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Found 9 results

  1. Focke Wulf FW C.30A Heuschrecke Late Prod (41018) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd There was a time when the Autogyro was looked at with great promise but the never materialised, The Avro licence built the Cierva C.30 designed by Juan de la Cieva. This was built from the fuselage of the Avro Cadet biplane and used an Armstrong Siddeley Genet Major engine. Lift was provided by an 11.3m diameter 3 bladed rotor. In Germany the Air Ministry thought as well that the Autogyro was the future for aviation. These were produced under licence by Focke Wulf using the AVRO pattern. The main difference between the early production models is the fuselage front of the pilots and the engine. The fate of these machines is not known. The Kit Until now I don't think there has been a kit of this in 1.35 scale. The kit is upto Minart's modern standards; there are 4 main sprues, 3 smaller sprues, a small clear spure and a sheet of photoetch in the box. Even in 1.35 scale this is not a large kit. Construction starts with the front mounted radial engine. The cylinder bank is made up fro individual cylinders, with the exhaust and collector ring being added. Ancillary parts are then attached to the engine and it is put aside for later. Construction then moves to the interior/cockpit. The two seats are made up complete with PE seatbelts. These then attach to their mounting frames. Onto the cockpit floor are mounted the rudder pedals and control column. Additional controls are added to the side frames and then these frames can be attached to the cockpit floor. Front and rear control panels are then added. The seats are added in and then the side frames added. The cockpit can then be closed up inside the main fuselage, Next up the mount for the rotor blades is made up and attached to the fuselage. The tail wheel assembly is added as are the tailplanes. The engine and its propeller are then added. The landing gear struts are made up and the wheels are added. Lastly the rotor blades are made up and added, these can either be in the flying or stowed positions. Markings There are two decal options provided on the sheet From the box you can build one of the following: D-EELA - Germany mid 1930's D-EIRO - Germany mid 1930s DE-TAX - Germany mid 1930s (Though the insignia would suggest Austria) Decals are printed by DecoGraph and have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion This is a really nice rendition of this unusual but important civil aircraft. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. Welcome to the Helicopter, Autogyro and STOVL GB. Duration: Saturday 27 June to Sunday 18 Oct 2020 Host: @JOCKNEY Co-Host: @Col. So all the usual rules apply but the most important one is to have fun and enjoy your own build and encourage everyone else with theirs, so the rules cover the usual points: 1) The subject of your chosen model has to be either a helicopter, an autogyro or a STOVL Aircraft. 2) The model kit and any aftermarket components can be of any scale or build material, additional GB points for Vacform and Scratch building. 3) All models must be less than 25% complete at the start of the build. If in doubt, please ask the GB hosts, we are very flexible as we want to see as many completed builds as possible. 4) All builds must have a WIP thread showing progress, models cannot go into the gallery unless there is a build thread for them. If you are building two or more similar models or there is a strong link between the subjects, then they may be combined in the same thread, or separately if you prefer. 5) No buying/wanted or selling in the GB please. Please use the buying and selling section in Britmodeller for this 6) There may be a poll to vote for your favourite build in the Gallery at the end of the GB. You do not have to put your competed build in the gallery or take part in the poll if you don't want to. 7) Please be polite and constructive with your comments to member’s build. I would encourage everyone to support others builds, lots a humour, and advice is the order of the day. Please do not leave comments in the Gallery thread but rather put them in the relevant subject thread. With so many different subjects to choose from this should be a really special GB. Good luck everyone Cheers Pat & Col
  3. Liore-Et-Oliver LeO C.30A Early Prod. (41007) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd There was a time when the Autogyro was looked at with great promise but the never materialised, The Avro licence built the Cierva C.30 designed by Juan de la Cieva. This was built from the fuselage of the Avro Cadet biplane and used an Armstrong Siddeley Genet Major engine. Lift was provided by an 11.3m diameter 3 bladed rotor. In Germany the Air Ministry thought as well that the Autogyro was the future for aviation and it was licence built Bu Forke Wulf.. Twenty-five aircraft were built in France by Lioré-et-Olivier as the LeO C.301 with a 175 hp (130 kW) Salmson 9NE 9-cylinder radial engine for the French and Belgian armed forces. The Kit Until now I don't think there has been a kit of this in 1.35 scale. The kit is upto Minart's modern standards; there are 4 main sprues, 4 smaller sprues, a small clear spure and a sheet of photoetch in the box. Even in 1.35 scale this is not a large kit. Construction starts with the front mounted radial engine. The cylinder banks are made up with the exhaust and collector ring being added. Ancillary parts are then attached to the engine and it is put aside for later. Construction then moves to the interior/cockpit. The two seats are made up complete with PE seatbelts. These then attach to their mounting frames. Onto the cockpit floor are mounted the rudder pedals and control column. Additional controls are added to the side frames and then these frames can be attached to the cockpit floor. Front and rear control panels are then added. The seats are added in and then the side frames added. The cockpit can then be closed up inside the main fuselage, Next up the mount for the rotor blades is made up and attached to the fuselage. The tail wheel assembly is added as are the tailplanes. At the front the engine cowl are is made up. The engine and its propeller are then added. The landing gear struts are made up and the wheels are added. Lastly the rotor blades are made up and added, these can either be in the flying or stowed positions. Markings There are two decal options provided on the sheet From the box you can build one of the following: F-407 French Air Force Late 1930s Belgian Army Artillery Observer Aircraft, Many 1940 352.8 352 Sqn French Naval Aviation, 1940 352.1 352 Sqn French Naval Aviation late 1930s Decals are printed by DecoGraph and have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Fished model picture from Miniart Conclusion This is a really nice rendition of this unusual but important civil aircraft. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Focke Wulf FW C.30A Heuschrecke (41012) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd There was a time when the Autogyro was looked at with great promise but the never materialised, The Avro licence built the Cierva C.30 designed by Juan de la Cieva. This was built from the fuselage of the Avro Cadet biplane and used an Armstrong Siddeley Genet Major engine. Lift was provided by an 11.3m diameter 3 bladed rotor. In Germany the Air Ministry thought as well that the Autogyro was the future for aviation. These were produced under licence by Focke Wulf using the AVRO pattern. The main difference being the use of a Siemens-Halske Sh 14 B radial engine. 40 were eventually ordered. The fate of these machines is not known. The Kit Until now I don't think there has been a kit of this in 1.35 scale. The kit is upto Minart's modern standards; there are 4 main sprues, 4 smaller sprues, a small clear spure and a sheet of photoetch in the box. Even in 1.35 scale this is not a large kit. Construction starts with the front mounted radial engine. The cylinder banks are made up with the exhaust and collector ring being added. Ancillary parts are then attached to the engine and it is put aside for later. Construction then moves to the interior/cockpit. The two seats are made up complete with PE seatbelts. These then attach to their mounting frames. Onto the cockpit floor are mounted the rudder pedals and control column. Additional controls are added to the side frames and then these frames can be attached to the cockpit floor. Front and rear control panels are then added. The seats are added in and then the side frames added. The cockpit can then be closed up inside the main fuselage, Next up the mount for the rotor blades is made up and attached to the fuselage. The tail wheel assembly is added as are the tailplanes. At the front the engine cowl are is made up. The engine and its propeller are then added. The landing gear struts are made up and the wheels are added. Lastly the rotor blades are made up and added, these can either be in the flying or stowed positions. Markings There are two decal options provided on the sheet From the box you can build one of the following: D-EKOP - Germany 1934 D-EKOM - Germany late 1930s Decals are printed by DecoGraph and have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion This is a really nice rendition of this unusual but important civil aircraft. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Avro Cierva C.30A Civilian Service (41006) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd There was a time when the Autogyro was looked at with great promise but the never materialised, The Avro licence built the Cierva C.30 designed by Juan de la Cieva. This was built from the fuselage of the Avro Cadet biplane and used an Armstrong Siddeley Genet Major engine. Lift was provided by an 11.3m diameter 3 bladed rotor. It was also used by the RAF, as well as civilian examples requisitioned, they purchased 12 of these under to equip the school of Army Co-operation. It was to be used for observation and light duties but was not taken any further in this role. It was the invention or Radar which was to find a wartime use for the 671. In order to calibrate the Chain Home stations the RAF needed an aircraft which could fly very slowly on a pre-defined heading and altitude. The RAF formed Flight 1448 at RAF Duxford to preform these duties. This later become 529 Sqn at RAF Halton. Post war 592 Sqn was disbanded and the gyro copters sold off. One of these was sold to Sweden and purchased back by the RAF Museum. The Kit Until now I don't think there has been a kit of this in 1.35 scale. The kit is upto Minart's modern standards; there are 4 main sprues, 4 smaller sprues, a small clear spure and a sheet of photoetch in the box. Even in 1.35 scale this is not a large kit. Construction starts with the front mounted radial engine. The cylinder banks are made up with the exhaust and collector ring being added. Ancillary parts are then attached to the engine and it is put aside for later. Construction then moves to the interior/cockpit. The two seats are made up complete with PE seatbelts. These then attach to their mounting frames. Onto the cockpit floor are mounted the rudder pedals and control column. Additional controls are added to the side frames and then these frames can be attached to the cockpit floor. Front and rear control panels are then added. The seats are added in and then the side frames added. The cockpit can then be closed up inside the main fuselage, Next up the mount for the rotor blades is made up and attached to the fuselage. The tail wheel assembly is added as are the tailplanes. At the front the engine cowl are is made up. The engine and its propeller are then added. The landing gear struts are made up and the wheels are added. Lastly the rotor blades are made up and added, these can either be in the flying or stowed positions. Markings There are four decal options provided on the sheet From the box you can build one of the following: LN-BAD Used to advertise Norwegian Tobacco Company Tiedemanns 1934 (mainly blue) VH-USQ private machine based in Marylands, Western Australia 1935. (mainly white) G-ACUT Cierva Flying School, UK 1930's (Mainly blue with Aluminium Engine covers) OK-ATD Used to advertise Bat'a Zlin, Czechoslovakia 1930s. (Green with white cheat line - as box art) Decals are printed by DecoGraph and have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion This is a really nice rendition of this unusual but important civil aircraft from the 1930s. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Avro 671 Rota Mk.I RAF (41008) 1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd There was a time when the Autogyro was looked at with great promise but the never materialised, The Avro 671 was a license built Cierva C.30 designed by Juan de la Cieva. This was built from the fuselage of the Avro Cadet biplane and used an Armstrong Siddeley Genet Major engine. Lift was provided by an 11.3m diameter 3 bladed rotor. The RAF purchased 12 of these under to equip the school of Army Co-operation. It was to be used for observation and light duties but was not taken any further in this role. It was the invention or Radar which was to find a wartime use for the 671. In order to calibrate the Chain Home stations the RAF needed an aircraft which could fly very slowly on a pre-defined heading and altitude. The RAF formed Flight 1448 at RAF Duxford to preform these duties. This later become 529 Sqn at RAF Halton. Post war 592 Sqn was disbanded and the gyro copters sold off. One of these was sold to Sweden and purchased back by the RAF Museum. The Kit Until now I don't think there has been a kit of this in 1.35 scale. The kit is upto Minart's modern standards; there are 4 main sprues, 4 smaller sprues, a small clear spure and a sheet of photoetch in the box. Even in 1.35 scale this is not a large kit. Construction starts with the front mounted radial engine. The cylinder banks are made up with the exhaust and collector ring being added. Ancillary parts are then attached to the engine and it is put aside for later. Construction then moves to the interior/cockpit. The two seats are made up complete with PE seatbelts. These then attach to their mounting frames. Onto the cockpit floor are mounted the rudder pedals and control column. Additional controls are added to the side frames and then these frames can be attached to the cockpit floor. Front and rear control panels are then added. The seats are added in and then the side frames added. The cockpit can then be closed up inside the main fuselage, Next up the mount for the rotor blades is made up and attached to the fuselage. The tail wheel assembly is added as are the tailplanes. At the front the engine cowl are is made up. The engine and its propeller are then added. The landing gear struts are made up and the wheels are added. Lastly the rotor blades are made up and added, these can either be in the flying or stowed positions. Markings There are four decal options provided on the sheet From the box you can build one of the following: K4230 used on HMS Courageous in the 1930s K4235 RAF Training use 1939-40 AP516 1448 Flight RAF Halton 1942 DR627 529 Sqn RAF Halton 1943-44 Decals are printed by DecoGraph and have good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion This is a really nice rendition of this unusual but important aircraft. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. Amodel is to release 1/72nd Kamov A-7 BIS and A-7-3A Soviet autogyro kits - ref.72257 & 72289 Source: http://hobbyterra.com/product/a-7bis-soviet-autogyro-amodel-72257.html Source: http://hobbyterra.com/product/a-7-3a-soviet-autogiro-amodel-72289.html V.P.
  8. This is the old Airfix kit of Wallis's autogyro, dressed up for the Bond film You Only Live Twice. Ken Wallis used to be proud of the fact the autogyro flew itself "hands off", but I doubt if he could have also fired guns, rockets and flamethrowers at the same time, as Sean Connery is doing in the box art: I scratch-built replacement front weapons pods, since the kit provided little spring-loaded rockets which may be remembered fondly but were thoroughly unrealistic. I added the pitot tube, lateral drift indicator tuft, and a support for the rotor spin up drive head, which weren't included in the kit, as well as a seat cushion and lap belt to hid the horrible kit seat base. I also added some of the more obvious cable runs - spark-plug leads, rudder cables, brake cables, and the control cables for the spin-up drive. And I made a couple of decals from a photograph of the real front weapons pods, to add a bit of detail. I wanted to model it with the rotor supports in place, and the pilot figure looked a bit daft sitting in an aircraft that obviously wasn't ready for flight, so I left him out. Even without the pilot, the kit wants to sit on its front wheel, whereas the real aircraft tilted back on its rear wheel when no-one was on board. So I slipped short lengths of 2mm brass rod into the hollow tubes of the rear flamethrowers before assembly (the only place to hide some weight), and that just tipped the balance in favour of a realistic "nose up" posture. Paint is Humbrol enamel and Alclad. I can't believe this was "Skill Level 2" on the box - it was a very fiddly build, with lots of parts having to marry up in complicated ways. I just hope I never meet a "Skill Level 4"!
  9. Hello folks, My entry is a little unusual. I have a weak spot for Autogyros. Fortunately for the BM universe, until now this affliction has not been thrust forth, up, down, port or starboard onto or into these hallowed digital pages. All that, is, I'm sad to say, going to change . KASKR-1 The Soviets sometimes had an interesting habit of, shall we say, building things following the lead, the example, of others. Their earliest, and even their second autogyro, both fit very well into this category of development. The most inspiring genius in this field, and the man regarded as the inventor of the Autogyro itself, was one Juan de la Cierva y Codorníu; Count de la Cierva of Mercia, Spain. His inventions, life in Spain, then life and untimely death in England, are described here, on Wikipedia: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_de_la_Cierva His Cierva C.6 autogiro design, first demonstrated to the Air Ministry in Farnborough, Hampshire, England in 1925, was based upon the fuselage and many other main components of the British Avro 504K biplane aircraft. Avro 504K British Trainer Aircraft (Wikipedia: Public Domain) The subsequent and more stable Cierva C.8 series Autogyros, were also based on the Avro 504K and derivatives such as the Avro 552 and Avro 504N (Cierva C.8L Mk II and III). Meanwhile, the Soviet Union, in addition to using a number of British built Avro 504K aircraft following the Great War, was producing its own copy; the Uchebnyi -1 (У-1) U-1 Avrushka ('Little Avro'). У-1 (Avrushka - 'Little Avro') Wikipedia Russia PD. In turn, as had been the case with the original Cierva C.6 and C.8 Autogyros and the Avro 504K derivative fuselages, the Soviets used a U-1 '504K copy' as the basis for their KaSkr-1, Cierva C8 based autogiro. It was virtually a copy of the Cierva C.8L Mk. III. The name designation was taken from the names of the designers: Kamov and N.K.Skrzhinskii. Known as 'Red Engineer' (Krasny Inzhener), a number of trials took place in this U-1 based Autogyro: This first version was not particularly successful, a full account of its flight achievements (or, sadly more correctly, lack of them), can be found here: http://www.aviastar.org/helicopters_eng/kamov_kaskr-1.php Everyone has to start somewhere and this airframe was subsequently modified into the KAСКP-2, a notably more successful autogyro. I will use Russian type designation from now on. The KAСКР-1 and KAСКР-2, and a number of other splendid Autogyros and exotic early Soviet aircraft are produced, in 1/72, by Amodel. People tend to love or hate early Amodel kits. They are short-run and often pose a number of challenges. The challenges can vary from batch to batch of the same kit, but in general, their kits are becoming, although still definitely 'short-run', easier to get together. I have always liked them; the unusual subjects and often bizarre challenges make them, to me, a little like a combination of a new kind of Rubik's cube, as yet unsolved, and a model kit. I don't always succeed in completing them. I still have a stalled thread here on Britmodeller involving three of their I-16's. Don't worry, that thread isn't over yet ! Here I will attempt to build this first Soviet autogyro,, replete with what appear to be washing lines with socks hanging off of them. OOB, exactly as you can see on the box-art: As the Australians here will understand, it is clear here that we can see the ghostly image of Stalin looking down, quite contentedly, as his socks dry on his design bureaux's first attempt at the 'Hill's hoist'. This design was subsequently exquisitely perfected in the antipodes for its designated purposes. To this day it is known to be capable of flight, given correct wind speed and direction: I am very much looking forward to the challenge(s) that I'm sure this kit will pose. As stated, it will be OOB and clean. All photographs I can find show it as a cared for and clean experimental prototype. I am behind with my modelling projects for a number of unavoidable (and mostly unpredictable) reasons, but hope to start this soon. I am struggling to find control panel decals for my F-111 before time runs out. For the DH Group Build, the recent announcement of a forthcoming 'twin-stage' Mosquito from Special Hobby, also has me rethinking sawing up a 'virgin' more or less mint collectible Matchbox Mozzie. Therefore, whilst I ponder those two, I will move ahead with my Jak - 23 for the Prototypes, World Firsts and Record Breakers GB, and in all likelihood, make a start on this on Saturday (Mrs. T has a coursework assignment to write that day). I hope this build will provide something a little different. Thank you for reading this far if you're still here , it would be lovely to have you on board Bye for now and have a nice Friday TonyT
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