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Found 1,495 results

  1. This was a little simple project to keep me out of trouble over Christmas and has just been finished. The Revell Snaptite Ford Expedition in 1/25, it comes all black with stickers for the white bits in it's intended police car model. The CFD decals are old ones from Chimneyville and the lightbar comes from the Ghostbusters model.It was brush painted using Humbrol enamels and finished with Winsor & Newton Galeria varnishes which were also brushed on. Because it was a simple idea I didn't bother with an interior although the model comes with some bits to put in the back, so I opted for some (heavily) tinted glass. Chicago 51 - 1 by phil da greek, on Flickr Chicago 51 - 2 by phil da greek, on Flickr Chicago 51 - 3 by phil da greek, on Flickr Chicago 51 - 4 by phil da greek, on Flickr Thanks for looking.
  2. Just completed this one for the B17 STGB, Revells B17F boxing come with the parts for an "E" model in the box. The kit itself is showing the moulds age, lots of flash to clean up and lots of filler along the fuselage seam but lots of detail inside. That said Revells instruction about interior colours are wrong in a lot of places but I didn't find out until after the fuselage was built. If I do another B17 I would correct the inaccuracies such as the floor in the rear missing, ammo storage box locations, missing air bottles, cockpit and bombardiers station. Tamiya acrylics and some oil paint on underside, kits decals for the stars and serial no made from 2 serial numbers (thanks to Shelliecool) Old Maid done with home made stencil. Build WIP is here. As usaual any comments welcome. IMGA0659 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0660 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0661 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0662 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0663 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0664 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0666 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0667 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0668 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0669 by neil Connor, on Flickr
  3. Tornado GR.1 "Gulf War" (03892) 1:32 Revell After the debacle that was the cancellation of the TSR.2, the European nations aligned (for once) in the common need for a new Multi-Role fighter, and partnerships began forming an dissolving, resulting in the joining of British Aerospace (now BAe), Aeritalia and MBB of Italy and Germany, who formed the Panavia company with a view to creating a Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MRCA). The basic design was a swing-wing airframe to provide good handling at high and low speeds, but with the usual problem of goal-posts being moved, layering additional requirements upon the project that resulted in a larger airframe. The MRCA first flew in the early 70s, powered by two Rolls Royce RB199 engines, and looking very much like a Tornado, replete with the two seats that were a bone of contention at one point. By the late 70s there were initial airframes with the British and German air forces, and training was undertaken at a joint base at Cottesmore, which stayed open until the beginning of the end of the Tornado in British service. During service in the RAF it fought in almost all conflicts, except for the Falklands, where the tried and trusted Vulcans were dragged from the brink of retirement, rather than use an as-yet untested airframe so far away from home. The Gulf War, the Kosovo war and subsequent peace-keeping duties, and Kuwait were amongst the most well-known operations the GR.1 was present for. In the 1990s the original GR.1s and 1As were upgraded to GR.4/4A standard, which involved many changes to the avionics and a broadening of the weapons it could carry. The GR.4 saw the RAF to the end of service, with the EF2000 Typhoon, another collaboration with European companies taking its place. The Kit This is of course a reboxing of the pre-millennial tooling from Revell with new decals for the Gulf War aircraft, which are probably the most popular options for a Tonka with many folks for their own reasons. The original kit is around 20 years old now, and is a very good product of its day, with engraved panel lines, a decent level of detail, and a wide range of aftermarket now available. Where it does suffer is the intakes, which are hollow, but have no internal trunking, leaving interior and the wing-swing mechanism visible if you don't cover them with FOD guards. The kit arrives in one of Revell's preferred top opening boxes with seven large sprues in light blue-grey styrene (one cut in half), two of clear parts, the instruction booklet and a colourful decal sheet. It's been a while since I've perused the sprues of this kit, and I was pleasantly surprised at how modern it looks, with fine engraved panel lines and raised details, a full set of fuel tanks and weaponry, and some good interior detail that will suffice for many, or act as a jumping-off point for detail hounds. This boxing has the additional parts for the GR.1, which also includes the small clear additional sprue, and while not new it does give the modeller a more accurate finished result. Construction begins with the two Martin-Baker seats, which are provided with slightly anaemic moulded-in seatbelts that could do with replacing after being scraped off with a sharp blade. The instrument panels are decent, and with the addition of the rather nice instrument panel decals, they should please a lot of builders. This carries over to the side consoles that are moulded into the cockpit tub, which is topped and tailed with bulkheads, panels, control columns and rudder pedals before the seats are added, and the single-part nose gear bay is attached underneath. This part suffers a little from mould-damage inside, with some scuffing in between the ribbing on the bay roof. Whether this will ever be seen is moot, but it is worth knowing about in advance. The completed assembly is then trapped between the two nose halves, the extra equipment and coaming between the two crew is added, and the HUD on the pilot's coaming is also constructed from two half ramps and a clear part. The nose cone is separate, and a basic representation of the radar is provided, with nose-weight of 55g suggested to prevent having a tail-sitter on your hands. Leaving the nose cone closed gives you a lot more space further toward the front of the airframe, losing out on only a little detail and preserving the lines of the aircraft. The nose cone is moulded as a single part, with an additional ring that attaches to the rear, and either hinges open to reveal the radar, or is fitted shut as already mentioned. The Tornado is a variable-geometry fighter, with wings that can swing back and forth, requiring the weapons pylons to also be able to rotate to follow the line of flight. Revell's engineers have managed to mimic the wing swing in styrene, but you will need to be careful with the glue and paint if you want to retain that past the build stage. The pylons are built up first, and have pivots and cams moulded into the tops, which will allow you to move the pylons manually later, while the wings have a sector cog on their roots, which mesh together, and permit their synchronised pivoting once they are in the fuselage. They are formed into an assembly by the addition of a rail top and bottom, and are then set to the side while the elevators and main fuselage are made up. The lower fuselage has the main gear bays fitted to the apertures, the wing-root gloves added to the sides, and a bulkhead with simple engine faces moulded into the front. The inflatable bags that seal the wing against the fuselage during pivoting are simple plastic, which might not suit modellers looking for accuracy, as their shape changes with the angle of the wing. There are aftermarket parts to help out here if you don't feel up to the task of adapting them yourself, but if you want to leave the wings able to pivot, you'll have to leave the parts as standard. The wings and elevators are then fitted into the lower half and the upper section is dropped on top, with a pair of holes drilled in the spine for the later fitting of a couple of blade antennae. One of the Tornado's nicknames (of unknown origin) is the Fin, due to the massive tail fin that makes it easy to see across a busy airfield. It has two main parts, plus an electronics lump on the leading edge, a hollow intake at the root, and a pen-nib fairing at the bottom of the moulded-in rudder. The twin exhausts are moulded with their trunking integrally, and these two parts drop into the rear fairing, which has much of the thrust-reversing bucket structure moulded-in, with two small parts between the exhausts added to depict the mechanism, and a pair of exhaust petals that finish off the area. With this last subassembly completed, the nose, fuselage, tail and exhausts are brought together, and joined by the two substantial intake ramps that fix to the fuselage sides via two pegs, and should stand proud of the upper fuselage by a fraction by design. The internal ramps inside the intake are separate to the main parts, but the trunking finishes there, which is why you'll see a lot of Tornados with FOD guards in place at model shows. At the rear the two air-brakes are separate, with an actuator jack each to set them to the correct angle, but they are equally at home flush with the fuselage to retain the clean lines of the aircraft. The tricycle landing gear of the Tonka is well-depicted, with a single strut at the nose, with twin wheels that have a flat-spot to depict weight. The bay doors all attach to the edges by small tabs, which are cut off if you plan on modelling your Tornado wheels up. The main gear struts are similarly detailed, with the forest of hoses moulded-in and the retraction mechanism shown in detail. Each leg has one larger tyre, which are also weighted for realism, and the same bay doors can be used in-flight as well as with the gear down. The nose of the Tornado is festooned with aerials and the distinctive FLIR pod with its clear window are supplied, plus various other aerials around the airframe. The rather "scabbed-on" refuelling probe runs down the cockpit side, and can be posed opened or closed next to the canopy, which is moulded in windscreen and canopy parts, with a support included to prop the canopy open. Apart from some small parts on the tail, the airframe is now complete, and it's a case of choosing a weapons load-out, which Revell have been proactive about, and have supplied three different options for you to choose from. You can of course go your own way too, but having three actual loads to choose from is a good start. The first item are the centreline rails, which need some holes drilling according to a diagram. They are detailed with cleats and shackles, then all three are glued to the flat underside of the fuselage ready for your chosen load. Included in the box are the following: 2 x 1,500L tank 1 x BOZ 101 chaff and flare pod AIM-7L Sidewinder A2A missile 1 x Sky Shadow ECM pod 2 x 2,250L tank 2 x 1,000lb LGB 4 x 1,000lb iron bomb Markings There are two options in the box, and you'd be right if you guessed that they were both painted in desert pink. From the box you can build one of the following: "Foxy Killer" RAF detatchment, Tabuk AB, Saudi Arabia 1991 "Nikki" RAF detatchment, Muharraq AB, Bahrain 1991 The decals are printed in Italy for Revell by Zannetti, in good registration, sharpness and colour density, with a thin matt/gloss carrier film cut close to the printed areas. The weapons are shown on the last page of the markings guide, with stencils provided on the sheet. Conclusion If you want a 1:32 Tornado, then this is the one. It's an older model, but it checks out with a few caveats mentioned above. It's still a good kit, decent value, and boy does it look smart once built up. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  4. Boeing 747-8 Lufthansa New Livery (03891) 1:144 Revell At the end of September 1968, Boeing revealed to gathered crowds at its Everett factory, an aircraft that would forever change the world of air travel. Taking advantage of the new generation of high by-pass turbofan engines capable of huge power output compared to the previously available power units, Boeing unveiled the B747 which would become affectionately known as the ‘Jumbo Jet’ due to its immense proportions. Designs for the new Boeing747 had actually been started three years earlier when engineer Joe Sutter approached the airlines to discuss their proposals with the companies that would actually buy the aircraft, and it was to be the Pan Am CEO, Juan Trippe, that had the greatest influence in the final design. Although intended from the outset to be a passenger aircraft, it was decided early in the design phase to ensure that the aircraft should be easily adaptable to a freighter; a decision that was to prove fortunate in later years. The original high wing designs were discounted in favour of the more popular low wing position, and at the request of Juan Trippe, various options in upper deck layouts were explored. These designs led to the now familiar ‘hump’, a feature that in no way detracts from the graceful lines of the aircraft that was finally rolled out at the end of September 1968, and provided the airlines with the first jet powered airliner capable of carrying more than 400 passengers. Over the next three decades, the original design was further modified by the enlargement of the upper deck and the introduction of improved engines and avionics. Probably the most radical change made to the airframe was with the introduction of the 747SP which featured a significantly shorter fuselage and a re-designed wing targeted at the short to medium haul and high density routes. In 1988, Boeing rolled out yet another variant in the shape of the -400 series, but it was not until November 2005 that the subject of this kit, the Boeing 747-8 family was launched. Incorporating advanced technology developed for the 787 Dreamliner, the first -8 model to fly was the freighter with Cargolux being the launch customer and taking delivery of its first aircraft in February of 2010. The 747-8i, the passenger version, made its maiden flight in March of the following year with the first delivery to an undisclosed private customer made in February 2012. Lufthansa, the original launch customer took delivery of their first aircraft in April of the same year. On June 28th. 2014. Boeing reached a significant milestone when the deliveries of the 747 totalled 1,500 aircraft. Deliveries of the 747-8 have been relatively slow with only just over 150 examples of both the freighter and passenger version ordered with only three national carriers taking options on the passenger version at the time of writing. (Preamble text courtesy of @stringbag) The Kit This is a reboxing of Revell's well-liked 2012 era 747 kit with a newly tooled -8i fuselage and new decals depicting the new, modern livery that was first unveiled in May 2018. Inside the top-opening box (yes, you read that right) are two fuselage parts, seven sprues of white styrene, three clear sprues, a long sheet of decals and the instruction booklet. The model is well-detailed, with fine engine components, engraved panel lines, landing gear bays and even a cockpit part, with the copyright marking on the inner wing showing 2012. The fuselage has open windows along the side, with clear parts that are applied inside, so if you plan on using alternate solid porthole decals (some folks do), you'll need to fill and smooth them out. It's probably not all that often a civilian aircraft review starts with the words "construction begins with the cockpit", but this one does. There is a tub that includes seats and instrument coaming moulded-in, plus a rear bulkhead with crew door moulded-in, which you are instructed to paint up with basic colours. If you're building it with the wheels down, you'll need to build the gear bays, which have some nice ribbing detail moulded-in, and add the landing gear legs, which are really well-detailed for the scale, with brake detail and retraction jacks worthy of a larger scale. The windows, gear bays and the cockpit tub are all inserted into the fuselage halves which are then joined together, with a short bulkhead slipped into the wing root area to prevent the weight of the wings from pulling the seams apart later. The underside is covered up by an insert which surrounds the main gear bays, and closes over those areas that are normally shut on the ground with additional parts. The wings have clear light inserts in the root, which are installed before the halves are brought together, with a standard tab and slot fixture to the fuselage, which is repeated on the elevators on a smaller scale. The wings need their flap actuator housings adding, which are all separate parts made up from two halves each, and you will need to take care to get the correct one in the proper recess. The engines are made up from a pair of fans on a central spindle, which is slid into the aft section of the engine which has another set of blades moulded into the rear. The fans can be left mobile by carefully gluing the retaining ring in place, which is then hidden by the tail cone, and then further enclosed in the outer housing with the single-piece intake lip and the two different sized zig-zag exhaust lips that are there to reduce exhaust noises. The engines are all handed, so take care with construction again, as the strake on the bypass housing faces the fuselage. The outboard main wheels are added at the same time as the engines, and then it's just a case of adding some aerials, the main wheels and their brake assemblies, gear bay doors, and the clear glazing for the cockpit. Instructions are also given for the installation of the bay doors for an in-flight model, which requires a little cutting of the parts, but nothing too taxing for even a novice modeller. As an addition, a three-part stand is included on the sprues, which fits between the landing gear into some holes in the belly. A nice addition that will allow you to sprinkle a few smaller models around the 747 on your display shelf. Markings The new livery is a simple tail-band that you will have to mask and paint, with the Lufthansa logo on the tail, and the name on the familiar hump behind the cockpit. The windscreen, window frames and doorframe decals are also included, plus many, many lengths of walkway markings for the gargantuan wings and tail surfaces. A dark blue swatch of the correct colour for the dark blue is included for reference on the sheet, and as usual the colour call-outs are using Revell's own paints with the blue being a 90%/10% mix of gloss midnight blue and black. If you're mixing your paint for this task, it's always best to mix too much and store the spare paint in an empty pot until the project is finished, in case touch-ups are needed at any point. Conclusion It's a great modern tooling of the still-impressive former holder of the largest passenger aircraft trophy, and these new decals will look splendid on a well-painted model. A cockpit and gear bays are good to see, all of which adds extra realism to the model. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  5. While I,am slowly working on HMS Eskimo in between giving my eyes a rest I have started on this fun build it will be OOB (Honest) after fighting all the little brass bits this is a bit of stress relief I had planned on doing this for the Pacific at war GB but it did not quite fit into the right criteria for the areas stated in the South East Asia campaigns so going to build it anyway where it fits with all floaty things I was inspired to get this kit a few years ago at SMW after following a great build by Gremlin 56 (RIP my friend) so will be trying to get some where near the top quality job he managed to pull off I will also be putting it in a small diorama trying to copy from the box art the colour scheme I will be doing And the cargo M4 Sherman's M8 Greyhound and Duce and a haff 3 of each beefy
  6. I've been admiring this Group Build from afar and, as I only have two kits I progress at the moment, have decided to join in. I usually build single-engined RAF or FAA aircraft, although I have several B-25s in the stash, so this will be a departure from my comfort zone. I dug these two from the stash: My preference would be to do the Italaeri one, because it has an RAF option and is rendered obsolete by the new Airfix one, but the transfers are yellowed so I decided to do the Revigawa one. Anyway, I've made a start. Interior painted with Humbrol 226: Some Humbrol 33 to undercoat the wheels and engines: Thanks for looking. PS. I've stuck the Italaeri transfers to the Helix window in the loft, in the hope sunlight can work it's magic, but I'll probably (for probably, read certainly) be buying the DK Decals sheet.
  7. Hallo! Well, the project is complete. I wouldn't say that I enjoyed the build. The kit goes together only when being asked politely with a gun in your hand. A LOT of cutting, sanding and so on. It looks like Eurofighter to me, but Revell was just l lazy engendering this kit. Manual is nicely printed but sloppy too. But it's a cheap kit, so no offence. Just don't pay more than 20 Euro for it. Anyway, it's a great opportunity to try new techniques and improve your skills. I've used some aftermarket parts. Eduard 49367 is adequate and helps a lot to detail the model. Reskit (from Ukraine I believe) wheels are really nice. They are a little bit smaller than those in the kit, I think they are correct. And now ModelMaker decals. It's a piece of crap. I almost decided that the model is ruined. Everything is wrong with this product, colours, fonts, size and so on. Instructions are laughable. Very sloppy job, simply don't buy it. I don't know about other products of this producer, may be they are better, but I wouldn't use anything from them. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year everyone! K.
  8. My build will be of Old Maid, one of the B17E's repainted in the Haywain Air Depot camouflage scheme after the attack on Pearl Harbour, I will be using the Revell B17F kit. I know that the aircraft would have had the Sperry lower turret fitted but some of the images that are available show the aircraft was retro fitted with the later F model ball turret and the kit has the earlier style nose glass with single mg mount so show be fairly accurate. I recieved the kit as a birthday present and made a start before I knew about the GB but only did a few parts before joining. IMGA0342 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0341 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0340 by neil Connor, on Flickr IMGA0339 by neil Connor, on Flickr Now the GB has started I can get stuck in
  9. Hello all, I just noticed, that I have no instructions of my 1/32 Hawker Hunter from Revell (04703), first edition. Unfortunately, Revell offers only the instructions of the re-edition as download. The first edition from 1998 has more decal options and the numbering of the stencils is completely different. Maybe some of you could provide a scan, or could mail me the instructions. This is the box art of which I need the instructions: Thanks, Thomas
  10. Just finished this one today. Not a bad kit considering it's 40 year age!! All that was required was a quick rescribe. Not much filler either which was a pleasant surprise! Paint used was Hataka in the main with Alclad Kleer Kote Flat to finish. Hope you like it!
  11. Hi all and here's my last finish for 2018. I built this one OOB as part of a 'Secret' GB on a Facebook modelling group page - the rules were simple; you couldn't tell or show anyone what you were building! That worked fine for me as the kit was a Christmas present for my neighbour who's a relation of Sir Ernest Shackleton. I wanted to say thanks for all his help during the year (taking in parcel deliveries when we're not home/cutting our verge to name just two) and thought this would be nicer than a bottle of wine. I dropped the kit around to him on Christmas night and he was absolutely gobsmacked with it - he never knew there was a plane named after his famous relative. He was like a big kid, asking me all about the kit and the hobby. Overall, the kit fitted together nicely and the wing spar gives a really strong, positive wing-to-fuselage join. The decals were great but some of the instruction steps could be clearer. e.g. for the props which meant the spinners aren't 100% flush. Also, the u/c parts could be a lot simpler - trying to align 5 parts with their mounting holes was a But she looks like a Shackleton and I'm happy how it turned out. And building for someone else was great fun too. Revell_Shackleton_AEW_2_ (1) by Dermot Moriarty, on Flickr Revell_Shackleton_AEW_2_ (2) by Dermot Moriarty, on Flickr Revell_Shackleton_AEW_2_ (3) by Dermot Moriarty, on Flickr Revell_Shackleton_AEW_2_ (4) by Dermot Moriarty, on Flickr Revell_Shackleton_AEW_2_(8) by Dermot Moriarty, on Flickr Revell_Shackleton_AEW_2_ (6) by Dermot Moriarty, on Flickr Revell_Shackleton_AEW_2_ (7) by Dermot Moriarty, on Flickr Thanks for looking and have a very Happy Christmas. Dermot
  12. Hi Everyone, i have seen the Ford GT Le Mans from Revell and it has a lot of issues (as any Revell kit). It has awful plastics, not so good details, thickness (on the rear diffuser wings in particular), and wheels too small. Then i saw Tamiya will release a road version of the same car. Detail and precision we all know that will be top notch, as usual (it costs almost twice the price..). I am here wondering if, in you opinion, there could be a chance that Tamiya will release a Le Mans version too. And if someone has Revell kit can make a wip? Thanks and regards
  13. Hi all, My last build for 2018 is a Revell 1/72 Boeing B-17F which I have finished as an RAF Fortress Mk.II operated by 206 Squadron in June 1943, in fact on 11th June whilst flown by Wing Commander R.B. Thomson she attacked and sank U-417 South East of Iceland but was herself brought down by return fire from the U-boat. All the crrew of the B-17 were rescued 3 days later by an RAF Catalina after a US Catalina crashed trying to rescue them, the US crew were rescued a few days later. The Revell kit is excellent and has great interior detail from the box but I have had to scratch build the ASV aerials for the nose and under the wings from brass rod, they are not perfect but they look okay to me. I used decals by DK Decals which are excellent and went on with no issues at all, I just wish their instruction sheets were bigger! Anyway enough waffle here are the pics; I've built this as part of the ongoing (and excellent) B-17 STGB which you need to check out as there are some great builds going on there. For those of you interested here is a link to my build; Thanks for looking in and as usual all comments and criticisms are gratefully received. A Happy New Year to you all. Craig.
  14. Hi everyone, and happy upcoming new year! First time modeller, new member. Wanted to share this out of the box build using the simplest tool setup I could find on a side-table in my uni room. Kit went together just using the Revell contacta glue, Revell aqua color paints thinned with tap-water, and a £5 brush pack. Decals were applied using Revell's decal fix to form around the detail. For a first attempt, actually quite happy with the result, definitely inspires to keep going! Next step might be to use some Milliput superfine putty for the gaps, and use Revell's Aqua color mix for the thinning as opposed to tap-water. Looking to stick to brushpainting with acrylics, personally think it might be more enjoyable and much easier to setup/maintain, you can listen to music while you're at it without a rattling compressor nearby, not to mention I've seen some astounding results with them like the works of @PlaStix here on the forums. Looking forward to all the feedback!! Cheers, Ed.
  15. Joining you with this Revell B-17F kit. Here are the parts still in bags. Instructions and decals. I'll be building this option Shamrock Special As can be seen, I've copied the boxtop flap idea from my B-17G colleagues.
  16. USS New Jersey, Platinum Edition 1:350 Revell The USS New Jersey, a 45,000-ton Iowa class battleship, was built at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania. Commissioned in May 1943, she spent the rest of that year in the western Atlantic and Caribbean area. New Jersey went to the Pacific in early 1944 and conducted her first combat operations in support of the Marshalls invasion. She was Fifth Fleet flagship during the mid-February raid on the Japanese base at Truk, where she used her guns to sink one enemy ship and join in sinking another. Through the rest of 1944, she took part in raids on Japanese-held islands, the Marianas invasion and Battle of Philippine Sea, the Battle of Leyte Gulf and operations against the Philippines. From August 1944, she was flagship of Admiral William F. Halsey's Third Fleet. The New Jersey continued her Pacific combat operations into 1945, supporting the invasions of Iwo Jima and the Ryukyus. Following overhaul, she again became Fifth Fleet flagship during the final days of World War II and remained in the Far East until early 1946. She then went to the Atlantic in 1947 and made one midshipmen's training cruise to Europe before decommissioning in June 1948. The Korean War brought the New Jersey back into commission in November 1950. Two Korean combat tours in 1951 and 1953 were punctuated by a European cruise in the Summer of 1952. After returning home from the western Pacific in late 1953, New Jersey operated in the Atlantic. She deployed to Mediterranean and European waters twice in 1955-56 and was placed out of commission in August 1957. During the Vietnam war USS New Jersey was the only battleship recalled to duty. She recommissioned in April 1968 and arrived off Southeast Asia in September. From then until April 1969, she conducted frequent bombardments along the South Vietnamese coast. But, whilst preparing for a second Vietnam tour, she was ordered inactivated and decommissioned in December 1969. The early 1980s defence build-up produced a fourth active period for the New Jersey, beginning with her recommissioning after an extensive refit, which saw the mounting of cruise missile boxes, harpoon launchers and Vulcan Phalanx CIWS in December 1982. She again fired her big guns in combat during the Lebanon crisis of 1983-84 and deployed to the western Pacific in 1986 and 1989-90, with the latter cruise extending to the Persian Gulf area. Decommissioned again in February 1991, USS New Jersey was towed from the Pacific to the Atlantic in 1999. She is since become a museum at Camden, New Jersey. The Model Originally released by Revell in 2000 and re-released in 2002 this kit appears older than it really is with quite a lot of flash and extraneous moulding stubs. The original kit looks like it was meant to have been motorised at some point as all the mountings are still extant. When released it wasnt exactly the best produced model of the New Jersey, that accolade went to the Tamiya kit, but it was pretty accurate. In this Platinum release Revell have included lots of goodies to try and bring the kit up to date including wooden decks, etched metal parts plus turned brass barrels and masts. Once cleaned up and the areas which fall short of todays standards removed, the additional parts really bring the model up to a good standard with lots of fine details and accurate shapes. The completed kit on shop at Scale Model World in Telford showed how good it could look. With the appropriate care, patience and time the model could meet almost museum standards. The major hurdle in building the kit is the way the instructions are presented. The original kit instructions have not been altered in any way. Instead the assembly and fitting of the etched and turned parts are provided on three A3 double sided sheets, so a lot of toing and froing will be required to ensure the correct assemblies and parts are fitted to their respective positions, which could get quite frustrating. It might be an idea to go through all the instructions first and mark on the main booklet where the additional parts need to go, so that none are missed or you find that something needs to be removed and youve got to the point where it will be awkward to do so. The standard build starts with the some areas on the single piece hull being removed. Dont forget to add the strengthening beams that were a feature of this commission, along the hull sides before painting. This is followed by the assembly of the three main gun turrets which consist of the mounting, upper turret, the three barrels, rangefinder housings and hatches. With the addition of the etched parts and brass barrels these turrets are transformed. The three barrels are now meant to be fitted to the main deck with locking piece fitted from the underside so that they turn. This is a toy like feature which I feel is unnecessary and will cause problems later in the build, so leave them off until the painting and wooden deck are fitted. What you can do is fit the main deck to the hull and once the propellers, their shafts and the rudders are fitted I would paint the hull and deck furniture, fit the wooden deck, and then put the assembly to one side whilst the rest of the parts are constructed. Attention is now focused on the main single piece superstructure section onto which the superstructure sides are attached. Now there is quite a bit of flash on these parts so a good clean up is called for before fitting. Dont forget to check with the etch instruction sheets as quite a few splinter shields and the like need to be removed, to be replaced by the etched brass parts. This goes for the whole superstructure, bridge and foremast, including the aerials, radars, funnels and main gun directors. In fact there is an awful lot of work to be done when building all these assemblies, but it will be worth it. The whole of the top of the foremast is in fact replaced with brass, the highlight being the super complex SPS-49 and AN/SPS 10 radar arrays. The kit funnels come with solid tops, so these need to be drilled out and carefully cut away and filed before the new caps can be fitted. The instructions have very clear diagrams showing how to do this. With the main fore and aft superstructure assembled and spruced up its on to the other weapon systems where again extensive use of the PE improves the look of the Harpoon and Cruise missile systems. The only downside is that the Vulcan Phalanx systems do not get any treatment and really could do with replacing with more accurate aftermarket parts. With this build you might as well go the whole hog and make the best model you can. The five inch gun turrets are improved with the addition of the turned barrels, etched ladders and doors. There is so much additional detail included in this kit that its difficult to explain it all, suffice to say that everything from the ships boats crutches, ensign and jack staffs are replaced. I particularly like the treatment the Refuelling At Sea boom gets, with replacement fixtures and the addition of the fuel hoses dangling down. The boats davits are also given an overhaul with the addition of the downhauls, access ladders and blocks. Even the Seahawk helicopters are given the etch treatment, with new undercarriage, rotors, both folded and spread, swash plates and pitch controls. Once the wooden decks are laid there are numerous deck hatches, windlasses and other fittings to add. Finally a full set of railings for the whole ship are included, including the flightdeck netting and blackned chain for the anchors. Decals The single decal sheet contains the ships name plaques, identification numbers, awards, and the whole of the faintail flightdeck with the correct markings. The helicopters also get national markings and Navy titling. There are several decals for certain sensors, but I think these would better painted. They seem pretty well printed, with good density and with minimal carrier film, but the larger items will probably need some softener or setting solution to settle them down nicely. There is also a paper sheet with code/signal flags should you wish to add them. Conclusion From a pretty ropey looking kit, certainly on initial inspection I think Revell have really turned this one around with the addition of the etched parts, turned brass and the wooden deck. It has the potential to build into an outstanding model given the appropriate care and attention. Yes it will take some work, and definitely one for a seasoned modeller not a beginner. Very highly recommended Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  17. Finished about 30mins ago, so please don't touch the paintwork yet, OK ? Not the best fitting or most detailed kit, but as a car it's utterly jaw-dropping !. Please feel free as ever to ask any questions, make any comments or add any criticism. Next car build will probably be another RoG kit, either a 599 or a McLaren. AFN Ian.
  18. I have managed to find the original thread that I had started for this build over in the WIP section, and I am ashamed to say that this has been sitting around the bench since October 2016. During that time it has suffered some minor damage - losing the tail from one of the wingtip launch rails, so that will need a bit of repair work. Here's a link to the build progress I had made. This is how things have stood over the past two years. by John L, on Flickr I made a bit of a restart last night by painting the undercarriage bays, inner areas of the doors, legs and wheels. by John L, on Flickr This shouldn't take too long to complete, then I can get started on the 1/144 Eurofighter.
  19. Hallo everybody, I started a new project, Eurofighter Typhoon with a lovely tail art. I used Revell's Tiger Day version, decals from ModelMaker and PE set from Eduard. So far I find the kit not as precise in fitting like many modern kits. Well, I don't know better kit in this scale anyway and Tiger was a bargain! K.
  20. Lightning McQueen 1:24 Revell Easy Click System (07813) Lightning McQueen is one of the animated stars of the Disney/Pixar Cars films. He is not named after actor and race driver Steve McQueen but after Pixar animator Glenn McQueen who dies in 2002. The design is primarily a stock car with a bit of Le Mans car thrown in with so Ford Gt40 as well. The Kit Revell have the license for Disney model kits in Europe and the West, and it's good to see them back in action after recent problems resulted in a new management as well as ownership of the company. The car is made using Revell's easy click system which means no glue is needed, but the parts will still need to be removed from the spures which is probably why its aimed at ages 10 and upwards. As well as the red body shell there are 11 sprues of different coloured plastics and 4 rubber tyres. Construction is fairly simple as you would imagine. The engine is first built up and this is added onto a sub frame part. The main underside is then fitted. At the front the radiator is fitted along with the front brake discs and calipers. the front tyres then go on. Inside of the main body shell the grill and solid windows are fitted. The main chassis of the car can then be fitted to the body shell. The rear axle and drive shaft are then built up and added along with the exhausts. The rear tyres are fitted as well as the rear valance and bonnet. Markings Markings are provided for the car as seen in the film. These are provided as both waterslide decals for the serious modeller and stickers for the younger ones. Conclusion Marvellous! some fun for the younger modeller, pr maybe even the older one . This should be a good way to introduce the younger generations to modelling. Recommended, and lots of fun! Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  21. https://photos.app.goo.gl/qHVqy5e3sPn6poHV9 https://photos.app.goo.gl/GWK1qHp1wCzw36ZF8 https://photos.app.goo.gl/CPzba9gAnfmKDs9g7 My latest progress, I will hopefully get more done this weekend
  22. Hi all, I've been here a few weeks now and though it was about time I showed you what I'm up to. I've very fond memories of watching Star Trek (TOS) as a kid in the 80's with my dad and my brother and it's one of the few things that has really stuck with me through changing times. The Enterprise itself I find mesmerising, it's graceful and each part of the ship has a clear purpose, a design classic and I love it. My favourite itteration has to be the refit, which I hope to build at some point in the future So, I got in to modelling because I wanted a decent model Enterprise, I've had a few very small die-cast models but they are always lacking something. I found the Revell kit online and decided that I'd build my own, LED lights and all. Now I've well and truly got the modelling bug, I've bought the Star Trek Starship Voyager for my next model, I've built a small Star Destroyer and plan to build models from Battlestar and other Star Trek models Here's some photos that I took while building my Enterprise, I wasnt originally planning on posting them online but then I found this place, so here it goes! 1. What a great start, I ruined my first model! I wanted to light my model with LEDs, so it had to be light-proofed. So the insides of the model had a coat of adhesion promoter, followed by black, then a silver or while coat would be painted to make it reflective. I was watching lots of Boyd's Trekworks Youtube videos for info and he used a heat gun on a gentle heat to aid the drying process.... I'll never do that again, my model melted You can see the plastic deformation from the heat in this image. It also shows my initial plan for lighting, which was to cover all windows with grease-proof paper, which diffuses the light, then placing LED's around the ship to light them up. 2. Saucer section interior is about ready So after buys a replacement model I started again, with a few important lessons learned This image shows the insides of the saucer section, painted and with the windows covered. I used 'Revell Contacta Liquid Special' to glue the clear windows in place, and to glue the greese-proof paper in place. The secondary hull, again with the inside prepared for lighting, it's had a black coat followed by a light coat to refelct the light. By this time I'd also started experimenting with LEDs, the breadboard in this photo had a 555 Timer chip and a 4017 Decade counter, they'll be used for the rotating lights of the Warp Nacells and the blinking navigation lights. 4.Let there be light! Not sure of the best positioning and arrangement of LEDs I just dove in with something that looked like it would give good coverage. I know some people use fewer but brighter LEDs, and some use LED tape/strips, which I might look at using in the future. Each LED has a resistor attached, and they're all in parallel, so if one should fail the others will continue to work. 5. Glue. After lighting the secondary hull in a similar way I was ready to glue a few parts together. Which I was pretty worried about as I considered it opportunity to ruin yet another model. I used Revel Contacta Professional glue and found my fears were unfounded, thankfully 6. Circuits To light this model I would need to build some circuits to handle the navigation lights and the rotating buzzard collector effects. So I bought the relevant gear from Maplin (I now use RS instead) and designed a few circuits in Pad2Pad, which is excellent free circuit design software. The first completed circuit was for the navigation lights, I was initially planning to put it inside the model but then decided I would fit it in the stand instead. 7. Warp Nacell Test #1 You saw my breadboard with a few components in an earlier photo. This is basically how the Buzzard Collector effect works on my model, The red, orange and green LEDs are aranged in a circle and give the impression of rotation. 8.Warp Nacell Circuit fitting After designing my Warp Nacell circuit in Pad2Pad, I printed it off, cut it out and placed it in it's intended final position to make sure it would fit. The circular plastic piece has holes drilled in it to receive the LEDs, 12 of them (for a single Nacell). 9. Assembled Warp Nacell Board After building the warp nacell board I fit it in place. Now you can also see how the LEDs sit. It's a pretty tight space so I was pleased that everything went in with no problems In the video below, the middle light isnt connected to any power, it will eventually be 'always-on' to provide a steady red glow. The camera doesnt really do the below any justice. 10. Closed up my first Warp Necell - and made my second big mistake It's amazing isnt it that you can do something, then the instant you finish you realise you've done it wrong. I guess it's not really that big a deal, the model isn't completely accurate anyway and I'd already decided that I would'nt worry about that this time. But this mistake was easily avoidably, yet at the crutial point I... put the wrong circuit in the wrong nacell, so the buzzard collectors now spin in the wrong direction. Only a Trek fan would notice, but it's annoying all the same. Still, after much grumpiness I think I can live with it. 11. Connecting the Pylons and the Seconday Hull. I'd already glued the warp nacells to the support pylons and let those set, I'd also done some work on removing the seams on all the parts glued so far. Now it was time to connect the wiring up and glue them to the secondary hull. With the wiring connected and the pylons glued on to the secondary hull, it looked like the area would be under a fair bit of stress, so I stuck a clamp in place to hold things together while they set. 12. Windows, I hate Windows I bought some masking fluid so that I could mask the windows, but found it to be far to imprecise and the results (of tests I did on my melted saucer section) were pretty messy. So after getting some advice right here on Britmodeller (thanks guys, you know who you are) I settled on masking the windows with masking tape. I used a scalpal to cut small rectangles working on one at a time. It took ages. I have used the masking fluid on a few of the larger clear pieces, but I'm still not impressed with the result, maybe I just need more practice with it! 13. All Masked, Time for the Primer With all the clear parts masked I bought myself a 'lazy suzan' and gave the entire ship a coat of Hycote Adhesion Promoter and then a nice coat of Hycote grey primer. No way was I going anywhere near this thing with a heat gun The wires you see here will eventually be fed through the stand in to the base. I found the Hycote cans give excellent fast coverage, pretty cheep too. 14. Base Color With the primer dry it was time to start mixing colours (as per the model instructions) and giving it some proper color. I used a 'Sparmax Arism Mini' Airbrush to spray the model, with Revel Aqua Color paints. I found that thinning the paint 2-parts paint to 1-part thinner worked pretty well. I'd aslo sprayed the deflector dish, I love that copper colour and started giving the warp nacell and impulse engines some colour. I was having trouble cutting the masking tape perfectly to cover the inside of the impulse engines, so decided to try the masking fluid. The result was not great but I think It'll look fine if I touch it up with a brush. So, that's my model so far. It's the first model I've ever build and while I've found it quite challenging I've really enjoyed it and plan to do many more in the future. I'll post more photos and videos as I make more progress. And thanks to everyone here for accepting me in to the site and giving me some great tips! Cheers
  23. SMS Dresden and Emden Revell 1/350 During the FIRST WORLD WAR - two of the Imperial German Navy's "light cruisers", SMS Dresden and SMS Emden waged a trade war against British ships far from home. The Dresden initially operated off the East Coast of South America and the Emden in the Indian Ocean. In order to avoid British Warships the Dresden made its way into the Pacific to join the German East Asia Squadron. In the first naval battle of the First World War, a Royal Navy Squadron was able to narrowly avoid defeat in an action in which two British Warships were sunk. The subsequent attack on Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands failed however and all the German ships except the Dresden were lost. Crippled the Dresden hid in bays around the South of Chile until 14 March 1915 when she was discovered by three British warships and fired upon. The Captain decided to scuttle his ship. The Emden however, cleverly avoided enemy contact and was thus able to destroy the Oil Storage Unit at Madras. During later actions, two small British cruisers and many merchant ships also fell victim to the Emden. The Emden was however, rendered unfit for action whilst under fire from the Australian cruiser Sydney on its way to the Coco Islands (early in November 1914). The captain was forced to run his ship aground in order to prevent her sinking. Later as a special commendation, all surviving crew members were permitted to bear the additional title "Emden". The model Originally released on their own, the SMS Emden in 1994 and the Dresden in 1996, both were well regarded kits at the time. Since their original release they have been re-popped a couple of times, but this is the first time that they have been released together in a kind of box set. Inside the deep end opening and rather feeble box you find two poly bags each with a complete kit inside. There is no other protection for the parts but they don’t seem to have suffered any damage, just a few parts have come adrift from the sprues. The 4 sprues, two hull halves and separate main deck part of rather odd greeny grey styrene appear to have been well moulded, with no sign of flash, but with quite a few moulding, (overrun), pips on the smaller parts. Detail is nicely done with some very fine engraved plate lines and open portholes, which could need some backing to avoid see through issues. The wooden decks though are a little disappointing in that they seem way out of scale, with the grain looking something more akin to the wooden dashboards you find in some cars, so probably best to get a nice real wood deck from the likes of Artwox or Pontos. The rest of the parts look good and even the gun barrels are nice and slim, but you could always change them for brass items should you wish. Apart from the lower rear hull around the props there isn’t any discernible difference between the kits, so if you were to waterline the hulls, the parts used would be exactly the same. If displaying them in full hull configuration then you would notice that the Dresden has four screws whilst the Emden only has two. With that fact now known the build described below will be for the Dresden, but can easily be used to describe the Emden build with the only difference being the colour scheme. The build begins with the fitting of the longitudinal bulkheads onto the main deck structures foreward and amidships along with the addition of the capstans, bollards and deckhouse vents. The bridge consists of two halves, which when joined together are fitted to the single piece bridge wing section and topped off with the roof and binnacle. Each of the gun turrets are also in two halves, with the gun barrel incorporated into one half and just need joining together to complete. Each of the three funnels are made up of port and starboard parts along with a separate funnel cap. The gun turrets are then mounted onto their main deck positions and held in place with a small washer from beneath. The same goes for the single piece unshielded guns. With the guns in place the bridge is now fitted. Before the main deck is attached to the hull two more open guns are fitted to separate decks parts in their casements beneath the main deck. The hull is then fitted with the bilge keels and the two propeller shaft panels, (as mentioned above, the only area that is different between the two ships), along with the propeller shafts, propellers, shaft supports and single rudder. With the main deck and hull structure assembled it’s on to the fitting out stage. Starting at the bow the ensign staff is attached, followed by the two anchors, breakwater, boat booms, complete with Jacobs’s ladders, casement hinged doors, which can be posed either open or closed up with the judicious use of a sharp knife, and finally the cleat boards for the halliards. The funnel assemblies are then glued into position and the amidships raised gangway attached to the port side of the funnels. An additional binnacle is fitted aft near to the emergency steering position and two vents are fitted amidships. The eight ships cutters and single steam pinnace, (with separate funnel/boiler section), are now shipped along with their respective davits and cradles, three boats each side amidships and one each side aft on the quarterdeck. Revell have kindly provided an accommodation ladder for those that will waterline the model and incorporate it into a diorama. There is another binnacle in a tub which sits on top of a four legged tower just aft of the rear funnel and the two ships wheels are joined together and mounted at the emergency steering position. The final section of the build is the construction of the two ships masts. The foremast is fitted with a platform on its foreward face about a third of the way up. This platform is then fitted with two searchlights. The main mast is of similar construction, but has a second platform half way between the searchlights and the deck. Each mast is stepped in position and the two ladders fitted between the main platforms and the deck. Each model is provided with two display stands, one of which is fitted with a plaque plate onto which the decal with the ships name is attached. There are a pair of very well drawn and clearly illustrated rigging plans provided, but I wouldn’t recommend using the black thread that Revel include in the kit, you really need something a lot finer and less furry. Decals The small decals sheet has the name of each ship to be fitted to the plaque plate along with the crests for bow and stern. There are some decal windows, presumably for the bridge and the ships name boards are also provided. The Dresden is also provided with one large ensign, whilst the Emden has one large and one battle ensign. The decals are nicely printed, with very little visible carrier film and in good register. Conclusion Nothing seems to have changed over the intervening years since these kits were first released and that includes the nice clean moulding. They are still very nice looking kits to build and should build up into good looking display models. There are a number of aftermarket etched sets and wooden decks should you really want to go to town on them and i think they deserve it. It would be great to see them displayed together in their different colour schemes. Highly recommended. Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit or
  24. I was wanting to try some 3D weathering and opted to try Vallejo's Chipping Medium as the method. The subject is a 1/48 scale 1967 tool P47 Razorback from Revell. Although, this build was really just something of a 'test-bed' for my weathering self-tuition. I liked the end result and thought I'd share it with the forum.
  25. Next model coming close to finish. Made to go with the recent finish London Bus.
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