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Found 17 results

  1. Su-30MKK Family Interior 3D Decal (QD48047 for Hobby Boss Kits) 1:48 Quinta Studios When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention recently they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or Photo-Etch brass panels with either two steps of etching, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of relief as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces, MFDs and metallic-effect hardware, often also including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with two folded instruction booklets protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the detailed nature of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to the truism that pictures speak a thousand words. Additional hints and instructions for the uninitiated are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit part numbers and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based sheet give additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would fit the bill, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or turn it completely invisible. This set is patterned for the Hobby Boss kits of the Su-30MK, MK2, M2, MKV, MK2V and MKK. The set comprises one large sheet, containing instrument panel sections, multiple large MFD panels surrounded by buttons, dials and other instruments, the former having a deep green shiny finish, just like the real displays when switched off. The panels are in the more modern brighter bluish shade, and includes the side consoles plus the side wall framing and insulation that have flat-spots on them to accept other parts on the sheet for the ultimate in relief. Conclusion The detail on the parts is incredible, even down to the infinitesimal switches, the texture of the insulation and impressive crispness of the set. Any Quinta outfitted cockpit really needs a crystal-clear or opened canopy to show off the details. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. Su-27UB Interior 3D Decal (QD72020 for Zvezda) 1:72 Quinta Studios When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention recently, they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or pre-painted Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of relief as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces, MFDs and metallic-effect hardware, often also including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziploc bag with two folded instruction booklets protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the detailed nature of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to pictures speaking a thousand words, as they say. Additional hints and instructions for the uninitiated are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based sheet give additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would perform that task, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or turn it completely invisible. This set is patterned for the 1:72 Zvezda kit of the two-seater Sukhoi Su-27UB, so you get two of pretty much everything. The set comprises two sheets of decals, containing instrument panels; multiple large glossy instrument dials and a couple of small MFD panels on inserts, having a deep green shiny finish, just like the real displays when switched off. Side consoles and cockpit sidewalls are covered in new panels with quilted insulation, and the seats are decked out with new belts, cushions and leg harnesses to replace the kit parts, the cushions having a realistic crinkled finish to the vertically stitched surface and side-panels. The interior is in the more modern bluish grey shade, and you will of course have to remove the moulded-in detail to the cockpit surfaces. The detail is still impressive in 1:72, and includes sections of the bulkheads behind each ejection seat. Conclusion The detail on the parts is impressive for the scale, especially in the seat department. Any Quinta outfitted cockpit really needs a crystal-clear of opened canopy to show off the details. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Mig-29SMT Interior 3D Decal (QD32022 for Trumpeter) 1:32 Quinta Studios When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention recently they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or pre-painted Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of relief as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces, lustrous MFDs and metallic-effect hardware, often also including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziploc bag with two folded instruction booklets protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the detailed nature of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to pictures speaking a thousand words, as they say. Additional hints and instructions for the uninitiated are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based sheet give additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would perform that task, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or turn it completely invisible. This set is patterned for the 1:32 Trumpeter kit of the hunchback Mig-29SMT, which is one of those gorgeously ugly aircraft in my opinion. The set comprises three sheets of decals, containing instrument panel sections; multiple large glossy MFD panels surrounded by buttons that the camera doesn’t quite do justice to, having a deep green shiny finish, just like the real displays when switched off. Side consoles and cockpit sidewalls are covered with new parts, and the seat is festooned with new belts and cushions, the latter having a realistic crinkled finish to the vertically stitched surface. Even the sides of the consoles receive attention, as does the HUD box, with a yellowish lens, and the control column is upgraded with a set of buttons that are just superb. The panels are in the more modern bluish grey shade, and you will of course have to remove the moulded-in detail to the cockpit surfaces, as shown in the first diagram on the instructions. Conclusion The detail on the parts is incredible, even down to the infinitesimal switches, the texture of the seat cushions and impressive crispness of the set. If you think the 1:48 sets are impressive (they are), the impressive dial goes all the way up to 11 in 1:32 scale and larger. Any Quinta outfitted cockpit really needs a crystal-clear of opened canopy to show off the details. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. Mig-29 Vacuformed Canopy (QC48008 for all GWH) 1:48 Quinta Studio Quinta are renowned for their superb 3D Printed cockpit decals, but they also have a range of crystal-clear canopies, some of which we’ve reviewed in the past. This set provides a replacement canopy and windscreen for all of Great Wall Hobbies (GWH) single-seater Mig-29s, of which there are a few. It arrives in a small Tupperware style container with a tear-off section to access the lip of the lid. Once removed from the box (which is useful in itself), the canopy is protected in a small Ziploc bag that has an adhesive label applied to one side. The vacformed canopy is a delight to behold, literally crystal clear with frames moulded-in with good sharpness thanks to the female moulding process used in all good vacforms. It will provide the perfect complement to their 3D cockpit sets to show off all that lovely detail, and it would be a great idea if they were also sold as a package. Just thinking out loud, of course. The corners of the forming material have been removed at source to protect the packaging, and to stop you poking or scratching yourself with a sharp corner, and those corners can be really sharp from my experience. How to Vacform Some of us are a little phobic about vacforms in general, and when we’re talking about canopies there’s no need to be, as they’re small and relatively easy to cut out of the sheet thanks to their thinness. Pack the interior of the canopy with Blutak and run round the border with a brand-new sharp scalpel blade, lightly at first. With successive strokes you will see the canopy start to come away from the carrier, so keep working until the whole thing is free. At this point you can test fit it and trim away any excess carefully with a sanding stick or very sharp scissors (I prefer the former). If you are separating the windscreen from the canopy, perform the same actions along the cut-line while the Blutak is still in position. When you remove the Blutak, you may need to remove the residue with a soft cloth, and a dip in Future/Klear will improve the clarity even further. To attach the canopy to your model, use either a PVA-based canopy adhesive, or GS-Hypo cement, which is my personal favourite. Conclusion Shiny, incredibly clear and pocket friendly. There’s nothing more to say really! Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Fi-156 Storch Interior 3D Decal (QD48078 for Tamiya) 1:48 Quinta Studios When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention recently, they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or pre-painted Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of relief as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces, MFDs and metallic-effect hardware, often also including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with two folded instruction booklets protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the detailed nature of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to pictures speaking a thousand words, as they say. Additional hints and instructions for the uninitiated are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based sheet give additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would perform that task, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or turn it completely invisible. This set is patterned for the excellent Tamiya kit of the type that was released a few years back now, but it’s still the top of a very small heap by quite a way. The set comprises two small sheets, containing instrument panel sections, two large radio boxes, levers and other instruments, the dials having a lustrous shiny finish, just like the real glass panes. The panels are in the RLM 66 dark grey, and includes mag straps if your Storch was fitted with a self-defence machine gun, seatbelts for up to three crew members, rudder pedal straps, plus small instruments on the canopy internal framework. Conclusion The detail on the parts is incredible, even down to the infinitesimal switches, the texture of the main panel and impressive crispness of the set. Any Quinta outfitted cockpit really needs a crystal-clear or opened canopy to show off the details. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Mi-24V Hind & NATO Hind Interior 3D Decal (QD48026 & QD48036 for Zvezda Kits) 1:48 Quinta Studios When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention recently they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or pre-painted Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of relief as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces, MFDs and metallic-effect hardware, often also including cushions and seat belts in the set. Other brands are starting to come to market now offering similar products, but in this reviewer’s personal opinion the Quinta sets are still the best. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with two folded instruction booklets protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the detailed nature of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to pictures speaking a thousand words, as they say. Additional hints and instructions for the uninitiated are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based sheet give additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would perform that task, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or turn it completely invisible. While some might argue that they’re not really decals, they arrive on decal paper so to me they’re decals. This set is patterned for the Zvezda kit so that you can depict it in the older green cockpit for a Soviet era aircraft, or a NATO chopper with black interior and an almost identical set of instruments. Each set comprises one large sheet of decals, containing instrument panel sections, multiple switch panels festooned with buttons, dials and other instruments, and a single screen, the black version supplied on a separate section for additional depth when complete. The Soviet era panels are in the Emerald Green shade, while the NATO bird is deepest black, and both include additional consoles, panels and a full set of crew seatbelts. Pictures shamelessly taken from Quinta’s own website Conclusion The detail on the parts is incredible, even down to the infinitesimal switches, the texture of the belts and impressive crispness of the set. Any Quinta outfitted cockpit really needs a crystal-clear of opened canopy to show off the details. Very highly recommended. Crocodile Hind (48026) Emerald Green Interior NATO Hind (48036) Black Interior Review sample courtesy of
  7. Petlyakov Pe-2 Interior 3D Decal & Vacform Canopy (QD48011 & QC48011 for Zvezda) 1:48 Quinta Studio When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention a little while ago they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of relief as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces and metallic-effect hardware, and often including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with a folded instruction booklet protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the awesomeness of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to the “pictures speak a thousand words” maxim. Additional hints and instructions are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions are text-based, giving additional tips to the new user regarding maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would perform that task, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or turn it completely invisible. This set is for the Zvezda kit of this type that first hit our shelves in 2015. The cockpit area from the box is relatively modern, but suffers from totally blank instrument panels that are fitted with decals during construction. This set includes a complete set of new 3D instruments, with additional details added over the main panels for extra relief, it also has a number of instrument packages that are sat next to the two crew, and yet more on the cockpit sidewalls. Finally, you get a bonus of two complete sets of four-point seatbelts for the top crew, and another pair of lap belts for the waist gunner inside the fuselage. If you’re wondering if any of this beautiful looking detail will be seen under the kit canopies, then I have news for you. Quinta have also created a full set of clear vacformed canopies for this aircraft, which has a relatively large amount of greenhouse glass to contend with. Read on. Pe-2 Vacform Canopy (QC48011) 1:48 Quinta Studio Some aircraft have a few canopies, some have a seemingly endless greenhouse of glazing just waiting for your fingerprints or masking disasters. The Zvezda kit of the Pe-2 has a fair number of clear parts, and the necessary thickness of styrene canopies reduces visibility of the interior. If you’ve spent any time working on the detail inside the aircraft, you’ll want a clear view into the fuselage so that all your effort isn’t wasted. If you’ve used the 3D printed decals above, you’ll be highly motivated to show them off, which is just what this set is designed for. It arrives in a sub-miniature Tupperware style box, with the contents secured in a ziplok bag, and each part further protected within its own smaller bag. There are no instructions, as once you’ve cut the canopy parts from the backing sheet, they can be glued in much the same way as the kit parts, and masked as usual. The frames for these parts are very well defined, so there should be no issues with masking them, but unlike styrene canopies, you’ll be best served by either trying some commercial masking sets, or using thin strips of tape to line the frames and fill in between with more tape or masking fluid. The set includes the following glazing panels: Two oval waist gunner windows in the sides of the fuselage Two small C-shaped windows on the fuselage sides above the waist gun ports Clamshell top window/hatch for waist gunner with pop-up forward windscreen to deflect the slipstream Clear floor for the forward cockpit Canopy with a separate rear turret for the aft gunner Flush wing-light cover If you’re new to using vacform canopies, here are a few tips. Push Blutak into the hollow interior of the vacformed parts to give it some rigidity while handling. Cut off any rigid edges with scissors before beginning the cut-out process. When cutting out the canopy, use a brand new #11 blade, and proceed slowly, using gentle, shallow cuts. Some folks use fine scissors to remove the backing sheet, although I’ve never felt the urge to try it as a blade works for me. Once the canopy has been removed, trim the edges in easy stages to refine fit with the model and test fit frequently. To trim the canopy down, you can use fine scissors (taking care not to close the blades fully), or a sanding stick, being careful not to scratch the clear panes. When you’re happy with the shape, remove any remaining Blutak and clean the screen to remove any residue and finger oils, then dip it in Klear/Future to give it a glossy finish that will allow you to strip it back if you make a mistake. If you make a mistake when painting or gluing, drop your canopy in a sacrificial bath of Klear/Future, and the paint/superglue will just flake off into the liquid if it hasn’t breached the Klear barrier. They’re really not as hard to use as people seem to feel. If I can do it with my big stubby fingers, you can too! Conclusion You have to see them to believe how good they are, and for a turn-key solution they are without match in the hobby right now. Add to that the seatbelts, the incredibly competitive price, and they’re a must-have for anyone that isn’t a cockpit painting master. A true innovation. Add the crystal-clear canopies to your build, and you’ll end up with a brilliant model. Extremely highly recommended. 3D Printed Instrument Decals (QD48011) Vacform Canopy (QC48011) Review sample courtesy of
  8. Lockheed P-38F/G Lightning Interior 3D Decal (QD48031 & QD48030 for Tamiya) 1:48 Quinta Studios When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention a few months ago they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of elevation as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces and metallic-effect hardware, and often including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with a folded instruction booklet protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the awesomeness of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to the “pictures speak a thousand words” maxim. Additional hints and instructions are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based, giving additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would perform that task, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or turn it completely invisible. This set is patterned for the still new Tamiya kit of the P-38F/G Lightning, the twin-boom heavy fighter from Lockheed that was hugely successful in its role. The set comprises one sheet of decals, containing instrument panel sections, side consoles, additional black boxes, levers and a full set of seatbelts for the pilot’s convenience and safety. Conclusion The detail on the parts is incredible, even down to the infinitesimal switches and impressive crispness of the set. This cockpit really needs a crystal-clear or opened canopy to show off the details. Very highly recommended. P-38F P-38G Review sample courtesy of
  9. Mig-29 SMT (9-19) Interior 3D Decal (QD48024 for Great Wall Hobby) 1:48 Quinta Studios When Quinta Studio’s innovative products first came to our attention a few months ago they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of elevation as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces and metallic-effect hardware, and often including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with a folded instruction booklet protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the awesomeness of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to the “pictures speak a thousand words” maxim. Additional hints and instructions are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based, giving additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would perform that task, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or turn it completely invisible. This set is patterned for the lovely/ugly Great Wall Hobby (GWH) Mig-29SMT (9-19), with its distinctive spine hump that houses additional avionics. The set comprises one relatively small sheet, containing instrument panel sections, and two large MFD panels surrounded by buttons and other instruments, the former having a deep green shiny finish, just like the real displays when switched off. The background to the panels are in the more modern bluish shade, and includes the side consoles plus the electronics panel, part C66. Conclusion The detail on the parts is incredible, even down to the infinitesimal switches and impressive crispness of the set. This cockpit really needs a crystal-clear or opened canopy to show off the details. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  10. A-10A Thunderbolt II Interior 3D Decal (QD32008 - For Trumpeter Kit) 1:32 Qunita Studio When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention a few months ago they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of elevation as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces, lustrous MFD screens and metallic-effect hardware, and often including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with a folded instruction booklet protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the awesomeness of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to the “pictures speak a thousand words” maxim. Additional hints and instructions are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based sheet gives additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. This set for the Large scale Trumpeter kit supplies the instrument panel, side consoles and additional instruments on the A-10's front screen frame. Also included are the cockpit anti-spalling side pads, ejection seat pads, seat belts, seat handles and seat placards, as well as RBF tags. Conclusion They’re still a highly impressive product and look to be very useful, even more so to those who are not fans of PE (Like myself). Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. F-16I SUFA Interior 3D Decal (QD48046 - For Hasegawa Kit) 1:48 Quinta Studio When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention a few months ago they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of elevation as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces, lustrous MFD screens and metallic-effect hardware, and often including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with a folded instruction booklet protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the awesomeness of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to the “pictures speak a thousand words” maxim. Additional hints and instructions are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based sheet gives additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. This set for the Hasegawa F-16I Sufa supplies all of the front and rear instrument panels and side consoles. Also included are the cockpit sidewalls, seat pads, seat belts, seat handels and seat placards, as well as RBF tags. Conclusion They’re still a highly impressive product and look to be very useful, even more so to those who are not fans of PE (Like myself). Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. F-14A & F-14D Interior 3D Decal (QD48048 & QD48070 for Tamiya) 1:48 Qunita Studio When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention a few months ago they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of elevation as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces, lustrous MFD screens and metallic-effect hardware, and often including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with a folded instruction booklet protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so they should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the awesomeness of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to the “pictures speak a thousand words” maxim. Additional hints and instructions are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions in the text-based sheet gives additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. There are two sets because of the difference in avionics and instruments in each variant, with the -D having a group of Multi-Function Displays (MFDs) and more streamlined belts and ejection initiation handles for the seats, the -A using the Martin-Baker Mk. GRU-7(A) with additional twin head-loop handles, the -D flying with the more advanced MB Mk. 14 NACES with seat-cushion actuator only. Each set has a full complement of instrument panels, side consoles, ancillary instrument clusters, sidewall details, and of course the seatbelts with pull-handles as already mentioned. Each set also has a few tiny parts for the coaming, which you’ll need to remember to put in place before you attach the coaming to the cockpit aperture. F-14A Tomcat (QD48048 for Tamiya) F-14D Tomcat (QD48070 for Tamiya) If you’re wondering whether the -D set would work with the new(er) AMK Tomcat, fear not as Quinta have you covered. They have patterned a set just for this kit, and you can pick one up at the link below: F-14D Super Tomcat (QD48070 for AMK) Conclusion They’re still a highly impressive product and are likely to remain so to this reviewer, even after perusing several different sets, and I’m itching to use them live in the wild on a project soon. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. Hi folks, Sorry for another one. Some may have saw that I just bought this: ... partly because I like Russian helicopters but also because I'd seen Quinta Studio's new 3D-printed-on-to-decal-paper cockpit parts and wanted a relatively low-risk project to try them on. It arrived yesterday, and today I made a start. To use the Quinta Studio set there are a few of small consoles the instructions say you have to scratchbuild in order to attach the printed parts to, so I started with that. I've then gone about prepainting most of the interior and fiddly bits. I'd planned to just chuck this together but have ended up painting all the interior parts including the engines. Tomorrow I can begin assembly.
  14. Yak-130 Interior 3D Decal (QD48007 for Zvezda) 1:48 Quinta Studios When Quinta’s innovative products first came to our attention they caused quite a stir, as well they should. The replacement Instrument Panels and internal details are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to seeing simplified styrene instrument panels, or Photo-Etch Brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they might be pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers and colours on a flat carrier film, having as much in the way of elevation as is needed to complete a realistic panel printed in the correct colours, complete with shiny dial faces and metallic-effect hardware, and often including cushions and seat belts in the set. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with a folded instruction booklet protecting the decals, which are also separately bagged, so should reach you in good condition. The pictorial instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the awesomeness of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to the “pictures speak a thousand words” maxim. Additional hints and instructions are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit parts and other useful tips. The technical instructions are text-based, giving additional tips to the new user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would perform that task, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or render it completely invisible. This set is patterned for the recent Zvezda Yak-130, or Mitten as NATO call it. The set comprises two sheets, the larger one containing a full set of seat cushions, belts, straps and even the pull-handles to initiate ejection, complete with red warning paint where necessary. The smaller sheet contains instrument panel segments, and three large MFD panels per cockpit are surrounded by buttons, and have a deep green shiny finish, just like the real thing when switched off. There are also two white det-cord canopy breaker runs that can be seen in the top of the canopy, shattering the plexiglass in the event of an emergency exit. These can be attached invisibly with a little Klear/Future. The panels are in the more modern bluish shade, and due to how the panels are fitted into every space around the pilots and MFDs, they are supplied in a number of parts that fill up the area gradually, making the task easier for the modeller. Conclusion The detail on the parts are incredible, even down to the cushions with a quilted surface, differing textures and impressive crispness of the whole set. I’d love to see the printing process in-motion, but to me it still seems like magick! This big open cockpit now really needs a vacform canopy to show off the details, especially as my Zvezda kit seems to have arrived with badly fogged/scuffed canopies. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Pe-8 (TD-7) Interior 3D Decal & Vacform Canopy (QD72005 & QC72005 for Zvezda) 1:72 Quinta Studio When Quinta’s products first came to our attention a few months ago, there was a lot of noise and gibberish typed because of jaws hitting our keyboards. These things are mind-boggling to look at, because we’re used to simplified styrene instrument panels, or Photo-Etch brass panels with either two layers of etch, or laminated parts that can be tricky to glue together, even though they are pre-painted for your ease. But decals? These aren’t your run-of-the-mill decals though, they’re 3D printed in many layers on a carrier film, having as much in the way of elevation as is needed to complete a realistic panel that has also been printed in the correct colours, and even has glossy dial faces and metallic-looking hardware of the ancillaries such as seat belts. Each set arrives in a ziplok bag with a folded instruction booklet protecting the decals so they should reach you in good condition. The visual instructions are printed on glossy paper, and are shown in full colour as befits the awesomeness of the sets, showing exactly where each part should go on the actual model, so there’s no confusion due to the “pictures speak a thousand words” maxim. Additional hints and instructions are also included, marking out parts needing bases, kit part numbers and other useful tips. There are further instructions on another sheet using the printed word, giving additional tips to the novice or forgetful user about maximising adhesion and preventing lift at the edges by wicking in super glue. That section is definitely worth a good read. Application is much the same as your standard decal, but you will need to remove any raised detail that would be underneath the location depicted in the instructions, and some new parts will need small backing panels or bases on which to apply the decal. A slim piece of sheet styrene would perform that task, and painting the edges a matching colour should minimise its appearance or even turn it completely invisible. This set is for the Zvezda kit of this monster that first graced our shelves in 2009, but has been re-issued in a new box as recently as 2017. I’ve been eyeing it for a while, so used this review as an excuse to pick one up. The cockpit area from the box is relatively modern, but suffers from totally blank instrument panels that have standard 2D decals applied during construction. This set from Quinta includes a complete set of new 3D instrument panels, with additional details added over the main panels for extra relief. It also has a number of instrument packages that are sat next to the two crew, and yet more on the cockpit sidewalls under the port windows. Finally, you get a bonus package of two textured cushions for the crew, two complete sets of four-point seatbelts for the top crew, and two more sets of lap belts for the radio operator and bombardier buried away within the glazed areas of the fuselage. If you’re wondering if any of this beautiful looking detail under the slightly unimpressive and hazy (on my kit at least) kit canopies, then I have news for you. Quinta have also created a full set of clear vacformed canopies for this beast, which has a ton of greenhouse glass to contend with. Read on. Pe-8 (TD-7) Vacform Canopy (QC72005) 1:72 Quinta Studio Some aircraft have a few canopies, some have a seemingly endless greenhouse of glazing just waiting for your fingerprints or masking disasters. The Zvezda kit of the Pe-8 has a ton of canopy parts, and on my edition they’re not the best, having a patina and haze to the surface. If you’ve spent any time working on the detail inside the aircraft, you’ll want a clear view into the fuselage so that all your effort isn’t wasted. If you’ve used the 3D printed decals above, you’ll be highly motivated to show them off, which is just what this set is designed for. It arrives in a sub-miniature Tupperware style box, with the contents secured in a ziplok bag, and each part further protected within its own smaller bag. There are no instructions, as once you’ve cut the canopy parts from the backing sheet, they can be glued in much the same way as the kit parts, and masked as usual. The set includes the following glazing panels: Two rear gunner installations in the rear of the engine nacelles Combined nose glazing and front turret in one piece, rather than two halves and the front glazing Top turret dome Fuselage side windows in short runs to replace the thick kit parts Two complete sets of canopy glazing to allow cutting of the opener if you wish Rear gunner dome with clear central panel Under-chin glazing panel plus smaller hatch insert to the rear Two flush wing-light covers If you’re new to using vacform canopies, here are a few tips. Cut off any rigid edges with scissors before beginning the cut-out process. When cutting out the canopy, use a brand new #11 blade, and proceed slowly, using gentle, shallow cuts. Once the canopy has been removed, trim the edges in easy stages to refine fit with the model. To trim the canopy down, you can use fine scissors (taking care not to close the blades fully), or a sanding stick, being careful not to scratch the panes. When you’re happy with the shape, remove any remaining Blutak and clean the screen to remove any residue, then dip is in Klear/Future to give it a glossy finish that will allow you to strip it back if you make a mistake. If you make a mistake when painting or gluing, drop your canopy in a bath of Klear/Future, and the paint/superglue will just flake off into the liquid if it hasn’t crossed the Klear barrier. To glue the canopies in place, use GS-Hypo cement, one of the available PVA canopy glues, or very careful application of a non-fogging super glue. They’re really not as hard as people make out. If I can do it, you can too! Conclusion You have to see them to believe how good they are, and for a turn-key solution the 3D decals are without match in the hobby right now. Add to that the seatbelts, cushions and the incredibly competitive price, and they’re a must-have for anyone that isn’t a true cockpit painting master. A true innovation. Add the crystal clear canopies, and you’ll end up with a brilliant model. Extremely highly recommended. 3D Printed Instrument Decals (QD72005) Vacform Canopy (QC72005) Review sample courtesy of
  16. An interesting new player: Quinta Studio https://www.facebook.com/groups/QuintaStudio/ Designer: Alexander Trofimov https://www.facebook.com/AlexLavka 3D printed polymerized vinyl cockpit decals, made of layers of colored resin they have more depth than color printed PE stuff. The beginning of the end for the Eduard market dominance in the field of interior detailing sets? Where to find these products: https://www.ebay.com/sch/lavka_75/m.html https://northstarmodels.ecwid.com/Quinta-Studio-c40242335 V.P.
  17. So, my cockpit set arived directly from Russia yesterday! looks really exquisite! point is I definitely did not decide yet on an operator, scheme or conflict.... seems to be difficult! the kit decals are from Begemot, so no issues here, but somehow I do not fancy a Russian scheme... they look so common, or arbitrary... just like generic but I usually build something with some personality/ history in mind... (I have a Czech one already build/ modified even including the famous 2°30...) I nearly decided on a Peruian scheme with sharkmouth, when I noticed that these are either Mi-24Ds or Ps.... so.. not sure yet! Probably I really need the new Begemot sheet or an old Zotz one... ... ... apart from that, Eduard just released a of of PE for interior, exterior, cargo bay........ very tempting! stay tuned and best inspire me! /Werner
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