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Found 6 results

  1. Messerschmitt Bf.109G-6 (RFSQS-48029 for Tamiya) 1:48 Red Fox Studio via AMMO of Mig Jiménez During the last few years we have been blessed by the introduction of new technologies to our hobby, amongst them being 3D Printing in coloured resins to create instrument panels, dials and all sorts of interior (and exterior) details for our models in various scales. New company (to us) Red Studio of Hungary have begun producing a range of these panels in various scales under the distribution of AMMO by Mig Jiménez, which broadens their introduction to the market appreciably. Their sets arrive in clear foil bags with a red card topper for display on racking, held together by a single staple. With the staple undone, the bag empties to unveil a folded card backing that also has the parts printed on its satin surface, a concertina folded instruction sheet, and the sheet of decals that face outward at the back. The sheets are small, but the detail is exceptional, looking about as realistic as a panel can get at this scale. The instructions lay out clearly where the parts should go, and the areas that will need their moulded-in detail removing are marked out in blue over photographs of the kit parts, which are also called out by sprue and part number for your ease. The next step shows where the individual parts should fit, again arrowed to their location on the actual parts. This set is patterned for the Tamiya Messerschmitt Bf.109G-6, and preparation begins with the removal of the moulded-in detail on the instrument panels, throttle-quadrant, plus other equipment boxes on the sidewall and right console. In addition, it also includes an extra panel for controlling the 210mm Wfr.Gr.21 rocket tubes that this variant could carry under its wings in an attempt to break up the bomber streams with poorly-aimed, almost indiscriminately into their echelons. The main instrument panel consists of three or four parts depending on which variant you are building, adding the rocket panel if needed. The panel that the fuel line is wrapped around is a large part that brings a lot to the party, with another four parts on the side walls, and three small decals added to the boxes on the starboard console. There are several notes made throughout the instructions advising you not to try to cut the decals with a scalpel as they could disintegrate due to their delicate nature. They also tell you that you can apply most types of washes and varnishes over the surface once they are applied, and that once wet they are somewhat flexible, although there are limits of course, which is stated to be 5%. The resins used in production are also ultra-violet (UV) resistant, so your dials and other light parts shouldn’t be affected over time, retaining the same look as if they had just been applied. Here is a link to an instruction guide on how to apply this type of decal to your models, which should help you avoid any pitfalls. Conclusion The detail applied to 3D printed instrument panel is at the current apex of realism, and they’re one of my must-have choices of aftermarket for the discerning modeller. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. F/A-18C Hornet (RFSQS-48085 for Kinetic) 1:48 Red Fox Studio via AMMO of Mig Jiménez During the last few years we have been blessed by the introduction of new technologies to our hobby, amongst them being 3D Printing in coloured resins to create instrument panels, dials and all sorts of interior (and exterior) details for our models in various scales. New company (to us) Red Studio of Hungary have begun producing a range of these panels in various scales under the distribution of AMMO by Mig Jiménez, which broadens their introduction to the market appreciably. Their sets arrive in clear foil bags with a red card topper for display on racking, held together by a single staple. With the staple undone, the bag empties to unveil a folded card backing that also has the parts printed on its satin surface, a concertina folded instruction sheet, and the sheet of decals that face outward at the back. The sheets are small, but the detail is exceptional, looking about as realistic as a panel can get at this scale. The instructions lay out clearly where the parts should go, and the areas that will need their moulded-in detail removing are marked out in blue over photographs of the kit parts, which are also called out by sprue and part number for your ease. The next step shows where the individual parts should fit, again arrowed to their location on the actual parts. The F/A-18C hornet was a single-seater, and as such the 3D printed parts are all for the front cockpit, although the instructions show a two-seat cockpit tub. The side consoles, instrument panel, centre section of the coaming and two quarter panels are first relieved of their moulded-in detail, then have the new parts applied over the top using super glue or PVA, preferably after painting is completed for the rest of the cockpit to avoid any tricky masking. There are several notes made throughout the instructions advising you not to try to cut the decals with a scalpel as they could disintegrate due to their delicate nature. They also tell you that you can apply most types of washes and varnishes over the surface once they are applied, and that once wet they are somewhat flexible, although there are limits of course, which is stated to be 5%. The resins used in production are also ultra-violet (UV) resistant, so your dials and other light parts shouldn’t be affected over time, retaining the same look as if they had just been applied. Here is a link to an instruction guide on how to apply this type of decal to your models, which should help you avoid any pitfalls. Conclusion The detail applied to 3D printed instrument panel is at the current apex of realism, and they’re one of my must-have choices of aftermarket for the discerning modeller. If you’ve got a Kinetic early Hornet, this set is a perfect choice. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor (RFSQS-48057 for Hasegawa) 1:48 Red Fox Studio via AMMO of Mig Jiménez During the last few years we have been blessed by the introduction of new technologies to our hobby, amongst them being 3D Printing in coloured resins to create instrument panels, dials and all sorts of interior (and exterior) details for our models in various scales. New company (to us) Red Studio of Hungary have begun producing a range of these panels in various scales under the distribution of AMMO by Mig Jiménez, which broadens their introduction to the market appreciably. Their sets arrive in clear foil bags with a red card topper for display on racking, held together by a single staple. With the staple undone, the bag empties to unveil a folded card backing that also has the parts printed on its satin surface, a concertina folded instruction sheet, and the sheet of decals that face outward at the back. The sheets are small, but the detail is exceptional, looking about as realistic as a panel can get at this scale. The instructions lay out clearly where the parts should go, and the areas that will need their moulded-in detail removing are marked out in blue over photographs of the kit parts, which are also called out by sprue and part number for your ease. The next step shows where the individual parts should fit, again arrowed to their location on the actual parts. This set is designed with the Hasegawa kit of this top-of-the-line 5th Gen American fighter in mind, and includes a choice of two styles of three-part main panels depicting the screens either on or off to suit your preference, plus two large side console decals with their attendant diagonal sections where the consoles rise toward the front of the cockpit. You’ll need to remove some of the moulded-in details on the kit parts of course, but the effort is most definitely worth it. There are a number of notes made throughout the instructions advising you not to try to cut the decals with a scalpel as they could disintegrate due to their delicate nature. They also tell you that you can apply most types of washes and varnishes over the surface once they are applied, and that once wet they are somewhat flexible, although there are limits of course, which is stated to be 5%. The resins used in production are also ultra-violet (UV) resistant, so your dials and other light parts shouldn’t be affected over time, retaining the same look as if they had just been applied. Here is a link to an instruction guide on how to apply this type of decal to your models, which should help you avoid any pitfalls. Conclusion The detail applied to 3D printed instrument panel is at the current apex of realism, and they’re one of my must-have choices of aftermarket for the discerning modeller, essential for the big open expanse that is the cockpit of a Raptor. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. P-40E Warhawk 3D Printed Acrylic Instrument Panel (RFSQS-32076 for Hasegawa) 1:32 Red Fox Studio by AMMO During the last few years we have been blessed by the introduction of new technologies to our hobby, amongst them being 3D Printing in coloured resins to create instrument panels, dials and all sorts of interior (and exterior) details for our models in various scales. New company (to us) Red Studio of Hungary have begun producing a range of these panels in various scales under the distribution of AMMO by Mig Jiménez, which broadens their introduction to the market appreciably. Their sets arrive in clear foil bags with a red card topper for display on racking, held together by a single staple. With the staple undone, the bag empties to unveil a folded card backing that also has the parts printed on its satin surface, a concertina folded instruction sheet, and the sheet of decals that face outward at the back. The sheets are small, but the detail is exceptional, looking about as realistic as a panel can get at this scale. The instructions lay out clearly where the parts should go, and the areas that will need their moulded-in detail removing are marked out in blue over photographs of the kit parts, which are also called out by sprue and part number for your ease. The next step shows where the individual parts should fit, again arrowed to their location on the actual parts. This set includes three sections for the main instrument panel, five surfaces for the boxes on the starboard sidewall, and one for the left. There are another two small dials for the floor panel in the cockpit, all of which are superbly detailed, and should be attached to the kit parts via PVA or super glue. From my experience, 1:32 lends itself very well to this type of decal, giving a balance of depth and detail at its most effective. There are a number of notes made throughout the instructions advising you not to try to cut the decals with a scalpel as they could disintegrate due to their delicate nature. They also tell you that you can apply most types of washes and varnishes over the surface once they are applied, and that once wet they are somewhat flexible, although there are limits of course, which is stated to be 5%. The resins used in production are also ultra-violet (UV) resistant, so your dials and other light parts shouldn’t be affected over time, retaining the same look as if they had just been applied. Here is a link to an instruction guide on how to apply this type of decal to your models, which should help you avoid any pitfalls. Conclusion The detail applied to 3D printed instrument panel is at the current apex of realism, and they’re one of my must-have choices of aftermarket for the discerning modeller. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. AH-1G Cobra 3D Printed Acrylic Instrument Panel (RFSQS-32030 for ICM) 1:32 Red Fox Studio by AMMO During the last few years we have been blessed by the introduction of new technologies to our hobby, amongst them being 3D Printing in coloured resins to create instrument panels, dials and all sorts of interior (and exterior) details for our models in various scales. New company (to us) Red Studio of Hungary have begun producing a range of these panels in various scales under the distribution of AMMO by Mig Jiménez, which broadens their introduction to the market appreciably. Their sets arrive in clear foil bags with a red card topper for display on racking, held together by a single staple. With the staple undone, the bag empties to unveil a folded card backing that also has the parts printed on its satin surface, a concertina folded instruction sheet, and the sheet of decals that face outward at the back. The sheets are small, but the detail is exceptional, looking about as realistic as a panel can get at this scale. The instructions lay out clearly where the parts should go, and the areas that will need their moulded-in detail removing are marked out in blue over photographs of the kit parts, which are also called out by sprue and part number for your ease. The next step shows where the individual parts should fit, again arrowed to their location on the actual parts. This set includes two instrument panels, one for each for the crew, plus side-console panels for each of their cockpits, totalling five additional decals in all. The rear pilot’s side consoles has two separate sections on the left and one on the right, all of which are superbly detailed, and should be attached to the kit parts via PVA or super glue. From my experience, 1:32 lends itself very well to this type of decal, giving a balance of depth and detail at its most effective. There are a number of notes made throughout the instructions advising you not to try to cut the decals with a scalpel as they could disintegrate due to their delicate nature. They also tell you that you can apply most types of washes and varnishes over the surface once they are applied, and that once wet they are somewhat flexible, although there are limits of course, which is stated to be 5%. The resins used in production are also ultra-violet (UV) resistant, so your dials and other light parts shouldn’t be affected over time, retaining the same look as if they had just been applied. Here is a link to an instruction guide on how to apply this type of decal to your models, which should help you avoid any pitfalls. Conclusion The detail applied to 3D printed instrument panel is at the current apex of realism, and as such they’re one of my must-have choices of aftermarket for the discerning modeller. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. After Quinta Studio (link), Red Fox Studio from Hungary is jumping into the marvelous world of cockpit 3D detailing decals. https://www.facebook.com/Red-Fox-Studio-112301346967714/ Homepage: https://www.rfstudio.hu/ Discover Red Fox Studio fast growing catalogue of products here with already twelve 1/48th references and ten in 1/32nd scale: https://www.hadmodels.com/tcslista/red-fox-studio-3d-cockpit http://dreamkit.hu/spl/424779/Red-Fox-Studio V.P.
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