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  1. Quake Crackle Creator Textures Crackle base (A.MIG-2182), Old Blacktop (A.MIG-2183), Dry Season Clay (A.MIG-2186) AMMO of Mig Jiménez It’s no secret that things crack and break up with old age or due to droughts. Old roads, dried out wells, rivers or ponds, deserts – the list is endless. Creating those effects in miniature is difficult, but a task that’s about to get easier. This new range of pastes from AMMO gives you a selection of colours to make your diorama or basing projects that much easier, allowing you to create a surface that will crack up as it dries, with the cracks more pronounced the thicker the layer you apply. Each one arrives with 40ml of product in the clear plastic pot, with a white screw-cap that has a one-time security seal that you break on opening. Inside is a glutinous liquid, and you are advised to apply it with a spatula rather than a brush, because the particles will get into the bristles and ruin your brush in short order. I used a palette knife that I had on hand, choosing a tapered blade to make accessing the 21mm diameter neck of the pot a little easier. Once on your spatula, it is quite stable, and won’t drip off immediately, but hanging around probably isn’t all that wise, so apply it to your substrate as soon as you can, laying it on thicker if you want larger, deeper crack, or thinner if you want just a few smaller cracks where it’s deepest. It spreads easily, and doesn’t sag too much, so you can create textures and humps within the paste to add some variety in profile as well as the size of the cracks. It sets reasonably quickly, but the full effect isn’t achieved until it is fully dry in 24 hours. If you paint it on thinly, rather than apply a layer of 0.5mm or more, it’s likely that it might not crack unless you are applying it to an absorbent base. My bases for this experiment were credit card sized plastic sheets, which I scuffed up with a sanding stick to promote adhesion. The test above shows the pre-mixed shades, both of which were applied too thinly initially, so were re-coated more liberally to achieve the desired result. The cracking is random, deepest where the application was at its thickest, working particularly well on the Old Blacktop, which was laid very thickly. As well as the pre-mixed colours, there is also a Crackle Base, to which you can add your own colour from many brands of acrylic paint, although they’d prefer it if you used AMMO paints of course. You must bear in mind that the base is white, so any colour you add will become lighter as a result, so pick a darker shade than you need to counter this effect. In my testing of the base, I mixed up two batches in grey and red, which you can see above turned out lighter grey and a muted reddish pink once mixed. You can literally add whatever colour you like to the Base however, as long as it is a compatible acrylic. My test used two Citadel shades, as they were what was to hand, but test a small quantity if you plan on using other brands, just in case. Application is straight forward, and if you use a smaller spatula to place the paste with accuracy, accidents should be reduced. The cured paste can be pried off non-porous surfaces with the edge of a sharp blade, but if you notice it immediately during application, a cotton bud, followed by another dampened with water should remove any unwanted residue, as would an old brush that you’re not worried about ruining. Conclusion A useful tool for dioramas and bases, available in different shades as a first step for further work in breaking up the monotone colour for extra realism. Recommended. Crackle Base (A.MIG-2182) Old Blacktop (A.MIG-2183) Dry Season Clay (A.MIG-2186) Review sample courtesy of
  2. Moss Diorama & Basing Materials and Dio Glue Garden Center AMMO of Mig Jiménez Diorama and basing are Dark Arts to which I’ve only just ventured by dipping a toe into basing, and if you’re unfamiliar with the term ‘basing’, it refers to creating realistic bases for your figure models, such as Games Workshop, Star Wars Legions and many other figure-based tabletop games. Back when I was a figure painter in the 90s, you’d just sprinkle some sand onto a base over some glue, paint it a mud or sand colour, and if you were feeling brave, you’d dry-brush it in a lighter shade. Today, there are hundreds, if not thousands of products that you can use to add some variation to your bases to set them apart from others, and create a miniature diorama beneath your figure or vehicle. This new series of Moss products from AMMO is intended to create texture on the bases that could look like moss or low-growing flora on the base, with a different texture to grass, sand or mud. We have four bottles in for review, plus a PVA based Dio Glue, all in identical bottles that hold 35ml of product under a white screw-cap that has a single-use security seal to prevent leaking during shipping, and to ensure you are receiving an unused bottle for your hard-earned cash. Dio Glue The glue is PVA based, but mixed to a fluid consistency that allows it to be painted onto surfaces easily with reduced surface tension so it won’t retract into puddles on your model, and it is also thin enough to be able to wick into existing applications if you wanted to add another layer or touch up any bald spots. It can be diluted further with water, and clean-up is also with water, so if you splash it somewhere you don’t want it, simply moisten a brush and wipe it away, being careful to remove as much of the residue as you can, as it dries with a glossy sheen. It also dries clear, so a dusting of matt varnish will remove any shine that shows through on your model, but where it soaks into Moss or other absorbent materials, I can confirm that it dries matt, and it also gets a good grip between the materials and base, making it difficult to brush off the Moss once the glue is dry. Moss We received the following four bottles for review, and have created a couple of bases with two shades per base to demonstrate the finish you can achieve in a very short period. Some of my spare bases were prepared by priming and brush-painting a coat of brown acrylic to represent soil where the base may be seen beneath, and the edges were painted a very dark grey after applying the product and letting it dry. Clearly, if this was for a real model rather than just as a test, there would be other elements added, maybe even a figure, and possible shading with paints and washes, but it should give you enough of a view to know what to expect. The powder is something akin to coarse flock, dyed to depict the different colours, and during shipping they can settle to different levels as you can see above, so it’s best to give them a good shake before use to reduce clumping of the fibres on your model. It can be scooped out of the container with a small tool or spatula for controlled application, or shaken over the model directly to create a random pattern, and you can either coat the base with glue before application or after, holding a brushload of Dio Glue in position until it has wicked into the material to prevent lifting the Moss away on your brush. Moss Yellow (A.MIG-8828) Braken Green (A.MIG-8823) Fenland Green (A.MIG-8820) Lichen Orange (A.MIG-8829) Conclusion An easy-to-use diorama and basing tool with its own glue that makes life more convenient, as well as bringing the ability to represent different colours and textures of moss or low-growing foliage to you models. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. Messerschmitt Bf.109G-6 (RFSQS-48029 for Tamiya) 1:48 Red Fox Studio via AMMO of Mig Jiménez During the last few years we have been blessed by the introduction of new technologies to our hobby, amongst them being 3D Printing in coloured resins to create instrument panels, dials and all sorts of interior (and exterior) details for our models in various scales. New company (to us) Red Studio of Hungary have begun producing a range of these panels in various scales under the distribution of AMMO by Mig Jiménez, which broadens their introduction to the market appreciably. Their sets arrive in clear foil bags with a red card topper for display on racking, held together by a single staple. With the staple undone, the bag empties to unveil a folded card backing that also has the parts printed on its satin surface, a concertina folded instruction sheet, and the sheet of decals that face outward at the back. The sheets are small, but the detail is exceptional, looking about as realistic as a panel can get at this scale. The instructions lay out clearly where the parts should go, and the areas that will need their moulded-in detail removing are marked out in blue over photographs of the kit parts, which are also called out by sprue and part number for your ease. The next step shows where the individual parts should fit, again arrowed to their location on the actual parts. This set is patterned for the Tamiya Messerschmitt Bf.109G-6, and preparation begins with the removal of the moulded-in detail on the instrument panels, throttle-quadrant, plus other equipment boxes on the sidewall and right console. In addition, it also includes an extra panel for controlling the 210mm Wfr.Gr.21 rocket tubes that this variant could carry under its wings in an attempt to break up the bomber streams with poorly-aimed, almost indiscriminately into their echelons. The main instrument panel consists of three or four parts depending on which variant you are building, adding the rocket panel if needed. The panel that the fuel line is wrapped around is a large part that brings a lot to the party, with another four parts on the side walls, and three small decals added to the boxes on the starboard console. There are several notes made throughout the instructions advising you not to try to cut the decals with a scalpel as they could disintegrate due to their delicate nature. They also tell you that you can apply most types of washes and varnishes over the surface once they are applied, and that once wet they are somewhat flexible, although there are limits of course, which is stated to be 5%. The resins used in production are also ultra-violet (UV) resistant, so your dials and other light parts shouldn’t be affected over time, retaining the same look as if they had just been applied. Here is a link to an instruction guide on how to apply this type of decal to your models, which should help you avoid any pitfalls. Conclusion The detail applied to 3D printed instrument panel is at the current apex of realism, and they’re one of my must-have choices of aftermarket for the discerning modeller. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. F/A-18C Hornet (RFSQS-48085 for Kinetic) 1:48 Red Fox Studio via AMMO of Mig Jiménez During the last few years we have been blessed by the introduction of new technologies to our hobby, amongst them being 3D Printing in coloured resins to create instrument panels, dials and all sorts of interior (and exterior) details for our models in various scales. New company (to us) Red Studio of Hungary have begun producing a range of these panels in various scales under the distribution of AMMO by Mig Jiménez, which broadens their introduction to the market appreciably. Their sets arrive in clear foil bags with a red card topper for display on racking, held together by a single staple. With the staple undone, the bag empties to unveil a folded card backing that also has the parts printed on its satin surface, a concertina folded instruction sheet, and the sheet of decals that face outward at the back. The sheets are small, but the detail is exceptional, looking about as realistic as a panel can get at this scale. The instructions lay out clearly where the parts should go, and the areas that will need their moulded-in detail removing are marked out in blue over photographs of the kit parts, which are also called out by sprue and part number for your ease. The next step shows where the individual parts should fit, again arrowed to their location on the actual parts. The F/A-18C hornet was a single-seater, and as such the 3D printed parts are all for the front cockpit, although the instructions show a two-seat cockpit tub. The side consoles, instrument panel, centre section of the coaming and two quarter panels are first relieved of their moulded-in detail, then have the new parts applied over the top using super glue or PVA, preferably after painting is completed for the rest of the cockpit to avoid any tricky masking. There are several notes made throughout the instructions advising you not to try to cut the decals with a scalpel as they could disintegrate due to their delicate nature. They also tell you that you can apply most types of washes and varnishes over the surface once they are applied, and that once wet they are somewhat flexible, although there are limits of course, which is stated to be 5%. The resins used in production are also ultra-violet (UV) resistant, so your dials and other light parts shouldn’t be affected over time, retaining the same look as if they had just been applied. Here is a link to an instruction guide on how to apply this type of decal to your models, which should help you avoid any pitfalls. Conclusion The detail applied to 3D printed instrument panel is at the current apex of realism, and they’re one of my must-have choices of aftermarket for the discerning modeller. If you’ve got a Kinetic early Hornet, this set is a perfect choice. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor (RFSQS-48057 for Hasegawa) 1:48 Red Fox Studio via AMMO of Mig Jiménez During the last few years we have been blessed by the introduction of new technologies to our hobby, amongst them being 3D Printing in coloured resins to create instrument panels, dials and all sorts of interior (and exterior) details for our models in various scales. New company (to us) Red Studio of Hungary have begun producing a range of these panels in various scales under the distribution of AMMO by Mig Jiménez, which broadens their introduction to the market appreciably. Their sets arrive in clear foil bags with a red card topper for display on racking, held together by a single staple. With the staple undone, the bag empties to unveil a folded card backing that also has the parts printed on its satin surface, a concertina folded instruction sheet, and the sheet of decals that face outward at the back. The sheets are small, but the detail is exceptional, looking about as realistic as a panel can get at this scale. The instructions lay out clearly where the parts should go, and the areas that will need their moulded-in detail removing are marked out in blue over photographs of the kit parts, which are also called out by sprue and part number for your ease. The next step shows where the individual parts should fit, again arrowed to their location on the actual parts. This set is designed with the Hasegawa kit of this top-of-the-line 5th Gen American fighter in mind, and includes a choice of two styles of three-part main panels depicting the screens either on or off to suit your preference, plus two large side console decals with their attendant diagonal sections where the consoles rise toward the front of the cockpit. You’ll need to remove some of the moulded-in details on the kit parts of course, but the effort is most definitely worth it. There are a number of notes made throughout the instructions advising you not to try to cut the decals with a scalpel as they could disintegrate due to their delicate nature. They also tell you that you can apply most types of washes and varnishes over the surface once they are applied, and that once wet they are somewhat flexible, although there are limits of course, which is stated to be 5%. The resins used in production are also ultra-violet (UV) resistant, so your dials and other light parts shouldn’t be affected over time, retaining the same look as if they had just been applied. Here is a link to an instruction guide on how to apply this type of decal to your models, which should help you avoid any pitfalls. Conclusion The detail applied to 3D printed instrument panel is at the current apex of realism, and they’re one of my must-have choices of aftermarket for the discerning modeller, essential for the big open expanse that is the cockpit of a Raptor. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Waffen SS Spring Einchenlaubmuster Camouflage Figure Set (A.MIG-7043) AMMO of Mig Jiménez As WWII progressed, both sides experimented with hiding their troops from enemy eyes by applying camouflage colours to their uniforms, helmets and overcoats in various patterns and styles. Even a slight increase in the time needed for the enemy to see and identify upcoming soldiers gives the camouflaged troops precious seconds to get into position, increasing the possibility of success in their endeavours. Germany used camo extensively in later war, and true to form they used complicated patterns to hide their troops. They created the well-known pea-dot camo, as well as other variants and styles, using different shades based upon the conditions and seasons in effect, although that meant providing more uniforms per soldier, but some were reversible to cut down on the bulk of their baggage, as they seldom carried wardrobes with them whilst out on the field and engaged in combat. Imagine that? This six-paint set arrives in a cardboard box with a stand-up header, inner tray and some usage suggestions printed on the rear. Inside the box are six bottles that are appropriate to the camo type. Every bottle contains 17ml of paint that is dispensed by a dropper that is found under the white screw-top cap. Inside each bottle is a little stirring ball that rattles when agitated. AMMO paints separate quite readily, so having a ball in the bottle makes mixing them a lot easier, especially when giving them a good shake or using a mechanical shaker. We’re all familiar with the quality of AMMO paints by now, and they have a pretty good reputation amongst us modellers, and dry a little slower than some of the competition, which could be a useful benefit when you’re talking about painting figures. The paints are as follows: AMMO.F-532 Red Brown AMMO.F-533 Dark Brown AMMO.F-534 Olive Green AMMO.F-555 Lime Green AMMO.F556 Dark Green AMMO.F-558 Beige Pink The shades should be very useful for creating a good range of tones to depict your figure’s uniform, that were used by Waffen SS units from 1941 (Oak Leaf A) and 1943 (Oak Leaf until the end of World War II. Most of the garments were reversible as previously mentioned, with spring camouflage on one side and autumn camouflage on the other. If you use a wet palette, you should be able to get a myriad of shades between each one to help your figure look more realistic. They cover well and the colours are strong, with the base shades offering a backdrop to begin building up your scheme, and the darker shades adding extra depth where needed. Conclusion If you’re painting WWII German troops and you don’t have the right colours, you could certainly save yourself some time and head-scratching by picking up one of these sets, just needing a little bit of patience and talent to make good on your plans. Review sample courtesy of
  7. AVRO Lancaster & Other Night Bomber Acrylic Colours (A.MIG-7252) AMMO of Mig Jiménez More paint from those prodigiously productive people at Ammo. This set includes six colours in 17ml bottles in a cardboard tray inside a cardboard pack, each with a dropper top and yellow cap that is an indicator that there is a stainless steel "stirring ball" inside to assist with mixing the paint, which is also mentioned on the box. This is a good thing, as AMMO acrylic paint does tend to separate out when left unattended. By now it's common knowledge that AMMO paints are pretty good, and I have a few friends that swear by them. They go on easily, settle down well and once fully dry after 24 hours they are robust enough to withstand sensible handling. They dilute with AMMO thinners (A.MIG-2000) or water, and can either be airbrushed or brush painted, depending on your preference. This set covers the main colours used to paint the lumbering night bombers that the RAF sent in huge numbers to erode the Nazi’s capability to wage war against the Allies, which they accomplished after many losses. It is intended primarily for the Lancaster, mainly due to the fact that the Border 1:32 Lanc has recently reached our shores after long delays due to reasons we won’t go into. There’s also the relatively recent 1:48 Lancaster kit from HK Models too, if the cost of the Border kit sends your wallet into hiding. It is of course also suitable for any of the RAF bombers that tackled the job during the night hours, from Stirlings to Wellingtons, Hampdens and beyond. The colours within the box are as follows: A.MIG-0046 Matt Black A.MIG-0070 Dark Earth A.MIG-0203 Light Compass Ghost Grey FS36375 A.MIG-0219 Interior Green FS34226 (BS283) A.MIG-0912 Red Brown Shadow A.MIG-0915 Dark Green The paints can be airbrushed or brush painted as already mentioned, and you can of course mix the shades to give yourself even more variety, as is demonstrated on the box front and back, which shows a few examples of the use of these (and other) colours to create highly realistic models. Your artistry will of course play a part in whether you achieve such levels of brilliance, but this is a good palette to start your RAF Bomber career or step up a level. There is one caveat to my eyes however, as I feel that the Dark Green is a bit vibrant, and not drab or dark enough for my liking. I brushed out the two main camo colours on an old Hawk wing to see whether I was imagining it or not, and it confirmed my feelings, as you can see below. I feel it would benefit from a dark undercoat, maybe using a black or dark grey primer on your model instead of the usual grey, but you’re perfectly entitled to disagree with me. The light grey and red brown shades don’t immediately stand out as useful for a British night bomber, but they are included to create the prominent exhaust staining that is visible on many of the heavy bombers that have survived a sufficient number of missions to get dirty. Careful study of the real thing and ideally spraying the paint to give you the soft-edged wispy effect that is usually evident, it will take a bit more of your usual skill to get the job done well. The Interior Green is used within the airframe, although the more prominent sections of the cockpit were often painted black, so check the instructions for your particular model before laying down the green. As an aside, I’m not a brush-painting modeller apart from painting small details, but brushing these colours onto the unprepared Hawk wing was quite an experience, as the paint brushes out really well, leaving no obvious brush marks behind, especially if you ‘lay off’ the paint by drawing your brush lightly over the paint perpendicular to the original brush strokes. That requires the paint to remain wet for long enough for you to finish the job, but at around 27°c last night, it was still possible. I was impressed, and after two light coats it was pretty solid, even without any primer under it. I also sprayed a little grey primer on another section to see whether it darkened the green at all, and it didn’t. Dark grey or black primer would be my guess to give it a darker hue, but test the theory before putting any paint on your model. Conclusion If you don’t have the correct colours for your latest project and want to get them all in a handy box, this could well be the set for you. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. RAF Coastal Command Acrylic Paint Set (A.MIG-7248) AMMO of Mig Jiménez RAF Coastal Command worked by the side of the Navy’s Fleet Air Arm to protect the coast of the British Isles and take the fight to the enemy with strikes on their shipping, as well as hunting the dreaded U-Boats that were taking a toll on our Merchant Navy and warships, both essential to the survival of WWII Britain. Dubbed the Cinderella Service by an Admiralty Lord, the service was always near the bottom of the list when it came to funding, and didn’t receive the adulation that others received, An example of which is that Coastal Command played an important part in the Battle of Britain, even recovering downed airmen so that they could go back into the fight. This four-paint set arrives in a clear clamshell box that has a card header with some colour use suggestions on the rear in the form of side-view profiles of some example aircraft. Inside are four bottles that are best described as murky and mostly grey, especially if they haven’t been shaken up recently. Each bottle contains 17ml of paint that is dispensed by a dropper that is found under the yellow screw-top cap. Inside each bottle is a little stirring ball that rattles when agitated. AMMO paints separate quite readily as you can see when they’ve been still for long periods, so having a ball in the bottle makes mixing them a lot easier. We’re all familiar with the quality of AMMO paints by now, and they have a pretty good reputation amongst us modellers, drying a little slower than some of the competition, which can be of benefit when hand painting details. In the box you get the following shades: A.MIG-0250 Night Blue Grey A.MIG-0217 Dark Slate Grey A.MIG-0047 Satin White A.MIG-0243 Sky Type S (BS 210) The bottles all look rather similar when they have been allowed to separate in their carton, but once agitated the differences become more apparent, although they’re all muted shades so the differences aren’t huge except for the white. You may want to pick up or already have a bottle of dark grey or black to modulate the other shades to depict fading, or to create a darker shade to paint a base onto which the pure and/or lightened colours can be applied. The profiles on the back of the box shows a Beaufighter, Beaufort, and a Wellington that is highly adapted to operation at sea, which is of course not an exhaustive list, but useful as examples. Conclusion If you want to model an RAF Coastal Command aircraft from the late 30s to the end of WWII, this set is going to be extremely useful to take away any guesswork when it comes time to paint your latest creation. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  9. Chrome Sheet (Self-Adhesive) A.MIG-8248 AMMO of Mig Jiménez There’s nothing like actual metal to represent a metal finish on a surface, and modellers have been using tin foil glued onto their kits with foil adhesive on panels for years. This product from AMMO arrives in a resealable foil bag, and contains five sheets of self-adhesive chrome foil on a paper backing, at around A4 size (280 x 195mm). The foil is very thin, measuring 0.1mm when adhered to the backing paper, measuring less than half of that when removed from the paper. It was on removal of the paper that I noticed that the film feels almost like plastic, although it looks highly realistic on the paper. I cut an oversize section away in the usual manner to apply to a panel on a fuselage half that I had lying about, and applied it to the long straight edge, burnishing it down as I applied it to the surface. It is quite forgiving and can be repositioned if it wanders off from your intended destination, but when I tried to remove another piece later it felt more difficult, possibly due to the burnishing down, but it also may be the adhesive bond becoming stronger as time goes by. Burnishing over detail was difficult due to the foil flexing back, and there was an element of bounce-back in deeper curves that made it almost impossible get it to conform, so I had to use a cocktail stick to define the panel lines well-enough to cut the panel edges to shape. Small raised areas tended to trap air pockets because of this resistance, and smaller panel lines such as inspection hatches were almost impossible to find in order to define or cut around. It doesn’t conform to the surfaces like a true metal foil does, tending to crease or pucker rather than follow the contours, and it doesn’t have sufficient flexibility to conform to compound curves, although it will adapt to smooth curves in one direction. This makes it difficult to use in foiling a model aircraft, the surfaces of which are usually a mass of compound curves in all directions with only the occasional exception. I don’t remember seeing the F-117 Wobblin’ Goblin in chrome though, so that’s a shame. Scratching the foil creates a permanent mark that can’t be burnished or sanded out like traditional metal foils, so care must be taken when applying it. The instructions advise against using metal tools in application for this reason. Conclusion The applications for this type of foil are limited to flat, single direction or lightly curved surfaces that have few or no raised or recessed details within the area to be foiled. It must be applied to shiny, smooth surfaces, and even a tiny mote of dust between the foil and surface will blemish the surface unless you remove it and reapply. Large open areas will be the primary use for this type of foil, although if you’re more skilled than this modeller, you might be able to tease more uses out of it. Not really recommended for foiling complex curved, detailed surfaces. Review sample courtesy of
  10. Modern Luftwaffe Paint Set Vol.2 (A.MIG-7247) AMMO of Mig Jiménez The post WWII German Luftwaffe were reinstated after a suitable period under the leadership of WWII ace Johannes Steinhoff and included a number of well-known WWII pilots who were still of an age to be capable of serving their country. When Germany reunified after the Soviet Union broke up, they inherited some former Soviet equipment, some of which was kept in service for extended periods, eventually being repainted appropriate colours for the newly reunified air force. This four-paint set arrives in a clear clamshell box with a card header and some colour use suggestions on the rear in the form of side profiles of some aircraft in Luftwaffe service. Inside are four bottles that are best described as murky and mostly grey. Each bottle contains 17ml of paint that is dispensed by a dropper that is found under the yellow screw-top cap. Inside each bottle is a little stirring ball that rattles when agitated. AMMO paints separate quite readily as you can see from the box photo, so having a ball in the bottle makes mixing them a lot easier. We’re all familiar with the quality of AMMO paints by now, and they have a pretty good reputation amongst us modellers, and dry a little slower than some of the competition, which can be of benefit when hand painting details. The bottles all look rather similar when they have been allowed to separate in their package, but once agitated the differences become more apparent, although they’re all shades of grey so the differences aren’t huge. You may want to pick up or already have white or dark grey/black to modulate the other shades to depict fading, or to create a darker shade to paint a base onto which the pure and lightened colours can be applied. The box shows Mig-29s, F-4 Phantoms and EF2000 Eurofighters, but that’s not an exhaustive list. Conclusion If you want to model a German post WWII Luftwaffe aircraft from the late 50s onward, this set is going to be very useful to take away any guesswork when it comes time for painting greys. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  11. Waffen SS Autumn Eichenlaubmuster Camouflage Figures Set (A.MIG-7041) Erbsenmuster Pea-Dot Camouflage Figures Set (A.MIG-7042) AMMO of Mig Jiménez As WWII progressed, all sides experimented with hiding their troops from enemy eyes by applying camouflage colours to their uniforms, helmets and overcoats in various patterns and styles. Even a slight increase in the time needed for the enemy to observe and identify approaching soldiers gives the camouflaged troops precious seconds to advance into a better position, increasing the possibility of success in their endeavours. Germany used camo extensively in later war, and true to form they used complicated patterns to hide their troops. They created the well-known pea-dot camo, as well as other variants and styles, using different shades based upon the conditions and seasons , although that meant providing more uniforms per soldier, who seldom carried extensive wardrobes with them whilst out in the field and engaged in combat. These two six-paint sets both arrive in a cardboard box with a stand-up header, inner card tray and some usage suggestions printed on the rear. Inside each set are six bottles that are appropriate to each camo type. Every bottle contains 17ml of paint that is dispensed by a dropper that is found under the white screw-top cap. Inside each bottle is a little stirring ball that rattles when agitated. AMMO paints separate quite readily, so having a ball in the bottle makes mixing them thoroughly a lot easier, especially when giving them a vigorous shake or using a mechanical shaker. We’re all familiar with the quality of AMMO paints by now, and they have a pretty good reputation amongst us modellers, drying a little slower than some of the competition, which could be a useful benefit when you’re talking about painting figures. The paints are as follows: Waffen SS Autumn Eichenlaubmuster (A.MIG-7041) AMMO.F-502 Outlining Black AMMO.F-507 Matt Earth AMMO.F-533 Dark Brown AMMO.F-557 Brown Orange AMMO.F558 Beige Pink AMMO.F-559 Orange Rust Erbsenmuster Pea-Dot (A.MIG-7042) AMMO.F-510 Uniform Sand yellow AMMO.F-533 Dark Brown AMMO.F-547 Pale Earth AMMO.F-555 Lime Green AMMO.F-556 Dark Green AMMO.F-558 Beige Pink The shades should be pretty useful for creating a good range of tones to your figure’s uniform, and if you use a wet palette, you should be able to create a myriad of shades between each one to help your figure look more realistic. They cover well and the colours are strong, with the base shades offering a backdrop to begin building up your scheme, and the darker shades adding extra depth where needed. If you’re painting WWII German troops and you don’t have the right colours, you could certainly save yourself some time and head-scratching by picking up these sets, just needing a little bit of patience and talent to make good on your plans. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. Vignettes MUD Acrylic Textured Pastes Light Earth (A.MIG-2152), Sand (A.MIG-2156) & Vietnam Earth (A.MIG-2159) AMMO of Mig Jiménez Creation of ground works have been revolutionised by the introduction of pre-prepared pastes from various manufacturers, and now we have this range of texturing products from AMMO in smaller 100ml pots with a white screw-down lid. Each pot provides a different colour and texture of paste to be used in specific circumstances, as per the name on the front of the label. The pots are pre-sealed by thin tear-off covers that come off when first opened, revealing the glutinous mass beneath, and here you need to be careful, as shaking the pots can introduce bubbles that aren’t easily dispersed in the thick liquid. If you put the pot down firmly, you may end up with a big “plop!” and small quantities of paste spattering you and your workplace. I can testify to this, as I have had to clean a little of the sand coloured paste off my keyboard and jacket in such circumstances just the other day. At this point, it’s worth mentioning that it is acrylic paste, which made it easier to get off my black jacket before it dried, using a wet-wipe and some kitchen roll. In order to get a feel for these pastes, I ladled out a quantity onto small plastic cards, spreading it reasonably thin and smooth on each one, then introducing a little texture to the layer either on purpose or by happy accident. Whether the shapes were retained by the drying material indicated that the slump of the paste was low, which should allow the modeller to create ruts and other shapes in the layer with confidence that it will remain in the dried paste. I used an artist’s palette-knife to apply the layers, cleaning it between colours, although you may wish to mix your own colours and textures if you’re making a diorama where that would be appropriate. I left the cards to dry overnight, as they were still a little soft by the end of the session. The next day they were all touch dry, but a little softness remained in the thicker areas, and that softness remained the following day or two, although slightly reduced each day. After taking the photographs for the review I flexed the cards to see if I could dislodge the paste, and it stayed in place tenaciously, despite having been applied to an unprepared and shiny plastic surface, although a few cracks did appear, which is only to be expected due to how much I flexed it. Larger clumps can be picked or scraped off with a suitable blade or tool, so corrections or flat-spots can be made later without needing to resort to tactical nukes to dislodge the paste. Incidentally, the paste dries with a slightly glossy or satin aspect, and although it’s likely you will lay some paint over the base coat to vary the tone, it will create a good base upon which to build, thereby saving some paint and time. It also gives an impression of wet ground thanks to its shiny surface, and the larger grained earth pots appear as if they were damp ground where the soils are reaching saturation point before water starts to pool on the surface. Conclusion Application was easy with the correct tools, and the palette knife is definitely the right tool for the job, as it would ruin any paint brush you used, and as to blowing it through an airbrush? Don’t be silly!!!! Allow plenty of time for the paste to dry, and you should end up with realistic base on which to build your diorama or vignette. Highly recommended. Light Earth Ground (A.MIG-2152) Sand Ground (A.MIG-2156) Vietnam Earth (A.MIG-2159) Review sample courtesy of
  13. StuG III Early & Mid Colours (A.MIG-7185) Used from 1939 To 1943 AMMO of Mig Jiménez More paint from those prodigiously productive people at Ammo. This set includes six colours in 17ml bottles within the pack, each with a dropper top and yellow cap that is an indicator that there is a stainless steel "stirring ball" inside to assist with mixing the paint, which is also mentioned on the box. This is a good thing, as AMMO acrylic paint does tend to separate out when left untended. By now it's common knowledge that AMMO paints are pretty good, and I have a few friends that swear by them. They go on easily, settle down and once fully dry after 24 hours they are robust enough to withstand careful handling. They dilute with AMMO thinners (A.MIG-2000) or water, and can be airbrushed or brush painted. This set covers the camouflage used on the initial batches and subsequent mid-range Sturmgeschütz III (StuG III), which was a tank destroyer based upon the chassis and running gear of the Panzer III, with a fixed gun instead of a turret. As they were intended to be ambush predators, they were camouflaged heavily to help them blend in with the surrounding countryside while they waited for their hapless prey to amble into range. The colours within the box are as follows: A.MIG-0002 RAL 6003 Olivegrün Opt.2 A.MIG-0008 RAL 7021 Dunkelgrau A.MIG-0009 RAL 7027 Sandgrau A.MIG-0010 RAL 7028 Dunkelgelb (mid war) A.MIG-0015 RAL 8017 Schokobraun A.MIG-0024 Washable White Camo The paints can be airbrushed or brush painted, and you can of course mix the shades to give yourself even more variety, as is demonstrated on the box front and back, which shows a few examples of the use of these (and other) colours to create highly realistic vistas. The washable white is one of AMMO’s products that can be thinned or attenuated by applying water with a brush after drying to work the paint and simulate the effects of wear and tear from weather and use of this temporary winter camouflage distemper that was often applied over the summer camo with a large brush or even a broom, either fully or partially at the whim of the commander of the tank. Your artistry will of course play a part in whether you achieve such levels of brilliance, but this is a good palette to start your StuG painting career or step it up a level. There is also a mid to late set available with the next product code up from this one, in case your StuG career is going to be a long one with multiple builds from different parts of the vehicle’s career. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  14. Japanese Infantry Acrylic Paint Set (A.MIG-7040) AMMO of Mig Jiménez The Japanese military juggernaut rolled through much of Asia at the beginning of WWII, sweeping all before them, whether they were British, Chinese or Australian/New Zealand troops that they came across. Their uniforms colours were tuned to their environment, and were somewhat paler than those from the cooler climes of Europe for example, with a more sandy aspect that merged well into the drier, less verdant areas of the world. This four-paint set arrives in a clear clamshell box with a card header with some colour use suggestions on the rear in the shape of a superbly well painted figure of a Japanese soldier stood at rest on a vignette base. Inside are four bottles that have been picked to match the colour of the various parts of the soldier’s uniform, from the cloth of his fatigues to his leather belt and harness, all the way to his cap and steel helmet. Each bottle contains 17ml of paint that is dispensed by a dropper that is found under the yellow screw-top cap. Inside each bottle is a little stirring ball that rattles when agitated, a fact that is advertised on the sides of the bottle. AMMO paints separate quite readily as you may probably be aware, so having a ball in the bottle makes mixing them a lot easier. We’re all familiar with the quality of AMMO paints by now, and they have a good reputation amongst us modellers, and dry a little slower than some of the competition, which can be of benefit when hand painting details of figures for example. The paints are as follows: AMMO.F-505 Figures Paints Pale Yellow Green FS-33481 AMMO.F-514 Figures Paints Field Grey Shadow FS-34086 AMMO.F-541 Figures Paints Rust Ochre AMMO.F-554 Figures Paints Khaki Green The bottles all look rather similar when they have been allowed to separate in their carton, but once agitated the differences become apparent. You may want to pick up or already have white or dark grey/black to modulate the other shades to depict fading, or to create a darker shade to paint a base onto which the pure and lightened colours can be applied. Bear in mind that many soldiers would have tunics and trousers from different batches of dye, or of differing ages that would result in their shades being slightly at variance with each other. Taking the time to depict this divergence can really add some realism to your project. Conclusion If you want to create a believable figure of a Japanese solider, this set is going to be very useful to take away the guesswork when it comes time for paint. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. Masking Tape 20, 10, 6 & 2mm AMMO of Mig Jiménez Masking tape for modelling was revolutionised by the introduction of Kabuki tape from a well-known Japanese model manufacturer, and since then it has gone on to become one of the modeller’s staples. It is traditional low-tack paper tape that was allegedly used in Kabuki theatre in the construction of the intricate shadow-puppets and scenery, which is where the name comes from. Whether that’s true or not I have no clue! This new tape from AMMO is available in a range of widths, and each one is supplied on a standard sized roll with 25m/82ft of tape on each one, although I’m not about to unroll one to check that assertion. The tape is bright yellow and each roll arrives in its own resealable clear foil bag with the AMMO logo and colour scheme printed upon it. The 20mm, 10mm and 6mm rolls are wide enough to be quite sturdy, while the two 2mm rolls we were given are flexible and if you are rough with them the tape could fall off the reel and make a mess, so treat the narrow ones with care, possibly reusing the bag to keep dust and fluff out of the reels. The tack of the tape is very familiar, as is the texture and stretch of it, so no surprises there either. One thing or note is that as it has been wound around a larger reel (just over 8cm diameter), the tape comes off the roll with less curl and is fractionally easier to handle as a result. It burnishes down well, and even those areas I tested on acrylic paint came up easily without any lift at all. Conclusion It’s a large roll kabuki tape that has all the same properties as the rivals, so if it’s available near you or you need some tape and your favourite online retailer sells it, you can grab a roll or two as part of your order with confidence. Highly recommended. 2mm Tape 6mm Tape 10mm Tape 20mm Tape Review sample courtesy of
  16. German Marineflieger Paint Set (A.MIG-7243) AMMO of Mig Jiménez Germany was one of the primary partners in the Panavia Tornado Multi-Role Combat Aircraft project in the 70s, reaching service toward the end of the decade with some users, and in the 80s for others. They ordered over a hundred airframes to replace their ageing Starfighter fleet, providing the maritime attack and reconnaissance roles, carrying Kormoran anti-ship missiles amongst their other munitions. They also operated Westland Mk.88 Lynxes in the anti-surface role, serving from the 80s with a brief break due to some stress cracks in the fuselage, and due to be replaced by the NH.90 in due course. This four-paint set arrives in a clear clamshell box with a card header with some colour use suggestions on the rear in the form of three-view profiles of the aircraft. Inside are four bottles that are best described as murky and mostly grey. Each bottle contains 17ml of paint that is dispensed by a dropper that is found under the yellow screw-top cap. Inside each bottle is a little stirring ball that rattles when agitated. AMMO paints separate quite readily as you can see from the box photo, so having a ball in the bottle makes mixing them a lot easier. We’re all familiar with the quality of AMMO paints by now, and they have a pretty good reputation amongst us modellers, and dry a little slower than some of the competition, which can be of benefit when hand painting details. The paints are as follows: A.MIG-0249 FS34086 ANA 613/RAL 7009 A.MIG-0235 FS36152 Dark Grey AMT-12 RAL 7012 A.MIG-0226 FS36622 Grey RAL 7035 A.MIG-0227 FS25042 Sea Blue ANA 606/RAL 5008 The bottles all look rather similar when they have been allowed to separate in their carton, but once agitated the differences become apparent. You may want to pick up or already have white or dark grey/black to modulate the other shades to depict fading, or to create a darker shade to paint a base onto which the pure and lightened colours can be applied. All the older Tornado kits, as well as the new Revell kits will be a great base to paint yourself a German Tornado. Conclusion If you want to create a German Maritime aircraft from the 60, 70s and onward, this set is going to be very useful to take away any guesswork when it comes time for paint. Review sample courtesy of
  17. Stalingrad Vehicles Colours (A.MIG-6146) ISBN: 8432074061465 AMMO of Mig Jiménez Stalingrad was the turning point of Operation Barbarossa, Hitler’s invasion of Soviet Russia, throwing aside their non-aggression pact and proving as if proof were needed, that he couldn’t be trusted one iota – a common theme with psychopaths. After astonishing initial successes, rolling over the unprepared forces of the Soviet army and causing death and destruction on a previously unprecedented scale, they floundered at Stalingrad thanks in part to Hitler’s obsession with taking control of a city bearing Stalin’s name, but also thanks to the awakening of the sleeping bear that was the might of the Soviet military, Stalin emerging from hiding in his Datcha, and their new T-34 medium tank. This book is a new volume from AMMO, and covers the various units that were engaged in the fighting on both sides, a conflict that took a heavy toll on both the combatants, people and the infrastructure of the city of Stalingrad where the two sides met. The book is perfect bound in a card cover that has colourful folded inner flaps advertising other AMMO products, and within the cover are 88 pages of content in full colour, printed on glossy paper. The text is in English, Spanish and Russian, and after a short introduction it is broken down into short chapters that deal with one unit at a time, beginning with the Germans and finishing with the Soviet component. Each section has a short text introduction that gives a brief run-down of the unit’s history and then tells of its exploits during the battle and where it ended up. The profiles of vehicles from each unit have a caption giving some information about the location and sometimes a little about what they did and where. The profiles are excellent, showing the vehicles in the condition that they would have been seen in at the time, streaked with grime, covered with winter distemper and individual markings, which are sometimes depicted in a larger size nearby. It’s a shame there aren’t more profiles from different angles to assist the modeller in portraying that individual vehicle, but with AFVs there are seldom that many markings anyway, so there’s not much you’re missing. Conclusion This is a book for the profile-lover, who enjoys the visual delights that these pieces of artwork provide. The background of the various units and vehicles is possibly a little light for the historian, but it can be an interesting primer for the proverbial deep dive into any part of the Stalingrad legend. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  18. How to Paint 4BO Green Vehicles Solutions Book #11 (A.MIG-6600) ISBN: 8432074066002 AMMO of Mig Jiménez WWII Soviet vehicles, particularly AFVs were generally given a good coat of a paint that we refer to generically Soviet Green, which has an internal military code of 4BO. It’s a can of worms to the colour purists, as any forum user will know. Storms in a paint pot are common, so I’m making no comment on the colours presented, as they’ve been photographed, printed, scanned and reproduced upon your screen, 99.75% of which have never been colour calibrated. I know, how does one do that? Painting a vehicle a single, solitary colour can be problematic if you just splash a coat of exactly the same colour over the whole hull/chassis, leaving it looking bland and toy-like if you’re not careful. Here comes a magazine to help you with your struggles. AMMO have a range of Solution Boxes designed exclusively for carrying out the painting and weathering of certain subjects, and this accompanying series of magazines have been launched to put the flesh on the bones of the Solution Boxes. Unsurprisingly called Solution Books, they are useful whether you’ve bought the solution box already or have your own tools available and don’t need any more than information on techniques to complete the job. It’s best to have a dry run through the book first though, just in case you’ve missed something as you don’t really want to stall half way through if you can avoid it. Arriving in a magazine binding, it’s more of a bookazine really as you’ll doubtless come back to it again and again. Consisting of fifty pages plus the covers (there is some content on the cover), the first section revolves around the tools, paints and solutions you’ll use during the task and the descriptions are given in English, French, Spanish and German with a picture of each product by the side. After a brief introduction and a shot of the kit being used, which is the Zvezda 1:35 T-34/76, we get down to it in the AMMO style with a step-by-step description, starting with the brown primer applied over everything including the tracks. The next few steps cover the painting, use of oil brushers and enamel thinners to subtly change the tones of nearby panels, then moves onto washes, chipping, streaks, dust, mud, splashes, muddy road wheels and track preparation are also covered, and finally, oil and fuel spills just to finish off the lived-in look of any in-service machine. Toward the end is an overall shot of the finished model with a set of arrows showing which products were used where, and on the back page you’ll find some profiles of various tracked vehicles used by the Soviets in WWII. Conclusion Whilst it might be teaching your grandmother to suck eggs for the experienced modeller, it would be a great help to anyone looking to grow their skillset, or someone like me that has an awful memory and often forgets what to do because I also build aircraft…slowly. It’s also a great advert for other AMMO products of course! Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  19. WWII Regio Esercito Colours Paint Set (A.MIG-7180) AMMO of Mig Jiménez This four-paint set arrives in a clear clamshell box with four bottles inside, each containing 17ml of paint that is dispensed by a dropper found under the yellow screw-top cap. Inside each bottle is a little stirring ball that rattles when agitated. AMMO paints separate quite readily as you can see from the box photo, so having a ball in the bottle makes mixing them a lot easier. We’re all familiar with the quality of AMMO paints by now, and they have a pretty good reputation amongst us modellers, and dry a little slower than some of the competition, which can be useful to avoid paint drying on the tip of your needle when spraying. The paints are as follows: A.MIG-0238 FS34092 Medium Green (verde Medio) A.MIG-0275 Giallo Mimetico 3 (Giallo Sabia) A.MIG-0277 FS34159 Green Grey (Grigioverde) A.MIG-0912 Red brown Shadow (Marrone Rossiccio) Conclusion It’s great to be able to get boxes of paint that will set you up to paint a WWII Italian AFV project in one hit with just the addition of some white and black to assist you with modulation if that’s your methodology. The paints are rich with pigment, brushing and spraying well with many adherents to the brand from all walks of modelling life. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  20. WWII US Paratrooper Uniforms Paint Set (A.MIG-7039) AMMO of Mig Jiménez This six-paint set arrives in a card box with a new card inner tray (for easy recycling), with some colour use suggestions printed on the rear (see above right), although it’s a bit hard for me to tell which is which at a glance due to the lack of numbers next to the swatches. Inside are six bottles, each containing 17ml of paint that is dispensed by a dropper found under the white screw-top cap (white caps for figures sets). Inside each bottle is a little stirring ball that rattles when agitated, helping get the paint moving when you shake it. AMMO paints separate quite readily as you might already know if you have any of their range, so having a ball in the bottle makes mixing them a lot easier. We’re all familiar with the quality of AMMO paints by now, and they have a pretty good reputation amongst us modellers, and dry a little slower than some of the competition, which can be useful to avoid paint drying on the tip of your needle when spraying, or on your brush when painting figures, which might be especially useful for this set to allow blending etc. The paints are as follows: AMMO.F-504 Yellow Green AMMO.F-560 Khaki Grey AMMO.F-561 Green Violet AMMO.F-556 Light Ochre AMMO.F-563 Buff AMMO.F-564 Military Green Conclusion It’s great to be able to get sets of paint that will set you up to paint the uniforms of your US paratrooper figures in one go with just the addition of some lightening and darkening to assist you with modulation if that’s your methodology. The paints are rich with pigment, brushing and spraying well with many adherents to the brand from all walks of modelling life. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. Leather Colour Range Paint Set (A.MIG-7036) AMMO of Mig Jiménez This six-paint set arrives in a card box with a new card inner tray (for easy recycling), with some colour use suggestions printed on the rear (see above right), although on my example, it looks like there should be some text next to the swatches. Inside are six bottles, each containing 17ml of paint that is dispensed by a dropper found under the white screw-top cap. Inside each bottle is a little stirring ball that rattles when agitated, helping get the paint moving when you shake it. AMMO paints separate quite readily as you might already know if you have any of their range, so having a ball in the bottle makes mixing them a lot easier. We’re all familiar with the quality of AMMO paints by now, and they have a pretty good reputation amongst us modellers, and dry a little slower than some of the competition, which can be useful to avoid paint drying on the tip of your needle when spraying, or on your brush when painting figures, which might be especially useful for this set to allow blending etc. The paints are as follows: AMMO.F-508 Brown base AMMO.F-531 Light Brown AMMO.F-532 Red Brown AMMO.F-533 Dark Brown AMMO.F-538 Bright Orange AMMO.F-541 Rust Ochre Conclusion It’s great to be able to get sets of paint that will set you up to paint leather and other brown shades in one go with just the addition of some white and black to assist you with modulation if that’s your methodology. The paints are rich with pigment, brushing and spraying well with many adherents to the brand from all walks of modelling life. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  22. WWII Regia Aeronautica Late Colours Paint Set (A.MIG-7238) AMMO of Mig Jiménez This six-paint set arrives in a card box with a new card inner tray (for easy recycling), with some colour use suggestions printed on the rear (see below). Inside are six bottles, each containing 17ml of paint that is dispensed by a dropper found under the yellow screw-top cap. Inside each bottle is a little stirring ball that rattles when agitated. AMMO paints separate quite readily as you can see from the box photo, so having a ball in the bottle makes mixing them a lot easier. We’re all familiar with the quality of AMMO paints by now, and they have a pretty good reputation amongst us modellers, and dry a little slower than some of the competition, which can be useful to avoid paint drying on the tip of your needle when spraying. The paints are as follows: A.MIG-0202 FS30219 Tan (Nocciola Chiaro 4) A.MIG-0276 Verde Oliva Scuro 2 A.MIG-0262 IJN Ash Grey (Grigio Azzuro Chiaro 1) A.MIG-0275 Giallo Mimetico 3 A.MIG-0070 Medium Brown (Marrone Mimetico 53193) A.MIG-0023 Protective Green (Verde Mimetico 53192) Conclusion It’s great to be able to get sets of paint that will set you up to paint a late war Italian aviation project in one hit with just the addition of some white and black to assist you with modulation if that’s your methodology. The paints are rich with pigment, brushing and spraying well with many adherents to the brand from all walks of modelling life. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  23. The Weathering Magazine – Accessories AMMO of MIG Jiménez (AMIG4531) It can be said that the accessories used on a model can often make the model or diorama itself. All of those accessories build the overall picture. This magazine in the Weathering series really deals with armour models and the accessories you would use with them, though with the inclusion of tanks parts such as Mantlet covers, and figures, it may be stretching the "accessories" tag a little. Each article concentrates on one technique, and after a preamble from Mig himself, it proceeds as follows: German Jerry Cans WWII Sandbags and stowage Tank ammunition and ammo crates Details - Cans, bottles & crates Painting Weapons How to paint a manlet cover G.I Green - uniform colors Painting Furniture Each article spans a reasonable amount of pages, and follows the familiar pattern of AMMO books, with plenty of photographs of the work in progress, plus captions that complete the picture. Of course AMMO products feature heavily in the articles,, but the techniques are important in themselves and if you're not wedded to AMMO products for whatever reason, it is easy enough to substitute your own existing stocks. The modelling on display is first-rate and an inspiration to us all as to what can be achieved with a little bit of skill and some innovative products and techniques. While related to armour or vehicle projects the principles can be applied across the board. The magazine isn't over-burdened by adverts, and this English language version has been translated from the original language by Iain Hamilton, and is available in Spanish, French and Russian in addition. The series can be purchased individually or as a subscription from the AMMO website, or you can probably find them at your more adventurous newsagent or model shop. Highly recommended for anyone looking for a quick reference for weathering techniques. Review sample courtesy of
  24. Masking Sheets 1mm Grid (A.MIG-8045) AMMO of Mig Jiménez If you’ve ever wished that you could get larger sizes and bigger areas of kabuki-style masking material, wider than 40mm that’s available on rolls, you’ve had your wish granted with the release of their masking sheet that we reviewed here. AMMO have now released this new set of five sheets with a 1mm grid printed on it in a clear foil bag with branding over-printed and a green label in the middle, with a stated size of 290 x 145mm per sheet written in yellow on the front. The bag is resealable, which will allow you to keep the dust out, and other than that there’s not an awful lot to say, other than to extoll the virtues of Kabuki tape, which is a paper-based washi tape that gets its name from Kabuki theatre, where it is presumably used on the paper puppets, characters and backdrops. It is a low tack tape that can last years in position on your model without leaving any residue (I’ve done this in the past), is flexible so that it can conform to curved surfaces well, and you can burnish it down to reduce the likelihood of paint creeping under the edge, although not squirting too much paint on a masked model is still the best way to avoid creep. The grid is very handy to check the size of shapes you’re planning on masking, and it also looks a bit cool in situ before you spray paint all over it. The grid is printed in ink of course, and may have a coat of clear varnish over it to protect the printing as it seems shinier thank the bare tape, but I felt it would be a wise decision to test whether the ink could be removed by solvents that are present in most of our paints. I first tried Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA or Isopropanol), and it slowly brought a little of the printing off, although it was more visible on the bud than the tape. The Liquid Reamer brought it off much quicker as expected, because it is a much “hotter” chemical. The take-away is not to blast too much paint on at once, and resist handling until the paint is actually dry to the touch. If you’re at the stage where there is a lot of IPA or cellulose thinners taking off the inked grid, you probably have much bigger problems than a bit of grey mixing with your paint! Having played around with it for a while, it might be wise to peel larger sheets of masking material off the backing paper before drawing out or transferring your design, applying it to a flat surface such as a mirror or a spare tile to finish preparation. Peeling the paper off a very complex design may cause a few more grey hairs as well as risking puckering the edges with the resultant stretching and potential lack of adhesion. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  25. In Combat – Future Wars #3 (AMIG6086) ISBN: 8432074060864 Ammo by Mig Jiménez Whether you call them Gundams or Mechas, they’re still gigantic robots that are piloted by young and adventurous folks, battling against evil as the Earth Federation, or for the baddies under the evil Principality of Zeon banner. Just to confuse the issue further, the model kits of these giant robots are often referred to as Gunpla, a portmanteau of the words Gundam and Plastic. This book is the third in a series of volumes that describes and teaches modellers how to build and paint these kits, which are available in various scales and various Grades, such as Hi-Grade (HG) and Master Grade (MG), which have different levels of detail included in the box. The book is perfect bound in a card cover, with 127 pages, and fold-over extra leaves on the cover that have a few colourful adverts printed on the same high-gloss card as the rest of the cover. It is available in English, Spanish and French, and I think you can probably guess which language edition we’re reviewing. The book is broken down into the following sections: 1 Combat: Armour Dougram Daniel Morcillo Page 6 2 PMX-003 The - 0 Hojoon Kim Page 22 3 The Red Comet Daniel Morcillo Page 30 4 Revenge Deja Vu Sin Don Wook Page 42 5 Warrior's Rest Lee Jaejong Page 56 6 MG MSN-06S Sinanju Stein Ver.Ka Alfredo Mei Page 72 7 Glint Evolve - 2.0 Aaron Simons Page 88 8 ZGMF - 10A Freedom Gundam Domenico Febbo Page 106 As you can see above, the book is broken up into eight chapters, split between the modellers and their chosen model. Judging by the end result they’re some of the best Gundam modellers around, and each one has added additional personalisations to their model to give them some individuality, rather than building them slavishly according to the instructions. The kits are finished from relatively clean to hopelessly over-used and battle weary, with both simple and complex paint and weathering effects used, plus some great diorama bases that they break down into steps to demonstrate how easy it is, although some talent and the correct materials will also be required, but I think you knew that already. Battle damage, small alterations to the basic models, addition of extra detail, and even water effects are broken down into manageable chunks in order to assist the modeller with taking the new on board, and refreshing the memories of those that have already come across them. In truth the techniques could equally be applied to any genre of modelling with a little adjustment in either scale or depth of application, so it should be of use to anyone that makes models that they don’t want to look like they just came out of Corgi’s factory with a pristine paint job. Conclusion Excellent photography, instructive text, and useful captions make this a great aid to the Gundam modeller, and even the product placement isn’t too heavy-handed, with other brands mentioned where appropriate to bolster your techniques and improve your models. Review sample courtesy of
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