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Found 190 results

  1. So after getting the ok from the Sarge (thank you), I'm in with this one.. Meng M4A1 by Dermot Moriarty, on Flickr Just three sprues, two vinyl tracks and some decals Meng M4A1 contents by Dermot Moriarty, on Flickr Going to add a couple of Tamiya figures, kindly donated by club colleague and Sherman guru Pat. He also sold me the kit (cheers Pat). Tamiya crewmen by Dermot Moriarty, on Flickr I know it doesn't have a scale and looks a bit odd in this company.....but thought it might be something to have a bit of fun with! Cheers, Dermot
  2. Here it is, all done. Based on a 70's TV show about two LA County Sheriff's deputies, working as rescue paramedics on a Ford Bronco, whose callsign was "2-40 Robert". In real life the vehicle works out of East LA and is crewed by two paramedic trained deputies, so this is the idea updated. Basic kit is by Meng and went together well, the lightbar is from www.policecarmodels.com in the US and the decals are from JBOT in Canada, they are superb but very thin so although they go down well there is very little room for error or messing about. Plus a few bits and bobs from the spares boxes. Brush painted using Humbrol enamels and finished with Winsor and Newton Acrylic varnishes. There are a couple of mistakes and a couple of things I would do differently next time, but all in all I'm quite happy with this. F350 - 2 by phil da greek, on Flickr F350-30 by phil da greek, on Flickr F350-33 by phil da greek, on Flickr F350-28 by phil da greek, on Flickr F350-32 by phil da greek, on Flickr F350-31 by phil da greek, on Flickr F350-27 by phil da greek, on Flickr F350-29 by phil da greek, on Flickr Thanks for looking.
  3. Renault FT in 1/35 scale by Meng-Model. The only changes to the kit are the use of metal chain and tool straps made with Tamiya tape to replace the photo etch ones provided in the kit. Finished in Vallejo Model Air (ugh...) and Tamiya acrylics; AK Interactive and Ammo of Mig enamels; and Ammo of Mig and Secret Weapon Miniatures pigments. As a whole, I think this kit turned out pretty good and I would place it as one of my better kits, which is funny because I started this kit almost a year ago and put it aside after I painted the camouflage because I was really unhappy with how it turned out. That being said, the strengths are the washes, oil paint rendering, the chipping, and the metal chain on the unditching tail. The weakness are the pigment effects and the camo paint. I'm not satisfied with the dirt effects (mainly on the tracks themselves) even though I think it's a step up from my previous efforts. I decided against using the kit-supplied base, as cool as it is, for a couple of reasons. It's a little too dramatic for my tastes and it's going to take more work than I'm willing to do to make it good. I'll probably swing by the craft store and grab a small wood plaque or picture frame and use it to build a little base to have the tank look like it's trundling down a dirt road on the Western Front. Comments and criticism is welcomed as always!
  4. Hello everybody. The Caterpillar D9 heavy bulldozer in scale 1:35. Based on the fantastic kit of the armored Bulldozer of Meng Models. Several parts replaced, made new or modified. Plus metal tracks, etched parts, new decals, lights, .... I hope that you like it! Cheers Micha
  5. Last year I purchased the meng king tiger and full interior set. While I was preparing for the build I noticed that I couldn't find many sites showing a step by step guide in construction (I have recently found out that there are many and I just wasn't looking), so I have decided to log the build on this feed. I am aiming just to build the kit straight out of the box. I hope everyone enjoys my work. I will post more pictures as and when I manage to get bench time.
  6. My first completed model of 2018! And it's not even December! Here is the very fun and very little Meng Kids Lancaster. Obviously inspired by the classic egg planes of the past. This is more of a cartoony or "chibi" style. The inspiration for this build once again came from Andy Moore who has built a couple of these in the past. The model is essentially OOB. The tires supplied are have very square shoulders so those were sanded to round them off. The bottom of each tire was also sanded to give the impression of weight. The three turrets come molded completely clear so I masked and sprayed on some simplified framing. The guns were drilled out and the decals came from Kits-World. I used a mix of 1/72 and 1/144 to fit the non scale nature of this model. There was a little silvering on the larger decals with clear sections but I'm sure that was more my fault as the decals seem to be of very high quality. The decals I used were only fractionally bigger than the markings provided in the kit. But due to the tiny size of the compressed fuselage there was VERY little room for decals of any kind! The aircraft serial number had to be located underneath the horizontal stabilizers. In reality, Ropey (KB772) was a Lancaster Mk.X operated by 419 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force. She was built in Canada and flew out of RAF Middleton St George. She survived the war and was brought back to Canada in anticipation of being used in the Pacific. But the war ended with Ropey in Canada and there KB772 would remain until being scrapped in 1947. The bombs were painted OD and given some non historically correct yellow stripes just to add a little visual interest. It really is a tiny little thing. This was a lot of fun and I would absolutely build another. Thanks for looking! -matt
  7. Anyone remember the programme? In the late 70's early 80's, created by the same guy who created "CHiPs" and hot on the heels of the classic "Emergency!" 240 Robert was the callsign of the Bronco used by two Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies who were also search and rescue paramedics. The programme focused on this aspect rather than the policing role, it only lasted 15 episodes and one of the main characters was played by Mark Harmon, later of NCIS fame. As a young kid in West Yorkshire, I loved it, I think it was on ITV on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon. Of course now through the magic of the internet you can research and revisit all these things that you only vaguely remember. The modern LASD still operates these search and rescue teams and they use a wide range of vehicles, so this build will be a little "what if" but is based strongly on the real thing. I've had the Meng kit for quite a long time and had played with the idea of doing this but lacked any suitable decals, however with JBOT decals making a reappearance I decided now was the time. The kit will be used pretty much out of the box, just a little scratch building and alteration of the centre console to turn it into a police vehicle, then the scratching of a box to sit on the truck bed. The decals are here and look excellent and the light bar is coming from police car models in the US and other little interesting bits from the spares box and Kit Form Services. So a few pictures. F350 - 2 by phil da greek, on Flickr F350 - 3 by phil da greek, on Flickr Big box full of stuff, a lot of it is to build a very realistic engine, not for me as the bonnet / hood will be down, just enough so if anyone views it from the right angle there is something there. The instructions are good. Nice & clear, making it obvious where bits need to go. F350 - 4 by phil da greek, on Flickr F350 - 5 by phil da greek, on Flickr Centre console as supplied and then as butchered and then an idea of where we're going with it. F350 - 6 by phil da greek, on Flickr F350 - 7 by phil da greek, on Flickr F350 - 8 by phil da greek, on Flickr So far so good. The chassis is built and being painted up, it went together very well with almost no need to "fettle", all in all the kit goes together well with no big gaps to fill (so far). Only two complaints really, first the nasty rubber tyres, I've had no success finding resin ones (anybody got any leads? 35mm diameter, probably the same size as 1/24 Land Rovers) and the second were the truly stunning ejection marks in the crew cab floor that took some serious fixing. Feel free to join in but a word of warning, if you're a F350 or LA County Sheriff expert, you may want to go somewhere else. Feel free to count my rivets but don't expect me to thank you. Laters.
  8. German Medium Tank Sd.Kfz.171 Panther Ausf.A late (TS-035) 1:35 Meng Model The Panther was Nazi Germany's answer to the surprise appearance of the Russian T-34 after they finally reacted to the invasion that was Operation Barbarosa. Although the project had been in gestation some time before, they took some design cues from the T-34 in the shape of the sloped armour, resulting in the Panther that was intended to fill the gap between the Panzer.IV and the (then) new Panzer VI Tiger. It was eventually supposed to replace both the Pz.IV and the earlier Pz.III that was really showing its age, but in reality it often fought alongside the Panzer IV. It was planned as a lighter, more manoeuvrable tank than the Tiger, and was fitted with a high velocity gun from the outset, which gave it enormous penetrating power that was only equalled by the British 17-pounder fitted to the Sherman to make the Firefly. The sloped frontal armour gave it an increased effective armour thickness, but this was not so true of the side armour, which was comparatively weak, and this area became the preferred target of engaging allied tanks, especially in urban combat where this was a telling issue. Like most German WWII tanks it was complex to produce, so suffered in terms of volume produced, and this led to it being rushed into service with quite a tick-list of things still to sort out. Later production solved most of these initial gremlins, but loses in the interim were high with many being abandoned after failing during combat. Curiously, the Ausf.D was the first to enter production, with the Ausf.A following later in 1943, replacing attrition of the less reliable Ausf.Ds until they themselves were superseded by the Ausf.G, which became the final major variant with increased ammo storage, simplified design to ease production, and further improvements to reliability, although this was never fully cured with a high rate of attrition due to mechanical issues, some of which resulted in catastrophic fires. A Panther II was planned, which retained much of the look of the original Panther, while improving armour and suspension. They got as far as creating a pair of prototypes before the war ended, and a destroyed but still substantial chunk of the Schmallturm (smaller turret) can be seen at Bovington. The Kit This is a complete new tooling from our friends at Meng, who never cease to impress with their products. Their use of CAD for design is peerless, and they have mastered it to such an extent that their depiction of organic or random textures appear totally natural. They also use advanced moulding techniques such as slide-moulding, and include parts in the box that were once considered aftermarket (and still are) by some producers. Their recent kits have been modular, allowing the modeller to pick and choose whether to buy the base kit, add an interior, working track system, Zimmerit or all of the above depending on their level of interest, skill level or bank balance. The box is typical Meng, with an attractive painting of a Zimmerit encrusted Panther on the front, with profiles, colour codes and information on the sides. Inside are (for the most part) individually bagged sprues to minimise chaffing during transport, and plenty of parts. There are seven sprues in a Primer Red styrene, three sprues in black for the tracks, one in clear, plus two frets of Photo-Etch (PE) brass, one of which being nickel plated, a decal sheet, two lengths of twisted wire for the tow ropes, a turned aluminium barrel, two strips of poly-caps, instruction booklet, and a Z-fold painting and markings guide. Very nice. First impressions are excellent. The parts breakdown is sensible, whilst also somehow managing to be a bit cool and clever. The detail is superb, with the rolled steel surface of the thickly armoured panels so nice that it would almost be a shame to slap Zimmerit on it. The casting texture on parts like the mantlet (of which there are two) is well done, if a shade too neat, and the wooden texture on the unditching block is also worth a squint. The instructions are typical Meng, offering crisp isometric views of the build with an uncluttered style that still manages to get the point across. You are informed that there are seven decal options at the beginning, and advised that this will affect your choice of parts, so you should choose now. At this point, it is highly likely that you might reach for your wallet to pick up just another Meng Panther, as the options are all so interesting, although some might test your camouflage skills. Construction begins with the road wheels, all of which have a poly-cap between the two dished wheels. The three-part drive sprockets and four-part idler wheels also have poly-caps at their heart, so that wheels can be added and removed throughout the build. In order to mount them however, you need a lower hull, so this is next, being made up from two sides and one floor part, with two bracing parts holding everything rigid inside. If you're building yours with the Suspension Kit (SPS-049), you'll diverge from the instructions here and come back later once you've finished adding all the working metal torsion bars and workable track links. Go on – get your wallet out and I'll meet you back here when you're done, but just in case you're not convinced yet, read the paragraph under this one. If you're sticking with the base kit, the rear bulkhead, final drive housing and the many suspension arms are inserted into the hull sides, and for some reason the towing shackles are also clipped onto the torch-cut ends of the side plates at this stage. The pre-prepared road wheels, idlers and drive sprockets are all slotted into place on the stub-axles, and an optional two hook can be fitted under the rear of the vehicle, directly below the jack, which is also installed now between the armoured exhausts, which gives you a choice of two identical single-tube units, or a triple-tubed port-side unit that resembles a pair of bagpipes. Either side of these the distinctive stowage boxes are added, with separate tops in case you wanted to mess about with them. The tracks on the base kit are individual parts that are glued into track runs and draped around the wheels until they set up, while the aforementioned suspension set has workable links that will drape and move of their own accord, and include a huge quantity of tiny metal track pins! Meng helpfully include a jig that will allow you to make up a length of tracks at the correct slope and sag for that return run from the drive sprocket to the second road wheel, which drops in a gentle curve and would be tricky to arrange without help from the jig. Each track link is free from ejector-pin marks, and has a pair of guide-horns that you will need to glue into place. This is a manual job, so prepare your tweezers and a good album to listen to whilst you plough through this necessarily tedious part, building up 87 links per side. Each track link has six attachment points to the sprue, but the guide-horns only have one on their base, so it's swings and roundabouts. Given the level of detail visible on the external side of each link though, it is worth having those six sprue gates to ensure there is no under-shoot on the detail. A set of ice-cleats are included as an option if you are thinking of a winter scheme. The upper hull has a number of rectangular holes in the front, sides and top, with only some of them making sense initially, until you realise that the glacis and side walls are added separately to give you all that lovely tooling detail. The circular radiator vents are separate too, as is the engine hatch and the two crew hatches at the front of the tank. The crew get clear periscope blocks, while the perforated engine deck vents are covered from the inside by inserts that well-represent the radiator baths and the fan in the centre. The small wedge-shaped skirt at the rear of the sponsons are also added from separate parts, and the underside of the sponsons are closed in by two plates that sit on turrets moulded into the upper hull part, and holds them in place while you add all the brackets for the Schürzen parts, which were fitted to pre-detonate shaped charges. These nickel-plated parts are fitted later, and if scraped gently after painting should reveal some of their bright metal under the paint. The upper hull is then detailed with all the usual parts you would expect, such as the armoured periscope covers; mesh screens on the engine deck; stowage bracketry; spare track links; pioneer tools; gun cleaning kit; towing cables with plastic eyes and wire ropes; a big square profiled unditching beam with excellent wood texture; lifting lugs and so forth, after which the two halves of the hull are combined into something distinctly tank-like. The mudguards are able to be fitted in a complete or missing state, the latter achieved by using the stub parts and omitting the curved guards and their width indicator "lollipops". The turret is constructed on a sketeton framework using individual panels that are detailed up during the build. The rear has a hatch added that can be posed open or closed, front has a letterbox slot for the gun and mantlet, while the sides are undecorated until later. The gun's breech is depicted in three parts, with a pair of poly-caps linking it to the two pivot points that cap either end of the inner mantlet, which is then hidden by one or other of the two cast mantlets that are included. The barrel fits snugly into a keyed slot in the mantlet, and has a three-part flash-suppressor added to the front in styrene, plus the very stub of the coaxial machine gun fitted through from the inside of the mantlet. The Anti-Aircraft (AA) machine gun that fits to the commander's cupola is an MG34 on a simple ring-mount with a belt-feed of ammo into a cloth bag, and that is glued onto the ring after it is fitted to the top of the cupola once the clear vision blocks and hatch cover has been put in place. The completed cupola fits into the roof of the turret with a key ensuring correct alignment, then more track stowage hooks are added to the sides, and/or brackets for spare road wheels at your whim. The track parts come from the spares included with the kit, as do the spare wheels. The turret has a three-lug bayonet fitting, and the gun can be locked in place by using the supplied travel lock, which has a length of simulated chain wrapping over the top. Markings You are treated to seven markings options with this kit, some of which will require you to either purchase the Zimmerit decals I reviewed recently here, or to apply your own the old-fashioned (and sometimes messy) way. From the box you can build one of the following: No.534, 5th Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Panzer Regiment, SS Panzer Division Wiking, Kovel, VOlyn, Ukraine, Summer 1944 No.113, 1st Battalion, 35th Panzer Regiment, 4th panzer Division, Wehrmacht, Eastern Front, Autumn 1944 No.135, 1st Battalion, 31st Panzer Regiment, 5th Panzer Division, Wehrmacht, Kowel, Poland, June 1944 No.613, 6th Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Panzer Regiment, SS Panzer Division Wiking, Kowel, Poland, Summer 1944 Sd.Kfz.268 Befehlspanther No.96, 3rd Panzer Regiment, 2nd Panzer Division, Wehrmacht, Normandy, France, Summer 1944 No.011 Headquarters, 2nd Battalion, 5th Panzer Regiment, SS Panzer Division Wiking, Summer 1944 No.503, Panther Tank Company Under Command of Gds. Lt. Sotnikov, 8th Guards Tank Corps, Soviet Red Army, Warsaw, Poland, August 1944 Decals are printed in China, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Option 5 is a Befehlspanther, which is externally identical to an ordinary Panther, but has a reduced ammunition complement in order to accomodate the additional radio gear that is carried by this control tank. Conclusion All personal bias aside, this is an excellent representation of a Panther Ausf.A from the box, but add the suspension set and some Zimmerit, and it will make up into a stunning model. Detail is exceptional, and the build should provide plenty of pleasure due to the fit and finish usually associated with Meng kits. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Hi All, Here's the Meng Hilux with ZPU-1. They can't call it Hilux but it is! My first Meng kit and I found it a bit of a fight - some black sprues which were hard to work with, plenty of flash and lots of location holes too big for the pins on the part to attach. I persevered and am reasonably happy with it - would like to try the bigger Land Cruiser with heavier gun but not sure I have the patience. I looked for some arabic script decals but was unsuccessful - I think its based on a vehicle used in the revolt in Lbya Usual comments and criticism welcomed Thanks David
  10. Hi guys first tank that I've managed to get finished started this last year final done (hopefully). It's a lovely kit to build really enjoyed it! I plan on making a base just got to get so materials but I've got an idea in my head! I'm looking for any advice on this for further improving, I've used 'skills' and techniques from doing aircraft so not sure what other tank stuff I could do so any comments will be greatly appreciated. Thanks for looking! Regards Joss
  11. I haven't stopped work on the other WIPs, the Walrus, Landie etc, but I have been distracted by a variety of smaller kits, and am also part way through a Kubelwagen, Panzer II and this little beastie Meng Pickup with DEF wheels 1/35 kit by jongwinnett, on Flickr
  12. Here are some more pictures I have managed to find on Meng's and Takom's Panther. Heres some pics for Mengs's Panther. From the looks of these pics it seems that Mengs will not contain an interior with the kit. I have heard that they are making an interior for the Panther but they will be selling it as a separate kit like they did with their KT. From the looks of it, Meng is further ahead in production than takom, but I could be wrong. Hopefully, they do not release on the same date otherwise I'll be broke. Mark
  13. I've got my hands on a Meng F-102A XX wing kit, and very nice it looks in the box too. However, the instructions call for a red/white striped pitot tube (or, at least, for most of its length). Any handy hints on how to achieve this without placing my eyesight and sanity at too great a risk?
  14. Mengs 1/35 scale King tiger or Bengal tiger as the correct translation from German word Königstiger. And that animal name was the reason to start this. As “Beast of Nature” was the subject for a scale modelling show in Friesland and also for the upcoming IPMS euro scale modelling on 25 November. However my last tank build experience was over 25 years back. Thought it would be an relative easy build. I was totally wrong! By that I meant the painting and weathering job. Not the superb plastic fit. Only one intervention was needed to align the suspension (those axis were the wheels are mounted on). From late 1944 the Tigers camouflage scheme were (factory dilivered) hard edged patterns. At SennelÄger (Germany) Schwere Panzer-Abteilung 509 (sPzAbt 509) received their new Tigers ausf. B in the last months of 44 till January 45. It was then hastily send to Hungary where they were partly white painted for the operations in winter conditions. From 18 January to 9 May 1945, sPzAbt 509 was continuously involved in offensive fighting in Hungary and (until the surrender to Americans) in Austria. So instead of using simple hand airbrush spay technics a lot of effort was done to simulate the hard edge pattern. To give the model more colour appealing I did not paint the tooling on the hull sides white. But I suspect that in real those tools were also white. The tracks are from Dragons mini tracks series and the tank crew figures from MiniArt. The display is made from wood, filler and bakers flour. Some steps from the construction process followed with final outdoor photographs . Thank you for watching.
  15. My finished build of Mengs Shilka ZSU-23-4. Model depicted as a tank been used during the Syrian conflict/civil war. Stock build, painted with Tamiya Paints (custom yellow), weathered with lifecolor Liquid dust pigments and Ammo dust pigments. Will be building a suitable dio base for it.
  16. My Mojo has been at an all time low for so long I can't remember my last completed model, but do know it has been over a year. I needed something quick (that is a relative term in this modeller's language) and simple to get over the finish line so picked a Meng Kids He177. This would also give me an opportunity to try out the new Mission Models acrylic RLM colours for the first time. I hope you like it as much as I have enjoyed building it. For a snap together kit the tolerances were amazingly tight, I had to scrape the paint off the pins to get things to fit. The clear parts were probably some of the clearest I've ever seen and the instruction booklet was well designed with some nice information on the real aircraft included along with some lovely artwork. All in all a testament to Meng's engineering and kit production techniques. The Mission Models acrylics were really nice to use and the colours matched the Kieroff Paint chips very nicely. Duncan B
  17. The Meng version of the Abrams M1A2 Tusk II became available while I was working on Tamiya's effort which had a few issues associated with it. Its been in the stash a while and I decided to give a go while taking a break from an F-16. I'll spare people the pictures of the box and parts as there's already a good review of those at http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235003243-m1a2-sep-abrams-tusk-iii-135/#comment-2372771 Its a good kit with rich detail on the parts and clean mouldings without flash. Its a step up in detail from the Tamiya offering and was about the same price. No need for Eduard or other aftermarket extras. It does suffer from a couple of Meng issues. The ejector pin marks are like a bad rash but generally are on the hidden sides of parts. The sprues connecting fragile parts are way to thick and the fit of parts in general is so precise that a layer of primer is enough to throw things off. Some of the brass that's to be fitted looks a bit "chunky". I'll see how that goes when I get round to it. Having no flash on the track bogies is a joy. As both kits came on the market within a year of each other they should be of similar quality however I'm guessing that Tamiya went for the easy option and upgraded an earlier model with a few extra sprue for the Tusk II. The track on this kit is made from individual links. Bit like Friuls but plastic. Meng supply a jig for track assembly which is rubbish but its not necessary. A few nights of old fashioned track bashing is required. Basic hull assembled easily and here it is waiting for some sandy type colours. It includes a working suspension although whether that is any use is debatable. The suspension arms are rather fragile and I've already broken one of them with the Frankenhands. The rear of the engine deck was a pig to fit and requiring copious filing and swearing. Unexpected as most of their parts generally have a good fit. This kit is an Abrams M1A2 however extra parts in the box and some markings on holes to be drilled would suggest that Meng are also planning an M1A1 at some time or other. Last night I completed the first track using 80 blocks, leaving a few over. I wish I'd had a proper look at the link with the earlier review of the kit. The tracks are omnidirectional. After I saw this I went back to my effort and yes I've managed to mix them up....grrr! I'll cover that up with sandy looking stuff. Pity Meng made no mention of it in their instructions. My fault really, if I'd looked at the link pins properly I'd have seen my mistake earlier. Painting the tracks is mind numbing and best done when you want to switch off. Meng suggests an all over colour for the various parts however in reality that's not the case and the individual rubbers need to be painted a different colour from the metal blocks they are fixed to. That's 640 in total. I'm half way.
  18. P-51D sets & masks 1:48 Eduard - For Meng Kit The Meng P-51D despite being a glueless kit is a good one. Eduard are now along with a few update sets to detail the kit. Interior Set (49850) This set is for the interior. There is one nickel platted coloured fret and one plain one. The colour fret is dominated buy the large three part instrument panel. Also on this fret is the gunsight for the dash and other cockpit fittings. The other fret has pilot head armor, the radio boxes, and parts for the area behind the cockpit and inside the canopy. There is also a template for marking the aerial positions on the tail. If wanted the interior set is available as a Zoom set which contains just the coloured fret. Full Set Zoom Set Seatbelts (FE851) This set provides a full sets of seatbelts. These are the newer Steel type. Masks (EX559) This set provides all the masks for the glazing in the yellow tape. Review samples courtesy of
  19. T-90 1/35, Meng with Masterclub tracks
  20. German Leopard 2A4 AGDUS Training System 1:35 Meng Model via Creative Models The AGDUS system is a Laser training system similar to the US MILES system (but not compatible). The tactical laser-based training system is used by the German Bundeswehr fir combat simulation. It can be used with all weapons to simulate line of sight weapons. The laser is eye safe. The beams fired are coded so that it can inform who fired, when, and how severe the hit was. Like MILES umpires have a reactivation key. Rheinmetall Defense Electronics GmbH have recently been awarded a contract for the 2nd generation of the system and to integrate it into the latest TPz Fuchs. The Kit This is another release from Meng no one was expecting, though it does complement their excellent Leopard 2A4 kit. The set includes includes the muzzle laser emission device, the laser receiving devices around the vehicle, and the control components on top of the turret. The parts are excellently cast in resin and very fine, maybe a little to fine in some cases. The one major draw back of this set is it comes with no instructions. There are box top pictures which lack contrast, and one picture on Meng's website. (Picture from Meng, circles by us) Conclusion Another great release from Meng of a subject that will be welcome for armour modellers to create a tank being used in traning. It would have been nice to have some actual instructions though. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. Little H has decided she wants in on this BlitzBuild lark. A quick dig through the stash has uncovered the Meng Lancaster bomber. Perfect for a seven year olds fingers. Plus it's a push fit with stickers not decals. Starting shots Forgive the upside down pictures I'm still learning how to use Village.Photos.
  22. Hi guys, I'm not usually an aircraft builder however I decided to incorporate a diorama into this build and have a go at adding an electric motor to one of the engines, also this is my first attempt at modelling a grass base. I wanted a patchy and worn looking effect where a lot of work seems to have been carried out under the plane and the grass has suffered for it. I hope you like the results.
  23. Russian BMR-3M Armoured Mine Clearing Vehicle 1:35 Meng Model via Creative Models The BMR-3M Vepr is the latest Russian mine clearing vehicle. The BMR-2 was based on thr T-54 chassis, and the BMR-3 the T-72. The New BMR-3M which is a private venture from Uralvagonzavod utilises the T-90 chassis. The turret has been replaced by a welded on deck housing which for additional protection is fitted with Explosive Reactive Armour Blocks. The space inside allows for a crew of three and two engineers to assist with mine clearing, all having blast suppression seats. The vehicle is fully NBC protected and the crew can live inside for 2 days. For its mine clearance role a composite construction belly armour plate has been fitted. Actual mine clearance is provided by KTM-7 mine rollers. These will detonate pressure mines, and chains strung between the rollers will detonate rod type fuses. The BMR-3M is also fitted with mine ploughs to removed panted in mines. Depending on conditions a clearing speed of upto 12kmh can be achieved. In addition to the convention mine clearing attachment the vehicle is also fitted with a full electronic counter measures system. For self protection the BMR-3M is fitted with a remotely operated turret with a 12.7mm machine gun. This can also be used to detonate surface mines. For road travel and when not mine clearing the vehicle is fitted with its own crane and racks in order that the mine rollers are lifted onto the back deck of the vehicle. The Kit This is another left field release from Meng, though it is good to see these types of vehicles being kitted. The first thing that strikes you is that it is a big box, it needs to be as its stuffed with plastic. & sprues of tracks, plus 7 lots of end connectors. The there are 25 sprues of plastic, the two main hulls, a length of chain, some PE, a flexible sprues and a set of jigs for the suspension and the tracks. Construction starts with the running gear. Two idler wheels, tweo drive sprockets and 12 road wheels are built up, all have a poly cap centre. Next up the additional belly armour is added to the lower hull. The track return rollers are added along with mounts for the idler wheels. At the front additional armour which also mounts the mine rollers is added. The torsion bar suspension is added next and if glued in correctly will work like the real thing. The rod go through to the other side where only the ends (as shown on the instructions) are added. There is a Jig supplied to ensure everything stays at the right angle while the glue sets. The rear bulkhead is then added along with the drive sprocket fixings. All of the wheels can now be added. The tracks are a work of art, but you have to follow instructions carefully and not be too free with the glue if you want them to remain workable after completion. The hollow guide horns are supplied as pairs, which clip onto the central area of the track pins, which are moulded into the main track parts. You must assemble short lengths before separating the two from their little sprue-runner to ease handling, then insert the runs into the two-piece jig that is supplied on its own sprue. Then you insert the flexible styrene track-ends into yet another part of the jig, cut them from their runners, and apply them to the ends of the track pins in runs of five on each side using no glue! The track pads are added once the tracks are complete if you wish, though this is not shown on the instructions. Two sets of 81 links are needed, so again, you'll be working for some time with the jig, but the results should be well worth the effort. The tracks are then wrapped around the wheels and closed with two of the flexible end parts. Once the tracks are on then its onto the main upper deck housing. This is built up from 4 sides and the top, it is then added to the upper main hull along with the frontal plate to which the ERA blocks are added. The side upper track fenders are added along with the front mud guards and exhaust covers. Some smaller attachments are added along with the rear PE grills and their covers. Next up is to concentrate on the rear deck. Various handles and brackets are added and then the mine roller stowage rack is added along with a beam and the auxiliary fuel tanks (drums). Flexible pipe is supplied for the tank connectors. A stowage box and an additional ammunition box are added to the rear along with an antenna base. Moving onto the main superstructure a whole host of smaller parts are added including antenna bases which have to be made up, the smoke grenade dischargers and additional ERA blocks. The drivers hatch and vision block is also added. The side crane for lifting the mine rollers is made up and added, with one major part stowed on each side of the vehicle. The crew hatches are made up and added. Following this the track sides skirts are then built up, and all of their ERA blocks are fitted. Once complete they are added to the hull. The remote weapons station is also built up and added at this time. Next up is construction of the mine rollers. These are little kits in their own right. They are handed but each builds up in the same way. 6 mine-roller wheels are added together on a main axle, the axle has different diameters for the different wheels so they should all slot easily into place. The axle then attaches to the side parts and additional bars front an rear are added. Short lengths of the chain need to be added to each mine roller. Next each side has an ECM system built up and attached. The roller arm assemblies are next to be built up and added. I would suggest using wire instead of the string supplied by Meng as it will undoubtedly look better. The KMT-8 mine plough arms are then built up added to the roller/arm assembly. Once complete these can be added to the main body of the vehicle. Markings There are no markings supplied with the kit, but there are three different camouflage schemes included from the 2009, 2014 & 2015 Russian Arms Expos. Conclusion Another great release from Meng of a less than traditional subject. The parts count is high but not unnessasarly given the complex nature of the Mine Clearer. Once completed it will look like an impressive model. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  24. I was looking to do a vehicle without the sideskirts, so after a great deal of research (5 mins on the 'net and another five asking friends), I went with this one from the 503rd at Potsdamer Platz, Berlin 1945, numbers are a best guess and too small. Great kit, tough scheme for me though. I didn't have a clue where I was going with the painting and weathering of this, which was fun, so I kept throwing stuff on it until I thought it looked ok. I think in future I might do the dirt and dust before the washes see how that turns out. No fun posting it after Andy's one though. Cheers for looking y'all.
  25. Hi folks Sorry, I know this subject has been done to death recently but I thought I'd throw mine in anyway: Regards J A
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