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Found 1,494 results

  1. Apollo 11 Astronaut on the Moon (03702) 1:8 Revell On the 20th July 1969, a man by the name of Neil Armstrong stepped off the ladder of his flimsy spacecraft and onto the Moon's dusty surface, uttering the words that would become famous "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind". His name and this quote, plus the likeness of the Saturn V rocket that got them there, and the Apollo 11 spacecraft that consisted of the Command Module (CM), Service Module (SM) and Lunar Module (LM or LEM if you add "excursion" into the mix) also became amongst the most recognised images of their time. Leaving many footprints in the dusty regolith of the Sea of Tranquility where they landed, they soon clambered back onboard and blasted off for home, paving the way for another six missions, only one of which didn't quite make it but became almost equally famous because of their accident and subsequent return to earth that was fraught with danger. Maybe they should have skipped the name Apollo 13? The Kit Following the 50th year since we walked on the Moon theme, we have more from Revell on the subject, which again is a new edition of a previously released kit from the same era as the Apollo 11 CM & SM that we reviewed recently here. The kit arrives in an end-opening box, with four sprues in white styrene inside, some of which have been cut to fit the new box. There is also a yellow tinted clear part for the visor, a small sheet of decals and the instruction booklet, which is printed in Revell's new colour style. As it's a special edition, there is also a pack of four thumb-pots of Revell paint, a small tube of Contacta semi-liquid glue, and a paintbrush, which as always with these sets has had its hair parted by the bag. The kit is clearly a product of its day, but has good detail throughout and a simple method of construction. The completed model stands at 258mm tall, a little over 2m in scale, out of which you must take the bulk of the suit, helmet and base to account for the difference between Neil's 1.8m height and that of the model. I'd say that scales out pretty well. The astronaut's face is moulded into the helmet area, with the yellow tinted visor added after paint, but here there is a slight deviation that stands out to the average Joe. The bottom edge of the visor is a little flattened when compared with those famous photos of Neil after touch down, so if it bothers you, you'll need a little putty to make that more to your liking. The suit is a pretty detailed rendition of the one that Neil wore, with some slight differences from the real thing such as the central panel on his chest and the lack of umbilical ports on the left of the chest plate. There are also some straps hanging around that are missing for obvious reasons, and the umbilicals that attach to the backpack should have insulating sleeves on them that give them a crinkled, faceted look. All of this can be fixed if you're minded, or you can just enjoy the model for what it is and build it to the best of your ability. Construction begins with the head and torso, which are split vertically front to back, with the astronaut's head moulded into the helmet, as mentioned. It's a generic face that's a very nice sculpt, but clearly not Neil Armstrong, and bears more of a resemblance to a face from a Captain Scarlet puppet. Whether that was for copyright reasons, I guess we'll never know. The legs and arms are next, with the former split the same way, and the latter split to give maximum detail to the gauntlets. The backpack is similarly split front and back, attaching to the torso with a central pin and two realistic-looking strap-ends, with a good amount of surface detail. On the front is another much smaller pack that resembles a claymore mine in shape, but has more to do with environment regulation. The fixed video camera glues into a slot on the front of the pack, and at this stage you are also instructed to install the visor into the helmet. If you've been brave and adjusted the shape of the lower edge, you'll need to reduce the glazed part to match. These things are gold-plated to protect the wearer from excessive sunlight exposure, as there is no atmosphere to speak of on the moon, so the light is undiminished by atmospheric backscatter. This has been mimicked by the clear yellow tint, but you could experiment with gold leaf of gold chrome paint if you feel the need. To complete the figure, the two umbilicals (umbilicii?) are routed from the backpack to the chest and chest pack, with the aforementioned caveat of them requiring insulating sleeves. The base consists of a chunk of the moon's surface with a depression for the lander's leg, and another flat-spot for the figure's left foot, then a raised flat area with that famous phrase engraved on it for posterity. You get a portion of the lander's leg, which has a section of the ladder added to the front, and the big dished foot at the bottom. This portion of the lander was covered in a golden mylar layer for insulation too, so treat yourself to some Cadbury's Bournville or other confection with a golden inner wrapper, and have a go at making it look suitably wrinkly if you feel up to the challenge. The completed figure is attached with one foot on the base, the other in the dished top of the landing pad, with two flat tabs ensuring a good join. Markings The majority of Neil's suit is white, with grey used mainly on his gloves and overshoes that protect his boots from damage, which incidentally debunks another of the deniers' arguments about the tread pattern on their boots being different. I digress. The moon is very dusty, so after even a few steps the suits got covered in an incredibly fine grey dust that was hard to shift. Check your references, and enjoy replicating some of it. There was a #2 Revell paintbrush included in the pack, but as the bristles were bent over, I decided not to photograph it. Ok, I forgot! The decal sheet is small and consists of a couple of American flags, two NASA meatball logos for the backpack and his chest, and a stencil for the water reservoir at the bottom of the backpack. There's no name tag for the suit, but that's hidden away under the chest pack, so hardly an issue. Decals are printed for Revell by Zanetti, in good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion This is a fun model that will give a lot of pleasure to a lot of folks if they approach it with the right attitude. If you treat it as a blast from the past, or a desktop model you'll have fun building it, but if you want something accurate, there are some alterations you can make and still have fun. Considering the age of the moulds there are some really nice cloth effects, with creases, seams and so forth giving a realistic landscape for you to paint over and weather. A fitting tribute to the late, great Mr Armstrong, may he rest in peace. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  2. RoG's McLaren 570S all done, finished in Tamiya TS21 Gold, with Semi Gloss Black and Alclad Dark Aluminium details. Interior is my own 'cream' and 'light black' acrylic mixes. The CF decals are from Ka Models of Korea (highly recommended). Not a great kit and fought me all the way to the very end - the final assembly is a proper PitA. I knew to attach the dash onto the lip BEFORE adding the interior because I'd read and seen so many build reviews. Even so, the final fit is truly dreadful... All that said, like the Ferrari 458, the finished car is truly a thing of beauty to my eye. Please feel free to make any comments or ask any questions (yes I know the exhausts aren't on yet). Best from NZ. Ian.
  3. This is my entry. I thought about Burma Banshee P40 but decided to safe it for a P-40 STGB. So it will be stang. ~Hope it could be as good as Warhawk 8-) And some work I've done yesterday evening....
  4. I didn't realise until late last night that the build threads were getting going. So if I may just 'lay down a marker' for these bad boys... They have been sat in the cupboard stash for a few months - waiting for this GB to 'kick off'. I'll get some sprue shots before the weekend, but the vague idea is to do them as a 'matching' set. They will be strictly OOB and a 'just for fun' project - as my mojo has been a little lacking of late. Hopefully the 'team spirit' of a GB will give me the KUTA I need at the moment. See you at the weekend and good luck everyone, Steve
  5. U Boat Type VII C/41 Platinum Edition 1:72 Revell The Type VII submarine was based on earlier German designs. This type would go onto become the most used German submarines of WWII with over 700 being built. As with anything there would be many modifications along the way. The type started as the V11A with an initial 10 being built. The type VIIC would become the main boat of the German Navy with 568 being built between 1940 and 1945. With a range of 8500 nautical miles. The boats had 4 forward, and one stern tube in general (there were a few exceptions) with 14 torpedoes being carried. For surface running and battery charging a pair of supercharged 6 cylinder 4 stroke diesel engines were used which gave a top speed of 17.7 knots. A maximum submerged speed of 7.6 knots was possible with a new fully charged battery. The submarines generally carried a crew of 44 to 52 men in what can best be described as "cramped" conditions. For anyone familiar with the original "Das Boot" mini series U-96 was a Type VIIC. The Kit This boxing is a re-release of Revell's new tooling from 2003 which was released again in 2006. This new boxing is a Platinum edition, It contains all of the original plastic, two large sheets of photo etch, self adhesive wooden decks; and metal parts for the Periscopes (extended & retracted), snorkel mast, radar mast, nav lights, ensign staff, boom support, & gun barrels. such is the large number of these additional parts that a complete separate instruction book is provided for them. Construction begins with the torpedo tube, the modeller must decide whether to have them open or shut and then fit the respective parts into the hull sections. Once this is don't two internal bulkheads for strength are added in and the left/right hull sections can be joined. The stand can then be made up and the hull placed on it. Construction now moves to the stern and the details for the propeller shafts, propellers and supporting structure are added. Once these are on the stern planes and twin rudders can be added. Switching back to the bow, the bow planes are added along with the anchor and protective guides for the bow planes. Next the snorkel is made up, This part is moveable so care must be taken to follow the instructions if you want it to work. The snorkel is fitted into the appropriate deck section, and all the main deck sections can be added to the hull. Work now switches to the conning tower of the sub. The search and attack periscopes are made up installed into the decking along with the tower hatch, The upper tower deck and the lower one are then added into the tower superstructure. Radio masts and other item are then added in also. The deck extension for the anti aircraft gun is then added as well. The single 3.7cm flack gun can then be built up and added. Two additional twin barrelled 20mm Zwilling Anti aircraft guns are then made up and fitted to the tower decking as well. Once these are on various deck fittings, ladders and the railings are added. Finally the ensign staff can be added. The coning tower can then be added to the main hull. Thread is provided for the one forward and to aft wires from the conning tower along with the blocks for securing it. The hull is then finished of with a variety of smaller fittings. Platinum Edition As mentioned this is Revell's Platinum Edition which features two large sheets of photo etch, self adhesive wooden decks; and metal parts for the Periscopes (extended & retracted), snorkel mast, radar mast, nav lights, ensign staff, boom support, & gun barrels. such is the large number of these additional parts that a complete separate instruction book is provided for them and this must be read in conjunction with the main booklet. As expected there are many parts here and I suspect not for the beginner. The many fittings which will replace moulded on detail will look good on the model. The guns also benefit from many detail parts and metal barrels. All the railing will look much better in etch rather than plastic. Markings There are decals for U 997, U 995, U 295, U 324, U 307, U 1023, U 1002, U 1105 included on the sheet with diagrams to show the different paint schemes on individual boats as well as small histories of them. Conclusion It's good to see this kit re-issued as it makes up into an impressive model. The addition of the platinum parts should make a big difference over the kit plastic. Very highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  6. This is not my usual fayre so please don't expect anything too fancy from this build, which will be made as it comes in the box. All tips for simple improvements I can make along the way will be welcome, and so folks, I give you the box and its contents. by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr by John L, on Flickr
  7. "Wittgenstein here, clear off!" Second nightfighter in my collection, and probably the last one I make in 1:72, installing those antennas was a nightmare. Some pieces also didn´t fit, others were too long, the instructions tell you to install the exhausts without mentioning you won´t be able to fit the flame dampers if you do so, the rudder pedals supporters won't let you fit the nose unless you trim them, etc... Pay close attention, if you build this kit, when making the antenna array: the support struts are of different lengths, something Revell misses to point out. Brushpainted with Revell acrylics.
  8. Revell is to release 1/144th new tool Airbus kits - ref. 03942 - Airbus A320 neo Lufthansa New Livery - ref. 04952 - Airbus A321 neo Sprues on display at Shizuoka 2019 Sources: https://www.facebook.com/tetramodel/photos/a.2474802349220072/2475722535794720/?type=3&theater https://www.facebook.com/hobbyland.osaka/photos/a.2253464838073537/2253472751406079/?type=3&theater V.P.
  9. Apollo 11 Spacecraft with Interior (03703) 1:32 Revell There can't be many people that don't know about the Moon landings in the late 60s and early 70s, and the Saturn V rocket and its cargo the Apollo spacecraft are instantly recognised by most with even a shallow grasp of history. It was an incredible feat of engineering, providing you don't believe that millions of people have all kept quiet about a conspiracy to fake it all for 50 years, achieved with such a tiny amount of computing power that you probably carry around many times more in your hip pocket these days. Driven in part by Werner Von Braun, who had dreamt about flying to the moon since his childhood, NASA was given the go ahead by JFK in a rousing speech "to go to the moon and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard". Incredibly, they were ready to fly men around the moon seven years after the start of the programme in 1968, after a false start due to the loss of the crew of Apollo 1 on the Launchpad in a horrific fire during training. Apollo 7 to 10 were manned, and pushed the envelope incrementally each time, until Apollo 11, which was the first to attempt a moon landing, with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin scheduled to make the descent, and the lesser known Michael Collins waiting for their return in the Command Module (CM), fully aware that he may have to make the return on his own if things went wrong. They didn't, and on 20th July 1969 they touched down on the moon with many millions watching on TV, when Neil uttered those immortal words "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind". When they lifted off from the moon after a walk on the surface and a brief rest period, they had to rendezvous with the CM, dock and transfer back to the cramped module, discard the Lunar Lander, and then make the journey back to Earth. Upon reaching home, the cylindrical Service Module (SM) section was also discarded, leaving the Command Module the only part to return back to earth, safely splashing down in the Pacific Ocean after re-entry and a thorough roasting. Following this mission were six more successful moon landings in various areas, until funding and public interest dried up, leaving Apollo 17 the last time man went to the moon. There are currently plans to go back in the next several years, but we've been absent now for a lot longer than we were there. The Kit This is a special re-release of Revell's 1970s kit to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing, and includes a set of four acrylic paints in little plastic pots, a small bottle of Revell Contacta Professional glue, and a #2 paintbrush, which had become a little dishevelled during transport due to the bag it was in. Inside the top-opening box are five sprues of silver(ish) styrene, four in white styrene, and one in crystal clear plastic. The paints and instructions are accompanied by a set of decals on a medium sized sheet. First impressions are that this is a product of the times, but time has been good to the moulds, and because it is a full interior kit, the various internal parts of the model are all there, obviously in a somewhat simplified way, but certainly a good starting point if you're a detailer that is looking to build an accurate model. New Ware have a number of sets that you would probably find very useful, but of course that increases the overall price, and that's entirely up to you and your wallet. For the younger modeller that isn't so much bothered with painting, the colour of the parts is roughly broken down into their final colours, so it could be built that way, and for the folks in the middle that want to build what's in the box, there's enough to do a decent job, as can be seen by the picture on the front of the instruction booklet. Construction begins with the aft bulkhead of the crew compartment, which has a number of parts added around its perimeter, and some detail painting done before a rear panel is fitted to its underside and surrounded by a number of strengthening webs. Then the cockpit panels are made up, with decals supplied for many of the faces, although there is no raised detail moulded in, so the decals are all the detail you have. The three crew seats are mounted into a framework that suspends them out in front of the main instrument panels, and there are three crew figures, each a single part with different hand positioning to add a little variety. Their heads are moulded as the glass domes they wore during the ascent stage, but as this is white plastic, the simple option is to paint them a light blue unless you want to go crazy and find some resin heads and vacform some clear domes for each one (New Ware also have a set for this). The instructions would have you painting a black aperture as if they were wearing helmets, but that's not the case if you watch the videos of the real thing. The crew seats and main IP are then fixed to the aft bulkhead in three places, and the docking ring assembly is built up from a partial ring (only part will be seen), plus the pointed docking mechanism, which is made up from seven parts plus an external ring. This sits on top of the opaque section of the Command Module's conical skin, with the clear part added in, exposing the docking ring, and the rest of the crew compartment once it is added over the internals. Moving onto the tubular body of the Service Module (SM), the segment that will be seen through the clear part is built up, comprising various tanks, bottles and equipment, with more detail painting to give it some life. The top bulkhead where the conical CM attaches is a single part, as is the aft bulkhead, which has a small tapering tube attached inside before it is glued in place. Now the external details can be added, starting with the communications array, which has four dishes on a mast, with receivers in the centre of each one. Other small details are added around the exterior, including the four manoeuvring thruster packs, which have four individual bells and are mounted at 90o around the circumference. The crew compartment also has some grab handles added, and the big engine bell is a single part that keys into the aft bulkhead at the rear of the SM, with the comms gear fitted nearby. The CM fits to the SM with three conical pins and can be left unglued if you want to separate them later. The final parts are a stand, which has a small silver-grey part that fits onto join between the CM and SM, and two large curved white parts to hold the model off the ground. There is also a decal provided on the sheet that you fix to the large flat front. Markings Each Apollo mission had subtle differences, so Apollo 11 was unique from the others, with the decals called out on a five-view diagram on the back of the instruction booklet. The decals were printed for Revell by Zannetti, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. While the interior decals add a little detail to the blank instrument panel areas, they're no substitute for raised or engraved detail, and are fairly simply printed, which may put off a few potential purchasers. The exterior decals have the correct weirdly spaced A in the United States, plus a few of the stencils that are found around the spaceframe (?), with some large and small flags, and even a few tiny NASA meatballs for the crew's suits. Conclusion It's a welcome re-release, and although time has moved along, there's definitely still a market for it amongst those that want a nice desktop model, as well as anyone that will use it as a jumping-off point for a highly accurate model. When you see what can be done with it, and its finished size, it becomes quite tempting. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  10. Hot off the bench and finished just yesterday! This is a commission build for a friend, OOB except for the aftermarket seat belts from Eduard. Revell's 1/32 P-51D kit, whilst affordable, was not quite what I expect of a modern, new-tool kit in this day and age. Some notable issues around fit include: Just about EVERYWHERE! All major joins required filling and sanding, reminiscent (to me) of the very old Hobbycraft kits I'd built in the past. Details were soft and sprue gates were massive! Honestly, I switched to my more heavy duty cutters rather than risk my good nippers to get parts off before cleaning up the flash and burr lines. In short, I would not look to build another of this kit. I am so looking forward to going back to 1/72 after this! But... she's finished nonetheless, and I'm hoping her new owner will be satisfied with the results. Once again, thanks for looking
  11. Hi everybody; here's my new project, the 1/72 Revell Eurofighter Typhoon This type entered into Italian Air Force service (AMI, Aeronautica Militare Italiana) in 2004, and it's currently deployed in three different bases: Grosseto (4° Stormo), Gioia del Colla (36° Stormo) and Trapani Birgi (37° Stormo). The kit supplied decals allow to build six different versions: two Germans, one Austrian, one British, one Spanish and one Italian, which is the one I'm doing. Typical Revell instruction sheet, with basically useless color table - it only refers to Revell paints The airframe I'm going to reproduce and the sprues (there's many of them ) The clear parts: the windshield shows some bubbles While the canopy has an annoying moulding seam going all along mid-line I'm planning to use the AM cockpit set from PAVLA More later, now I need to take care of my lawn. Ciao
  12. Hi guys and gals, Can you believe this is my first Messerschmitt 109? I've been modelling for years and never got round to making one of these seminal aircraft! Well, I've now broken my duck so here's the very nice Revell G-6 Late kit in a dramatic nightfighter scheme (Red 2, 1. NJG) from an AIMS decal sheet. There are seven more versions on the sheet so it was great value. The aircraft was painted in Colourcoats enamels (still the best model paint I've ever used, and shall continue to do so!) I used RLM 74/75/76 and RLM 02 with an overspray of Night Black. I thought this was a really cool looking scheme and makes the clean lines of the aircraft look even more menacing! I don't know much about these aircraft or modelling them, so there are probably a few howlers - I just enjoyed it for the easy-to-build kit and cool paintjob! All the best, Alan
  13. Sometimes older kits showes up as old friends. And some times as not so good friends. When it comes to 1/72 scale P-51D Mustang's the Revell kit must have an record in availability. Albeit not as an good kit. We also have older kits from Airfix, Matchbox, Heller and Hasegawa. But one of the oldest P-51's must be the Lindberg "Bomber Escort". Anyone seen it? Built it? https://www.oldmodelkits.com/index.php?detail=23976&page=1&manu=lindberg Cheers / André
  14. Junkers Ju.52/3mg4e Transport (03918) 1:48 Revell Developed in secret by Germany like other aircraft of the late thirties, the Ju.52 was originally portrayed as a passenger aircraft, which is was actually used for and continued to be used for purpose beyond its original projected lifespan. Once Germany came out of the shadows regarding their rearmament as they geared up for war, its true nature as a troop transport and for hauling military cargo became clear. Initially intended to be a single-engined aircraft, the designers soon added two additional power-plants in the wings, close to the fuselage. Its distinctive corrugated duralumin skin (a Junkers development from WWI) and its reliability resulted in the nickname "Tante Ju", which mean Aunt or Aunty Ju, derived of course from its designation. Like castor oil it got everywhere, and saw action in all theatres that the German forces served, and played a huge part in the resupply of the beleaguered Stalingrad, thanks to Göring's boast that he could resupply the 250,000 soldiers stranded there by air. Hitler often used the Ju.52 as his own personal transport, although it was hardly a speed-demon, with a top speed of around 165mph, so it was significantly slower than the alternative Fw.200, and more importantly, about half the top speed of fighters of the time. After WWII the remaining airframes found employment around the world, and continued flying into the 1980s commercially, with numerous airframes in museums around the world. The Kit This boxing is a re-release of Revell's original tooling from 1998, but don't let that put you off one bit. I've had one of these in the stash for years now (I build slowly), and it's an impressive rendition of this wriggly-skinned oddity, with corrugations across the outer skin, an interior and a trio of well-detailed engines. You even get a quartet of paratroopers to pose in and around your Tante Ju if you so wish. No pilots though, which is a shame. If we break down the designation of the aircraft, we find that the /3m simply means that it is a trimotor, while G4e tells us that it is the military transport version with a tail-wheel instead of skid, and three BMW 132A-3 engines, which is a licensed upgrade of a P&W 1690 Hornet. The interior includes a set of seating for paratroopers or standard soldiers who realise that jumping out of a serviceable aircraft is a bad idea. The kit arrives in a top-opening box, which is a bit flimsy for the size of it, and inside are four large sprues of a very light grey styrene, one in clear styrene, a large(ish) decal sheet and the instruction booklet printed in colour, with the decal options in the rear. Time has been kind to the moulds, and they don't seem to have deteriorated at all, which is always nice. Construction begins with drilling a few holes in the floor panel to accommodate the interior parts, which are all pre-thinned from underneath in anticipation. The cockpit is added to the front, comprising a large instrument panel with optional decal and centre console, two crew seats with control yokes, cockpit bulkhead with door and additional detail parts. At the rear of the floor another two bulkheads with doorways and a pair of seats are fitted, and behind that a short assembly with raised floor is added for the dorsal gunner. After that, the rows of seats running down the side of the cargo area can be installed after the windows and additional framework have been glued in place, taking care to remove all the little over-flow sprue-gates that prevent short-shots in these delicate parts. The seats have moulded-in belts, and fit into the holes drilled at the beginning along with a side-door support rail that helps stop paratroops or crew from unplanned exits. You'll probably spend some time painting the interior before closing up the fuselage, and Revell have provided coloured flags with letters to show you which colours to use, but don't forget to install that tail wheel between the fuselage halves before you close them up. Fuselage halves is a slight misnomer, as the bottom and top sections have been moulded separately to enable the designers to put the same corrugations in those areas, and it's the bottom fuselage that is first to be installed after a few holes are drilled out from the inside. I've test-fitted the fuselage parts together before now, and they fit pretty well, so with care the clean-up will be minimal as long as you take your time and do plenty of test-fitting and use lots of tape to hold the glued areas. The fuselage top is detailed with a couple of clear lights and other parts, then it too is glued in place with the same caveats. There is a top hatch for loading large cargo, and this is moulded into the roof, with its panel lines visible in case you're feeling adventurous, but now you can at least bore people to death by pointing it out if you didn't already know. The wings and elevator fins are next to be put together, and both are a simple task. The wings are made up from top and bottom halves, as are the fins, but with the addition of the elevator surface to the rear that is attached via three pins. These assemblies are fixed in place with the usual tab and slot method, although the wing is slightly offset for extra strength of the final joint, and now it looks like an aeroplane! Support struts are added to the elevators, and more struts hold the two main wheels in place, with weighted flat-spots moulded-in to add a little realism, and then it's time to build-up the engines. Each one consists of a piston bank, which must be properly aligned to fit correctly, so take note of the location of the round parts. A set of push-rods are laid on top, then the slotted cover, with different shaped exhausts added at the rear depending on the final location of the motor. The two wing-mounted engines have a two-part wide cowling added, and are then fitted to their nacelles, while the front engine has a pair of long exhausts fitted and a smaller cowling before it too is attached to the nose. With the fitting of the trailing edges of the wings together with their actuator arms, and a landing light under the port wing, it's time to add the ancillaries such as the DF loop, APU and side doors (with a choice of open or closed parts) and canopy. The first canopy option is of the Condor Haube variety, with a machine gun mounted on a rotating ring fitted to the top of the cockpit canopy. Alternately you can fit a vanilla canopy that has a glazed panel where the gun would be. The dorsal turret is a similar affair to the Condor Haube, with the addition of a simple seat for the gunner's use, which then fits into the aperture on the upper fuselage with a clear curved wind deflector in front. The aerial, pitot probes, two-blade props and topside aileron actuators are last to be fitted to the airframe. The four paratroopers look a bit melted on the instructions, but they're much better in the styrene. They scale out around 5'11" which is a good size for gentlemen of that era, and they have their paratrooper "potty" style helmets and smocks, with harnesses moulded in and parachute packs as separate parts. Two of the figures are broken down with separate arms and 'chute, while of the other two, one has a separate pair of legs and the other has a leg moulded separately, due to their poses of looking down checking their harness and climbing aboard respectively. Under a coat of sympathetic painting they should look great, but for the absence of the pilots to fly them away. My boxing has a set of aftermarket Luftwaffe pilots stashed away to remedy this. Markings There are two quite different markings options in this boxing, one from Africa, the other from Italy, both of which saw many Aunt Jus in their skies. From the box you can build one of the following: 4U+NH, 1.(F)/123 Derna/Libya, Northern Africa, June 1941 C3+KH, Transport Staffel/II.Fliegercorps, Reggio/Italy, December 1942 Decals are by Cartograf as can be seen from the small "c" at the end of the code, which is a guarantee of good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion It's good to see the Ju.52 back in some interesting markings in the paratroop transport role that it did so well. The kit still looks good, and is the only one in 1:48, so if you haven't got one already, get one soon. Very highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  15. PBY-5A Catalina 1:72 Revell The Consolidated Catalina was one of the most widely used amphibious aircraft of World War II. First flown in 1935, the Catalina proved to be remarkably long-lived. It was so well suited to its role that it not only served throughout the War, but remained in service with its primary user, the US Navy, until 1957 and with the Brazilian Air Force until 1979. There are many surviving Catalinas around the world, including a significant number of airworthy examples. Powered by two Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp engines, the Catalina had a range of over 2,500 miles. Eagle eyed readers will no doubt have already spotted that this is not (thankfully) ye olde Revell kit from the late 1960s. Instead, it's the more modern Academy kit, originally released in 1993 and now repackaged in one of Revell's familiar large-but-flimsy boxvelopes. The kit features clean, crisp mouldings, fully engraved surface details and a respectable level of detail. All together there are around 140 parts spread across six frames of grey plastic and a single frame of clear plastic. Two decal options are included. Assembly begins with a series of sub-assemblies that fit inside the fuselage halves. The main landing gear bays are first and these can be built in wheels up or wheels down configuration. Wheels down will require the main landing gear legs to be assembled from four parts, and care will be required in order to ensure that the parts all align correctly. The wheel wells themselves fit into the inside of the fuselage, so make sure they are firmly glued in places just in case they pop out halfway through the build and rattle around inside the fuselage. There waist and nose gunner stations are present but fairly basic, as is the cockpit. Decals are provided for the instrument panel and sear harnesses. Aftermarket parts will definitely be required if you want to build the model to a modern standard of detail. Once the fuselage halves have been joined (remembering to add 40g of nose weight, which seems a lot) the slab-like wing is next. The wing is moulded in separate sections for the port, starboard and centre parts. The centre section holds the engine pods, to which the basic-but-good-enough engines and cowlings can be added. The outer wing sections hold the retractable floats, and as with the landing gear, these can be finished in retracted or deployed positions. The ailerons and elevators are moulded in place, as is the rudder. A number of details, such as exhausts and DF loop, are provided in different forms for both the early and late variants depicted on the decal sheet. Four bombs are provided to hang under the wings, but these could be swapped for aftermarket depth charges if so desired. The clear parts are nicely moulded. Two different options are provides for on the decal sheet. The first is for a PBY-5A Catalina of the US Naval Aviation Reserve, NAS Glenview, Illinois, 1947. The second is a wartime-ara Catalina PBY-5A of Patrol Squadron 61, US Navy, Umnak Island, Alaska, 1943. The decals are fairly basic but appear to be high quality. Conclusion Academy's Catalina is a solid kit, and although it is starting to show its age, it is still capable of being built into a faithful and convincing replica. It's not as detailed as many of the modern kits we are used to today, but it has recessed panel lines and just about enough detail to pass muster where it counts. Overall this should be a straightforward kit to build. Recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  16. This is the older Revell kit, but despite it's age, it still builds into a nice model. The fit is generally pretty good and you do have the option to fold the wings. This is built straight from the box, with the roundels masked and painted on. The aircraft is one used in the 100 Hours, or more commonly known as the Soccer War between Honduras and El Salvador in 1969. It was the last air war fought with piston engined aircraft, Honduras flying Corsairs and El Salvador flying a mix of Mustangs and Corsairs. Surviving fighters on both sides continued to serve into the 1970's.
  17. Greetings Been waiting to see one pop up on here but it hasn't happened yet - So here's mine. I'd made a start on it a long while back but only got as far as taking the main pieces off the trees and infilling the windows to do the "MATS" version before I put it back in the box and back on the shelf... Trust this is within the 25% rule? Hopefully get on with further work soon. KR's IanJ
  18. My latest builds are all either stalled or taking a long time so I thought I would post an old favourite from 2016. I don't normally go in for competitions for various reasons but I was persuaded to enter a model at the Scottish IPMS Nationals in 2017. To my surprise, my model won it's class! So here it is, my Revell 1/32 Bf-109G-6 with a long list of modifications and accoutrements including replacement gun bulges (Quickboost), prop/spinner, Exhausts and radiator (Barracudacast), Wheels (Eduard), Gun pods (robbed from a Hasegawa G-10 and detailed), belts (HGW) and replacement decals from EagleCal. I bought the AlleyCat improvement set but was disappointed with it, only using the template to rescribe the incorrectly located hatch on the port upper fuselage - oh, and the tiny intakes on the front fuselage. I also did away with awful and inaccurate canopy hinge supplied by Revell and added an under fuselage FUG 25 aerial from metal rod. The replacement elevators from the AlleyCat set were too long for some reason so I painstakingly removed all of the errant raised circle detail myself. It sounds like the kit was poor and I am a perfectionist but neither is really true - just enjoyed tinkering with the myriad bits and pieces more as an experiment really. Paints were Mr Hobby acrylics for the main camo and Vallejo for the blue band. Weathering and mottling were based on the reference pictures supplied in the EagleCal instructions which indicated a well maintained, maybe dusty machine. One last thing, I added the exhausts after painting by cutting openings at the front fuselage, where the prop sits - this allowed me to fiddle the exhausts into place without too much drama. I popped the prop/spinner onto the front "temporarily" with bluetack to check all was well and Lo! - I managed to get the thing in perfect position, even including the slight gap between fuselage and spinner. Pondering on how to fix the prop permanently - I finally decided to leave well alone. It has survived a season of shows and still sits there nearly 3 years later! Looking now there are lots of errors and inaccuracies but I am really quite fond of this model - I hope you like it too. Cheers Malcolm
  19. Revell Porsche 934rsr Martini 1:24 The Porsche 934 is the race version of the iconic 911 Turbo, built for the group 4 FIA rules for the 1976 season. By the time it was replaced in 1978 41 had been produced for the race track. It had a 3l flat six engine mounted at the rear producing from 480-550 bhp. Revell have produced a kit of this car in the classic Martini team colours to sit alongside the other versions including the orange Jargermeister version. This kit is classed as a level 3 kit and is in the normal flimsy end opening box, that is packed with plastic. The body shell is a single part and has some large re-enforcing gates over the windows and the gates are wide so will need care when removing. Under the bonnet at the front is a fairly well detailed area with he fuel cell and battery represented. The rest of the kit is over 7 sprues, the body parts are in white, and grey and black for the other parts, the chrome wheels, and a clear sprue. All the parts are well cast with no flash on the review kit. The chrome is nice and done to scale and doesn’t look toy like. Construction starts with the transmission, and this is joined to the engine block and this is a well detailed assembly with nice cast detail. Careful painting will be needed, the engine lid can be made to open, but even if glued shut it can be seen through the finely cast grills on the lid. The detail extends to the separate drive shafts, and 6 branch manifold. The massive turbo is added to the back of the engine before completing and adding to the chassis. Looking the engine can be left out till the end of the build if wanted and fitted from below. The wheels are BBS multi-spoke type, with the rear being wider. Behind the rim sits a brake disc, with a detailed drilled surface and caliper. Inside is a basic cockpit, there wasn’t much technology back in the late 70’s but some nice bucket seats with a roll cage building up a tub. The dashboard fits on the bodyshell from below before the interior is slid in. The painting instructions refer to the Revell paint range, and the list of required colours is listed on the box for you to check you have them in stock before leaving the shop. The decals sheet is to the usual Revell standard, crisp and well printed with some fine small details for the 1976 season with the Martini team. The C in the number would indicate these are printed by Cartograf. Overall a good model of this iconic car. Recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  20. My first foray into 1:32 after a long time. I don´t plan to build more 1:32 unless I get Revell's Bf 109G-6 and decals to build it as Erich Hartmann's all white plane while he was part of JG 53. The aircraft here is the second run of Revell's 1:32 Fw 190, the A-8/R11 nightfighter. The antennas were difficult to add because they didn´t want to stick to their support struts. At some point after the build the right hand mounting peg for the right wheel got damaged and the wheel slanted to one side. It was "fixed" by applying quite a bit of epoxy glue and letting it to harden during the night. The photos were taken with backlighting to give the aircraft a better nightfighter feel.
  21. Revell 1:25 '68 Chevy Chevelle SS 396 I am obsessed with American car shows, Fast ‘n Loud with Gas Monkey garage being my favourite. Richard Rawlings scours the ‘Interweb’ for old classic cars and re-builds them or flips them for a few dollars profit. The ’68 Chevy SS would be a prime candidate for the monkeys to get their hands on, and when this 1:25 scale Chevy landed on the doormat I was very happy! The 68 Chevy SS, SS is for Super Sport is powered by an all American 6.5L (or 396 cubic inches) V8. The Chevelle SS is a popular muscle car, and many have been restored or modified by their owners worldwide. This is a new tool kit to represent this car. The body shell is a single part incorporating the doors and boot with only the bonnet needing adding separately. All the parts are crisp as expected and there isn’t any flash on the review sample. The kit is over 7 sprues, 5 in white plastic, a chrome sprue and a clear sprue. The rear lights are done in a clear red, and the final bits are 4 rubber tyres with tread detail. Colours are referenced to the Revell range and they are listed on the outside of the box so you can check what you will need before you leave the shop. The box is the flimsy end opening Revell box. The instructions start with the V8 and transmission, the block and ‘tranny’ is in two parts, with the heads and ancillary parts added. As the bonnet is separate you can add some plumbing and wiring to the engine. The distributor is included and can be drilled out and HT leads from the dizzy to the plugs would be a simple addition. The engine can be built as a unit and added later to the chassis frame. The frame is a separate part to the floor pan, and it looks like you could build the chassis, and suspension as a separate unit before adding to the floor and body. If you have watched some of these car shows, they often build the rolling chassis before adding the painted and detailed body. The interior is built into a tub, and it is nicely detailed. You can follow the blacks and greys on the instructions or go all out with the colours of seats and trim with a custom look. You have an option with the wheels, original spec, or optional style. The are on the chrome sprue, and as with other newer Revell kits the chrome is nice, and not too bright and toy like. The tyres have a red line on the side wall, and you can have this on the outside or inside to hide it. The body is finished with the chrome bumpers, and the grill with lights. The Bonnet has hinges so you can glue it shut, or have it working to show off the engine. There is a nice decal sheet and it includes the lap-style seat belts for the front seats, and the racing stripes to go over the body in a choice of white to go on a black car, or black for a red car. There are various badges and details for the body, interior and engine bay along with a choice of American Ohio state plates, and different European registrations for an imported car. A nice kit of a ‘compact’ American muscle car, can be done stock, or as a full custom build with a nice interior and paint job on the outside. Another quality model from Revell Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  22. Revell 1:24 Ford GT Le-Mans Revell have a history of some very good race car kits in there 1:24 range, they have now produced a copy of the 2017 Le-Mans Ford GT. Ford re-released the GT road car a few years ago now to replicate the original GT40, but with modern luxury, and power. The GT was always a performance car so the cross over to the track is an obvious one. Revell have produced a road version as part of there ‘easy Click’ range and Mike has reviewed one previously. . This Le-Mans version is not part of the easy click range and is a fully detailed model kit and is officially licenced by Ford. The body is in 3 parts, (shell, rear section, and floor) with 7 sprues in white and some clear parts with some rubber racing slick tyres in the normal Revell end opening box. The parts are very crisp with no flash or mold lines and the detail is very nice. The rear section fits well on the shell and incorporates the roof. The way this is cast makes me think more versions of the GT will be produced in the future. The chassis is flat as expected on an aerodynamic race car and the access panels are engraved on the parts. Construction begins in the cockpit, a single bucket seat is fixed to a well detailed tub, sometime detail painting the switches and controls will be rewarded as the interior will be visible through the windows when the car is completed. The harness for the driver is on the decal sheet to be placed on the seat. The engine is next on the build with the block and transmission in 2 halves, with heads, intake and pulleys added with the exhaust headers. All the paint codes are called out referencing to the Revell paint range. The engine is added to the lower chassis plate along with the interior tub completed earlier. The extensive roll cage come next, either side of the engine and interior this includes the front and rear inner chassis leg detail, with the fire wall and cross brace sandwiched between behind the driver’s seat. The dashboard spans the interior at the front and copies the real race part nicely with the flat top and bottom steering wheel with multiple controls and a screen on the top of the dash. As a mid-engine car under the front isn’t an engine, but the air intakes and radiators to keep it cool on the long race and the ducting is a single part so no awkward seams to fill and sand down the tubes. The suspension is multilink with upper and lower A arms front and back, the hub with nice brake disk details are added, with the final piped and inter coolers completing the chassis and interior. The wheels are nicely done and the multi spoke design popular with race cars, with this design being strong and very light. The tires are racing slicks with Michelin decals for the side walls, the front is narrower than the rear so check before sticking the wheels in place! The body needs painting white, with blue and the instructions show where to split the colours between the red, white and blue. The two sections come together before the glazing is added. The windows come packaged in separate bags, and have the black areas pre-painted onto them with the clear sprue only holding the front headlights and light covers, the rear lights come in red clear ready to add to the back the decal sheet is comprehensive and as expected well printed. There is lots of detail and small decals with all the sponsor logos and required safety decals for the car. You have a choice of 4 different cars to model on the sheet with the differences in decal placement covered in the instructions A nice addition to the Revell race car range in 1:24, having seen the car after the race it would look fantastic done and weathered in post-race condition! Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  23. Just finished, a poor effort I know. Thanks for looking
  24. Revell 1:12 Honda CBX 400F Motorcycle The Honda CBX 400F was produced from 1981 it has a 4 inline producing 48hp, it has aluminium swingarms, and suspension to save weight, with disc brakes to slow it down. It is a popular bike and sold well for Honda before this model was discontinued in 1984. Revell have produced this bike kit in 1:12, a popular scale for Bike builders with this kit being Revell Level 5 as its classed as a complex kit. The kit is laid out over 6 sprues and includes 2 rubber tyres and some soft rubber hose. The instructions are the new style type, and they are clear and easy to follow with paints referenced back to the Revell paint range. The parts are vey crisp and there is no flash or mould lines visible on the review sample. You get 2 chrome sprues, and they are nice and not too shiny. The frame and other parts are done in black; engine is in grey and the body is white. A small clear sprue includes the lights and glass for the dials. Construction starts with the 4 inline engine, the parts have nice surface details and will give a good representation of the engine. The rubber hose is cut to length and added to the engine to represent fuel and oil lines around the block. Looking at reference photos the engine is a realistic part, and you can add HT leads and other wiring to give a very detailed model. I would add some more detail here as the fairings on this bike don’t cover the engine so its visible on the model. The wheels are on the chrome sprue and I would keep the chrome so cut away with care. The wheels are in 2 parts with the axle sandwiched between the 2 parts on the front wheel, with the dampers added next. The rear swingarm is a single part, and the back wheel is added with the chain and brake hub. The engine is sandwiched between the frames with the stand and rear swing arm/ wheel assembly. I would probably build and detail the engine, before building the frame I would paint that and all the ancillary parts before assembling the bike to allow detail painting and extra detailing like wiring. The exhausts are chrome, but they join along the length top and bottom so will have a join line that will need work, this is a shame as the real bike has nice polished pipes. The bodywork can be painted gloss whit as the red is all included as decals, the decals are as expected from Revell, very nice except the UK registration plate is wrong and should read A400 HCB. I would go online and get a replacement made up. This is a nice detailed model from Revell, and can give a detailed build from the box, but leaves scope for some super detailing if wanted. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  25. Hi All, This is the first of five projects I have just started. I am titling it 'Promise made, promise fulfilled' This is the enormous Revell AEC Routemaster bus. Revell just call it 'London Bus'. Trying to avoid licensing issues maybe? I don't know why, since the box top picture has 'Routemaster' on it. One initial observation: It is BIG. On the box, it says 38.1 cm, that's about 15 ½ inches in old money. Anyway, pictures: The box of bits: It's rammed full of parts. The sprues on some of the parts, notably the floor-pan, was attached to massive sprues, about 6mm in diameter! Probably, to stop the floor-pan from warping. I recently re-discovered a fantastic solvent cement. Cellulose thinners. It smells a bit, is rather hot, but does weld styrene together well. It's biggest advantage is that it's cheap! The engine starts here. Revell offers the original Leyland engine or a new Scania engine. Now, I have read somewhere (maybe here) that the Scania engine was not fitted, but a Cummins. However, I have opted for the Scania engine, wrong or not. After a bit more fettling, we get here: The fit of the parts so far is very good indeed. I am impressed. Next is priming and painting the chassis. Thanks for looking. Alan.
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