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  1. Hallo Here I represent you the fourth P-38 Lightning out of a series of 5 aircraft. P-38L-1-LO s/n 44-23852 Beautiful Bitch Flown by Lt. John J. Kane of 96th FS / 82nd FG Vincenzo, Italy March 1945 This is my last kit is from Eduard. In my WIP I described all the working steps, my decisions and all shortcomings in every detail. I will here only explain my paint job and final assembly. During my build I improved some steps from my last P-38. Specially the cockpit. The worst thing like last time is the Revi installation. This time I failed, the armor glass is in position. I used C8 from Gunze and SM201 as well GX range for some weathering. At the very finish I used black highly diluted as overspray. So have a look: Happy modelling
  2. Hello The question that arises from a simple fact. After recently observing the weather in the Pacific and the many islands, a simple question arises for me: How many pilots of the fighting armed forces had to lose their lives in the Pacific region due to metrological issues? Navigation when no horizon line is visible anymore, the rain fronts and storm fronts that blur all contours. The islands where the clouds are constantly crowding, day and night. Electronic homing devices may be of some help. If I take the idea further and then ask the question, how many aircraft were lost due to technical errors? In this environment. As a conclusion, every war seems even more pointless to me. The fight against nature makes the fight against the enemy take a back seat. Does any of you have numbers and facts on this topic? Happy modelling
  3. Hallo This is the P-38L-5-LO 44-26176 Vagrant Virgin coded A flown by Lt. Peter Macgowan of 36th FS 8th FG Ie Shima September 1945 This model was the 3rd Eduard-Acadamy hybrid kit. Everything which showed up is told in my previous RFI and my WIP. Here I faced first time on this type the pure aluminum coat. Together with black anti-glare and white outline. It was a nice challenge. Look at the outcome and enjoy it! Happy modelling
  4. Hallo Here I represent you the second P-38 Lightning out of a series of 5 aircraft. P-38G-15LO, 43-2475, 48th FS/14th FG El Bathan, Thunesia, second half of June 1943, Babe, flown by Edgar L. Yarberry The kit is from Eduard. In my WIP I described all the working steps, my decisions and all shortcomings in every detail. I will here only explain my paint job and final assembly. The BIG difference are decals and stencils. Here I used EXITO Decals of superb quality. Also from Hobby Decal the dry transfers. During my build I improved some steps from my first P-38. Specially the cockpit. The worst thing like last time is the Revi installation. This time I failed, the armor glass is in position. The painting was done with a mixture of OD 1 from Gunze C12 and some brown C79. Highly diluted of course. The neutral grey also, as C13. The shading in brighter and darker shades with white or yellow for OD, for neutral grey with white and darker with some black added. Again all highly diluted. The weathering I did with salt. In detail explained in WIP. At the very finish I used black highly diluted as overspray. So have a look: Happy modelling
  5. Hallo Here I represent you the first P-38 Lightning out of a series of 5 aircraft. P-38G, 42-2197, 80 FS/8 FG New Guinea, 1943/44, 'Nulli Secundus / X-Virgin' The kit is from Eduard. In my WIP I described all the working steps, my decisions and all shortcomings in every detail. I will here only explain my paint job and final assembly. The painting was done with a mixture of OD 1 from Gunze C12 and some brown C79. Highly diluted of course. The neutral grey also, as C13. The shading in brighter and darker shades with white or yellow for OD, for neutral grey with white and darker with some black added. Again all highly diluted. The chipping of the weathering I did with salt. In detail explained in WIP. At the very finish I used black highly diluted as overspray. So have a look: Happy modelling
  6. Hallo This kit is from Dora Wings and represents a P-47C in 1/48 from the early operational days. The kit and his features are all described in my WIP here. This kit is a short run kit, but for this it was a joy! This particular aircraft was piloted from Kenneth Peterson from the 363rd FS in the 4th FG. The serial was 41-6539. Have a look and enjoy: Happy modelling
  7. Hallo This kit is from Tamiya and represents a P-47D in 1/48 from the mid operational days. The kit and his features are all described in my WIP here. This kit was a joy to build. This particular aircraft was piloted from Fred Christensen from the 62th FS in the 56th FG. The serial was 42-26628. Have a look and enjoy: Happy modelling
  8. Hallo This kit is from Tamiya and represents a P-47M in 1/48 from the late operational days. The kit and his features are all described in my WIP here. This kit was a joy to build! This particular aircraft was piloted from Leo Butiste from the 62nd FS in the 56th FG. The serial was 44-1199. Have a look and enjoy: Happy modelling
  9. Hallo This kit is from Tamiya and represents a P-47D in 1/48 from the early operational days. The kit and his features are all described in my WIP here. This kit was a joy to build. This particular aircraft was piloted from Howard Curran from the 510th FS in the 405th FG. The serial was 42-26249. It was used in ground operations. Have a look and enjoy: Happy modelling
  10. Hallo This kit is from MiniArt and represents a P-47D in 1/48 from the mid operational days. The kit and his features are all described in my WIP here. This kit was the most difficult one to build! Not the aircraft was the problem, the kit design was the problem! This particular aircraft was piloted from Ben Mayo from the 82nd FS in the 78th FG. The serial was 42-26671. Have a look and enjoy: Happy modelling
  11. Hallo My basic question is concerned to the surface of the P-47. We know, that two basic options are there. Olive Drap or metal. To the metal option: Are there parts of the wings like on the P-51 which are covered with lacquer? Is the wing surface realy pure metal or are some parts grinded and filled with puty and again grinded to get a lacquer surface? If it is so, does anyone have a drawing according to it? Thanks in forward! Happy modelling
  12. Hi, I'd quite like to scratch build a WW2 Airfield USAAF control tower. Does anyone have and plans references i could perhaps use to scale a model.. 1:72 and or 1:48 scale would be my preferences. I've had a look online but can't see anything suitable.. Cheers Regards, Andy
  13. I'm currently modelling subjects used by U.S. forces, and that means I'm going to need some kits of specific British-built aircraft. A fresh order of decals has prompted me to look more closely at the Spitfire Mark Vb. I really only know the basics about Spits and even less regarding the available 1/72 representations. Although due diligence demanded some basic research in this department before starting a new topic, digesting the available information can be likened to drinking from a fire hose. Please forgive me restating this question directly as I'm sure the topic is old hat for the bona fide afficionado. From what I've been able to glean, the Tamiya kit goes together well but has some shape issues (though no reviewer in my quick survey seems to state precisely what these issues are) and the Italeri kit is good WRT to shape, but doesn't go together so well. I like the newest generation of Airfix kits, but apparently their Mk. Vb is an older issue? Do the latest small-run kits from eastern Europe stack up well? I appreciate any light to be shed, and again, I apologise if this seems an oblivious inquiry.
  14. Dear fellow Britmodellers, here's my 1/72 Arma Hobby P-51C Mustang in markings of 382nd Fighter Squadron, 363rd Fighter Group, in France 1944. I built from the "Expert Set", photographs by Wolfgang Rabel. A full build review will be featured in an upcoming edition of Phoenix Aviation Modelling magazine. Thank you for your interest, best greetings from Vienna Roman
  15. A 1/48 scale Tamiya kit build of Major George Bostwick’s extremely colourful P-47M ‘Hotrod’ Thunderbolt as it was in mid-1945 after shooting down a Messerschmitt Me-262A jet. To celebrate this feat, it was marked with the addition of a black cowling band to the already colourful 56th Fighter Group dark blue and light blue scheme. Spent rather longer on the weathering and chipping than usual for this build as without it, this scheme tended to look rather too ‘cartoony’ for my taste. Pleased with the end result though 🙂
  16. Dear fellow Britmodellers, here's my 1/72 Revell P-47D Thunderbolt, built from the box. I received this kit from the legacy of a fellow IPMS club member. The kit's box was badly crushed and torn, and every time I saw it in my stash I felt sorry for it. Looking for a 'quick build', I moved it to the workbench. The Revell model was released 20 years ago: https://www.scalemates.com/de/kits/revell-04155-republic-p-47d-30-thunderbolt--107126 It still holds up well today, with nice details and clean mouldings, and is a cheaper alternative to the Tamiya kit. Markings represent "Chuck's Wagon", an aircraft of 362nd Fighter Group, operating from Rouvres aifield (allied code A.82) in early 1945. The decals are from Eagle Strike (#72058, "362nd FG Jugs Pt.II"). Painted with Tamiya, Mr.Hobby and Alclad II. Photographs by Wolfgang Rabel. "Chuck's Wagon" carried colorful wheel hubs. These were punched from plastic sheet and painted according to instructions. Thank you for your interest. Best greetings from Vienna! Roman
  17. I like the music of Cole Porter, and one day maybe a week ago the words "Night and day..." lead in my mind to a Group Build idea. But to the point: Night and Day GB. The Allied combined bombardment campaign to defeat the Axis and its industrial heart and logistic veins. Why not bleed their air force white too, conveniently along the way. Achieve this with British by night, Americans by day, hammering the enemy Night and Day. Adding Little Friends as they came along, from the early Spitfire escort reaching the Netherlands to Mustangs all the way to Berlin and back. Not forgetting the photo recon Mosquitos, Lightnings and Spitfires that brought back valuable information about the effects of the bombing. Assembly ships and Pathfinders too, of course. And the Dambusters! On the other side of the table, Jagdwaffe, with anything they ever could send up in the air to defend Das Reich. Night and Day. The wild boars and the tame ones. Rocket firing dayfighters to break them up and ones with antitank guns to do havoc in a tight combat box formation. The Schräge Musik, btw, that's jazz. A lot of metal in the air too, known as the notorious Flak, so the German AAA and ground radar equipment are eligible if that's your interest. And the night fighters chasing other night fighters, the choices are endless...less...less... So how'd this sound for 2022? 1) V-P the host 2) MarkSH 3) Col. the co-host 4) Antoine 5) Corsairfoxfouruncle 6) Rabbit Leader 7) Arniec 8. trickyrich 9) Ol' Scrapiron 10) CliffB 11) Silenoz 12) Wez 13) TEMPESTMK5 14) Mottlemaster 15) Hockeyboy76 16) JOCKNEY 17) specky 18) Peter Lloyd 19) Valkyrie 20) Muddyf 21) Redstaff 22) BerndM 23) PhantomBigStu 24) Paul821 25) alt-92 26) franky boy 27) Greg Destec 28) modelling minion 29) Tim R-T-C 30) Stefan Buysse ... thank you all! 31) Work In Progress 32) Davey Gair 33) wimbledon99 34) Bill Davis 35) Richard Tucker 36) Rafwaffe 37) ...
  18. An interesting but very sad website. In addition to the hundreds of thousands of aircraft sold and scrapped here in the U.S. there were numerous sites around the world where aircraft were not flown back to America, but were scrapped in place; in the PTO aircraft were either dumped offshore or were parked in long trenches and covered by bulldozers. I can remember seeing C-82's, BT-13's, and T-6's parked in the grass behind the aprons at the San Antonio Municipal Airport awaiting sale and/or disposal in the 50's. Amazing that Paul Mantz bought almost 500 aircraft in one purchase; he kept eleven, drained the others of their avgas, which he sold, and then sold the remaining aircraft for scrap. If only Paul Allen had been alive with his fortune back then, or if Hap Arnold's wishes for a postwar military aviation museum had been followed... Mike https://www.airplaneboneyards.com/post-wwii-military-airplane-boneyards.htm
  19. Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vb (A50125A) 1:48 Airfix The Spitfire is perhaps one of the best known and well-loved aircraft in Britain, and deservedly so for its work in the Battle of Britain alongside the doughty Hurricane. It thrived in its point-defence role, and shone during its finest hour, then on through many versions and types to the end of WWII and beyond. The Mk.I was predictably the first in-service type, and sported eight .303 Browning machine guns, and by the time hostilities commenced in 1939 many of them were using the blown canopies that gave the pilot a better field of view with less likelihood of smacking his head against the glazing. The Mk.I was superseded by the Mk.II, Mk.III, and then the Mk.V due to the introduction of the Focke Wulf Fw.190 by the Germans that gave the British Spitfire pilots a nasty shock when they first encountered it. The Mk.V gave them the extra horsepower to cope with these pugnacious little fighters, and so the tactical leapfrog continued to the end of the war with the Mk.22/24 being the last mark of the Spitfire with cut-down fuselage, bubble canopy and the monstrous power of the Griffon engine in front of the pilot with all the torque steer he could handle. The Kit This is a reboxing of Airfix’s recent Mk.V that has been given new decals and box art to depict it as a couple of different aircraft, and leaves the tropical filter parts in the box. It arrives in a standard Airfix red-themed top-opening box, with five sprues of light grey styrene inside, a clear sprue, decal sheet and the spot-colour instructions that have a colour painting guides on the rear pages. It brings with it all the detail you would expect from a recent Airfix tooling, and the knowledge that if you want more detail, the aftermarket industry will be there to help you out if you don’t fancy the DIY option. It shares a lot of parts with the rebox of the Mk.Ia we reviewed recently, which is to be expected due to their common heritage. Construction begins with the cockpit interior, which consists of two inner skins that are decorated with the usual items we all probably know and recognise instantly. The pilot's chair is made from an L-shaped seat with separate sides, that is mounted on an armour panel, with the adjustment lever on the right side. The frame behind the pilot has moulded-in lightening holes that you can either fill with wash or drill out at your whim, then add the seat frame and head-armour, finally fitting the seat to the frame on its four corners. The rudder pedal assembly goes through a section of the wing spar and has separate pedals that you should leave off if you are intending to fit the pilot, and the control column with separate top is planted in the middle of the sub-assembly. The instrument panel is glued to the next frame forward and has a nice decal with just the dials printed and an outline to help locate it correctly on the panel. A little decal solution should help that to settle down into the recesses nicely. The compass attaches to the rear of the panel, and is then inserted into the port cockpit side along with the rudder pedal assembly and a lever, allowing the two halves to be joined and a front firewall bulkhead to be fitted to close in the foot well. Then the seat assembly and next frame to the rear are slotted into the grooves, and your optional pilot with his two separate arms can be placed in if you’re using him. Before inserting the cockpit tub you need to paint the interior of the fuselage above the waistline, and remove a small part of the sill if you are posing the canopy closed. Then it slips inside the starboard fuselage half along with an oxygen bottle, and the port side is joined up together with an insert in front of the canopy, which is where the fuel tank filler is found. You can also cut out the access door on the left side of the fuselage, bearing in mind that you have a new door on the sprue so you can be a bit brutal in removing the plastic. The wings are built next, and the full-width lower wing has two circular bay walls fitted along with a section of the front spar, before the rear spar and front extensions are also attached to stiffen the wing. The tops of the gear legs are inserted into recesses in the bay, then it’s just a case of popping on the upper wings and moving on to joining them to the fuselage after making sure you’ve fitted the light in the belly first. The elevator fins are slotted into the tail at 90o to the rudder fin, then the flying surfaces are added with any deflection that you might wish to portray, remembering that some smart-alec will always complain if you don’t also offset the control column and rudder pedals too. The ailerons are also separate and can be posed with the same caveats applied. Under the nose the chin-insert is glued in, noting the Dzuz fastenings there and on the side cowlings. They could possibly stand a very slight flatting down to look less like semi-flush donuts, but maybe that’s just me. Under the leading edge of the wing there is a two-part intake, then the square radiator bath with textured radiator panels and tubular oil-cooler are added to their recesses, with optional open or closed cooling flaps on the rear of the radiator. The tail wheel was still fixed in the Mk.V, so slots into a hole under the tail, and you then have the choice of wheels up or down. In-flight a small portion of the wheels can still be seen, so Airfix have provided a slim wheel to put on the doors so that a realistic look is obtained. For the wheels down option, you have separate struts and doors, which slot into the top-sections already within the bay and have a pair of tyres with separate hubs added, making sure that the slightly flattened section is facing the floor. A pair of scrap diagrams show the correct angles from the front and sides to help with positioning. A T-shaped pitot probe goes under the wing, then the triple-fishtail exhaust stubs are glued into the nose and the long-fairing equipped cannons, joined by a one-piece triple-bladed prop, two-part spinner, and three parts that permit the prop to spin if you don’t flood it with glue. You then have a choice of open or closed canopies, using a three-part assembly plus rear-view mirror for open, and two-part plus mirror for closed. You did remember to paint and fit the clear reflector gunsight, didn’t you? The open option also allows the door to be posed down, which as previously mentioned uses a new part. There is an aerial mast behind the cockpit with small teardrop light, with a little look at your references showing where to string the antennae wires. Markings There are two decal options in the box, one of which is an American airframe with early stars painted over the roundels, the other in British roundels but with an American at the helm. From the box you can build one of the following: ‘Buckeye Don’ Flown by 2nd Lieutenant Don Gentile, 336 Fighter Squadron, USAAF, RAF Debden, North Essex, England, 1942 Aircraft flown by Sqn.Ldr. Eric Hugh Thomas, No.133 (Eagle) Squadron, RAF Biggin Hill, England, April 1942 Decals are by Cartograf, which is a guarantee of good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. Conclusion A welcome reboxing of this recent tool from Airfix, and the American decal options should appeal to our colonial cousins from across the pond. Detail is good, and you’ll be left with a number of spare parts for the parts bin. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  20. An old and flawed kit, but one that has a special place in the memory banks for me – when I was 12 we were told we could have a home made mascot on our desks for end of primary school exams. I persuaded my parents to get me a Flying Fortress model kit for my 13th birthday and by exam season it was ready. Despite my teachers’ horror at such an oversized mascot, they were amused enough at the odd child with the plane to let it slide, and it sat on my desk proudly for my entire Common Entrance exams (which went well enough to get into the school I wanted). Despite many moves since, I still have the old B-17 ‘Memphis Belle’ sat in my workshop at aged 30, looking more than a little tired. So I figured since I’d got back into model making after a 10 year absence about 3 years ago; it would be a nice thing to find the same very old Revell kit and make it again – to keep the old and the new side by side. I don’t normally do 1:72 scale as I find weathering effects tricky when going below 1:48, and the detail starts to go. Am really pleasantly surprised by how this came out though – despite the atrocious kit transparencies, lackluster detail which necessitated quite a bit of scratch built detail near the windows, and the strange panel texture on the nose. One issue was right at the end, I dropped superglue on the right wing when trying to rig up the radio aerials, which left a very ugly mark and meant I had to eventually sand down and paint over the whole panel. I couldn’t match the colour or weathering again so I tried instead to represent a battle-damage replacement panel with un-faded Olive Drab. Short video build summary video is available on my YouTube channel if folk are interested - BritFlyer.
  21. I recently completed my first 1:48 scale Tamiya ' Bubbletop ' P47-D I rather liked this kit so i decide i'd perhaps buy another one. However, i saw a Hobbyboss kit online and thought i'd have a go at this instead. It was a lot cheaper than the Tamiya offering ( whichit'self is superb!). I thought i'd start a new build with this HobbyBoss offering. Here's the kit out of the box as a starting point It looks to be quite a nice kit for the money. Crisp mouldings. NO flash. small pieces are very good. The plastic is nice quality. The engravings are light but appear to be recessed. It's limited in comparison with the Tamiya offering.. No options to add rockets / pylons / bombs or the under-wing drop tanks. (This isn't a problem of course as the 2 examples to build to are probably Escort fighter configurations.) A lot of scope for cockpit improvement here! The seat lacks the upright supports.. but have a pair of these from the a Tamiya kit in spares. No details to speak of for the cockpit side controls and gear.. No pilot figure. A one piece canopy - would have to cut the canopy to do this as an open canopy model. The canopy moulding is actually very nice with very well cast ,slightly lipped dividing lines between Perspex and metal. Looking forward to starting the build .. will decide what options i'll add myself..
  22. Dear fellow Britmodellers, here's my 1/72 KP Cessna UC-78A in USAAF Colors, representing an aircraft of 405th Fighter Group in 1944. The KP kit seems to be a re-box of the Pavla moulds, originally released in the late 1990s. Fit is generally good, but I noticed some surface irregularities, especially on the wings. These are easily corrected with sanding sticks. The clear parts are relatively thick, which resulted in unpleasant light fames around the side windows - I should have painted the fames in a dark color before attaching the clear parts! I've added brake lines from stretched sprue. The model was painted with Gunze/Mr.Hobby acrylics, all photographs by Wolfgang Rabel. Thank you for your interest in this topic. Best greetings from Vienna, Roman
  23. Dear fellow Britmodellers, here's my latest, the 1/72 Airfix B-17G (new tool) built from the box with the addition of photo-etch-seatbelts from my spares box. "Mah Ideel" operated with 401st Bomb Squadron, 91st Bomb Group, out of Bassingbourn/Cambridgeshire in fall of 1944. The model was painted with Alclad II lacquers and Gunze/Mr.Hobby acrylics. All photographs by Wolfgang Rabel. Thank you for your interest in this topic. Best greetings from Vienna Roman
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