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Found 14 results

  1. Martin Model 139 WC/WSM/WT (SH72440) 1:72 Special Hobby The B-10 started life as the Martin Model 123 which was privately developed by the martin Company. It was to have a drew of four and feature an internal bomb bay and retractable undercarriage, something new in 1932 when the aircraft first flew under the designation XB-907 before being returned to Martin. This then become the XB-10 when it was returned to the US Army. The XB-10 featured a number of changes to the original design. The crew complement was reduced from 4 to 3, and all crew positions were now covered including the nose turret something completely new at the time. The new aircraft would have a longer wingspan. The original Townend rings on the engines were changed to NACA cowlings which reduced drag. The US Army ordered 48 of the new aircraft in 1933 with production models differing very slightly from the XB-10., and another 103 in 1935. The twin 600 hp Wright SR-1820-E Cyclone engines provided the aircraft with a similar if not better performance than the Army's pursuit aircraft of the day. Although the rapid pace of aviation in the 1930s would soon leave the aircraft design behind. It had really been eclipsed by the time the US entered WWII In combat over China and Asia the aircraft was found to lack the speed of modern fighters and not have the same hitting power as other medium bombers. As well as service with the US the aircraft was used by The Argentine Army & Navy, The Chinese Nationalists, The Netherlands East Indies Army Air Force, The Philippine Army, The Royal Thai Air Force, and Turkey. The export models were designated the model 139 with WC for China, WSM for the then Siam, and WT For Turkey. The Kit This is a new tool kit from Special Hobby in collaboration with Azur Ffrom. The mouldings are typical of the higher end of the short run market. The fuselage is very well moulded with the corrugations of the skin very good indeed. There is a small amount of flash on some of the other components. The fuselage is moulded in a top/bottom split instead of left/right to avoid having a seem in the corrugated area which is good. There is one main sprue containing the wings, and a second for the fuselage and rear control surfaces. There are a further 2 sprues with all the other parts, and a large clear sprue. The last item in the box is a small PE fret. Of note in the boxing is the different wing sprue for these models. There are two tracks on the trailing edge of the wing behind the engine nacelles, one was broken off in this box and not present in the plastic bag which is slightly disappointing. Construction starts with the fitting out of the upper fuselage, some small parts go in and at the cockpit area the instrument panels are added. At the rear supports go in for the rear position. We then move to the lower fuselage where the main parts for the three crew positions go in. These include the pilots position, rear gunner and front gun position. At first many smaller parts are added in to all three areas. In the rear the bulkheads go in for the observer/rear gunners area and the seating position is attached to the fuselage. A central support for the wings is also added in at this point. The pilots position has a front and rear bulkhead which supports the floor. The seat and flight controls are added to the floor and PE belts go on the seat. At the front the floor area for the gunner goes in as well as the support ring for the turret. Once all these parts are in two fuselage halves can be joined. Following this the extreme aft tail assembly including the tail wheel is made up and added to the fuselage. The fin/rudder and tail control surfaces can then be added. Next step in the construction are the wings. These are of conventional left/right with uppers and lowers. Into each lower wing the wells for the landing gear must be added in the bottom of the engine nacelles. The front firewalls can go in and the main gear legs are also show as being fitted at this stage, though I suspect modellers will leave these until later on. The wing halves can then go together. The engines can then go in the front of the nacelles before closing them up. The fronts of the cowls can then go on with different ones depending on the decal option used. The wings can then be attached to the main fuselage. Lift devices are then added between the engines and the main fuselage. The exhausts then match up with their engines. The rear gun is added along with all the exterior glazing. At the front don't forget to add the gun to the turret before putting it in place. To finish off the main wheels are assembled and added, then the props can go on as well. Lastly various aerials and the pitot tube go on. Decals This boxing of the kit gives four choices of markings, decals by Eduard. The decals look a little thick and they were hard to extract from their plastic envelope as there is no protective paper over them and they were stuck in there. Model 139 WC, 1403 14th Volunteer Sqn / 14th Chungfui, Chinese Nationalist Air Force, Hankow 1938 Model 139 WC, 3001 14th Volunteer Sqn / 14th Chungfui, Chinese Nationalist Air Force, Hankow 1937 Model 139 WSM, No.6, 50 Bomber Sqn Ubon AFB, 1940 Model 139 WT, No. 10/2310, 55 Sqn Corlu, Turkish AF 1941 Conclusion This is another left of field release from from Special Hobby in collaboration with FFROM of an lesser well known but good looking aircraft from the earlier years of aviation. Recommended. Review samples courtesy of
  2. MikroMir is to release a 1/72nd Martin XB-51 kit - ref. Source: https://www.facebook.com/mikro.mir.dnepr/posts/4094017577342614 V.P.
  3. Joining you with this Special Hobby 1/72 Martin Baltimore, Martin Baltimore, first flew 14 June 1941. Twin engine medium bomber, with two Wright R-2600 engines. Operated with RAF and Fleet Air Arm, Australian, Canadian, South African Air Forces, Free French, Greek, Italian, and Turkey. Italian after they joined the Allies, and the Greek AF in exile. The modelled aircraft operated from Gambut, Libya with 13 squadron Royal Hellenic Air Force, alongside and looking just like RAF Coastal Command. The Baltimore was never operated by front-line US services. The narrow fuselage similar to that of the Maryland, Boston, and Hampden, was restrictive of movement, preventing crew-members assisting a wounded colleague - contributing to the aircraft being unpopular. 1575 aircraft were built, but none survive intact today. The kit cost me £13.50 from Hannants, in 2002.
  4. Martin B-10 Export WC/WAN (FR0043) 1:72 Azur FR.ROM The B-10 started life as the Martin Model 123 which was privately developed by the martin Company. It was to have a drew of four and feature an internal bomb bay and retractable undercarriage, something new in 1932 when the aircraft first flew under the designation XB-907 before being returned to Martin. This then become the XB-10 when it was returned to the US Army. The XB-10 featured a number of changes to the original design. The crew complement was reduced from 4 to 3, and all crew positions were now covered including the nose turret something completely new at the time. The new aircraft would have a longer wingspan. The original Townend rings on the engines were changed to NACA cowlings which reduced drag. The US Army ordered 48 of the new aircraft in 1933 with production models differing very slightly from the XB-10., and another 103 in 1935. The twin 600 hp Wright SR-1820-E Cyclone engines provided the aircraft with a similar if not better performance than the Army's pursuit aircraft of the day. Although the rapid pace of aviation in the 1930s would soon leave the aircraft design behind. It had really been eclipsed by the time the US entered WWII In combat over China and Asia the aircraft was found to lack the speed of modern fighters and not have the same hitting power as other medium bombers. As well as service with the US the aircraft was used by The Argentine Army & Navy, The Chinese Nationalists, The Netherlands East Indies Army Air Force, The Philippine Army, The Royal Thai Air Force, and Turkey. The Kit This is a new tool kit from Azur Ffrom in collaboration with Special Hobby. The mouldings are typical of the higher end of the short run market. The fuselage is very well moulded with the corrugations of the skin very good indeed. There is a small amount of flash on some of the other components. The fuselage is moulded in a top/bottom split instead of left/right to avoid having a seem in the corrugated area which is good. There is one main sprue containing the wings, and a second for the fuselage and rear control surfaces. There are a further 2 sprues with all the other parts, and a large clear sprue. The front turret had become detached for the clear spure, but was not damaged. The last item in the box is a small PE fret. Construction starts with the fitting out of the upper fuselage, some small parts go in and at the cockpit area the instrument panels are added. At the rear supports go in for the rear position. We then move to the lower fuselage where the main parts for the three crew positions go in. These include the pilots position, rear gunner and front gun position. At first many smaller parts are added in to all three areas. In the rear the bulkheads go in for the observer/rear gunners area and the seating position is attached to the fuselage. A central support for the wings is also added in at this point. The pilots position has a front and rear bulkhead which supports the floor. The seat and flight controls are added to the floor and PE belts go on the seat. At the front the floor area for the gunner goes in as well as the support ring for the turret. Once all these parts are in two fuselage halves can be joined. Following this the extreme aft tail assembly including the tail wheel is made up and added to the fuselage. The fin/rudder and tail control surfaces can then be added. Next step in the construction is the wing. These are of conventional left/right with uppers and lowers. Into each lower wing the wells for the landing gear must be added in the bottom of the engine nacelles. The front firewalls can go in and the main gear legs are also show as being fitted at this stage, though I suspect modellers will leave these until later on. The wing halves can then go together. The engines can then go on the front of the nacelles. The wings can then be attached to the main fuselage. Lift devices are then added between the engines and the main fuselage. The exhausts then match up with their engines. The rear gun is added along with all the exterior glazing. At the front don't forget to add the gun to the turret before putting it in place. To finish off the main wheels are assembled and added, then the props can go on as well. Lastly various aerials and the pitot tube go on. Decals This boxing of the kit gives two choices of markings, decals by Special Hobby; Model 139 WC, 1403 14th Volunteer Sqn / 14th Chungfui, Chinese Nationalist Air Force, Hankow 1938 Model 139 WAA, 2-B-3, Escuadrilla de Bombardo, Escuadra Aerea No.2 Argentinian Navy Conclusion This is another left of field release from FFROM of an lesser well known but good looking aircraft from the earlier years of aviation. Very Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  5. Martin B-10B In US Service (FR0044) 1:72 Azur FR.ROM The B-10 started life as the Martin Model 123 which was privately developed by the martin Company. It was to have a drew of four and feature an internal bomb bay and retractable undercarriage, something new in 1932 when the aircraft first flew under the designation XB-907 before being returned to Martin. This then become the XB-10 when it was returned to the US Army. The XB-10 featured a number of changes to the original design. The crew complement was reduced from 4 to 3, and all crew positions were now covered including the nose turret something completely new at the time. The new aircraft would have a longer wingspan. The original Townend rings on the engines were changed to NACA cowlings which reduced drag. The US Army ordered 48 of the new aircraft in 1933 with production models differing very slightly from the XB-10., and another 103 in 1935. The twin 600 hp Wright SR-1820-E Cyclone engines provided the aircraft with a similar if not better performance than the Army's pursuit aircraft of the day. Although the rapid pace of aviation in the 1930s would soon leave the aircraft design behind. It had really been eclipsed by the time the US entered WWII In combat over China and Asia the aircraft was found to lack the speed of modern fighters and not have the same hitting power as other medium bombers. The B-10B which was the most numerous variant form the US features the 675 hp Wright Cyclone R-1820-19 engines. As well as service with the US the aircraft was used by The Argentine Army & Navy, The Chinese Nationalists, The Netherlands East Indies Army Air Force, The Philippine Army, The Royal Thai Air Force, and Turkey. The Kit This is a new tool kit from Azur Ffrom in collaboration with Special Hobby. This kit unlike the other boxings contains different wings, nacelles and engine covers for the different engines. The mouldings are typical of the higher end of the short run market. The fuselage is very well moulded with the corrugations of the skin very good indeed. There is a small amount of flash on some of the other components. The fuselage is moulded in a top/bottom split instead of left/right to avoid having a seem in the corrugated area which is good. There is one main sprue containing the wings, and a second for the fuselage and rear control surfaces. There are a further 3 sprues with all the other parts, and a large clear sprue. The front turret had become detached for the clear spure, but was not damaged. The last item in the box is a small PE fret. Construction starts with the fitting out of the upper fuselage, some small parts go in and at the cockpit area the instrument panels are added. At the rear supports go in for the rear position. We then move to the lower fuselage where the main parts for the three crew positions go in. These include the pilots position, rear gunner and front gun position. At first many smaller parts are added in to all three areas. In the rear the bulkheads go in for the observer/rear gunners area and the seating position is attached to the fuselage. A central support for the wings is also added in at this point. The pilots position has a front and rear bulkhead which supports the floor. The seat and flight controls are added to the floor and PE belts go on the seat. At the front the floor area for the gunner goes in as well as the support ring for the turret. Once all these parts are in two fuselage halves can be joined. Following this the extreme aft tail assembly including the tail wheel is made up and added to the fuselage. The fin/rudder and tail control surfaces can then be added. Next step in the construction is the wing. These are of conventional left/right with uppers and lowers. Into each lower wing the wells for the landing gear must be added in the bottom of the engine nacelles. The front firewalls can go in and the main gear legs are also show as being fitted at this stage, though I suspect modellers will leave these until later on. The wing halves can then go together. Onto the top section then goes the other half of the engine nacelle. The engines can then go on the front of the nacelles and the cowlings are attached. The wings can then be attached to the main fuselage. Lift devices are then added between the engines and the main fuselage. The exhausts then match up with their engines. The rear gun is added along with all the exterior glazing. At the front don't forget to add the gun to the turret before putting it in place. To finish off the main wheels are assembled and added, then the props can go on as well. Lastly various aerials and the pitot tube go on. Decals This boxing of the kit gives two choices of markings in the colorful yellow wings scheme. 35-238 Code 59, 28th Bombardment Sqn, Clark Field Philippines 1938. Since the instructions were printed it has been found out this aircraft was not passed to the Philippine Army. The aircraft was struck off in 1941. Code 138, Sqn Hack for the 17th Pursuit Sqn, 1st Pursuit Group, Selfridge MI, USA. Sqn badge on the nose. Conclusion This is another left of field release from FFROM of an lesser well known but good looking aircraft from the earlier years of aviation. Very Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. Martin B-10 Export WH-2/WAA (FR0042) 1:72 Azur FR.ROM The B-10 started life as the Martin Model 123 which was privately developed by the martin Company. It was to have a drew of four and feature an internal bomb bay and retractable undercarriage, something new in 1932 when the aircraft first flew under the designation XB-907 before being returned to Martin. This then become the XB-10 when it was returned to the US Army. The XB-10 featured a number of changes to the original design. The crew complement was reduced from 4 to 3, and all crew positions were now covered including the nose turret something completely new at the time. The new aircraft would have a longer wingspan. The original Townend rings on the engines were changed to NACA cowlings which reduced drag. The US Army ordered 48 of the new aircraft in 1933 with production models differing very slightly from the XB-10., and another 103 in 1935. The twin 600 hp Wright SR-1820-E Cyclone engines provided the aircraft with a similar if not better performance than the Army's pursuit aircraft of the day. Although the rapid pace of aviation in the 1930s would soon leave the aircraft design behind. It had really been eclipsed by the time the US entered WWII In combat over China and Asia the aircraft was found to lack the speed of modern fighters and not have the same hitting power as other medium bombers. As well as service with the US the aircraft was used by The Argentine Army & Navy, The Chinese Nationalists, The Netherlands East Indies Army Air Force, The Philippine Army, The Royal Thai Air Force, and Turkey. The Kit This is a new tool kit from Azur Ffrom in collaboration with Special Hobby. The mouldings are typical of the higher end of the short run market. The fuselage is very well moulded with the corrugations of the skin very good indeed. There is a small amount of flash on some of the other components. The fuselage is moulded in a top/bottom split instead of left/right to avoid having a seem in the corrugated area which is good. There is one main sprue containing the wings, and a second for the fuselage and rear control surfaces. There are a further 2 sprues with all the other parts, and a large clear sprue. The front turret had become detached for the clear spure, but was not damaged. The last item in the box is a small PE fret. This boxing allows aircraft with the Wright Cyclone R-1820-G3 engines to be built. It also has extra clear parts for an aircraft with a rebuilt nose following an accident. Construction starts with the fitting out of the upper fuselage, some small parts go in and at the cockpit area the instrument panels are added. At the rear supports go in for the rear position. We then move to the lower fuselage where the main parts for the three crew positions go in. These include the pilots position, rear gunner and front gun position. At first many smaller parts are added in to all three areas. In the rear the bulkheads go in for the observer/rear gunners area and the seating position is attached to the fuselage. A central support for the wings is also added in at this point. The pilots position has a front and rear bulkhead which supports the floor. The seat and flight controls are added to the floor and PE belts go on the seat. At the front the floor area for the gunner goes in as well as the support ring for the turret, or the parts for the replacement clear nose can be installed if building that version. Once all these parts are in two fuselage halves can be joined. Following this the extreme aft tail assembly including the tail wheel is made up and added to the fuselage. The fin/rudder and tail control surfaces can then be added. Next step in the construction is the wing. These are of conventional left/right with uppers and lowers. Into each lower wing the wells for the landing gear must be added in the bottom of the engine nacelles. The front firewalls can go in and the main gear legs are also show as being fitted at this stage, though I suspect modellers will leave these until later on. The wing halves can then go together. The engines can then go on the front of the nacelles. The wings can then be attached to the main fuselage. Lift devices are then added between the engines and the main fuselage. The exhausts then match up with their engines. The rear gun is added along with all the exterior glazing. At the front don't forget to add the gun to the turret before putting it in place. To finish off the main wheels are assembled and added, then the props can go on as well. Lastly various aerials and the pitot tube go on. Decals This boxing of the kit gives three choices of markings, decals by Special Hobby; Model 139 WH-2 M515, 2 VIG III Of the Netherlands East India Force. This aircraft was sent to Singapore and flew combat missions alongside the RAF, Two different types of Triangles are supplied as it was felt the originals had too thin a border. Model 139 WAA, B-504, Regimiento 3 de Ataque, BAM El Plimerilo, Argentina 1949 Model 139 WAA, B-511, Regimiento 1 de Bombardeo, BAM El Plimerilo, Argentina 1946-47 (Aircraft with a rebuilt nose following an accident) Conclusion This is another left of field release from FFROM of an lesser well known but good looking aircraft from the earlier years of aviation. Very Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  7. I've finally finished re-purposed Monogram B-26 Marauder That I originally built decades ago. After striping down the old paint and disassembling as carefully as possible. I reassembled the B-26 as an XB-26H which was a "Proof of Concept" for Bicycle landing gear. This configuration was adapted for the B-48, B-51, and operationally for the B-47. Some of the parts didn't survive disassembly so I had to manufacture my own props, engines, outrigger wheels and redesigned rear gunners position. Also printed my own nose art decals You can see my work in progress here. This was a fun build of an unusual subject. I hope you will enjoy this finished work. Thank for stopping by and if you have ant comments critiques or suggestions, they are always welcome.
  8. As I'm sitting here watching paint dry on an F4U for the Corsair GB I start thinking, I know Dangerous, then I start what-ffing,, even more hazardous, then I start plotting.... Catastrophic. End result.... I have an old Monogram B_26 Marauder I disassembled a long while back for restoration. THis is an old kit, built waaaaay back in the last century. Not in the best of shape, cracked pieces, real glue marks, not CA. Probably should be tossed in the bin, and it may still, BUT lets see if it can be resurrected into an XB-26H. Otherwise known as the Middle River Stump Jumper. And I'm just certifiable enough to try and do this because I ain't never not done it. So if you feel brave to follow along if only to watch me flail about, or to offer pearls of wisdom you are most welcome to join. Extra refreshments have been stocked and seating have been arranged. Lets begin shall we? As always Comments, suggestions,and general anarchy is welcomed.
  9. Have just obtained the lovely Williams Bros B-10 kit, and looking forward to using it as my first In Progress build log here on the Forums. That said, I want to do a fair bit of extra detailing for the interior. The kit provides a decent basis for the interior, but leaves the inside of the forward turret quite entirely empty. Does anyone have any nice references for the inside of the B-10? And does anyone know of any detail issues with the kit? So far, I am assuming that the pictures on Military Factory of the B-10 at the National Museum of the United States Air Force are correct - But I question the combination of interior elements in both aluminum and green zinc chromate. It is my understanding that aircraft had one or the other, but that may not be true. Many thanks for your time, Tweener.
  10. A new giant on approach by Amodel, a 1/72nd Martin JRM Mars - ref.? Thanks Tali ;-) Source: http://www.greenmats.club/topic/2421-amodel-jrm-martin-mars-172-тестовая-сборка/ V.P.
  11. LukGraph is rumoured making plans to do a Martin T4M-1 Torpedo Bomber in 1/32nd scale Source: http://www.network54.com/Forum/149674/message/1489941240/I'm+impressed! To be followed. V.P.
  12. Special Hobby has just announced a 1/48th Martin Baltimore kit - ref. SH48160 Source: http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235016099-novelties-from-special-hobby/ V.P.
  13. Thought I had already shared the rest of my albums here from Oshkosh but apparently not. Just click the link to see all of my photos of the Martin Mars. https://www.flickr.com/photos/92554273@N07/albums/72157673631912586 20160727-MJS_6102 by _m_sinclair, on Flickr 20160727-MJS_6201 by _m_sinclair, on Flickr 20160727-MJS_6370 by _m_sinclair, on Flickr 20160727-MJS_6371 by _m_sinclair, on Flickr 20160727-MJS_6402 by _m_sinclair, on Flickr 20160727-MJS_6409 by _m_sinclair, on Flickr 20160727-MJS_6414 by _m_sinclair, on Flickr 20160727-MJS_6432 by _m_sinclair, on Flickr Thanks for looking! -matt
  14. Howdy, I am trying to cobble together references for the Martin Baker MB-2. So far all I have is info found on the web. Can you suggest any publications that follow the design and building for this aircraft? I'm interested in plans for the Napier Dagger too. I am curious where the engine cooling air exhausted to. There are big inlets in the front. Where do they go? Any help is appreciated. Brent
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