rockets were launched against targets such as London, causing an estimated 9,000 civilian and military casualties. The British Government initially sought to suppress public information about the V-2 rockets, blaming the damage caused on gas main explosions. The public were not fooled however, and the V-2s acquired the sardonic nickname of "flying gas pipes". The missiles proved almost impossible to intercept, and the most effective countermeasure proved to be the disinformation system operated by MI5, whereby double agents fed false reports about the impact points and damage caused by V-2 attacks. This model is a re-release of a kit released five years ago by Special Armour, the small scale AFV imprint of CMK. Inside the end-opening box are two sprues of grey and a small decal sheet. Even a cursory glance at the sprues indicates that this is as far from a limited run kit. The mouldings are pin sharp and there is a wealth of fine detail. The overall effect is reminiscent of a modern Eduard kit, which is quite a compliment. The kit is made up of almost fifty parts. This is pretty impressive for a rocket, but most of the parts are for the launch structure. The rocket itself is made up of two halves, split vertically, plus the four fins and the rocket exhaust. The latter part is nicely detailed but is made up of two halves and will require careful assembly in order to remove the join. The rest of the parts are used for the launch platform, which can be finished in either launch position or stowed position. The platform is made up of well over twenty parts and is superbly detailed. It features accurately represented components such as the stabilising feet and the controls. A wheeled trolley is also provided, but this isn't used if you want to build the rocket in the launch position. The painting scheme shows four differnet rockets, from a black-and-white prototype through camouflaged in-service rockets and finishing with the emergency rockets used in 1945. Conclusion If you are expecting this to be a relatively simple kit with few parts, then you're in for a surprise. The rocket itself is superb, with fine surface details and precise engineering. The launch pad and transportation section are superbly complex, and I'll be paying close attention to the instructions when I finally get round to building mine. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  22. With my Airfix Wildcat approaching completion, I thought I would dig out another naval subject. Picked this up cheap late last year. Haven't made a Revell model in years so it will be an interesting change for me. Straight out of the box as I really like the gloss sea blue look. First time I have seen a black Revell box. Sprue shot. Looks Ok. Couple of nasty sink marks on the drop tanks, but I don't intend to use them. The wing tips for the FAA aircraft on the box. Canopy parts - which I gather are very thin and fragile. Neat decal sheet (that's just a bit of dust by the way - markings are fine). Instruction booklet - which os quite a difference from the old Revell standard printed on very poor recycled paper. Confusingly there are variations between the marking scheme in the instructions and the completed kit on the front of the instructions...... Instructions look nice and clear, with plenty of colour call outs. So from my reading around, the markings in the kit are for a Corsair Mk IV which is a Goodyear built FG-1. In terms of painting it should have an interior green cockpit and inside of the engine cowling, gloss sea blue wheel wells, undercarriage and wheel hubs and overall gloss sea blue for the main colour. So relatively straight forward. Lets see if I can mess it up!
  23. Augusta Westland Lynx Mk.8 Revell 1/32 History The initial design, then known as the Westland WG.13, was started in the mid-1960s as a replacement for the Westland Scout and Wasp, and a more advanced alternative to the UH-1 Iroquois. The design was to be powered by a pair of Bristol Siddeley BS.360 turboshaft engines. As part of the Anglo-French helicopter agreement signed in February 1967, French company Sud Aviation (later Aérospatiale) had a 30 per cent share of production work, Westland performing the remainder. It was intended that France would procure the Lynx for its Navy and a heavily modified armed reconnaissance variant for the French Army, with the United Kingdom in return buying Aérospatiale Gazelle and Puma for its armed forces. The initial naval variant of the Lynx, known as the Lynx HAS.2 in British service, or Lynx Mk.2(FN) in French service, differed from the Lynx AH.1 in being equipped with a tricycle undercarriage and a deck restraint system, folding main rotor blades, an emergency flotation system and a nose-mounted radar. An improved Lynx for the Royal Navy, the Lynx HAS.3, had Gem 42-1 Mark 204 engines, an uprated transmission, a new flotation system and an Orange Crop ESM system. The Lynx HAS.3 also received various other updates in service. A similar upgrade to the French Lynx was known as the Lynx Mk.4(FN). In the early 1990s, Westland incorporated some of the technology from the Naval Lynx-3 design into a less-radical Super Lynx. This featured BERP rotor blades, the Westland 30-derived tail rotor, Gem 42 engines, a new under-nose 360-degree radar installation and an optional nose-mounted electro-optical sensor turret. Royal Navy Lynx HAS.3s upgraded to Super Lynx standard were known in service as the Lynx HMA.8, and several export customers ordered new-build or upgraded Super Lynxes. From the 1990s onwards, Westland began offering the Super Lynx 200, which was equipped with LHTEC CTS800 engines, and the Super Lynx 300, which also had a new cockpit and avionics derived from the Agusta Westland EH101. Both of these models have achieved several export sales. In 2002, Flight International reported that more than 40 variants of the Lynx were in service, numbering almost 400 aircraft having been built for various customers The Model The original RN Lynx from Revell was released back in 2013 and it’s then them until the aircraft’s retirement to release the latest and final version. Although this is pretty much a re-box of the original Mk3 it does come with all the upgrades that the Mk8 was known for, namely the ugly nose FLIR on the modified nose panel, and under fuselage radome. It does also come with a different tail boom with separate fin allowing the possibility of posing the fin folded. The box the kit comes in is adorned with a nice painting of a Lynx in flight, unfortunately it is an end opening box, therefore and floppy as ever, so no shoving it in the stash with any more than one other kit on it. Inside there are fourteen sprues of grey styrene, two of clear and a largish decal sheet. The mouldings have stood up well and there is no sign of flash or other imperfections, but quite a few moulding pips. The internal details are very nicely moulded and includes the sound proofing and tie downs on the inside of the cabin, although it could be doing with being a little bit baggier. Construction begins with drilling out the requisite holes in the cabin floor before added the cockpit centre console frame, instrument panel pedestal and panel, which appears to be correct for the type. The rudder pedals, cyclic and collective levers for both pilots are then glued into position, followed by the centre console control panels. Each of the pilots seats are made up from five parts with the seatbelts moulded into the backrest and seat squab. Once assembled the seats are glued into position along with the cabin rear bulkhead, sidewalls and rear bench seat with front support frame. The middle set of six seats might look ok from a distance but they bear little resemblance to the real things as the end frames are solid, whereas you’d see the actual framework on the real items. There is a group of electronic black boxes fitted behind the pilots seat consisting of seven parts and the middle seat assembly is fitted at the same time. The roof soundproofing is fitted with a hand hold before being glued into position. Before the fuselage halves are closed up the sections are fitted either edge of the side doors and more holes are required to be drilled out. The engine exhaust plate is fitted with two, tow piece exhausts while the main rotor gearbox, which is very nicely represented is fitted with a drive pin and cap, so that, should you wish, the rotors can be turned once fitted. The cabin and main rotor gearbox assembly are then sandwiched between the fuselage halves as is the exhaust plate. The roof panel and engine covers are then glued into place, followed by the exhaust shrouds and several access panels. The underside of the fuselage is also attached at this point as are the underside tail panel and what looks like a doppler panel, but could be for the radio altimeter and orange crop panels. The intake grilles are unfortunately represented by clear parts, not mesh as per the rear aircraft. Personally, unless an aftermarket company can reproduce them the clear parts could make for good moulds for the modeller to produce their own mesh grilles. The underside is fitted with several more panels and aerials before work begins on the nose section. the nose comprises of five parts before the five piece FLIR unit is attached. The completed assembly is then glued to the fuselage. The thwo piece tail cone is fitted with the end bulkhead which includes the hinge and locking points, as does the two piece tail fin. If you were to pose the fin folded you will need to add some internal detail to both, including the tail rotor transitional gearbox in the fin. The kit does come with the locking handle for the fin as well, so it looks like Revell nearly decided to give the folding fin option in the kit, but decided to do it properly. The completed tail cone/fin is then glued to the fuselage, along with the side doors and the slides, windscreen and pilots doors, as well as smaller items such as the windscreen wipers and various blade aerials. The main undercarriage legs each comprise to halves for each oleo, two parts to the scissor links and two halves for each wheel. The completed undercarriage legs are then sandwiched between two halves of each sponson interior before the two part sponson itself is attached. The nose wheel oleo is also in two halves and fitted with a two piece scissor link, plus two, tow piece wheels. With all the undercarriage assembled they are glued into their respective positions, along with the large anti IR beacon under the front end of the tailcone, a large blade aerial on the port side near the beacon and a number of other items which this reviewer hasn’t a clue what they are. The SACRU hook is then attached, along with four strengthening straps and the hold down harpoon unit. The tail rotor is a single piece moulding to which the inner hub and outer control rods are attached before being fitted to the port side of the fin, while on the starboard side the horizontal stabiliser is fitted. Another large blade aerial is fitted where the sonar hole used to be while just aft and to starboard there is a retractable lamp fitted. The build now concentrates on to the weaponry. The modeller has the option to fit a 50 cal M2 heavy machine gun in the port doorway. This assembly is made up from no less than twenty two parts all told, and really looks the business, with the caveat that the cooling holes over the barrel could be better represented. The other options to add weapons to the Lynx include two Stingray torpedoes each from four parts or two Sea Skua anti shipping missiles, each consisting of eight parts. The launchers are made up from ten parts and if you’re not going to fir the gun you will need two launchers. Aside from the weapons, the kit also includes the rescue hoist consisting of ten parts and is fitted to the starboard side doorway. The HF aerial stays are fitted to the underside of the tail cone and fitted with a length of wire of the modeller’s choice. The last major assembly is the main rotor. The head is made up from thirteen parts, before the rotor blades are attached and the whole assembly fit to the main rotor gearbox finishing the build. Decals The single large decal sheet provides a complete stencil set for one aircraft all the marking specific to each option. The decals are very nicely produced with great colour density, in register and nicely opaque. The markings provided are for the following:- Lynx Mk8, 207 Flight, 815 Naval Air Squadron, HMS Iron Duke, March 2016 Lynx Mk8, 215 Flight, 815 Naval Air Squadron, HMS Monmouth, March 2012 Conclusion It’s very nice to see this kit re-released with the new parts to build the final version of this venerable helicopter, and it’s still a fabulous looking kit. Not being overly complex it shouldn’t take too much to make a good looking model out of it. I have heard there may be fit problems in some areas, but with a bit of care and patience I’m sure they won’t be too bad. It will certainly be an impressive model for any collection. There is certainly plenty of scope for super detailing if that is your wish. If you wish to pose your Lynx with the blades folded there si an aftermarket set that will help you with that. or
  24. Antonov An.225 Mrija (04958) 1:144 Revell Beginning life as an enlargement of the An-124, the An-225 was developed to carry the Soviet Buran Space Shuttle, which obviously wasn't to be a long engagement, and after a period in mothballs, it was re-engineered to be used by Antonov for carrying oversize loads, which it now does all over the world. There is only one airframe in existence due to the expiry of funding during construction of the 2nd airframe, which after more than a few false-restarts, only now might see completion to be used by another carrier in China. It holds a few world records for wingspan of an operational aircraft and for carrying the heaviest single load. The conversion of the An-124 involved lengthening the fuselage and wings to accommodate another two engines, and of course the number of wheels and gear legs were increased too to spread the load around, with the innovative "kneeling" nose wheel arrangement that makes loading cargo through the front visor an easier task. Its first commercial flight involved transporting four main battle tanks, a task that gives an idea of the huge capacity in terms both of volume and weight that this monster has. It has been surprisingly active, as its capacity and cost hits the right spot on more occasions than you would think. It also pinched the title of largest cargo plane in service from the American C-5 Galaxy, which it is fairly substantially bigger than, even in 1:144. The Kit This is a completely new tooling from Revell, and at first look it might seem an odd choice when you consider that there is only one airframe extant on this blue marble of ours. That said, it is a stunningly massive monster of a gigantic behemoth – I'm just getting all the superlatives out of the way early on. Seriously though, if you've ever seen this aircraft at a show or in the air, it will have made an indelible impression on your retina, as your mind struggles to comprehend just how large it is. The same thing will probably cross your mind when you admire the box on the shelf of your local hobby shop, or when it arrives at your front door. It's a big'un with the box measuring 43 x 60 x 12cm, and yes. It's also a top-opener, which is nice. There are only eight sprues of white styrene, plus two of clear parts, but with the exception of the clear parts, they're pretty large sprues, and there are a lot of parts. First impressions are excellent. The quality of the tooling is very fine and crisp as befits a 1:144 model, with lots of detail and a full-length interior that puts other large cargo aircraft models a bit to shame. The breakdown of the parts also shows a great deal of thought has been put into the construction and long-term welfare of the model once it is on display. There are also four distinct options for displaying the model, which are in-flight, landed and buttoned-up, landed with the visor open, and landed, visor open and kneeling down to accept cargo. Choose your option early on, and check the miniature colour profile at the top of each step before you make any blunders. Construction begins with the interior, which is built up into a tube-like structure that is then surrounded by the fuselage once completed. It starts with the roof, which is covered in structural detail, and has three bulkheads fixed to it at intervals, with the floor slid through the two forward ones before being glued to the bottom, and completed by the two walls, all of which will need painting beforehand if you're leaving any doors open. The tiny cockpit is a single part that is painted up and attached to the top of the roof at the front, while another spacer is fixed to the roof toward the rear of the assembly. The two long main gear bays are next, with seven individual compartments for each gear leg, although they are all linked into one part, with another seven parts supplied for the retraction jacks, which makes for simple alignment. The kneeling option has a different set of legs, with the shorter ones fitted at the front, while the in-flight option uses just the bay parts for structural strength. These sub-assemblies are then located on the underside of the floor and cemented in place, depending on which option you have gone for. The fuselage halves are prepared for use by the adding of all the small portholes on the sides, all of which have a small backing panel to hold them in place and to accept the glue. At the nose, a choice of cheek inserts are applied inside depending on the final position of the nose visor, and then the fuselage is closed up around the interior, taking care to remember the 20g of nose weight behind the cockpit as you do. At this point the fuselage is still open aft of the wing leading edge, which is closed by the large T-shaped insert that has a sturdy spar applied to its inside, and includes the inboard upper section of the wings for strength and to prevent any tricky seams being pulled open by the weight of the wings. At the rear another spar is installed in the tail to accept the empennage later in the build. The canopy is fitted at this point too, sliding in from the front. A similar insert is fitted under the fuselage straddling the main gear bays. As already mentioned, the upper wing root is a single part that spans the fuselage, and has a stiffening spar fitted to stop the model's own weight from pulling it apart. The upper wing panels are attached to the end of this centre section, with a portion of the spar and a U-shaped mating surface also helping seam integrity. This is all then hidden away by closing up the wing using the full-span lower panel, which is repeated on the other side, with clear wingtip lights added. The Mrija's angled H-tail is next, with the upstands and the horizontals made up from two parts each, fitted together over the aft spar to obtain the correct angle, with the uprights perpendicular to them, as shown in a scrap diagram. The two dorsal humps over the wing roots are made up from two parts each and applied to the surface on their raised positions. At this stage the 225 is looking like the world's biggest glider, as the wings are devoid of engines, of which you must now build six. The internals are identical, so with the fan, trunking and intake lip added together, they are inserted into the six external housings and pylons that are all different, so take note of which construction step each one represents with a mark inside the pylon or similar. Each wing also has six flap actuator fairings, which are two parts each and again fit in only one slot on the wing, so be careful not to get them mixed up. With those in place, the engine pods are added to their recesses on the wing, locating with two pins for additional strength. The nose can be posed open or closed, and this section is next to be assembled, again using the colour profiles as a guide. It starts with the nose gear bay, which is left bare for in-flight and uses the complete bay for the closed nose, with twin legs for the standard configuration, both of which are installed inside the two-part nose cone before being glued to the front of the fuselage. The in-flight option has all the bay doors fitted flush, while gear down has the nose gear doors sliding forward, and the main gear doors folding up and out away from the centre to hang folded parallel to the sides of the fuselage. For the open visor, more detail is added to the inside, and a hinge is fitted to each side, while the twin nose gear legs are glued into a short bulkhead that attaches to the front of the fuselage along with two support legs backing them up. In the kneeling configuration, the gear legs are fitted along the line of flight, with the axles pointing forward and the extra supports fitted again. A ladder is fitted to the inside of the fuselage in either retracted or deployed position, depending on whether the crew are coming or going, and while the main gear bay doors are the same as for the standard gear down option, the open visor retains the main bay doors, so these are fitted to the underside of the visor, which is propped open by two large rams. The loading ramp is shown deployed in the kneeling position, and folded for transport with the nose open but the wheels level. This involves most of the same parts, but with shorter rams at the sides for the stowed variant. After a few aerials are fitted on the nose, additional drawings show how the two open options should look once complete. I've missed out the wheels, haven't I? There are two reasons for that, because I didn't want to confuse the discussion of the four options, and also there are an awful lot of them. The nose gear has two sets of paired wheels, while the main gear has an impressive seven pairs per side, so there are a total of 32 wheels to clean up and paint. Sure that's a bit of a pain, but if you want to build the world's biggest cargo plane, what are your other options apart from an in-flight model, which is already an option? Wait for some resin ones if you don't like scraping seams, and either get yourself some masks or punch your own if you really don't like cutting the lines around the hubs, and who does? I tend to freehand mine after mounting them on a cocktail stick, but there are probably easier ways. Markings One airframe in existence, so there's one scheme, right? Not quite. The original scheme was worn from August 2009 for seven years, after which some subtle changes were made, adding a little badge below the International Cargo Transporter logo behind the cockpit, and some more stencils and manufacturer marks to the engine nacelles. Not a huge change, but a sign that someone at the designers DACO was paying attention. The decal sheet is very long, as it has a set of lurid yellow and blue cheat lines that extend the full length of the fuselage, and they were printed for Revell by Zannetti, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. It's not particularly obvious from the instructions, but the eight yellow spirals marked decal number 36 are intended for the spinners on the engine fronts, so it's nice to have two spares in case things go awry. Additionally, decals 42 and 52 that fit under the nose have small cuts marked in their edges to accommodate the compound curve in that area, so remember to cut the carrier film before you soak them. Helpfully, a spare of each one is also included in case your first try doesn't go so well, and the fuselage cheat lines are split into two sections in an effort to ease the task. There are also a couple of spare engine stripes, all of which is good news if you're concerned about messing up the decals. Conclusion It's hard not to be impressed by this kit, and not just from a point of view of size. The quality of the tooling is excellent, the level of detail is first-rate, and the engineering expertise that has gone into creating it is impressive, demonstrating a desire for the complete model to sit on your shelf for years to come without concern for it pulling itself to pieces under its own weight. Splendid! The price-point represents good value when compared to other similar-sized kits, and what's included improves that further. If you have the space in your stash and/or on your shelf, there's nothing holding you back, and even if you don't have the space, when has that ever stopped us? Extremely highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  25. Here is my Revell 1:72 Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8 which I built back in 2013. It represents "White 11" of I./SG4, Luftwaffe, based at Picenza, Italy, in May 1944. The kit was built mostly OOB adding etched belts from Eduard and replacing the nose ring with a correct replacement part from Quickboost. The kit was painted by brush except for the mottling and varnish which were done by airbrush. The white underwing tips were made from white decal sheet. One thing of note was the lack of swastikas. Revell never includes them but in this case it was correct as, together with the white theatre band, they were overpainted for camouflage purposes but it is believed the swastikas were painted out under orders of the unit's commanding officer for other reasons.... (he was later relieved of command!). Thanks for looking and all comments are welcome Miguel
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