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  1. Hi all, This was a very quick build, all wrapped up in 3 days. I deliberately kept it simple and OOB as I wanted a filler build between other projects. Sweet little kit! Guy
  2. Hello all, Today I've started on a new set of builds to add to my British collection while I wait for parts and paints to arrive for the Stranraer and a few other builds I have yet to post. Among others, I have a Persian Fury, Avro 504, and P-47 in the works. The classic Matchbox kits are some of my favorites, as they can produce a great model with little work, or can be upgraded as the builder wishes. The Siskin, Gladiator, and Fury have to be my favorites, and so armed with one each of the Gladiator and Fury and 2 of the Siskin, I've set out on a Triple Build. Additionally, I spent an embarrassing amount of money to obtain a copy of ModelDecal Sheet 31 to obtain decals for all 3. Having just built the Heller Gladiator in Chinese markings, I will be starting with the Fury and Siskin. That's all for the moment, Stay safe, Tweener
  3. In 2019, ICM is to release new tool 1/32nd Gloster Gladiator kits: - ref. 32040 - Gloster Gladiator Mk.I, WWII British Fighter - release late November 2019 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM32040 Dedicated decals by ICM: - ref. D32004 - Gladiator Mk.I/II in Foreign Services - release Q4 2019 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICMD32004 V.P.
  4. J-8 Gladiator WWII Swedish Fighter (32044) 1:32 ICM The Gladiator was the last biplane fighter used by the RAF due to the introduction of more modern monoplanes. The Gladiator was designed in response to an Air Ministry requirements for an aircraft capable of 250mph armed with at least four machines guns. Gloster decided that rather than developing a brand new fighter they could capitalise on their Gauntlet design. This modified design would dispense with a pair of interplane struts to reduce drag and follow a wing design developed by Hawkers. The "new" aircraft would use the 700 hp Bristol Mercury engine. The prototype flew in 1934, with the first production aircraft being delivered in 1937. The Gladiator was probably the pinnacle of biplane design with its streamlining, closed cockpit and heavier armament, While the RAF ordered 180 aircraft the biplane design was really at the end of its life with more modern types being introduced. The type saw service in France in 1940, and on the home front in the Orkneys. Overseas they were used in Norway and most famously in the defence of Malta. Here these aircraft managed to defend the Island against superior Italian forces. Gladiators also saw service in North and East Africa as well as in Greece and the Middle East. Gladiators would also see combat service in Belgium, China and lastly Finland. Sweden received 37 Mk I which they designated (Jaktplan 8) J-8, and 18 Mk IIs designated J-8A.The 37 J-8s were built new from 1927-1938 and were fitted with NOHAB built Bristol Mercury VIS2 engines. The 12 J-8As were built new in 1938 and were fitted with NOHAB built Bristol Mercury VIIIS.3 engines. The Gladiators were in action from January 1940 against Russian attacks on Finland and some were like other Swedish Aircraft fitted with skis for landing on snow. The Kit This is a new tool from ICM who really do seem to be giving us kits we want at the moment. On initial inspection the kit looks very good, this is the original Mk.I kits with an additional sprure for the Ski landing gear and different guns. There is plenty of detail and the moulding is first class. The fabric effects are not over done and the sprue gates are quite fine. This is the Mark I aircraft however be assured a Mark II and Sea Gladiator are scheduled by ICM. Construction starts with the cockpit and interior. Framework sides are added into each fuselage half with appropriate control systems and additional parts being added. Into the each side the fuselage mounted guns are also added at this stage. The cockpit itself with the seat, rudder controls, and the pilots compass is constructed and added into the left fuselage, The coaming around the cockpit is then added along with the main instrument panel and its coaming. Behind the cockpit the rear decking and bulkhead are added in. After the addition of the tail wheel to the rear of the fuselage, the two halves are then ready to go together. Once this is done the gun sight can be put in place. We now move toe the rear tail surfaces with the rudder and tail planes being constructed and added on. All of the moveable surfaces are separate parts. Back onto the front of the fuselage the pilots entry doors at each side are added along with the prominent side mounted oil cooler. Its worth noting here that the surface moulding of this part seems to accurately match the real thing. The canopies can now be added. The instructions show the front and rear being added first with the main canopy going over these. Next the lower main wing is assembled and added. There is a one part lower section to this with left and right uppers. The lower main wing part form the bottom of the fuselage in that area. Separate ailerons are then added. To the aft lower fuselage a plug section is added, this would appear to be in the area the arrestor hook will be on the Sea Gladiator version. Next up the top wing is assembled. This is in upper and lower parts with the ailerons as separate parts. Once together this can be joined to the lower wing with the outer struts and the inner ones attaching to the fuselage. There are positive locating points for all the struts. Next up the main gear is added. These seem quite strong with an inner part for the axle being sandwiched between the parts for the gear legs. The gun pods also need to go under the wings at this point. We now move to the front of the aircraft and the engine. Given the scale the engine is as detailed as the plastic parts can make it and it looks to be a good representation of the real thing. To the front is added the exhausts and collector ring. A three part cowling then goes over the engine. The engine details and exhausts here vary depending on the variant being built (though ICM really dont offer any expiation of this in the instructions). The front machine guns are then added along with the lower exhaust parts. The prop can then be added to the engine and the whole assembly mounted to the front of the fuselage. To finish up rigging diagrams are provided for the modeller to correctly rig the aircraft. Markings There are markings for three aircraft in this boxing J-8A, No.284 Yellow F, Swedish Voluntary Wing F19, Finland 1940 J-8A, No.278 Yellow H, Swedish Voluntary Wing F19, Finland 1940 J-8A, No.278/48, Fighter Wing F8, Barkarby 1939. Decals are printed by ICM, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion It is good to see a new kit of this important RAF type being released. Even in 1/32 this is not overly large. ICM have done a great job with this kit. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Gloster Gladiator Mk.II (03846) 1:32 Revell The Gladiator was the last biplane fighter used by the RAF due to the introduction of more modern monoplanes. The Gladiator was designed in response to an Air Ministry requirements for an aircraft capable of 250mph armed with at least four machines guns. Gloster decided that rather than developing a brand new fighter they could capitalise on their Gauntlet design. This modified design would dispense with a pair of interplane struts to reduce drag and follow a wing design developed by Hawkers. The "new" aircraft would use the 700 hp Bristol Mercury engine. The prototype flew in 1934, with the first production aircraft being delivered in 1937. The Gladiator was probably the pinnacle of biplane design with its streamlining, closed cockpit and heavier armament. The Nk II would be powered by a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine. While the RAF ordered 180 aircraft the biplane design was really at the end of its life with more modern types being introduced. The type saw service in France in 1940, and on the home front in the Orkneys. Overseas they were used in Norway and most famously in the defence of Malta. Here these aircraft managed to defend the Island against superior Italian forces. Gladiators also saw service in North and East Africa as well as in Greece and the Middle East. Gladiators would also see combat service in Belgium, China and lastly Finland. By 1941 the aircraft had been retired from front line service, though continued to serve in communications and weather research roles. The Kit This is a new tool from ICM re-boxed by Revell with new decals. On initial inspection the kit looks very good. There is plenty of detail and the moulding is first class. The fabric effects are not over done and the sprue gates are quite fine. Construction starts with the cockpit and interior. Framework sides are added into each fuselage half with appropriate control systems and additional parts being added. Into the each side the fuselage mounted guns are also added at this stage. The cockpit itself with the seat, rudder controls, and the pilots compass is constructed and added into the left fuselage, The coaming around the cockpit is then added along with the main instrument panel and its coaming. Behind the cockpit the rear decking and bulkhead are added in. After the addition of the tail wheel to the rear of the fuselage, the two halves are then ready to go together. Once this is done the gun sight can be put in place. We now move to the rear tail surfaces with the rudder and tail planes being constructed and added on. All of the moveable surfaces are separate parts. Back onto the front of the fuselage the pilots entry doors at each side are added along with the prominent side mounted oil cooler. Its worth noting here that the surface moulding of this part seems to accurately match the real thing. The canopies can now be added. The instructions show the front and rear being added first with the main canopy going over these. Next the lower main wing is assembled and added. There is a one part lower section to this with left and right uppers. The lower main wing part form the bottom of the fuselage in that area. Separate ailerons are then added. To the aft lower fuselage a plug section is added, this would appear to be in the area the arrestor hook will be on the Sea Gladiator version. Next up the top wing is assembled. This is in upper and lower parts with the ailerons as separate parts. Once together this can be joined to the lower wing with the outer struts and the inner ones attaching to the fuselage. There are positive locating points for all the struts. Next up the main gear is added. These seem quite strong with an inner part for the axle being sandwiched between the parts for the gear legs. The gun pods also need to go under the wings at this point. We now move to the front of the aircraft and the engine. Given the scale the engine is as detailed as the plastic parts can make it and it looks to be a good representation of the real thing. To the front is added the exhausts and collector ring. A three part cowling then goes over the engine. The front machine guns are then added along with the lower exhaust parts. The prop can then be added to the engine and the whole assembly mounted to the front of the fuselage. To finish up rigging diagrams are provided for the modeller to correctly rig the aircraft. Markings There are markings for two aircraft in this boxing, in addition Revell have provided seatbelt decals as well. K-WT, No. 615 Sqn RAF, Merville, France, November 1939 N5585 - No.247 Sqn RAF, RAF Roborough August 1940. Decals are printed by Cartograf, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion It is good to see a new kit of this important RAF type being released. Even in 1/32 this is not overly large. Very highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  6. Hi all, The rather fun, pocket money Gladiator from Airfix. Out of the box pretty much and using the Airfix decals which are excellent. No vices, just a well designed kit. It’s the box art Battle of France version with a rather complicated 6 colour scheme! I got help there with the ‘Top Notch’ set of camouflage masks. Guy
  7. Hello gents I was fortunate enough to receive the ICM Gloster Sea Gladiator as a Christmas gift from my folks and my Dad has enquired after its progress a few times since; as I rashly promised that it was next in the build queue it's past due time I got started on it. I also have the original issue Gladiator kit by the same company, which I had been planning to build as one of the Aéronautique Militaire Belge (Belgian Air Force) Gladiators of the 1/I/2 Aé (Comet) Squadron based at Schaffen in May 1940. The Gladiator will be built as G-22, flown by First Sgt Denys Rolin, who had what might euphemistically be described as an 'interesting' day in this aircraft on 11th May 1940 when he was part of a flight of 6 Gladiators tasked with escorting 9 Fairey Battles of 5/III/3 Aé on a mission to bomb the bridges over the Albert Canal. The Gladiators became embroiled with Bf109s of JG1 and although Rolin claimed a 109 as a probable he was in turn shot down and bailed out. The article linked to above says that he bailed out and was captured, but another article states that he was in fact 'roughed up' by Belgian troops when he landed, locked in a cellar and later captured by the advancing German forces. I am planning to build the Sea Gladiator as N5519 'R' of the Hal Far Fighter Flight using the kit decals, having been inspired in my childhood by the story of the three plucky biplanes holding off the might of the Axis powers, which is how I saw it at the time and if, later on, it transpired that it was true only for a comparatively short time in the opening chapter of the Siege of Malta still it left me with a certain fondness for the symbol of Faith, Hope and Charity and for the Gladiator as an aircraft. N5519 'R' was the only Gladiator destroyed in aerial combat when it was shot down by a Fiat CR.42 flown by Sergente Manlio Tarantino of 23o Gruppo, Regia Aeronautica, on 21st July 1940. The Gladiator's pilot, Flying Officer Peter Hartley escaped alive but was badly burned. Here are the kits: They're good sturdy boxes, with a more flimsy outer cover. Here are the parts; the different sprues for the Sea Gladiator are in the middle: Here's some of the bits and bobs that have accumulated: I've ordered another set of the LF decals for the Belgian Gladiator so I can make the G-22 serial and numbers. I've got another Eduard mask set on the way too. The kit's painting guide for the Sea Gladiator fits well with the information in Britmodeller's Tony O'Toole's excellent book on the Malta Battle 'No Place for Beginners'. Oh and I got some resin exhausts from Quickboost and a Top-Notch camouflage masking set for the Sea Gladiator: I think that will do for now... Cheers, Stew
  8. I’m ready! found this little gem where it’s been patiently waiting in my stash . Ready to go! (Once I have a few other builds done/underway!)
  9. For inspection today I have the second Matchbox Gladiator, marked as a J8 of the Swedish Air Force in 1938. Like the first, I added some (invisible) cockpit detailing, this time from Evergreen .020 Strip. Additionally, I changed the prop to a 3-bladed unit based on a photo of 8*5 of the same Squadron. Though it is missing the spinner, it looks better than having the wrong number of blades. Also similar to the first build, I chose to paint the cowling collector ring in Neutral gray, as the Vallejo copper I picked up proved to be far too bright. Next up is a Spitfire Ia (KL*B), and then a Miles Magister in RAAF markings. Hopefully more Gladiators will follow if I can find other simple decal options or I find better Dark Earth and Dark Green paints. Perhaps the Revell re-boxing of this one will be suitable. In any case, Thanks all! Stay safe, Tweener
  10. For inspection today I have the first of 2 Matchbox 1/72 Gladiators. These kits are for the most part lovely little builds, but I found that the exhaust pipes were too fiddly to be worth bothering with, and did not attach them. Originally these were slated to be paired with an aftermarket Microscale sheet, but unfortunately, that whole sheet was prone to intense shattering. The kit decals, easily 15-20 years older, worked a treat. Go figure. In any case, here is the result: Overall, I am quite happy with the build, and especially with the (invisible) extra details I added to the cockpit. I imagine I will build a few more of this kit in the future if I can find them for a reasonable price, as I did for these two. If not, the Heller and Airfix kits are always available as well, and both are more detailed and just as easy to build. The only thing I might change on this one is the addition of a thin wash, which I have surprisingly never tried before. Time will tell. Thanks for checking in everyone, Stay safe, Tweener
  11. As announced ( http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234973406-merit-cataloguefolder-2015-2016/?hl=merit), Merit is to release 1/48th Gloster Gladiator kits. - ref. 64803 - Gloster Gladiator Mk.I - ref. 64804 - Gloster Gladiator Mk.II First boxing is expected for 3rd Quarter 2015 Source: https://www.facebook.com/MeritIntlLtd/photos/a.117819558309628.25722.117797744978476/881471455277764/?type=1&theater Box art V.P.
  12. Today I have for you my second MB Gladiator. Originally this was supposed to feature aftermarket decals from Microscale, but all 3 options on the sheet shattered, so I had to revert to the supplied Swedish Air Force decals. One change that will be made regards the prop, as many of the Swedish Aircraft featured 3 bladed props. I found a picture of aircraft 8 * 5 with one, and assumed that 8 * 4 would have the same. Like most MB kits, it built quickly but lacked interior detail. With that in mind, I used some Evergreen .020 strip to fabricate some interior framing along the lines of my previous Gladiator build and added lap belts from Tamiya tape. All that remains to be done is a little bit of detail painting on the engine, guns, and canopy, and the installation of the prop and wheels, which should take place in the morning. Both Gladiator should be in RFI by Friday, and their space on the bench will be replaced by a FROG Magister and DH.60G that I intend to (semi) convert to a military M model by modifying the landing gear, adding fuselage stringer detail, and possibly adding an exhaust pipe. Thanks for checking in, Stay safe everyone, Tweener
  13. In the mail today came the first of two 1/72 Gladiators by Matchbox, and on the way is a Microscale sheet that covers Gladiators and Furies. While paint dried on the top of the Walrus, I got to work. From the spares bin came a CMK resin seat for a P-40 and a control stick from a Hasegawa Ki-46, and these were promptly added alongside some inaccurate-but-better-than-nothing sidewall framing. An equally inaccurately shaped instrument panel as added to the back side of the parts that form the top of the nose. In the coming days the proper interior paints will arrive and work will continue. For now, it looks like this: https://www.flickr.com/photos/112759894@N05/50793640181/in/dateposted-public/ I likely won't spend any more time detailing the cockpit / adding the radio rack behind the pilots seat as I doubt what little I have done will be seen anyways. This first Gladiator will be finished in the kit provided scheme of an aircraft from No.73 (Fighter) Squadron at RAF Station Digby in 1938. The second will use an option from the Microscale sheet. That's all the progress so far. Thanks all, Tweener
  14. Gloster Gladiator Mk.I with British Pilots Tropical Uniform (32043) 1:32 ICM The Gladiator was the last biplane fighter used by the RAF due to the introduction of more modern monoplanes. The Gladiator was designed in response to an Air Ministry requirements for an aircraft capable of 250mph armed with at least four machines guns. Gloster decided that rather than developing a brand new fighter they could capitalise on their Gauntlet design. This modified design would dispense with a pair of interplane struts to reduce drag and follow a wing design developed by Hawkers. The "new" aircraft would use the 700 hp Bristol Mercury engine. The prototype flew in 1934, with the first production aircraft being delivered in 1937. The Gladiator was probably the pinnacle of biplane design with its streamlining, closed cockpit and heavier armament, While the RAF ordered 180 aircraft the biplane design was really at the end of its life with more modern types being introduced. The type saw service in France in 1940, and on the home front in the Orkneys. Overseas they were used in Norway and most famously in the defence of Malta. Here these aircraft managed to defend the Island against superior Italian forces. Gladiators also saw service in North and East Africa as well as in Greece and the Middle East. Gladiators would also see combat service in Belgium, China and lastly Finland. By 1941 the aircraft had been retired from front line service, though continued to serve in communications and weather research roles. The Kit This is a new tool from ICM who really do seem to be giving us kits we want at the moment. On initial inspection the kit looks very good. There is plenty of detail and the moulding is first class. The fabric effects are not over done and the sprue gates are quite fine. This is the Mark I aircraft however be assured a Mark II and Sea Gladiator are scheduled by ICM. Construction starts with the cockpit and interior. Framework sides are added into each fuselage half with appropriate control systems and additional parts being added. Into the each side the fuselage mounted guns are also added at this stage. The cockpit itself with the seat, rudder controls, and the pilots compass is constructed and added into the left fuselage, The coaming around the cockpit is then added along with the main instrument panel and its coaming. Behind the cockpit the rear decking and bulkhead are added in. After the addition of the tail wheel to the rear of the fuselage, the two halves are then ready to go together. Once this is done the gun sight can be put in place. We now move toe the rear tail surfaces with the rudder and tail planes being constructed and added on. All of the moveable surfaces are separate parts. Back onto the front of the fuselage the pilots entry doors at each side are added along with the prominent side mounted oil cooler. Its worth noting here that the surface moulding of this part seems to accurately match the real thing. The canopies can now be added. The instructions show the front and rear being added first with the main canopy going over these. Next the lower main wing is assembled and added. There is a one part lower section to this with left and right uppers. The lower main wing part form the bottom of the fuselage in that area. Separate ailerons are then added. To the aft lower fuselage a plug section is added, this would appear to be in the area the arrestor hook will be on the Sea Gladiator version. Next up the top wing is assembled. This is in upper and lower parts with the ailerons as separate parts. Once together this can be joined to the lower wing with the outer struts and the inner ones attaching to the fuselage. There are positive locating points for all the struts. Next up the main gear is added. These seem quite strong with an inner part for the axle being sandwiched between the parts for the gear legs. The gun pods also need to go under the wings at this point. We now move to the front of the aircraft and the engine. Given the scale the engine is as detailed as the plastic parts can make it and it looks to be a good representation of the real thing. To the front is added the exhausts and collector ring. A three part cowling then goes over the engine. The front machine guns are then added along with the lower exhaust parts. The prop can then be added to the engine and the whole assembly mounted to the front of the fuselage. To finish up rigging diagrams are provided for the modeller to correctly rig the aircraft. Markings There are markings for four aircraft in this boxing No. 72 Sqn RAF, UK 1938 - Aluminium Dope / NMF overall. No. 607 Sqn RAF, UK Aug 1938 - Camo No. 112 Sqn RAF, Egypt 1940 - Camo No. 80 Sqn RAF. Egypt early 1940 - Camo Decals are printed by ICM, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Figures This is ICMs figure set 32106 and while it says British Pilots it would encompass a lot of commonwealth nations as well. There are two pilots and another standing office who look like they are in a briefing scenario. All are what would be considered dressed for the period and the climate. In general the mould in crisp and clean with plenty of detail. . Like ICM's recent figures these are well sculpted and should build up well. Conclusion It is good to see a new kit of this important RAF type being released. Even in 1/32 this is not overly large. ICM have done a great job with this kit, the inclusion of a set of figures is a nice touch. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. My initial thought for this GB was a Spit, everyone loves a Spit particularly an early mark. I have an Eduard Me109E "in the stash"but I didn't fancy modelling the "bad guys" this time. I took a bit of advice and settled on a Gloster Gladiator. 247th Squadron flew the Gladiator in protection of the SW ports from a pretty rough strip near Roborough (also known at one time as Plymouth Airport) (More history of the site here). The strip was unsuited to more modern monoplanes at the time so the Glad was deployed having moved the squadron down from Sumburgh in Shetland where they were tasked with providing cover for Scapa Flow. Since deciding on the subject of my model I have done some internet research and I will add more of this as I add to this thread. So this is the kit (love the pixie boots!) Contents of the box... And these are the add-ons I have chosen I decided against the resin engine and cowl as they almost doubled the cost of the build and I'm not particularly fond of working with resin. So I have the Yahu etched instrument panel a set of turned brass gun barrels (as I more often model armour plastic bun barrels seem, wrong) and then we have the real challenge of this kit... rigging on the recommendation of another Glad builder I have chosen this elastic material. Wish me luck! One thing that does concern me is the decals. I am told to expect these to be a pig to work with. I will try the Finnish swastikas to see how they handle. If they are as bad as people suggest I will be looking for alternates and would welcome pointers as it looks like I will be buying multiple sheets. This is what I hope to model.
  16. TopDrawings #94 Gloster Gladiator (9788366148864) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK The Gladiator was the last biplane fighter used by the RAF due to the introduction of more modern monoplanes. The Gladiator was designed in response to an Air Ministry requirements for an aircraft capable of 250mph armed with at least four machines guns. Gloster decided that rather than developing a brand new fighter they could capitalise on their Gauntlet design. This modified design would dispense with a pair of interplane struts to reduce drag and follow a wing design developed by Hawkers. The "new" aircraft would use the 700 hp Bristol Mercury engine. The prototype flew in 1934, with the first production aircraft being delivered in 1937. The Gladiator was probably the pinnacle of biplane design with its streamlining, closed cockpit and heavier armament. The Mk II would be powered by a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine. The Sea Gladiator was developed for the Fleet Air Arm, it featured the 3 blade propeller, arrestor hook, and onboard dingy stowage. They operated from HMS Glorious, Furious, and Eagle; as well as airfields including at Malta, While the RAF ordered 180 aircraft the biplane design was really at the end of its life with more modern types being introduced. The type saw service in France in 1940, and on the home front in the Orkneys. Overseas they were used in Norway and most famously in the defence of Malta. Here these aircraft managed to defend the Island against superior Italian forces. Gladiators also saw service in North and East Africa as well as in Greece and the Middle East. Gladiators would also see combat service in Belgium, China and lastly Finland. By 1941 the aircraft had been retired from front line service, though continued to serve in communications and weather research roles. We have great kits of the Gladiator available in all scales with the new 1/32 Kits from ICM being very welcome. The TopDrawings series majors on scale plans, which is the main thrust, but also includes a little background information, some pertinent profiles, and separate A2 sheets printed on both sides with drawings of various versions of the aircraft. This new publication covers the Mark I, I Tropical, II, II Meteo, Sea Gladiator and J-8. The book is written in English on the left of the page with Polish on the right, which translates to top and bottom for the captions to the various drawings within. The book itself is bound in a card cover and has 20 pages, and the rear cover is devoted to additional profiles of an RAF Machine. Throughout the book, there are numerous smaller diagrams that show equipment layout such as the cockpit, landing gear, engines and props; as well as the sometime small differences between Marks/ Conclusion These books are essential for the modeller that enjoys comparing their models against scale plans, and wants them to be as accurate as possible, with the separate large scale plans quite useful. Currently (at time of writing) on offer at a discounted price from Casemate UK Review sample courtesy of
  17. This is the Eduard re-pop of Roden's 1/48 Gloster Gladiator. It comes with some nice PE but is still a Roden kit at the end of the day. I used AIMS resin collector ring to replace the kit's 3 part offering, made things a lot easier. My first attempt at rigging - no problem with that but I was glad to see the back of the kit. Brush painted & with no weathering as I didn't want anything else to ping off. It certainly won't have pride of place in my collection. Any comments, criticisms & observations welcome. Pete Just noticed the muck on my sheet, must get it in the wash!
  18. Gloster Gladiator Mk.II (32041) 1:32 ICM The Gladiator was the last biplane fighter used by the RAF due to the introduction of more modern monoplanes. The Gladiator was designed in response to an Air Ministry requirements for an aircraft capable of 250mph armed with at least four machines guns. Gloster decided that rather than developing a brand new fighter they could capitalise on their Gauntlet design. This modified design would dispense with a pair of interplane struts to reduce drag and follow a wing design developed by Hawkers. The "new" aircraft would use the 700 hp Bristol Mercury engine. The prototype flew in 1934, with the first production aircraft being delivered in 1937. The Gladiator was probably the pinnacle of biplane design with its streamlining, closed cockpit and heavier armament. The Nk II would be powered by a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine. While the RAF ordered 180 aircraft the biplane design was really at the end of its life with more modern types being introduced. The type saw service in France in 1940, and on the home front in the Orkneys. Overseas they were used in Norway and most famously in the defence of Malta. Here these aircraft managed to defend the Island against superior Italian forces. Gladiators also saw service in North and East Africa as well as in Greece and the Middle East. Gladiators would also see combat service in Belgium, China and lastly Finland. By 1941 the aircraft had been retired from front line service, though continued to serve in communications and weather research roles. The Kit This is a new tool from ICM who really do seem to be giving us kits we want at the moment. On initial inspection the kit looks very good. There is plenty of detail and the moulding is first class. The fabric effects are not over done and the sprue gates are quite fine. This is the Mark II following on from the Mk.i and this kit has an additonal sprue with a new 3 bladed prop and a few other parts.. Construction starts with the cockpit and interior. Framework sides are added into each fuselage half with appropriate control systems and additional parts being added. Into the each side the fuselage mounted guns are also added at this stage. The cockpit itself with the seat, rudder controls, and the pilots compass is constructed and added into the left fuselage, The coaming around the cockpit is then added along with the main instrument panel and its coaming. Behind the cockpit the rear decking and bulkhead are added in. After the addition of the tail wheel to the rear of the fuselage, the two halves are then ready to go together. Once this is done the gun sight can be put in place. We now move toe the rear tail surfaces with the rudder and tail planes being constructed and added on. All of the moveable surfaces are separate parts. Back onto the front of the fuselage the pilots entry doors at each side are added along with the prominent side mounted oil cooler. Its worth noting here that the surface moulding of this part seems to accurately match the real thing. The canopies can now be added. The instructions show the front and rear being added first with the main canopy going over these. Next the lower main wing is assembled and added. There is a one part lower section to this with left and right uppers. The lower main wing part form the bottom of the fuselage in that area. Separate ailerons are then added. To the aft lower fuselage a plug section is added, this would appear to be in the area the arrestor hook will be on the Sea Gladiator version. Next up the top wing is assembled. This is in upper and lower parts with the ailerons as separate parts. Once together this can be joined to the lower wing with the outer struts and the inner ones attaching to the fuselage. There are positive locating points for all the struts. Next up the main gear is added. These seem quite strong with an inner part for the axle being sandwiched between the parts for the gear legs. The gun pods also need to go under the wings at this point. We now move to the front of the aircraft and the engine. Given the scale the engine is as detailed as the plastic parts can make it and it looks to be a good representation of the real thing. To the front is added the exhausts and collector ring. A three part cowling then goes over the engine. The front machine guns are then added along with the lower exhaust parts. The prop can then be added to the engine and the whole assembly mounted to the front of the fuselage. To finish up rigging diagrams are provided for the modeller to correctly rig the aircraft. Markings There are markings for four aircraft in this boxing No.247 Sqn RAF, Roborough August 1940. No.80 Sqn RAF, Greece December 1940. No.1 Sqn South African Air Force, East Africa 1940 Mo.615 (County of Surrey) Sqn RAF, St Inglevert (Northern France) April 1940. Decals are printed by ICM, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion It is good to see a new kit of this important RAF type being released. Even in 1/32 this is not overly large. ICM have done a great job with this kit. Very highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  19. Gloster Gladiator Mk.I/II In Foreign Service #2 (D3205) 1:32 ICM via Hannants There is now new tool Gladiator I &II kits from ICM. This kits come with decals for the RAF & Commonwealth Air Forces , however the Gladiator was exported to quite a few countries. The set arrives in a re-sealable foil bag stapled to a header card, with the decals covered by a sheet of translucent paper to keep moisture from damaging the carrier film. There are four options on the sheet, the national insignia for Latvia & Finland being broken down for obvious reasons. From the sheet you can decal one of the following; Mark I Aircraft, Latvian Air Force 1938 (Olive Green over Aluminium) Mark I Aircraft, No.1 Sqn Irish Air Corps, 1940 (Darek Green/Dark Earth over Aluminium) Mark II Aircraft, 2/LeLv 16, Finnish Air Force 1942 (Black/Green over Blue) Mark II Aircraft, 1/LeLv 16, Finnish Air Force 1942 (Black/Green over Blue) Additional scrap diagrams show the particular areas On the back page the wings are covered with decal placement. Conclusion A really nice set of decals that expand your options for this new kit. Highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  20. Gloster Gladiator Mk.I In Foreign Service (D3204) 1:32 ICM via Hannants There's a brand new tool Gladiator i 1:32 from ICM which we reviewed here. This kit comes with decals for the RAF, however the Gladiator was exported to quite a few countries. The set arrives in a re-sealable foil bag stapled to a header card, with the decals covered by a sheet of translucent paper to keep moisture from damaging the carrier film. There are four options on the sheet. From the sheet you can decal one of the following; Royal Norwegian Air Force, April 1941 (Overall Silver) 1 Escadrille, 1 Groupe, Belgian Air Force, Schaffen 1938 (Olive green over silver) Chinese Nationalist Air Forces, China 1938 (Overall dark green) 21 Mira, Hellenic Air Force 1940 (Dark Green/Dark Earth over white) Additional scrap diagrams show the particular areas On the back page the wings are covered with decal placement. Conclusion A really nice set of decals that expand your options for this new kit. Highly recommended. Available in the UK from importers H G Hannants Ltd. Review sample courtesy of
  21. Gloster Gladiator Mk.I (32040) 1:32 ICM The Gladiator was the last biplane fighter used by the RAF due to the introduction of more modern monoplanes. The Gladiator was designed in response to an Air Ministry requirements for an aircraft capable of 250mph armed with at least four machines guns. Gloster decided that rather than developing a brand new fighter they could capitalise on their Gauntlet design. This modified design would dispense with a pair of interplane struts to reduce drag and follow a wing design developed by Hawkers. The "new" aircraft would use the 700 hp Bristol Mercury engine. The prototype flew in 1934, with the first production aircraft being delivered in 1937. The Gladiator was probably the pinnacle of biplane design with its streamlining, closed cockpit and heavier armament, While the RAF ordered 180 aircraft the biplane design was really at the end of its life with more modern types being introduced. The type saw service in France in 1940, and on the home front in the Orkneys. Overseas they were used in Norway and most famously in the defence of Malta. Here these aircraft managed to defend the Island against superior Italian forces. Gladiators also saw service in North and East Africa as well as in Greece and the Middle East. Gladiators would also see combat service in Belgium, China and lastly Finland. By 1941 the aircraft had been retired from front line service, though continued to serve in communications and weather research roles. The Kit This is a new tool from ICM who really do seem to be giving us kits we want at the moment. On initial inspection the kit looks very good. There is plenty of detail and the moulding is first class. The fabric effects are not over done and the sprue gates are quite fine. This is the Mark I aircraft however be assured a Mark II and Sea Gladiator are scheduled by ICM. Construction starts with the cockpit and interior. Framework sides are added into each fuselage half with appropriate control systems and additional parts being added. Into the each side the fuselage mounted guns are also added at this stage. The cockpit itself with the seat, rudder controls, and the pilots compass is constructed and added into the left fuselage, The coaming around the cockpit is then added along with the main instrument panel and its coaming. Behind the cockpit the rear decking and bulkhead are added in. After the addition of the tail wheel to the rear of the fuselage, the two halves are then ready to go together. Once this is done the gun sight can be put in place. We now move toe the rear tail surfaces with the rudder and tail planes being constructed and added on. All of the moveable surfaces are separate parts. Back onto the front of the fuselage the pilots entry doors at each side are added along with the prominent side mounted oil cooler. Its worth noting here that the surface moulding of this part seems to accurately match the real thing. The canopies can now be added. The instructions show the front and rear being added first with the main canopy going over these. Next the lower main wing is assembled and added. There is a one part lower section to this with left and right uppers. The lower main wing part form the bottom of the fuselage in that area. Separate ailerons are then added. To the aft lower fuselage a plug section is added, this would appear to be in the area the arrestor hook will be on the Sea Gladiator version. Next up the top wing is assembled. This is in upper and lower parts with the ailerons as separate parts. Once together this can be joined to the lower wing with the outer struts and the inner ones attaching to the fuselage. There are positive locating points for all the struts. Next up the main gear is added. These seem quite strong with an inner part for the axle being sandwiched between the parts for the gear legs. The gun pods also need to go under the wings at this point. We now move to the front of the aircraft and the engine. Given the scale the engine is as detailed as the plastic parts can make it and it looks to be a good representation of the real thing. To the front is added the exhausts and collector ring. A three part cowling then goes over the engine. The front machine guns are then added along with the lower exhaust parts. The prop can then be added to the engine and the whole assembly mounted to the front of the fuselage. To finish up rigging diagrams are provided for the modeller to correctly rig the aircraft. Markings There are markings for four aircraft in this boxing No. 72 Sqn RAF, UK 1938 - Aluminium Dope / NMF overall. No. 607 Sqn RAF, UK Aug 1938 - Camo No. 112 Sqn RAF, Egypt 1940 - Camo No. 80 Sqn RAF. Egypt early 1940 - Camo Decals are printed by ICM, with good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion It is good to see a new kit of this important RAF type being released. Even in 1/32 this is not overly large. ICM have done a great job with this kit. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  22. Gloster Gladiator Mk.I/II (A02052A) 1:72 Airfix The Gladiator was developed by the Gloster Aircraft Company as a private venture with the aim of fulfilling Air Ministry Specification F.7/30. This specification called for a fighter aircraft capable of 250 mph and able to carry four machine guns. Rather than opt for a new design, Gloster decided to develop a proposal based on the existing Gauntlet fighter. The resulting aircraft featured improved aerodynamics, cantilever undercarriage, an extra pair of machine guns, a more powerful engine and an enclosed cockpit. The Gladiator flew for the first time in September 1934 and entered service in January 1937. Such was the pace of aeronautical development in the late 1930s that the Gladiator was becoming obsolete even as it was entering service. Nevertheless, over 700 examples were built (including Sea Gladiators) and it saw action in most theatres of the Second World War. Despite being more demanding to fly than the Gauntlet, the Gladiator was popular with pilots. The Gladiators finest hour was probably the battle for Malta in 1940, when a handful of aircraft formed the entire air defence of the besieged island. Airfix's released this kit back in 2013, just as they were hitting their stride following their acquisition by Hornby. The kit is part of the Series 2 range and arrives packed into a red top-opening box with the usual high-quality Adam Tooby artwork showing a Gladiator engaging an He 111. Inside are three sprues of grey plastic and a single clear sprue, holding over 60 parts in total. The mouldings are clean and crisp, with fine, recessed panel lines around the nose of the aircraft and an effective stretched fabric effect elsewhere. As this is the Mk.I/II version, the extra sprue from the Swedish boxing is included, although the only part required for this model is the Fairey three-blade propellor. The cockpit comprises a framework floor, seat, headrest, and a single part for the combined control column/rudder pedals. A pilot is also included. The inside of the fuselage sidewalls are nicely detailed and you have the option to remove the access hatch and replace it with a dedicated part that can be fixed in the open position. Before closing up the fuselage, you must fix the fuselage mounted .303 inch browning machine guns through the muzzle holes. These are quite finely moulded and should look much better than if they were just moulded as lumps on the side of the airframe. The remaining steps in the construction process are fairly conventional, but with some clever twists. The upper fuselage immediately in front of the cockpit is moulded as a separate part. The inner struts, the rearmost of which also includes the instrument panel, have to be sandwiched between this part and the fuselage. The lower wing follows, and as you can see from the photograph below, Airfix have marked the points you will need to use if you want to rig the model. Top marks, Airfix! The engine and cowling is quite a complex assembly, made up of no fewer than ten parts. The Bristol Mercury engine comprises the exhaust manifold and the single row of nine cylinders, as well as some smaller parts. The cowling is made up of four parts, with this somewhat complex arrangement being necessary because of the oval cross-section shape of the cowling. The inter-wing struts have to be added before the upper wing can be fixed in place. Airfix have taken an approach that was fairly novel in 2013, but which seems to be more commonplace now. Each pair of struts is joined by a small sprue which holds them at the correct angle. These have to be left in place while the wings are joined together and then removed afterwards. This is a clever twist, and it's nice to see Airfix have tried to make this model as easy to build as possible without compromising detail. Once the upper wing is in place, the tail planes can be added. The rudder is moulded as a separate part, but all of the other control surfaces are moulded in place. The undercarriage is simple but effective, and the wheels have separate hubs, which will aid painting. A choice of tyres is provided, both with and without flat spots. When it comes to the canopy, Airfix give you a choice of using either a single part or a canopy split into two parts. If you choose to rig your model, a full page diagram is provided, which shows how to break the job down into simple steps. Two options are provided on the decal sheet: Gladiator Mk.II, 615 (County of Surrey) Squadron, Royal Air Force, St. Inglevert, Northern France, December 1939. This aircraft is finished in Dark Earth/Dark Green and Light Eart/Light Green; and Gladiator Mk.I, 1 Escadrille, 1 Groupe Belgian Air Force, Schaffen Air Base, Diest, Belgium, 1938. This aircraft is finished in Olive Drab over silver. The decals themselves look thin and glossy and a full set of stencils are included. Conclusion This isn't the only available kit of the Gladiator in this scale, but it is the best. Although I have a soft spot for the Matchbox version, Airfix's kit has a wealth of extra detail, more options and should be just as easy to build. Overall this kit is a real gem and should build up into an excellent model. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  23. Hi all, Here's my 1/72 Airfix Gloster Gladiator Mk.II, done as N5583 with No. 605 Sqn at RAF Tangmere in August 1939. I bought this kit back in early January as a simple project to work on while I was away from home for a week, so without my airbrush. I hand painted it using Vallejo paints (Model Air ones actually), and some Italeri paint. Only the flatcoat has been airbrushed. Markings are from the kit. The rigging was done with EZ line, and then brushed gunship grey. My hand painting skills are pretty bad, so up close it's quite messy, but from a distance it looks half decent, I think. Thanks for looking, Pete
  24. Hi everybody; here's the lovely Mitchell Military Models Roman General Bust in 1/9. Outstading resin model, only two parts (head an torso), making for a boatload of painting fun Huge value for the money, if you ask me, and my thanks to Ross Mitchel for the really kind service. Thanks also to everybody followed and contributed to the WIP thread, which can be found here: On with the pics: This bust has been painted mainly with Lifecolor and Italeri acrylics, plus a few other paints for metallic parts; the black base coat was airbrushed, and so was the steel shoulder armor and the face base coat. All the rest is brush painted. Any comments welcome, hope you enjoy it. Ciao
  25. After the badly researched (kit-wise) false start to an attempt at a Hurricane, this should be my entry for the GB. Decals have been ordered depicting a Gladiator Mk.1 “10” Fighter wing F8 2nd Div. I should be ok for a kit this time, I have the Airfix Gladiator Mk.1 and the HobbyBoss easy assembly job. Which to go for. The HobbyBoss looks very easy and doesn’t seem too bad detail wise, the Airfix kit looks good and has indents for the wiring and a decent wiring diagram. I’ll mull that over a glass or two of something this evening and then commit tomorrow - box and sprue shots to follow once the white smoke appears from Casa Avereda.
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