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  1. 1/72 - MiG-21 Fishbed family project was finally officially confirmed by Eduard http://www.eduard.com/store/out/media/InfoEduard/archive/2015/info-eduard-2015-01CZ.pdf (english version soon) MF, bis and SMT versions expected first
  2. Eduard is to release a new mould from the 1/48th Focke-Wulf Fw.190A. Source: http://www.detailscaleview.com/2015/11/new-products-from-novemberfest-2015.html 3D renders V.P.
  3. In August 2020, Eduard is to release in August 2020 - just in time for the 80th Anniversary of the BoB - a new tool 1/48th Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I limited kit - ref. Source: https://www.eduard.com/out/media/InfoEduard/archive/2020/info-eduard-2020-01.pdf V.P.
  4. Eduard is to release a new tool 1/48th Sopwith Camel kits. Source: http://www.kitreviewsonline.de/eduard-pressekonferenz-in-nuernberg/ 3D render V.P.
  5. Eduard is to release 1/48th Grumman F4F Wildcat kits: F4F-3 through F4F-4, FM-1 and FM-2 to Martlets. Sources: https://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95280&start=33705#p2449036 https://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95280&start=33720#p2449051 https://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95280&start=33765#p2449103 V.P.
  6. F6F-3 Upgrade Sets (for Eduard) 1:48 Eduard The F6F Hellcat was one of Eduard’s earlier kits, first released in 2008 with many subsequent reboxings and additive toolings to depict other variants going on over the years. It’s still a jolly nice kit, but would of course benefit from some upgrades to bring it bang-up-to-date. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. SPACE 3D Printed Cockpit Decals (3DL48068) The Eduard SPACE sets use new 3D printing techniques that lay down successive layers of different colour resin, creating highly realistic almost full complete panels that are supplied on a decal sheet. They can depict metallic shades, plus glossy, satin and matt colours too, which really ups the detail on everything they print. In addition, a small sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted PE is included for the aspects of the set that lend themselves better to this medium, such as seatbelts and rudder pedals. The Hellcat’s cockpit is a cramped compartment, with large side console to the right and a small instrument panel in front of the pilot. The moulded-in details on these are removed and replaced by 3D printed decals that are jaw-dropping in their realism, with more decals on the sides of the console and cockpit walls, including a triplet of two-layer boxes with printed cabling gathered together below it. The panel is supplied in sections to fix to the front of the otherwise unused part G43 that is a blank panel, saving you from having to remove the details from the other part. The PE sheet includes new rudder pedals and a full set of seatbelts for the pilot, including comfort pads beneath the buckles and connectors. Masks Tface (EX865) these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy exterior on a large sheet of kabuki tape. Also included are another set of masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the inside of the canopy and give your model that extra bit of realism. In addition, you get a set of hub/tyre masks for all three wheels including the small tail-wheel, allowing you to cut the demarcations perfectly with little effort. Review sample courtesy of
  7. This model was begun as part of the 2021 F6F Hellcat STGB. Finally, it is finished. Another abandoned project done. Construction details in the link below. I hope that you enjoy these images of the completed model. Don
  8. Here is my build of Eduard's BF109 G-6 in 1/48 scale, not much to comment really on this kit, everything went together really well and no issues at all I can really mention. Any critique and comments more than welcome.
  9. So here is (potentially) the start of part one of a dual/joint/two at a time build. Jury is still out in my head if to try two at a time having only completed two builds in 1/350 in the past 3 years especially as I still have a lot to learn and want them to turn out well. Also whether to do a joint thread or separate ones? As a kid I built 1/600 battleships, if it didn’t have big guns I wasn’t interested. A few years back I dabbled in 1/400 and built battleships, (you may see a pattern), now that I’m rather hooked on the hobby again I’ve started by building you’ve guessed it – battleships, specifically Zvezda’s Dreadnought and Hobbyboss’s Dunkerque (95% complete). As I looked at my stash of 12 and counting with a couple of those started I realised bar a modern Russian destroyer I needed to change it up. I settled on Aircraft Carriers, specifically 3, the bank said I could have 2 - fair enough I said. I wanted something unusual looking and Graf Zeppelin is certainly that. I’d actually discounted her as the aftermarket options aren’t great, Mk.1 do a set three times the cost of the kit which I personally think is too much. Eduard do a set in 4 prts, 2 prts of which are now discontinued. I contacted them about this and another set for Roma they have done similar with and they very bluntly said they wouldn’t bring it back into production even if demand went up which seems odd but that’s up to them. So I have coming on monday trumpeters kit of Graf Zeppelin in 1/350 with half of the eduard sets available, I did track down all four parts but when I compared the kit parts with those offered by eduard I found multiple areas when eduard merely replaced what was already included in the kit with little or no marked difference. I’ve also an extra set of six ME 109’s and Stukas. I plan to do my best with it, maybe scratch build a few bits, it won’t be jaw dropping in terms of PE but I think there is enough to lift the base model up a level or two. Part of the thing with Graf Zeppelin is of course she was never finished (about 95%) and in the process of not being finished she was changed several times. A brief history can be found on many a website, likely including this one on other builds but essentially, she had an Atlantic bow added post launch, was put on hold a couple times, had bulges added as well as changes to her super structure, AA armament, Aircraft complement and make up etc. You get the idea, the brilliant thing is it means you can’t really go wrong and where the line is drawn is any ones guess. As you’ll see from the following photos, Insert obligatory pictures (all from scale mates and Wikipedia) I plan to make minor changes to the super structure and funnel cap as I think trumpeter got it very very very wrong. I’ve no idea on paint schemes she’d likely have adopted, the Germans didn’t seem to do much up to early 42 which is potentially when she could have entered service had she not be placed on hold repeatedly. There is this picture on Scalemates that are supposedly GZ but to me I'm not convinced, the step/angle in the bow is gone, the tip of the bow is different as is the rake, as are the missing casemates (which is possible) but the bulge comes a lot further forward and the superstructure is stepped out to one side which would be massive work to undertake during the brief times she was actually worked on post 1940, I wondered if these are perhaps pictures of Weser but I don't think she got that far in construction? Now as for the second ship I may concurrently build – I’ll say nothing partially not to jinx it, Im told it'll be here in short order but time will tell. I'll be initially working to complete to a point of airbushing as the bank balance has taken a hit and so I can’t invest in an Airbrush right now. So any areas hairy stickable I’ll look to do and other areas be left ready for airbrushing later in the build. I'm not sure how easy to do as sub assemblies carriers are - but I'll guess I will fid out. Dunkerque has taken 10 months and isn’t huge but is nearly there so I doubt this will be a quick build initially but if you’d like to follow on and have made it through my inane ramblings I’d be glad of any input and suggestions as to: - paint schemes - paint sequencing given my Airbrish plan/delay - and modifications that may make her stand out. Photo's of the kit and PE to follow when they arrive, Thanks for bearing with me Sam
  10. In the Czech Modelforum it's mentioned that after the 1/48th MiG-21, Spitfire and Bf.109 families, Eduard has as long term project the North American P-51 Mustang in the same scale. Wait and see. Source: http://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=68170&start=5865 V.P.
  11. I've become infatuated with Eduards Spitfire (probably a bit too much) lately and that got me thinking. Would it be a good idea to chop the Griffin of the Airfix XII and marry that to an (preferably Overtrees) Eduard VIII airframe? That way you'll get a lovely detailed XII, with a sliding hood that isn't made in one piece and looks a bit weird. Or am I trying/thinking too much, since the Airfix XII is a quite fine kit anyway? //Christer
  12. Eduard is to release a 1/48th Zlín Z-126 to Z-526 Trenér family. Source: https://www.facebook.com/EduardCompany/photos/a.122154977799458/3366784713336452 V.P.
  13. Hi, There are a couple of posts describing the conversion of combining various kits to end up with a Mk XIV high back. I am lacking the Spitfire knowledge despite reading through the various builds here on BM and P.B. on YouTube etc. to confidently build an accurate XIV. There is also a reasonable possibility that if I don’t post it as a WIP on BM, it may not be finished at all and keep lingering in it’s boxes. So here we go: Probably no surprise but the bases are the Eduard Mk VIII weekend ed. and the Airfix FR Mk XIV. In my naivety, I think below should probably accomplish the construction of the MkXIVc Highback. 1. Mostly use the fuselage of the VIII which should fit nicely in the: 2. C-Wing of the VIII 3. Using the bigger Airfix underwing air scoops 4. possibly filling in some fuselage panels on the port side and scribing a new panel on the Eduard starboard side 5. Use the nose and prop from the Airfix kit and attach it to the Eduard Mk VIII fuselage 6. Use the entire tail section of the Airfix kit As I write this I have a feeling that my assumptions are already wrong and I have cut off the wrong sections and made a complete hash of it, but perhaps not. The bases To my surprise after trying to figure out how to correctly scale and print a drawing, the outlines all match up. (Making sure everything will be aligned ok) The question is what to do with the fuselage panels? Use the air intakes from the Airfix kit: Any feedback confirming or pointing out flaws in my build assumptions are very welcome. If successful I may finish it as a MkXIVc in RAF 322 Squadron markings. It will not be a fast build as I will start work on my RF-101 Voodoo and continue on my ship build as well. At least, that is the plan. May do a WIP on both. Anyway, that’s all, Thanks for watching, Rgds, Rob
  14. SR-71A Ejection Seats PRINT (648758 for Revell) 1:48 Eduard Brassin Revell’s new SR-71A Blackbird in 1:48 has catapulted the old Testors kit into the back of the stash, and brings a lot more detail to the party, as well as a much more structurally rigid model once complete. Eduard’s heap of detail sets for this kit was already quite long, and you can see some of our other reviews here, here, and here too. This new set provides a pair of directly 3D Printed ejection seats for the Blackbird in incredible detail. The set arrives in a flat Brassin pack with card insert keeping it and the instructions straight, and the parts themselves are safely inside a small clear plastic box to prevent crush damage and jostling. Inside the clear foil bag is the box containing both ejection seats, which has a small sticky label to reduce the likelihood of excessive movement within. The detail is truly stunning, and there is more to come from the included Photo-Etch (PE) sheet of seatbelts, and a small decal sheet that contains stencils for the sides of the seat. Construction is simple, as much of the detail is already printed. The belts and pull-handles are also pre-painted and nickel-plated, so painting of the seat itself is all you need do, apply the stencils to the sides of the seats, then glue on the belts as instructed, all of which is times two, as the Blackbird is a two-seater. The detail is exceptional, which is what we’ll come to expect in the 3D printing age we’re entering. The cushions, sides of the seat and other such details are crisp and accurate, with the first print as good as the last, removing the lottery that was mould-wear on traditional cast resin. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Thanks HKR Eduard worked in secret on a new kit and tomorrow it will be announced 7PM (Warsaw Time) UPDATE - It'll be a family of 1/48th Mitsubishi A6M "Zero" Source: https://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95280&start=33390#p2448351 V.P.
  16. Hello, comrades! My next build is Eduard's recently issued profipack of Bf-110G early variants. Overall over engineered kit made on well used molds gave in result the very time consuming build. Fit is at the level of intermediate limited run kits. Special thanks to Eduard for nose guns cover made from two parts (resin and half of plastic part). I believe, single resin part is much more appropriate here... I started with most problematic assemblies - wings&nacelles and nose. So far one wing assembled, with minimal use of acrylic putty. Second wing and nose are in process. https://i.ibb.co/KzjmHcs/06.jpg Thanks for looking
  17. Vampire F.3 Seat PRINT (648753 for Airfix) 1:48 Eduard Brassin PRINT The new Airfix De Havilland Vampire F.3 has been available since late 2021, and you can see our original review here. A number of Photo-Etch (PE) and 3D printed decal sets have been released already now, and that range is still growing. This new set provides a directly 3D Printed ejection seat for the Vampire in incredible detail. The set arrives in a flat Brassin pack with card insert keeping it and the instructions straight, and the parts themselves are safely protected inside a small clear plastic box to prevent crush damage and jostling. Inside the clear foil bag is the box containing the ejection seat, which has a small sticky label within to reduce the likelihood of excessive movement of the part. The detail is truly stunning, and there is more to come from the included Photo-Etch (PE) sheet of seatbelts, which attach to the rear cockpit bulkhead after opening up a small hole in the seat armour above the new seatback. The seat has a rolled quilted back cushion, and the adjustment mechanism is baked-in during the printing process. You will need to supply a piece of 0.6mm rod or wire to stretch behind the seat as part of the mounting/adjustment equipment, and once you have it installed in place of the kit seat, you can apply the nickel-plated pre-painted belts, complete with comfort pads under the buckles. You could argue that little will be seen within the gloomy black cockpit of a post-war British fighter jet, but if one thing will be visible, it’s the seat, and this one will be sure to impress. The photo above shows the two kit seats on the left and centre, with and without belts. There are no other parts for attachment to the kit seat, so no adjustment mechanism will be seen. The PRINT seat on the right is exactly as it comes off the printing block, after sanding back the underside where the block attached. The belts are added later, and if you were to fit the rather strangely-shaped pilot, you'd be hiding all that detail. The photo shows up some light layering, although that will disappear under a coat of paint or primer. The difference in detail is stunning, and the shape is much more authentic. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  18. Sukhoi Su-25 Upgrade Sets (for Zvezda) 1:48 Eduard Zvezda’s new Su-25 kit arrived at an awful moment in history, but taken in isolation it is an excellent kit and we can hope that more variants follow on in due course. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE) and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Upgrade Set (491277) Two frets are included, one nickel-plated and pre-painted, the other larger one in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels, sidewalls and side consoles with added levers for the cockpit are in full colour, with a skin for the sides of the consoles and either side of the control column; sidewall skins with appliqué details; ejection seat details with rear and seat cushions and leg-restraints; replacement rudder pedals; a new support for the kit HUD glazing, and plenty of additional parts for the consoles. Moving externally, a number of strakes are added to the engine nacelles, joints are fitted along the seamlines internally, saving you a job, plus small parts to detail the exhaust on the way out; more piano-hinge plates on the underside of the exhaust; antennae and dielectric panels under the nose; AoA probes on the sides of the nose; appliqué plates over the intakes, with more under the tail; a detailed replacement “shade” over the pilot’s head; instruments on the windscreen sides; replacement bay doors for the nose gear; strakes and static wicks on the instrument pods at the wingtips. Inside the canopy is detailed with rear-view mirrors; a central detail strip; rear framework, plus a crew ladder, its door and crew step attaching to the side of the nose, with a scrap diagram showing the correct location for these assemblies. Zoom! Set (FE1277) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. SPACE 3D Printed Cockpit Decals (3DL48070) The Eduard SPACE sets use new 3D printing techniques that lay down successive layers of different colour resin, creating highly realistic almost full complete panels that are supplied on a decal sheet. They can depict metallic shades, plus glossy, satin and matt colours too, which really ups the detail on everything they print. In addition, a small sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted PE is included for the aspects of the set that lend themselves better to this medium, such as seatbelts and rudder pedals. Some of the PE parts are familiar from the set above, such as the replacement HUD frame; rudder pedals; rear-view mirrors in the canopy; leg-restraints, crew belts and pull-handle for the ejection seat, and small parts for the side consoles and sidewalls. The 3D decals include a complete main instrument panel in three sections, side consoles, sidewall details and other small instruments dotted around the cockpit. Seatbelts STEEL (FE1278) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as a full set of crew belts, you also get a set of the pull-handles between the pilot's knees that gets him out of there in case of an emergency. Masks (EX858) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition, you get a set of hub/tyre masks for all the wheels, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX859) Supplied on a larger sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. Review sample courtesy of
  19. About time I got my build up and running or I won't stand a chance of finishing it before my next GB commitment looms into view! I got this kit last year on an offer from Jadlam and it ended up costing me the same as the standard package from ICM but comes with masks, etched brass, resin wheels and some more interesting colour schemes. I quite like the box art too. Just to prove that the goodies are still securely wrapped; Certainly fills the box doesn't it. Here's the etched set, not usually a fan of this stuff but it would be wrong to not try to use it; And the resin goodies, wheels and conversion parts for one of the options; Speaking of options, most of the ones are for aircraft from the Battle of Britain in the standard 70/71/65 scheme (meh) but there are others which appeal to me, starting with this pair; I do like the look of the one with the black undersides, and no it hasn't got a bad case of the mumps those are flotation devices as the Z-5 was operated over water a lot and they are in the resin goody bag. I like the Greece based one because of the large theatre markings and I have an interest in the MTO, which brings me nicely onto the next set of possibilities; A proper MTO finish! I like that sand one a lot. Those of you who know my builds will also know that I have a thing for temporary Winter schemes too, so both these appeal. Looks like a have a difficult decision to make in the near future! There is also a Finnish option on the decal sheet but I built an ICM Z-2 as a Finnish Z-3 5 years ago; I enjoyed that build and can't see why this one should be any different, time to pull my finger out and get started! Craig.
  20. Eduard leaflet for May: http://www.eduard.com/store/out/media/distributors/leaflet/leaflet2016-05.pdf change digit in link for older issues
  21. I have just started the Eduard 1/48 Fulmar Mk II for something different, This version comes without the resin of the other various editions put out by other companies. I also have two more versions of the MPM kit sitting in stash to build at some stage. Here is the initial parts of the build including the wheel wells. The fuselage prior to painting. The fuselage after initial coat of SMS British Interior Green. I have added the pre painted PE and will be adding a few scratch built parts to make it look a fraction better prior to weathering the interior. The various interior bits that need to be completed then weathered prior to installation. Of course I still had to make up the interior of the wing light to add the wing light lens and PE.
  22. Dear fellow Britmodellers, here's my 1/72 Dragon Heinkel He-219 A2 in markings of NJG 3 in 1945. Painted with Mr.Hobby acrylics, photos by Wolfgang Rabel. The Dragon model was released in the early 1990s, but is still the best injection-moulded kit in 72 scale. It's age shows with plenty of ill-fitting parts, such as the canopy, wing-to-fuselage joint and panel lines which line up on the belly, but not on the spine. I added Eduard photo-etch for the interior and resin wheels from True Details. The kit's decals were unusable and had to be replaced with AIMS "Heinkel He-219 A" (72DO23). Upper surface camo was free-handed using my Harder & Steenbeck Evolution with 0.15mm needle. The radar antennas are included as photo-etch parts, their attachment requires a steady hand and lots of patience. There's mounting holes for the antenna arms on the nose, which theoretically set the correct angle. In practice this did not work, as I had filled the entire nose with lead shots to prevent a tail-sitter, and the plugs wouldn't go into position because of the inside ballast. All antennas had to be manually adjusted. The spinner spirals are decals, borrowed from an Eduard (Fw-190) kit: The Balkenkreuze on the lower surface were sprayed using a self-cut mask. This way I tried to avoid the dreaded "silvering" of carrier film that sometimes occurs on dark surfaces. Thank you for your interest in this topic! Best greetings from Vienna, Roman
  23. AH-1G Cobra Update Sets (for Special Hobby) 1:48 Eduard Special Hobby have launched a new range of 1:48 Cobras recently, much to the excitement of anyone that’s got a soft spot for the type, as there hasn’t been a new kit in years. Eduard's new range of sets are here to improve on the kit detail in the usual modular manner. Get what you want for the areas you want to be more of a focal point. As usual with Eduard's Photo-Etch (PE), 3D printed SPACE, Löök and Mask sets, they arrive in a flat resealable package, with a white backing card protecting the contents and the instructions that are sandwiched between. Update Set (491279) Two frets are included, one nickel-plated and pre-painted, the other in bare brass. A complete set of new layered instrument panels and side consoles with added levers for the cockpit and the extensive instrument panel for the rear cabin are in full colour, with a floor skin for both crew; added armoured side panels for the seats; an oval vent no the side of the fuselage; extra equipment in the rear shelf, and additional cockpit internal detail for the canopy roof and openers. The two ammunition paniers are detailed with extra parts that need some 0.3mm rod added as rollers and a replacement part for the ammunition feed that leads to the gun. On the underside of the tail boom a pair of oval surface panels are added appliqué style after removing the moulded-in detail. This will also make hiding the seams a much easier task, without caring if the kit detail is demolished during the process. Zoom! Set (FE1279) This set contains a reduced subset of the interior, namely the pre-painted parts that are used to improve on the main aspects of the cockpit, as seen above. Whatever your motivations for wanting this set, it provides a welcome boost to detail, without being concerned with the structural elements. SPACE 3D Printed Cockpit Decals (3DL48067) The Eduard SPACE sets use new 3D printing techniques that lay down successive layers of different colour resin, creating highly realistic almost full complete panels that are supplied on a decal sheet. They can depict metallic shades, plus glossy, satin and matt colours too, which really ups the detail on everything they print. In addition, a small sheet of nickel-plated and pre-painted PE is included for the aspects of the set that lend themselves better to this medium, such as seatbelts and rudder pedals. The PE sheet has two sets of seatbelts for the crew, plus backing parts for some of the decals to give them even more of a 3D look. The instrument panel decals are applied over the kit panels after removing the moulded-in detail, as are the side consoles. An equipment box is folded up from PE and covered by individual surfaces from the decal sheet, with another decal on a support on the windscreen frame. The same process occurs with some additional instruments on the other panels. Seatbelts STEEL (FE1280) These belts are Photo-Etch (PE) steel, and because of their strength they can be etched from thinner material, which improves realism and flexibility in one sitting. Coupled with the new painting method that adds perceived extra depth to the buckles and other furniture by shading, they are more realistic looking and will drape better than regular brass PE. As well as the two sets of crew belts there are comfort pads for under the furniture. Masks (EX862) Supplied on a sheet of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with a full set of masks for the canopy, with compound curved handled by using frame hugging masks, while the highly curved gaps are in-filled with either liquid mask or offcuts from the background tape. In addition, you get a set of hub/tyre masks for the wheels on the optional towing rig, allowing you to cut the demarcation perfectly with little effort. Masks Tface (EX863) Supplied on a two sheets of yellow kabuki tape, these pre-cut masks supply you with everything above, but also give you another set of canopy masks tailored to fit the interior of the glazing so that you can paint the interior and give your model that extra bit of realism. Review sample courtesy of
  24. EDUARD Eikó 1/48 - F-104J Starfighter F-104J was a version of the F-104G specifically built for interceptor role for the Japan Air Self-Defense Force. F-104J was armed with cannon and up to four sidewinders but lacked any strike capability. A total of 210 were built, most of them under license by Mitsubishi. A dual-control trainer version F-104Dj was also produced. The kit is Eduard 1/48 special edition box set which comes with some extra goodies. Also multiple paint schemes to choose from. Plastic parts are from Hasegawa - which should be a good kit apart from some excessive riveting. Not sure whether I will let that bother me. Hasegawa kit is fair bit older than the rather new Kinetic Starfighter but we will see how it holds up against it. I have built the Kinetic kit before but not Hasegawa. Some of the extra stuff that comes with the kit. Paint masks, resin ejection seat, PE cherry blossom and PE parts for the cockpit. Ejection seat is rather nice - even more so after some paint and PE harnesses. Some aftermarket stuff I got. Not sure whether the 'remove before flight' tags are correct for the Japanese machine but if not I will just leave them out. I also have some extra PE parts and resin pitot tube to spice things up. The kit not only comes with brilliant full color instruction booklet but with a reference book also. While I could do any of the paintjobs that come with the kit, these two catch my eye the most. High quality photos in the reference book. Pretty handy! This truly is pretty inspiring kit and I can't wait to do one of those Air Combat Meet -paintjobs on a Starfighter
  25. MICA RF/IR Missiles (648749 & 648750) 1:48 Eduard Brassin The MICA series of missiles are a French designed medium-range air-to-air (A2A) missile that is a fire-and-forget weapon that is capable of tracking multiple targets, including those behind the firing aircraft, which is sometimes referred to as over-the-shoulder targeting. They are available in Infrared (IR) or active radar (RF) flavours that are designed to resist counter-measures, filtering out the clutter to keep track of the selected target. They can also be launched vertically from ships or other installations as the VL MICA. There are two types available from Eduard, and those are the two airborne variants, both holding eight missiles, and all parts save for the IR seekers 3D printed directly on thin bases. As is now usual with Eduard's smaller resin sets, they arrive in the new shallow Brassin cardboard box, with the resin parts safely cocooned in bags, and the instructions folded around acting as padding. Each set has the missile bodies separately bagged from the nose cones and tails, and with my sample, a couple of the fins had been damaged due to the flexibility of the printing bases. They were simple to repair with super glue, but it may be worth the designers thickening the bases so that they aren’t able to flex and bang together in the bag. MICA RF Missile (648749) The main missile body is attached to the print-block by the front, and thanks to the way in which 3D printing is done, there is a socket waiting for you when you cut the body from the mount. This makes for much easier construction, and to test my theory I made one of the missiles up, which was extremely easy, fitting together perfectly without the use of glue. With a bit of super glue it will even stay together! That’s all there is to make one up, then following the painting instructions that are called out in the instructions, and the stencil instructions on the front page will see your missiles complete. Detail is excellent as usual. MICA IR Missile (648750) The missile body and exhaust parts are the same for this variant, with a different nose cone that has a socket in the front into which you slot the domed clear resin seeker window. Painting is different for the nose cone, having silver accents instead of a gold band. The stencils are subtly different too. Conclusion A couple of nice sets representing the most common MICA variants, with a generous eight missiles per set. With a thicker base plate to stop them clashing together in the box, the set would be perfect. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
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