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  1. The Japanese Battleship Kongo 1944 Kagero TopDrawings No. 110 via Casemate UK ISBN : 9788366673236 The Kongo named for the 3,691 ft mountain in the Kawachi region of Osaka Prefecture, Kansai, Japan was already an old ship when WWII Broke out. She was built as a Battlecruiser and the lead ship of here Class, she was the last major Japanese warship to be built outside of Japan by Vickers in Barrow, being laid down in 1911 and commissioned in 1913. In 1929 the Japanese rebuilt her as a Battleship increasing her power, armour; and fitting catapult aircraft. The in 1944 the Japanese Navy again sent the ship for a major refit. This upgraded the fire control system, the addition of increased anti aircraft defences; and the fitting of Radar. After taking part in the Battle of the Philippine Sea she sailed to Brunei in late 1944. On leaving there on 20th November 1944 she was attacked and sunk by the US Submarine USS Sealion. The ship sank following detonation of forward magazine with a loss of 1250 lives including her Commanding Officer Rear Admiral Shimazaki. This new volume from Kagero gives us 22 pages of line drawings and a double sided set of plans slightly larger than A2 in size. The book and the plans show the ship as she was after the 1944 refit. Conclusion This is another good book in the series. The pullout sheet is also good to see. This is certainly a very useful book for all modellers. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  2. Eastern Front Vol.1 Camouflage & Decals ISBN: 9788366673205 Kagero via Casemate UK This is the first of a new armour series from Kagero Publishing that consists profiles of various armour and softskins from the Eastern Front during WWII, drawing from both German and Russian forces. It is 40 pages and is in a card bound portrait format, and it is rammed with profiles, as you’d expect. In addition you get a set of decals in the three major armour scales of 1:72, 1:48 and 1:35, with tons of numbers in black and white, a bunch of crosses in various styles, some bird of prey motifs, and the name Rudy, which is from a popular fictional story. The quality of the profiles is up to Kagero’s usual standards, and includes various scrap diagrams where additional detail is necessary on the rear of the vehicle or on the front etc. Each profile has a caption in English and Polish, giving some information about the subject, inasmuch as there is available to the researchers and artists. At the front of the book is a single page that is split between an introduction to the series, and in the bottom half of the page is a large table that suggests a colour palette for the German vehicles in FS codes, Humbrol, Gunze, Pactra, Testors, Extracolor and Tamiya paint codes. Conclusion This is a niche series that will doubtless appeal to those that enjoy looking at and studying profiles of vehicles, and the decals that are included, whilst generic for the most part also include the Rudy decals (as seen above) that will appeal to an Eastern European market where the series is more well-known. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  3. The Aircraft Carrier HMS Invincible Kagero TopDrawings No. 111 via Casemate UK ISBN : 9788366673267 HMS Invincible (R05) was the lead ship of her class. Laid down by Vickers at Barrow in 1973 and launched in 1977.; she was commissioned in 1980. In a tradition within the Royal Navy R05 was the sixth ship to bear the name with a history stretching back to the first ship a 74 Gun Ship of the line. She was in fact though Royal Navy prize captured from the French and originally named Invincible, no guesses where the HMS came from then! R05 was to be 16,000 tonnes displacement, 677 feet long with a beam of 90 feet at the waterline and a draught of 24 feet fully laden. 4 Rolls Royce Olympus engines would give a top speed of 28 knots, with a normal cruising speed of 18 knots. She was designed to carry 10 Sea King Helicopters and 8 Sea Harriers. Despite only serving for 2 years it was announced in early 1982 that the Australian Government had agreed to buy the vessel to replace HMAS Melbourne. However international events would intervene with the Argentinian invasion of the Falkland Islands taking place in April 1982. HMS Invincible would sail with HMS Hermes as the capital ships of the task force to retake the islands. Despite various claims of damage and indeed of sinking; the carrier returned undamaged from the Falklands. After her return the ships close in weapons systems were supplemented with additional Phalanx & Oerlikon systems. A refit between 1986-89 would increase the vessels overall length allowing more hanger space to operate additional aircraft. Additional magazine space was also provided for the carriage of Sea Eagle missiles for the Harrier, and additional torpedoes for the Helicopters. The 20mm Phalanx systems were replaced by 30mm Goalkeeper systems. In 2000 additional modifications would also take place to allow the operation of RAF Harriers from the deck. One of the main noticeable differences was the removal of the Sea Dart System and its radar; along with an enlarged flight deck. In 2005 the vessel was made inactive in the sense it could be reactivated with 18 months notice to return to the fleet. However 5 years later the vessel was put up or disposal and struck off the register. With most of her systems gutted she was eventually sold for scrap and broken up in Turkey in 2011. Battle Honors or HMS Invincible were; St Vincent 1780, St Kitts 1782, Glorious First of June 1794,, Alexandria 1882, Heligoland 1914, Falkland Islands 1914, Jutland 1916, & The Falkland Islands 1982. In addition she served in operation Southern Watch over Iraq and in the Balkans. This new volume from Kagero gives us 28 pages of line drawings and two double sided set of plans slightly larger than A2 in size (one side of which is in full colour). The book and the plans show the ship as she was after the removal of the Sea Dart. Conclusion This is another good book in the series. The pullout sheets are also good to see. This is certainly a very useful book for all modellers. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  4. #14/2021 All good things come in three, so here´s my dad´s third and last 262 for now. Hobby Boss kit, "712" decals from Kagero book "Messerschmitt Me 262 In Defence of the Third Reich", rest of decals from the sparesbox, painted with different MRP metal colours, simulated all the filler stuff by airbrushing different grey tones. Brake lines and seatbelts added, EZ Line used for the antenna wires. Build thread here https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235091248-naked-bird148-messerschmitt-me262a-2a-jv44/ In May 1945 the rest of JV44 ended up in Tyrol/Austria. A bunch of 262s and other aircraft, standing and lying around in the mountain valleys, partly destroyed, have been captured there by US troops. Can´t tell if this aircraft was an A-1 or A-2. It had racks like an A-2 but four gun openings like an A-1. DSC_0001 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0002 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0003 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0004 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0005 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0007 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0008 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0009 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0010 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0011 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0012 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0013 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0014 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0015 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0016 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0017 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0018 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0019 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0021 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0022 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0023 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0024 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0001 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr
  5. History Of The Turan Medium & Heavy Tanks in WWII (9788366148956) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK While the Turan was a Hungarian tank of WWII it stemmed from a Czechoslovak design. Back before the war in 1937 the Skoda factory produced a prototype medium tank based on its earlier LT vz. 35 project. Construction of this was never finished. After Germany annexed Czechoslovakia, these prototypes were finished under the new designation of T-21, which in turn was a predecessor of a new prototype; the T-22. Two of the latter type were given to Hungary in 1941. The Hungarian engineers decided to replace the original gun with their own 40mm gun for both economic and military reasons. The 40mm gun was Hungary's main anti tank gun at the time and could fire the same ammunition as the 40mm bofors. A total of 285 Turan I, II and II tanks were produced. Following combat operations the Hungarian Army concluded the 40mm gun was insufficient and the later batch of tanks on order were changed to a 75mm gun. These were later designated Heavy tanks The book is written in English on the left of the page, with Polish on the right, which translates to top and bottom for the captions to the various drawings within. The book itself is bound in a card cover and has 80 pages, with 3 pages of colour photos and 4 colour profiles in the centre. The book is lavishly supplied with black & white photographs throughout, and there are eight pages of line drawings and technical information. As well as details of the tank itself the book looks at the use of the tanks with the Hungarian Army Conclusion This is a great book on a little known armoured vehicle of WII. As well as technical details on the Tanks the many photos along with technical details and colour profiles make it much more of an all round publication which will sit well with the modellers and also people interested in the history if the vehicle. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  6. TopDrawings 101 Junkers Ju.88G (9788366148642) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK The Junkers Ju.88 was a jack-of-all-trades aircraft in service with the German Luftwaffe during WWII, with its origins in the mid-30s and a steady trail of improvements to the airframe that kept it in service during the whole of WWII, although they were always casting around for replacements and ways to create a successor that would provide a quantum leap in performance and load-carrying capacity. A search that was mostly fruitless and never achieved any particularly impressive improvements. By the time the G-series came on the scene, the changes had been substantial, including a new, streamlined fuselage for the night fighter role that removed the gondola under the fuselage and made other changes to suit its new job. Up until that time every variant had been based upon the original A-series fuselage, so this was considered a major change. The engines were upgraded too, and the tail fin was enlarged for enhanced stability. The reduced weight was countered somewhat by the addition of radar gear in the nose and fuselage, which varied through sub-variants, with the external differences quite marked in some. It was a G-6 that famously landed in the UK in error, which gave the boffins their first look at the latest German radar equipment. Oops! The last G-series to see service was the G-7, which had high altitude engines and a new radar fitment, and some were fitted with the deadly Schräge Musik upward firing cannons that could devastate a bomber, the crew of which would have no clue what was happening until it was too late. We have kits of many variants of the 88 in all major scales, with many manufacturers getting in on the act, as German subjects like the Ju.88 are always favourites with modellers, it seems. The TopDrawings series majors on scale plans, which is the main thrust, but also includes a little background information, some pertinent profiles, and a separate A2 sheet printed on both sides with drawings in 1:32 and another slightly smaller sheet in 1:48 of sub-variants of the aircraft. The book is written in English on the left of the page, with Polish on the right, which translates to top and bottom for the captions to the various drawings within. The book itself is bound in a card cover and has 15 pages, and the rear cover devoted to additional colour profiles of two G-1s. After the introduction the first half of the plans show the early G-1 and later G-6 variants in 1:72. Following this are the colour profiles with four pages of profiles of G-1s & G-6s wearing some interesting and varied camo schemes with copious scribble pattern applied to some, with multiple layers visible on the airframe on the centre pages. After the break there is another set of plans for various G-6 variants with some unusual noses and differing radar antennae in 1:72, showing the differences between the types and the head-on drawings plainly show the streamlined fuselage on this model. Four pages at the rear indicate the differences between variants in grey on side profiles in 1:96, some of which are full, while others are partial in order to fit them all in. Throughout the book, there are numerous smaller diagrams that show the fuselage behind the canopy where there were many variations of the access hatches across the main sub-variants. Conclusion These books are essential for the modeller that enjoys comparing their models against scale plans, and wants them to be as accurate as possible, with the separate large-scale plans quite useful, especially if you model in 1:32 or have a stain on the wall that could be hidden by posting the plans over it to enjoy. Review sample courtesy of
  7. TopDrawings 97 – Sturmgeschütz III (9788366148895) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK Based on the Panzer III, the StuG III had its turret removed, was refitted with a casemate and a high velocity gun that had limited traverse within the hull. This meant that the vehicle had to roughly align itself with the target, fine-tuning it with the gun’s roughly 15oc traverse. This marked it out as being ideal as a tank destroyer that lay in wait for its targets, although it was originally intended to provide support for infantry, aided by the comparatively low silhouette of the turretless design. It was effective in its job and fought all the way to the end of WWII, although it was notionally replaced by the StuG IV that was based upon the heavier Panzer IV. We have kits in scales from 1:72 through 1:35 from many of the main manufacturers, all the way up to the 1:16 giant that you can get in Remote Control (R/C) form (I forget the brand), which explains the different scales used in the plans throughout the book. The TopDrawings series majors on scale plans, which is the main thrust, but also includes a little background information, some pertinent profiles, and often a bonus of decals, plans or masks targeted to the subject matter in hand. With this edition, you get a double-sided A3 sheet of folded loose-leaf plans in 1:16. The book is written in English on the left of the page, with Polish on the right, which translates to top and bottom for the captions to the various drawings within. The book itself is bound in a card cover and has 15 pages, with the rear cover devoted to two profiles of a couple of Ausf.Gs in very different camouflage. The first page gives a written introduction, then launches straight into the plans that show the vehicle from the Ausf.A through to the Fs and Gs, after which there are eight profiles of all types except the A, with a wide range of schemes, fitments and equipment. After the colourful break we’re back to plans again, this time in 1:48 scale from all angles, and again in 1:72, showing each mark in each scale. Conclusion These books are essential for the modeller that enjoys comparing their models against scale plans, and wants them to be as accurate as possible, with the additional large sheet perfect for poring over on the lounge floor or hanging on the wall. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  8. TopDrawings #99 Panzerkampfwagen VI Ausf.B Tiger II (9788366148703) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK Hitler's obsession with "bigger is better" is well understood, and that coupled with his constant interference in things he knew little about hampered their attempts to take over Europe. The Tiger tank and its even larger sibling the King Tiger or Tiger II were both part of that escalating size battle, and even before the Tiger design was completed the original drive-train that was used in both tanks was under too much strain that would result in many abandoned or scuttled Tigers and Tiger IIs on the battlefield due to mechanical breakdowns. When either tank wasn’t broken however, they were a terrible foe for the Allies with the Tiger II having almost impregnable sloped frontal armour and a powerful 88mm cannon that could out-range almost every tank on the battlefield. It played havoc with the poor Shermans until the British 17-pounder was fitted to the Firefly, but the Sherman's thin armour was still no match for it and they had to use a tactic of sending several Shermans to try to outflank them and penetrate their thinner side and rear armour. Thanks to a complex design that was never fully streamlined, they weren't able to put Tigers or Tiger IIs into the field in sufficient numbers to halt the tide of defeat, with a small number of the beasts prominently displayed in propaganda films to terrorise the enemy, and very few reaching the frontline. Overall, it could be argued that the Panther was a more successful design than either Tiger when every aspect was taken into account, but they were the most feared on the battlefield despite their shortcomings. Most manufacturers with AFV kits in their range have offerings of this iron beast in all the main scales, as other people's King Tigers don't make money for them, and it's still an amazingly popular subject today as my stash in 1:35 will attest. The TopDrawings series majors on scale plans, which is the main thrust, but also includes a little background information, some pertinent profiles, and often a bonus of decals, loose-leaf plans or masks targeted at the subject matter in hand. With this edition, you get an A3 sheet of double-sided isometric drawings of Porsche and Henschel turreted King Tigers from various angles. The book is written in English on the left of the page, with Polish on the right, which translates to top and bottom for the captions to the various drawings within. The book itself is bound in a card cover with 22 pages, and the rear cover devoted to additional profiles of two tanks in interesting Dunkelgelb-based late war schemes. The first half of the plans begin with the Henschel turreted production machines, then the more complex Porsche turreted tanks that had the curved sides and tubular commander’s cupola side panel. The Porsche turrets were dropped after the simpler Henschel design was implemented, which leads to them sometimes being referred to as “Early”. After this the colour profiles show eight vehicles in differing ’44 dark yellow-based schemes, most wearing the mine-resistant Zimmerit coating that was initially applied from the factory, and includes a mix of Porsche and Henschel turrets. After the break there is another set of plans that focuses on the turrets both inside and out, then the complex wheel arrangement that also plagued the Tiger I, but without rubber tyres to reduce reliance of the scarce rubber of earlier designs. There are also cross-sectional drawings of the turret, detailed scrap drawings of the various aspects of the hull, as well as a detailed view of the running gear from below, showing the orientation of the interleaved wheels. The larger drawings are in 1:35 scale, but some are printed in 1:48 and 1:72 for convenience, and there are numerous front and rear views as well as some overhead and the aforementioned view from below to give a better look at the King Tiger's form. Conclusion These books are essential for the modeller that enjoys comparing their models against scale plans, and wants them to be as accurate as possible, with the loose drawings a pleasant addition. Review sample courtesy of
  9. #27/2020 Newest model by my dad. Hasegawa kit, decals from the kit, Kagero and AML, EZ Line for the antenna wire, shortened the too long legs some mm to receive a more realistic look,, plastic rods and lead wire for the brake lines, Eduard seatbelts, painted with MRP RLM 76/75/81/83. Kagero Topcolors #9 and JaPo Messerschmitt 109 of JG52 in Deutsch Brod used as reference. Build thread here https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235082275-end-of-war148-messerschmitt-bf109k-4-iiijg52/ Aircraft flown by Hauptmann Adolf Borchers, III./JG52, Deutsch Brod/Czechoslovakia in May 1945. DSC_0001 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0002 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0003 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0004 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0005 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0006 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0007 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0008 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0009 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0010 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0011 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0012 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0013 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0014 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0015 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0016 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0017 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0018 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0019 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0001 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr
  10. My dad started his last Hasegawa K-4 DSC_0007 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr DSC_0008 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr gonna do this scheme with Kagero decals DSC_0001 by grimreaper110, auf Flickr
  11. RM Littorio Kagero Super Drawings in 3D Littorio was the lead ship of her class of battleship; she served in the Italian Regia Marina (Royal Navy) during World War II. She was named after the Lictor ("Littorio" in Italian), in ancient times the bearer of the Roman fasces, which was adopted as the symbol of Italian Fascism. Littorio and her sister Vittorio Veneto were built in response to the French battleships Dunkerque and Strasbourg. They were Italy's first modern battleships, and the first 35,000-ton capital ships of any nation to be laid down under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty. Littorio was laid down in October 1934, launched in August 1937, and completed in May 1940. Shortly after her commissioning, Littorio was badly damaged during the British air raid on Taranto on 11 November 1940, which put her out of action until the following March. Littorio thereafter took part in several sorties to catch the British Mediterranean Fleet, most of which failed to result in any action, the notable exception being the Second Battle of Sirte in March 1942, where she damaged several British warships. Littorio was renamed Italia in July 1943 after the fall of the Fascist government. On 9 September 1943, the Italian fleet was attacked by German bombers while it was on its way to internment. During this action, which saw the destruction of her sister Roma, Italia herself was hit by a Fritz X radio-controlled bomb, causing significant damage to her bow. As part of the armistice agreement, Italia was interned at Malta, Alexandria, and finally in the Great Bitter Lake in the Suez Canal, where she remained until 1947. Italia was awarded to the United States as a war prize and scrapped at La Spezia in 1952–54. With their ever increasing series of books in the 3D format, Kagero never fails to deliver. This particular publication on the Italian battleship not only provides a superb history of the ship, another one which I knew only a little, if anything about before reviewing this book. The first ten pages cover the history of the battleship in specific sections. The sections are:- Overview Design Armour Propulsion Security systems Underwater protection Armament Conning tower Service Conclusion The rest of the eighty three pages are filled with the beautifully rendered 3D drawings we have got know so well in this series, covering every part of the ships structure, weapons, boats and sundry equipment. The drawings are really clear and perfect for the maritime modeller to see all the useful details that could help make that masterpiece that we all strive for. This release does include drawings for below the waterline, unlike a lot of other books in the series, so perfect for those of us who build full hull. An A2 folded sheet of line drawings is also included and this contains 3 views of the ship overall, in 1:350 scale, while on the reverse there are bow and stern drawings in 1:350, plus numerous detail drawings of equipment in various scales between 1:50 and 1:200, giving more detail to the information hungry modeller. Conclusion Following the now tried and tested formula that Kagero have made their own, this book is superbly produced and with the subject matter being one of the most good looking battleships, it will become a must have for any maritime modellers. With the future release of the Littorio in 1:350, by Trumpeter, this book couldn’t have been released at a better time for the modeller to start collecting their references. Review sample courtesy of
  12. TopDrawings 73 – Chance Vought F4U Corsair A, C, D, P Mk.I-IV (9788366148215) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK The distinctive Gull Wing design of the Corsair made it one of the stand-out fighters of the Pacific theatre, helped greatly by the fact that it was also an excellent aircraft. With its Twin Wasp engine and massive propeller, which required the gull-wing design so that it was less likely to strike the deck on take-off and landing, it was fast, manoeuvrable and carried sufficient armour and armament to give a good account of itself against the Japanese Zero, a goal in which it was aided by the dwindling pool of experienced pilots available to Japan toward the end of WWII. Initially fitted with a "bird cage" canopy with limited visibility, it was later given a better blown hood, which coupled with an 18cm increase in the height of the pilot's seat and a 15cm lengthening of the tail wheel strut, gave the pilot better visibility both in the air and on the deck, which when taxiing around with a 13'4" prop was pretty important to the deck crews. We have kits in just about every scale from 1:350 upwards, with most major manufacturers getting in on the act, as other people's Corsairs don't make money for them, and it's a popular subject. The TopDrawings series majors on scale plans, which is the primary thrust, but also includes a little background information, some pertinent profiles, and often a bonus of decals or masks targeted at the subject matter in hand. With this edition, you get a handsome A4 glossy print of a pair of US Navy Corsairs carrying out a rocket attack on some poor unfortunates, which was last seen on the cover of their Monographs #56. The book is written in English on the left of the page, with polish on the right, which translates to top and bottom for the captions to the various drawings within. The book itself is bound in a card cover and has 20 pages, and the rear cover devoted to additional profiles of two F4U-1Ds and a loose A3 sheet printed on both sides with overhead plans of the -1C and -1D airframes on one side and the British Mk.I and Mk.IV on the other. The first half of the plans show the variants from the -1C, -1D and the British Mk.I. After this the colour profiles of a -1D, Mk.II and a -4 are printed on four pages in colour, augmented by the aforementioned two on the rear cover. After the break there is another set of plans of the Mk.II, Mk.III and Mk.IV, with some head/tail-on plans into the bargain. The final three pages show side profiles with the changes between the variants visible, showing just how ungainly the bird cage canopy really was. Throughout the book, there are a number of smaller diagrams that show the two types of rocket the Corsair typically carried and prop profiles. Conclusion These books are essential for the modeller that enjoys comparing their models against scale plans, and wants them to be as accurate as possible, with the print a nice bonus that has drama and poignancy at the same time - I've already put it up in my workshop as it happens. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  13. TopDrawings #88 – M16 Half-Track (ISBN: 9788366148758) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK The M16 Half Track Multiple Gun Motor Carriage was usually known by the easier and shorter name M16 Half-Track, derived from the M3 Half-track and fitted with a quartet of heavy-barreled M2 Browning .50cal machine guns, the same type that were fitted to Allied fighters and bombers of the day. The quad mount was nicknamed the meat-chopper for obvious reasons later in its career as it became used as ground support rather than Anti-Aircraft when the German Luftwaffe ran out of aircraft, then after when the speed of jet-powered aircraft made accurate targeting a very chancy business. They served in WWII in substantial numbers as mobile air-defence units with over 3,000 new build and conversions seeing the battlefield, and after WWII they soldiered on to the early days of Vietnam as ground support. We have kits in scales from 1:72 through 1:35 from Tamiya and Dragon, all the way up to the 1:16 giant from Trumpeter, which explains the different scales used in the plans throughout the book. The TopDrawings series majors on scale plans, which is the main thrust, but also includes a little background information, some pertinent profiles, and often a bonus of decals or masks targeted at the subject matter in hand. With this edition, you get two double-sided A2 sheets of large folded loose-leaf plans in 1:16 and 1:35, plus another double-sided A3 sheet of drawings of the major parts. The book is written in English on the left of the page, with Czech on the right, which translates to top and bottom for the captions to the various drawings within. The book itself is bound in a card cover and has 24 pages, with the rear cover devoted to profiles of an M16 in Olive Drab, although it seems a little light, verging on yellow. The first page gives a written introduction, then launches straight into the plans that show the vehicle from each corner from the outside, with drawings of equipment and small parts taking up any white space. After this the interior compartments are drawn from various angles with the quad gun mount missing. The quad mount is then detailed over three pages along with the .50cals and the ammo boxes. Then the bodywork is stripped away and many aspects of the chassis, the White power pack, axles, track unit and gearbox are laid bare for us to see. The last four pages show many views of the vehicle with and without bodywork in 1:72 and 1:48 from all angles. Throughout the book, there are numerous smaller diagrams that show pioneer tools, stowage, equipment, wheels, driver controls, and the White 160AX 6-cylinder engine. Conclusion These books are essential for the modeller that enjoys comparing their models against scale plans, and wants them to be as accurate as possible, with the additional large sheets perfect for poring over on the dining room table or hanging on the wall. Highly recommended. At time of writing this book is available at a discounted price, making an even more tempting target! Review sample courtesy of
  14. TopDrawings 87 – Sukhoi Su-24 (9788366148741) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK What became the Su-24 Fencer began as a fixed-wing attempt at creating a short-takeoff all-weather bomber, similar to the tasks that were originally envisaged for the American F-111, but without the variable-geometry wings that were expected to bring potentially insurmountable issues and complexity. This resulted in a rather angular “artists impression” of the aircraft that eventually saw service, but with the entry of the F-111 into US use, they realised that swing-wings weren’t as problematic as they had thought, so it was back to the drawing board for the engineers at Sukhoi. The second prototype flew with the new wings, and despite some fairly costly crashes, they developed the airframe into the Su-24M, which was comparable in performance to its US competitor. It benefitted from one of the first digital war-fighting systems, as well as a capable terrain avoidance system that allowed them to fly at low and very low altitudes to evade radar of their enemies, which required fitting of the K-36D zero-zero ejection seat for emergency egress. Later variants made improvements to the airframe as well as to its weapon-carrying capabilities, and a glass cockpit with modern avionics was fitted to the reminder of their on-strength airframes that are still flying (not literally right this second) at time of writing. We have kits even in the smaller scales from a few manufacturers due to the appealing look of this monster even outside of the former Soviet Union, with modern toolings from Trumpeter in 1:72 and 1:48, with perhaps 1:32 lagging behind a little. The TopDrawings series majors on scale plans, which is the main thrust, but also includes a little background information, some pertinent profiles, and often a bonus of decals or masks targeted at the subject matter in hand. With this edition, you get a set of loose 1:48 plans for the M and M2 variants. The book is written in English on the left of the page, with Czech on the right, which translates to top and bottom for the captions to the various drawings within. The book itself is bound in a card cover and has 20 pages, with the rear cover devoted to additional profiles of an MR and M airframe. The first half of the plans show the variants from the origin of the mature airframe, the M, and the later M2 (Fencer D). After this the colour profiles are printed on four pages in colour, augmented by the aforementioned two on the rear cover. After the break there is another set of plans of the MR (Fencer E), The MP and finally the MK (Fencer F). The final three pages show black and white detail photos of an airframe that will be very useful to modellers. Throughout the book, there are numerous smaller diagrams that show cross-sections of the infrared threat detector dome on the spine, nose cone and pitot probe changes, landing gear arrangement, sensor and pylon placement, and examples of it loaded with weapons. Conclusion These books are essential for the modeller that enjoys comparing their models against scale plans, and wants them to be as accurate as possible, with the pull-out plans tempting to put on the walls. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  15. A thread to keep you all updated on the latest modelling books from Casemate and our distributed publishers. Click on the jacket images of the books to link through to the website with more info. - Casemate UK
  16. The Japanese Battleship Hyuga Kagero Super Drawings in 3D No.71 The Hyuga was the second and last Ise-class battleship built for the Imperial Japanese Navy. This class of vessel was an improvement of the previous Fuso class. The hull was extended by 3m and the armour of the magazines and central command areas was changed. The layout of the turrets was changed to allow the boilers to be placed closer to the bow and the funnels to be moved closer to each other. Even though ordered in 1912 the ship was not completed until 1918 so she took no part in WWI. She did support Japanese forces during the Siberian Intervention in the Russian Civil war. Then in the late 1920s and again in the 1930 she was partially modernised with improvements being made in the armour and armour and propulsion before playing a small art in the Second Sino Japaneses War. By the start of WWII the ship was considered obsolete, however following the loss of the IJN's aircraft carriers during the battle of Midway she was partially converted to a sea plane carrier by removing the aft turrets and installing a flight deck. She continued to serve in WWII until being sunk by American airstrikes in July 1945. Post war the wreck was raised and scrapped. This is the latest book in Kagero Publishing’s superb series of Super Drawings in 3D. As with the previous books it has a brief history and the ships specifications at the beginning. This includes the following:- Overview Design / Structure Propulsion Armament Armour Service Conclusion The rest of the 79 pages are filled with the now well known style of beautifully drawn 3D renderings of every part of the ship. It is obvious that a lot of time has been taken to get the drawings this good and accurate, and there is a wealthy of information for the modeller to use during their build. Every area of the upper hull and superstructure is dealt with plus the lower hull including the propellers and rudder. There are a lot of close up renders of most of the equipment fitted, such as the turrets, ships boats, funnels, Kawasaki 37K2 seaplanes, and main turrets; as well as the longer view, showing how this design differed from all other battleships. As is the norm with this series, Kagero have included a double sided B2 fold out sheet with a three view on one side, unusually in 1:350, with additional drawings of the ships fixtures, such as casemates, main directors, torpedo tubes, ships boats and radar, in either 1:50, 1:100, 1:150 or 1:350 scales. It would be a nice extra if these books had a pull out profile of the whole vessel in colour, however this one does have a 3 fold A-4 colour pull out as well at the centre. Conclusion If you love Japaneses battleships and like to model them as accurately as possible then this book is most definitely for you. Highly recommended, Review sample courtesy of
  17. HMS Prince of Wales Kagero Super Drawings in 3D No.69 HMS Prince of Wales was a King George V-class battleship of the Royal Navy, built at the Cammell Laird shipyard in Birkenhead, England. She was involved in several key actions of the Second World War, including the May 1941 Battle of the Denmark Strait against the German battleship Bismarck, operations escorting convoys in the Mediterranean, and her final action and sinking in the Pacific in December 1941. Prince of Wales had an extensive battle history, first seeing action in August 1940 while still being outfitted in her dry-dock, being attacked and damaged by German aircraft. Her brief but storied career ended 10 December 1941, when Prince of Wales and battlecruiser HMS Repulse became the first capital ships to be sunk solely by air power on the open sea, a harbinger of the diminishing role this class of ships was subsequently to play in naval warfare. The wreck lies upside down in 223 feet (68 m) of water, near Kuantan, in the South China Sea. This is the latest book in Kagero Publishing’s superb series of Super Drawings in 3D, although this one is definitely thicker than the previous releases. As with the previous books it has a brief history and the ships specifications at the beginning. This includes the following:- Overview Design Propulsion Armaments and fire control Armour Service Conclusion The rest of the ninety three pages are filled with the now well known style of beautifully drawn 3D renderings of every part of the ship. It is obvious that a lot of time has been taken to get the drawings this good and accurate, and there is a wealthy of information for the modeller to use during their build. Every area of the upper hull and superstructure is dealt with plus the lower hull including the propellers and rudder. There are a lot of close up renders of most of the equipment fitted, such as the PomPom mounts, 5.25” turrets, ships boats, funnels, Walrus seaplane and main turrets, as well as the longer view, showing how clean the design was even though she had so much equipment onboard. As is the norm with this series, Kagero have included a double sided A2 fold out sheet with a three view on one side, unusually in 1:350, with additional drawings of the ships fixtures, such as turrets, main directors, torpedo tubes, AA turrets, ships boats and radar, in either 1:50, 1:100, 1:150 or 1:350 scales. Conclusion I wish I had owned this book when I built the old Tamiya 1:350 kit, it would have enabled me to give the sort of detail it deserved, maybe will be able to do it justice in the future build now. If you love British battleships and like to model them as accurately as possible then this book is most definitely for you. Review sample courtesy of
  18. TopDrawings 77 Junkers Ju.87D, G (9788366148420) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK The distinctive Gull Wing design of the Stuka, its screaming "Jericho Trumpets" dive siren and its fixed spatted landing gear made the Ju.87 a terrifying sight for the Allies and the civilian population of the countries they invaded. It also saw service in the period in and around the Battle of Britain, where its relatively slow combat speed first became an issue and required escorts on future missions to reduce the horrific attrition rates that unescorted sorties suffered. In the role it was designed for it excelled however, with an efficient almost vertical dive profile and semi-automatic pull-out system that catered for blacked-out pilots. The sirens instilled fear and confusion in their ground targets, a sound that has become a cinematic trope for almost every crashing aircraft on film (deftly parodied by the film Airplane), much to the amusement of anyone that knows about it about the subject. Production of new airframes ceased in 1944 after the main factory was obliterated, but the aircraft soldiered on to the end of WWII with various upgrades and role changes before cancellation allowing it to continue to be used, taking on the role as a tank buster with a 37mm cannon with armour-piercing rounds slung in a gondola under each wing, and known as the Kanonenvogel. In the hands of a skilled pilot they were lethal to armour, attacking from the side or from above where their armour was weakest. We have kits in just about every scale from 1:350 upwards (for the Trumpeter Graf Zeppelin), with most major and some minor manufacturers getting in on the act, as other people's Stukas don't make money for them, and it's a popular subject. The TopDrawings series majors on scale plans, which is the main thrust, but also includes a little background information, some pertinent profiles, and often a bonus of decals or masks targeted at the subject matter in hand. With this edition, you get a handsome A4 glossy print of a diving Stuka releasing his bomb from the swinging H-frame on some poor unfortunates, and a folded A3 sheet of plans printed on both sides with overhead views of D-2 and D-5 airframes. The book is written in English on the left of the page, with Polish on the right, which translates to top and bottom for the captions to the various drawings within. The book itself is bound in a card cover and has 20 pages, and the rear cover devoted to additional profiles of two G-2s and a loose A3 sheet printed on both sides with overhead plans mentioned above. The first half of the plans show the variants from the D-1 to D-5 including the outrageously peculiar glider towing D-1 that can only be described as a Stuka-and-sidecar. It genuinely has to be seen to be believed. After this the colour profiles of two D-1s, a D-3 with four view profiles, and two D-5s that are printed on four pages in colour, augmented by the aforementioned two on the rear cover. After the break there is another set of plans continuing the D-5, D-7, D-8, the odd canopy of the H-1, the G-1 and G-2, with some head/tail-on plans into the bargain. The final three pages show side profiles with the changes between the variants visible, describing the subtle changes, cannon pods and a torpedo fitted under a D-4. Throughout the book, there are numerous smaller diagrams that show the some of the weapons and bombs that the Stuka typically carried, plus prop profiles. Conclusion These books are essential for the modeller that enjoys comparing their models against scale plans, and wants them to be as accurate as possible, with the print a nice bonus that has drama and shows the lethal abilities of the Stuka well. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  19. Monograph #66: The P.24 A-G (9788366148055) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK The PZL P.24 was the last of a series of small single-engined monoplanes with high-set gull-wings that were designed in the 1930s by Polish engineer Zygmunt Puławski. It was initially to be powered by a license built Bristol engine, but due to restrictions on the licensing deal this was soon changed to a Gnome-Rhone unit and production began with airframes began entering service in 1936. In the run-up to WWII there were numerous orders for the fighter, and with each upgrade the letter designation increased from A through to G, with an H and J model proposed but not reaching service. When the war started it was soon realised that the fighter was out-dated compared to the more modern fighters fielded by the Nazis in their invasion of Eastern Europe, so it was pulled from the front and used in the training role. Greece however flew the aircraft against the Italians until they ran out of spares, and then were replaced by the Gloster Gladiator that fared little better. The Romanians also flew the type built under license, and some of the P.24's DNA found its way into their own IAR.80 in the aft fuselage, although the overall look of the aircraft was completely different to the casual observer. The Book This is number 66 in the Monographs 3D edition from Kagero, with Polish on the left half of the page and English on the right. It is perfect-bound in a card cover and 172 pages in colour and black & white. It is written by Andrzej Glass and Tassos Katsika. The first 90 pages are text interspersed with many pictures and their accompanying captions, and incidentally the English text is usually found under the Polish for these. The chapters break down as follows: Puławski's concept fighter Puławski's imitators around the world Puławski's fighter planes with in-line engines Puławski's fighter planes with radial engines The PZL P.24 fighter plane The PZL P.24A and P.24C in Turkey The PZL P.24B in Bulgaria The PZL P.24E in Romania The PZL P.24F, P.24G and P.24H in Greece The PZL P.24J and the export program Production of the PZL P.24 An evaluation of the PZL P.24 A technical description of the PZL P.24 The wing The fuselage Control surfaces Undercarriage Armament Engine Painting Plans & differences between marks (17 sheets in 1:48 plus loose A3 sheet in 1:32 printed on both sides ) Photographs of the aircraft in service Visualisations by Tassos Katsika (76 pages) Colour profiles (6 pages) There is a substantial amount of text in the first part of the book which gives a lot of detail on the development, entry into service with its various operators and the subsequent action that it saw during WWII in their service. The photographs are of great interest to anyone with a historical bent, and coupled with the captions there will be plenty of reading time after which you'll be an instant expert on the type, and ready to dig into the 3D computer renderings that take you deep into the heart of the machine, peeling it away like layers of an onion. The detail shown here is extremely impressive and would be an absolute boon for the modeller with an eye for it that perhaps wants to strip away some of the skin to reveal what's underneath. Conclusion This little aircraft isn't all that well-known outside of where it served, so it's good to see it getting a little prominence with this release. It is a good one-stop-shop if you would like to get to know it a little better, and broaden your knowledge a little bit in the process. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  20. Gloster Gladiator Monograph 3D Edition (9788365437860) Kagero via Casemate UK The Gladiator was Gloster's (late) winning entry for the competition to find the next frontline fighter that Supermarine submitted the 224 that later became the Spitfire after a ground-up redesign. The War Department went to the safer option and commissioned production of the aircraft that was to become the Gladiator, the RAF's last biplane fighter that although outclassed even at the start of WWII it still saw extensive service in areas where its lack of speed and manoeuvrability wasn't so fatal. Its designer Henry Folland was a firm believer in evolution over revolution and the Glad was an update of the Gauntlet that was already underway at the Gloster design works. It was still a biplane but efforts had been made to streamline the design by removing some of the interplane struts and other streamlining efforts. The Hurricane and Spitfire were in development at the time so the Gladiator's future was almost immediately a shorter one as there is a huge leap in performance when you dispense with one set of wings, especially if you pair the airframe with a Rolls-Royce Merlin. The Book This is #65 in the Monographs in 3D line, and it of course covers the Gloster Gladiators Mk.I, Mk.II and the Sea Gladiator. It is perfect bound in a card cover extending to 215 pages, so it's a weighty tome. It was written by Adam Cotton and 3D artwork by Marek Ryś. Introduction Evolving the last of the line The Gladiator enters the arena The Mk.I anatomy in detail Gladiator Mk.II The Sea Gladiator The last days of peace The Sea Gladiator joins the fleet The phoney war Norway – The token sacrifice The Sea Gladiator in Norway The Battle of France and Battle of Britain Malta, the legend of Faith, Hope & Charity, and the wider Mediterranean North Africa Onward to Greece East Africa and Aden Foreign users RAF camouflage and markings End Notes Visualisations by Marek Ryś (87 pages) Isometric camouflage schemes and profiles (28 pages) There is a substantial amount of text in the first part of the book which gives a lot of detail on the development, entry into service and the subsequent action that it saw during WWII in RAF, FAA and foreign service. The photographs are of great interest to anyone with a historical bent although some are a little saddening as they depict ruined airframes, one of which is the last of the famous three Faith, Hope and Charity looking a bit sorry for itself in a quarry. Coupled with the captions there will be plenty of reading time after which you'll be a bit of an instant expert on the type, and ready to dig into the 3D computer renderings that take you deep into the heart of the machine, peeling it away like layers of an onion. The detail shown here is extremely impressive and would be an absolute boon for the modeller with an eye for it that perhaps wants to strip away some of the skin of their model to reveal what's underneath. This will be especially of interest once the 1:32 kit from ICM arrives with your favourite model shop. Conclusion The Glad is a well-loved aircraft amongst the residents of Britmodeller, perhaps because of its origins, or maybe because we love an underdog. There are a few kits in each of the major scales from the diminutive Mark.I kit in 1:144 through the Airfix kits in 1:72, and the Roden kit in 1:48. There have been a few limited run kits in 1:32, but ICM are going to fix that this year, as mentioned above. Can't wait! Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  21. Challenger 2 PhotoSniper #30 (9788365437853) Kagero Publishing via Casemate UK Following WWII and the success of the Centurion, the Chieftain was eventually brought in as its replacement, and while it had some excellent features it was ageing technology that held it back and it took a long time to reach maturity. As it grew older the MOD began looking for a replacement and after the failure of a large sale of a new design to Iran, the Shir design was repurposed into the Challenger with some changes of course and advanced elements incorporated from another Vickers design. It was always a stop-gap and pretty soon a replacement was being considered with substantial improvements in the firing control system that was much needed. The first Challenger 2 was put out for evaluation in 1991 and found to be a bit of a dog, having many problems that took a long time to remedy, leaving the higher-ranking officers that remembered the same issues with the Chieftain with a bitter taste in their mouths. Eventually though, the issues were cleared and the Chally grew up to be a fine vehicle and is arguably one of the best Main Battle Tanks (MBT) in the world today. The Chieftains and Challenger 1s are now long gone and the Chally 2 is destined to be in service for a long time to come, with upgrades happening to the basic chassis as the need arises. They have proved to be a robust and capable platform that has served the British Army and Oman well and has an enviable combat reputation. The Book This is the latest PhotoSniper book from Kagero, #30 of the series. It is perfect bound in a card cover with 82 pages of text and almost 200 photographs, written by Dick Taylor who clearly has a lot of love for the subject matter. It is printed on satin finished paper with most of the photographs in colour and captions that inform and entertain in equal measure. Some of the photos are of a candid nature showing tankers going about their daily chores such as maintenance and repair and many appear to have come from private collections. The text is broken down into chapters as follows: Chapter 1 Design & development Chapter 2 Challenger 2 described Chapter 3 The Armoured Regiment & Squadron Chapter 4 Operational Use & Variants Although the title implies that it is a photograph-centred book, there is still plenty to read in between the pictures and their captions and that should keep the reader engaged for longer than a simple book of photos. The pictures are impressive on their own however with lots of modelling-friendly detail pics as well as a great deal of inspiration for dioramas and vignettes. There are also a good few pictures of the bridge-layer variant the Titan, and the engineering Trojan, plus the Driver Training Tank (DTT) which has the turret removed and is replaced by a cowling that bears a passing resemblance to the superstructure of an old pleasure cruiser boat. On the very back page (which I haven't counted in the total) is a discount code for a 30% discount on the similarly themed PhotoSniper #27 "Before the birth of the MBT", also by Kagero. Conclusion This book is for anyone interested in the Challenger 2, and as one of those people it makes for an interesting and informative read. The pictures are great too and it makes me want to retrieve my Tamiya kit from the loft, wherever it might be. Very highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  22. Renault FT & M1917 PhotoSniper 3D (9788366148048) Kagero via Casemate UK The diminutive Renault tank that is often known somewhat incorrectly as the FT-17 was the first true tank of the form that we know today, having a separate turret that could rotate 360o to fire in all directions. It arrived late in WWI and was so successful that it was to stay in service in some locations for up to 25 years and even America was a customer, building their own under license as the M1917 until they could produce their own tanks of a sufficient standard. With upgrades along the way it managed to take part in the early days of WWII in French service although it was hopelessly outclassed by even the early-war German tanks and fell to their guns with alarming regularity, with many being abandoned by their unfortunate crews. In their usual "that's mine now" manner, the Nazis pressed the little tanks into service but away from the front lines as defensive vehicles for airfields, arms dumps and other high value targets of the Resistance. The FT also saw service with a number of other countries and was copied by some others with greater or lesser divergence from the original. This book is a thick tome from Kagero and is number 29 in their PhotoSniper 3D line. It is 180 pages perfect bound into a card cover and is written by Jacek Szafrański and Samir Karmieh. It is broken down into sections, as follows: Introduction A Brief history of the tank with photos of it in service with many of its operators. Walkaround A 65 page photographic description of both the FT-31 and FT-17 variants of the vehicle, all in colour. 3D Visualisation The balance of the book is devoted to a huge quantity of computer generated images of the tank, including cross-sections and internal equipment such as engines, guns and suspension. The photographs in the introductory section are mostly from interwar and WWII situations and are presented in high quality black and white with captions to match. The walkaround section is based upon preserved examples in museums and of course the photographs are crisp and in full colour. As with all museum vehicles, take care not to assume that everything is in the correct place, as sometimes museums get it wrong or go with what they have through expediency, however if using the photos as highly detailed supporting information you won't go far wrong. Conclusion A very useful book for anyone that has this model in their stash, whether it is the 1:35 Meng, 1:16 Takom kit, or one of the smaller scale renditions that have been around for some years. The level of detail exposed is second to none, and will assist with building and detailing any kit of this ground-breaking tin can. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  23. The Battleship HMS Rodney Kagero Super Drawings in 3D No.70 HMS Rodney was the only other ship aside from HMS Nelson in the Nelson Class of Royal Navy Battleships. This class stood out from other ships of the day as they had all of their main armament forward of the main superstructure, and that armament was nine 16" guns. The design of the vessel was due to the limitations set out by the Washington Treaty of 1922 and the maximum displacement of 35,000 tons. By placing all three turrets in one place the armour could be concentrated there and not ship wide. The Rodney was to be named for Admiral George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney. Rodney was famous for defeating the French at the Battle of the Saintes in 1782, and the Spanish at Cape St Vincent in 1780. The Rodney was laid down at Cammell Lairds in Birkenhead in December 1922 and launched in 1925. She was commissioned into the Royal Navy in in 1927. The Rodney was plagued by problems throughout her careers and had numerous refits to try and correct these issues, and heavy use she was paid off in 1946 and scrapped in 1948. During WWII she earned battle honours for Norway, The Atlantic, The Bismark (she made history here by being the only Battleship to torpedo another) while firing 340 16" shells!, Malta Convoys, The Invasion of North Africa, the Sicily & Salerno, followed by the English Channel, Normandy and finally the Arctic, This is the latest book in Kagero Publishing’s superb series of Super Drawings in 3D. This book looks at the ship as she was after the 1942 refit. As with the previous books it has a brief history and the ships specifications at the beginning. This includes the following:- Overview Design Propulsion Armaments and fire control Armour Service Conclusion The rest of the 89 pages are filled with the now well known style of beautifully drawn 3D renderings of every part of the ship. It is obvious that a lot of time has been taken to get the drawings this good and accurate, and there is a wealthy of information for the modeller to use during their build. Every area of the upper hull and superstructure is dealt with plus the lower hull including the propellers and rudder. There are a lot of close up renders of most of the equipment fitted, such as the PomPom & mounts, 16", 6" & 4.7” turrets, ships boats, funnels, Walrus seaplane and main turrets, as well as the longer view, showing how this design differed from all other battleships. As is the norm with this series, Kagero have included a double sided A2 fold out sheet with a three view on one side, unusually in 1:350, with additional drawings of the ships fixtures, such as turrets, main directors, torpedo tubes, AA turrets, ships boats and radar, in either 1:50, 1:100, 1:150 or 1:350 scales. It would be a nice extra if these books had a pull out profile of the whole vessel in colour. Conclusion If you love British battleships and like to model them as accurately as possible then this book is most definitely for you. I have always had a personal like of the Ship as she was built at the shipyard where I served my apprenticeship, and when I helped doing some work in the archive I was able to look at original drawings for the ship. Highly recommended, Review sample courtesy of
  24. The Russian ASW Guided Missile Cruiser Petropavlovsk Kagero Top Drawings No. 74 via Casemate UK The Russian ASW Guided Missile Cruiser Petropavlovsk was a Kara Class Guided Missile Cruiser in Western Classification though the Soviets classed them as Large anti-submarine warfare vessels. The Kara Class was itself an enlarged Kresta II Class vessel with new Gas Turbine Engines replacing steam turbines. Even though designated ASW ships they have a formidable anti-aircraft capability as well. They are 173m long with a beam of 6.7m. Their primary ASW weapon is two quad SS-N-14 Silix missile systems. This solid fuel rocket system was a response to the US ASROC system could deliver a torpedo or nuclear depth charge at ranges of upto 50km. The system unlike the US one also has multipurpose torpedo's which can be used against surface vessels. Two additional RBU-1000 and two RBU-6000 are also carried. For the anti-aircraft role two twin SA-N-3 Goblet, and 24 SA=N-6 Grumble missile systems are carried. The vessel also mounts 2 twin 76mm guns, 4 30mm CIWS systems and finally two racks of 5 533mm torpedo tubes. An sub hunting helicopter can also be carried, All in all these were very capable ships, All of the class have now been paid off. One of these ships the Ochakov was used in anger, though in a strange way. In 2014 with the Russian invasion of the Ukraine she was sunk as a blockship in Donuzlav bay to prevent the Ukrainian gaining access to the Black Sea. This is the latest book from Kagero in their Top Drawing series, and like the previous books it has a brief history and the ships specifications at the beginning. The rest of the 15 pages are filled with beautifully drawn diagrams of almost every piece of equipment on the ship. Unusually for this series there aren’t any drawings of the hull, the largest section being covered is the superstructure. The main reson for the book are the the two double sided A2 foldout sheets, the first of which has a three view line drawing of the complete ship on one side, the other side containing similar views, but in full colour. The second sheet also contains three view line drawings of the ship, The opposite side of sheet 2 also contain line drawings of the ship, the top drawing of the hull only, the next, top down view of the hull, but also showing the internal spaces of he first level of the superstructure. The bottom drawing is a waterline drawing with annotations for the majority of the equipment visible above the main deck. The drawings also show the differences between entry into serivce and the changes to their final years. Conclusion This is another good book in the series. The pullout sheets are also wonderful to see. This is certainly a very useful book for all modellers. Recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  25. ORP General Tadeusz Kościuszko Kagero Top Drawings No. 65 ORP General Tadeusz Kościuszko, the former USS Wadsworth (FFG-9), is one of two Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigates in the Polish Navy. She is named for Tadeusz Kościuszko, an American Revolutionary War hero and hero of Poland's struggle for independence. General Tadeusz Kościuszko is home-ported in Gdynia Oksywie, and has participated in numerous NATO exercises in the Baltic Sea. Ordered from Todd Pacific Shipyards, Los Angeles Division, San Pedro, California on 27 February 1976 as part of the FY75 program, Wadsworth, was laid down on 13 July 1977, launched on 29 July 1978, and commissioned on 28 February 1980. Decommissioned on 28 June 2002, Wadsworth was handed over to Poland the same day, to become the second ex-Oliver Hazard Perry class in the Polish Navy inventory, the former USS Clark having been handed over in March 2000. This is the latest book from Kagero in their Top Drawing series, and like the previous books it has a brief history and the ships specifications at the beginning. The rest of the eighteen pages are filled with beautifully drawn diagrams of almost every piece of equipment on the ship. Unusually for this series there aren’t any drawings of the hull, the largest section being covered is the superstructure. Also not seen before are a series of photographs of the actual ship covering eight pages which give a different dimension to the book as they are great not only for detail but also for the colour scheme and even more importantly for the modeller, weathering. Also included are A2 foldout sheets, the first of which has a three view line drawing of the complete ship on one side, the other side containing similar views, but in full colour as she was in 2018. The second sheet also contains three view line drawings of the ship, but as she was in 2015, and it’s very interesting comparing the two sheets seeing what change in her last refit. The opposite side of sheet 2 also contain line drawings of the ship, the top drawing of the hull only, the next, top down view of the hull, but also showing the internal spaces of he first level of the superstructure. The bottom drawing is a waterline drawing with annotations for the majority of the equipment visible above the main deck. Conclusion This is another superb book in the series and I particularly like the use of the photographs as they are a great help to the modeller. The pullout sheets are also wonderful to see, especially the changes between 2015 and 2018. This is certainly a very useful book for all modellers who would like a slightly different Perry class ship in their collection. Review sample courtesy of
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