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Found 230 results

  1. Hi all, first post here so please go easy! I have recently taken to scale modelling and after a few practice builds on a few Airfix starter kits I thought it was time to get my teeth into something a bit more challenging. After watching this brilliant video I decided to go for the ICM Spitfire Mk.IX 'Beer Delivery', so a quick trip to eModels and about £13 and a week later the kit arrived. I hope that some of you find this build interesting and am looking forward to receiving any tips. Boxing: Plenty of parts First off I started building the engine block and cradle. The moulding is pretty poor with lots of flash and mould lines but the plastic is pretty soft so not too bad to sand down. I like the amount of detail though with about thirty parts coming together for the block alone. Interestingly there are very few locating pins on this kit meaning that the parts have to be manually aligned. Next for the firewall and engine cradle (right word?) After a good bit of sanding down the joins time to paint. Tamiya paints sprayed at 15psi and 2xpaint:1xthinner. Rubber black for the engine block and cockpit green for the cradle and firewall Exhausts sprayed with flat iron and dry brushed with Humbrol rust acrylic Bringing it together after drybrushing the engine block and cradle with Humbrol aluminium That's all for now. Any tips or criticism are equally welcomed and hopefully I will get a chance to move forward with the cockpit and post an update at the weekend
  2. In 2019 ICM is to release a new tool family of A/-B-26B/C Invader kits: - ref. 48281 - Douglas B-26B-50 Invader, Korean War American Bomber - release expected in Q3 2019 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48281 - ref. 48282 - Douglas A-26B-15 Invader - release expected in Q4 2019 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48282 Dedicated decals by ICM: - ref. D48001 - Douglas A-26B/C Invader (WWII) - release expected in Q3 2019 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICMD48001 - ref. D48002 - Douglas B-26B/C Invader (Korean War) - release expected in Q4 2019 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICMD48002 V.P.
  3. Hannants homepage has just revealed the ICM catalog 2019 new kits (ref. ICMxxxxx) and decals (ref. ICMDxxxxx). For the a/c: 1/72 - LINK 1/48 - LINK - ref. 48099 - Polikarpov I-153, WWII China Guomindang Air Force - ref. 48186 - Beech C18S "Magic by Moonlight" - ref. 48240 - Junkers Ju 88D-1 - ref. 48254 - Polikarpov U-2/Po-2VS with Soviet Pilots & GP (1943-1945) - ref. 48264 - Heinkel He 111H-20 - ref. 48265 - Heinkel He 111H-6 North Africa - ref. 48271 - Dornier Do 217N-1 - ref. 48281 - Douglas B-26B-50 Invader, Korean War - ref. 48282 - Douglas A-26B-15 Invader, WWII - ref. 48905 - Mikoyan MiG-25BM 1/32 - LINK - ref. 32004 - Polikarpov I-16 type 10 - ref. 32005 - Polikarpov I-16 type 17 - ref. 32006 - Polikarpov I-16 type 10 WWII China Guomindang Air Force - ref. 32007 - Polkarpov I-16 type 24 with Soviet Pilots (1939-1942) - ref. 32012 - Polikarpov I-153 WWII China Guomindang Air Force - ref. 32032 - Kokusai Ki-86a/K9W1 Cypress - ref. 32033 - Bücker Bü 131A - ref. 32034 - Bücker Bü-131D with German Cadets (1939-1945) - ref. 32040 - Gloster Gladiator Mk.I - ref. 32104 - USAAF Pilots (1941-1945)(3 figures) - ref. 32105 - British Pilots (1939-1945)(3 figures) And for the "rest" 1/35 - link 1/24 - link 1/16 - link V.P.
  4. SEAL Team Fighter #2 ICM 1:24 24112 The US Navy Sea, Air and Land teams (SEALS) are the US Navy's Special Operations forces under the Special Operations Command. They are organised into Teams and have reportedly one of the hardest entry courses of Special forces as it includes a great deal of water borne elements. Full training can take over a year. Recently Seal Team 6 was in the news as part of the Osama bin Laden operation. This second figure depicts a seal kneeling after emerging from the water. There is a main sprure of the figure, one of equipment, a rubber spure with flippers and hoses; and a small clear spure with a dive mask lens. The torso is two parts (front & back). The left and right legs are one part each and are added to the torso. There is a mould seam on both sides of the leg to clean up. The arms are added and again these have mould seam to clean up, the shield then attached to one arm. The head is then fitted and a choice of a masked figure or with the mask up can be modelled. Additional swim equipment and other tactical equipment is then added. Conclusion This is a new kit of a modern Special Forces figure in a large enough scale for the detail to pop out. Review sample courtesy of
  5. In 2019, ICM is to release new tool 1/32nd Gloster Gladiator kits: - ref. 32040 - Gloster Gladiator Mk.I, WWII British Fighter - release Q4 2019 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM32040 Dedicated decals by ICM: - ref. D32004 - Gladiator Mk.I/II in Foreign Services - release Q4 2019 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICMD32004 V.P.
  6. SEAL Team Fighter #1 ICM 1:24 24111 The US Navy Sea, Air and Land teams (SEALS) are the US Navy's Special Operations forces under the Special Operations Command. They are organised into Teams and have reportedly one of the hardest entry courses of Special forces as it includes a great deal of water borne elements. Full training can take over a year. Recently Seal Team 6 was in the news as part of the Osama bin Laden operation. This first figure depicts a seal emerging from, or just out of the water. There is a main sprure of the figure, one of equipment, a rubber spure with flippers and hoses; and a small clear spure with a dive mask lens. The torso is two parts (front & back). The left and right legs are one part each and are added to the torso. There is a mould seam on both sides of the leg to clean up. The arms are added and again these have mould seam to clean up, the shield then attached to one arm. The head is then fitted and a choice of a masked figure or with the mask up can be modelled. Additional swim equipment and other tactical equipment is then added. Conclusion This is a new kit of a modern Special Forces figure in a large enough scale for the detail to pop out. Review sample courtesy of
  7. After almost finishing the Eduard 1/48 Fokker DVII (it is standing forlorn on the shelf like an abandoned puppy, waiting for me to gather enough strength to eventually complete its wooden propeller), it is time for something different. Not too different though, as it is still German and propeller driven, but this time it is the ICM 1/48 Dornier Do17-Z10 Kauz II night fighter. I guess many know the Do17 "Fliegender bleistift" history, a surprisingly fast light bomber in its day, but the Z10 night fighter version was a rare one indeed. Built to test the new infrared Spanner Anlage sighting system, it featured a infrared beam transmitter in the nose that would illuminate the target, and a sight scope for the pilot to aim at the target image displayed there. The beam transmitter and receiver/sight scope is easily seen in this picture, together with the armoured windscreen: Unfortunately for the Luftwaffe, the Spanner Anlage proved worthless as the range in which the targets became visible to the pilot was way too short to make it useful. The pilot would probably be better off replacing the infrared sight scope with an ordinary telescope, and try to find the British bombers himself like an old skool pirate. Yarrrr. So the Z10 ended up with just 10 examples being built, making it an interesting curiosity in airplane history. The kit is ICM 1/48 DO 17Z-10, which has gotten very good reviews, so I`m praying for an easy build here. This is both my first ever W.I.P and a project to learn new techniques, so if you are going to follow this I`d suggest you buy some Guinness at the bar, as lager could go flat and taste horrible in the time between updates to this thread.
  8. In the framework of the recent toy tradefair Mir Detstva 2017, held at Moscow, ICM is reported having announced a new tool 1/72nd MiG-25RB/RBT "Foxbat-B" kit for 2018. To be followed. Source AlexGRD: http://master194.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=100171&sid=b7252e4ad3d849de8e26c4c009281a81 V.P.
  9. My first entry here in the Ready for inspection area......... This started life as a 1/48 ICM Spitfire MKIX although as there were alternative parts in the box I decided to build a MK VIII and use HGW decals for the South African Air Force version. Paint is Tamiya acrylics and the base is made from a kitchen drawer front with the addition of a SAAF cap badge. This was the last of 6 Spitfires built one after the other so looking for something completely different now!
  10. Here are a couple more spitfires finished over the last few months. Aircraft and figures are all ICM except for the Tamiya MK V and are built OOB with some aftermarket decals in places .
  11. Paul A H

    Do 17Z-2 WWII Finnish Bomber - 1:72

    Do 17Z-2 WWII Finnish Bomber 1:72 ICM The Dornier Do 17, nicknamed the Fliegender Bleistift or flying pencil due to its slender shape, was a light bomber designed by Dornier Flugzeugwerke in the mid-1930s. During the early design period the aircraft was euphemistically referred to as a high speed mail plane, but it's highly likely that it was always intended to fulfil a combat role. The Do17 was able to carry a bomb load of 1000kg, but range was limited when carrying heavy loads. Defensive armament was comprised of MG-15 machine guns carried in various positions in the forward fuselage. This is the fourth or fifth iteration of the newly tooled Do-17 family from Kiev-based outfit ICM, although it is almost identical to the original Z-2 boxing (only the clear sprue has been revised). Inside the very sturdy top-opening box are three largish frames of light grey plastic and two of clear plastic which together hold a total of nearly 200 parts. The airframe is covered in crisp, recessed panel lines which look very good indeed, and the mouldings are crisp and clean. The instructions are an A4 stapled booklet which has been printed in colour and the decal sheet is clear and well printed. The overall impression is of a well-executed kit which looks as though it should be enjoyable to build. Construction begins with the very well detailed cockpit. Interior detail includes the crew seats, rudder pedals, control column (moulded in two parts), radio gear and other sidewall details and a large number of spare magazines for the defensive machine guns. The instrument panel is made up from two parts and is beautifully detailed. Internal frames for the bomb bay and wing spar are also included, as is an optional fuel tank for the forward part of the bomb bay. The upper wing is moulded as a single span, complete with interior detail for the main landing gear bays. The ailerons are moulded as separate parts, which is always welcome. The rest of the flying surfaces follow suite, with the rudders and elevators all moulded separately. The elevator balance mechanisms are also included. With the major parts of the airframe complete, construction turns to the bomb bay and landing gear. Twenty 50kg bombs are included, although whether you use them all will depend on whether you have installed the optional fuel tank first. The landing gear is nicely detailed, although construction is somewhat unconventional. You have to install the interior parts for the landing gear onto the undersurface of the completed wing and then build the engine nacelles around them. This is quite a clever way of approaching this stage of the build and it should work well. The exterior parts of the nacelle have to be constructed with the firewall and engine sub-frame fixed to one half of the nacelle. The engines themselves comprise six parts and include options for different exhaust arrangements. With the engines in place, the rest of the build is occupied with finishing details. The canopy is nice and clear and includes an option for the DF loop, or the later streamlined fairing. Six MG15s are included. The bomb bay can be finished in open or closed positions, and for once you aren't required to simply cut the bomb bay doors apart to finish it in the open position as separate parts are included for that option. Decal options include: Dornier Do 17Z-2 3/LeLv 46, Finnish Air Force, February 1942. This aircraft is finished in a partial white distemper; and Dornier Do 17Z-2 2/LeLv 46, Finnish Air Force, February 1942. Conclusion We waited a while for a nice, modern kit of the Do17/215 family. ICM's effort looks to be slightly ahead of the Airfix kit in terms of detail, and of course they have offered a wider range of variants from their moulds. Speaking of which, the mouldings are high quality, there is plenty of the aforementioned detail and surface structures are fine and crisp. Overall this is a well executed and carefully designed kit which is rich in detail. Highly recommended. Review sample courtesy of
  12. Shar2

    Le.gl.Einheits-Pkw (Kfz-1). 1:35

    Le.gl.Einheits-Pkw (Kfz-1) ICM 1:35 After 1933, Germany began to build a modern army. The light off-road passenger car was built by the BMW-Werk Eisenach under the designation BMW 325, as well as Hanomag (Typ 20 and Stoewer . The vehicles were used as troop carriers (Kfz. 1), by repair-and-maintenance squads (Kfz. 2/40), by artillery reconnaissance sonic measurement squads (Kfz. 3) and by troop-level aerial defence (Kfz. 4). Almost 13,000 units were built. Between 1940 and 1943, only Stoewer continued to build the R 200 Spezial without the four-wheel steering (Typ 40). The cars weighed 1,775 kg empty (1,700 kg without the four-wheel steering). 90% of all military branches rejected the vehicle as "unfit for wartime service" in a 1942 enquiry, while the much simpler, lighter and cheaper Volkswagen Kübelwagen proved to be far superior in basically every respect. The Model The model arrives in the usual sturdy box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are four sprues of light grey styrene, a small decal sheet and, in a separate poly bag, one clear sprue. On initial inspection the parts are really well moulded, clean, with no sign of flash. There are a number of moulding pips, some of which are on quite fragile looking parts, so care should be taken when removing. The sprue gates attaching items like the exhaust are also quite heavy and I can see these parts breaking if you’re not careful. The build is actually one of ICM’s easiest having seen many of their earlier releases which seemed to include everything separately. In this case the chassis and much of the suspension bracketry is provided as one complete moulding to which a three piece V shaped crossbeam is added to the centre section followed by its floor pan, and then four bump stops at each corner. Two spring mouldings are then added to their respective mounting plates and the steering rack fitted to the front axle mount. The lower wishbones, also single mouldings for front and rear are attached, along with the front and rear differentials and axles, which are made up from four parts. The upper suspension arms are fitted, as are the drop links, four stowage boxes and the exhaust pipe. Strangely, the main drive shaft is fitted before the engine, which is a lovely little model in itself. Consisting of the main block split vertically, the cylinder head and support cradle are glued into place, before the two piece bell housing and four piece gearbox are attached. The engine is further detailed with the fitting of the ancillaries, such as starter motor, alternator, filter and manifolds. With the fitting of the drive belts and fan the engine is fitted into place between the main drive shaft and the front differential, before the air filter and exhaust section which attaches to the main pipe work already attached to the chassis. The main section of floor pan, which also includes the rear mudguards is also a single piece moulding, the underside of which is fitted with the three piece fuel tank, skid pan, fuel filler pipe and a rear reflector. This section is then glued to the chassis and the each of the three piece wheels are fitted to their respective axles. The two piece radiator is then glued into position, when construction moves to the interior, with the fitting of the front and rear bulkheads. The front bulkhead is fitted with the instrument binnacle, cross beam, and grab handle, as well as the foot pedals and steering column. The cabin sides are then attached, as well as the three piece bonnet, which, unfortunately has not been moulded so that the engine can be seen. If the modeller wishes to reveal the engine, then quite a bit of careful surgery will be required. To the rear the boot section is attached, as are the roof hinge supports, while in the front the gear stick is fitted. Each of the seats, two singles at the front and a bench seat in the rear as assembled and glued into place, as are the front mud guards. The rear of the bench seat is glued into place along with the two rifles and their stowage supports, at the front of the vehicle the three piece bumper assembly is attached. There are two more rifles fitted, one per side in the front cabin and the four doors assembled and fitted either open or closed. The windscreen is made up from three parts and attached to the front bulkhead. The rear bumpers, one for each quarter are made up form three parts, with the left hand unit fitted with number and unit id plates, while the left unit is fitted with a rear light. The completed bumpers are glued into position, followed by the two piece spare wheel and four piece folded roof, there being no option to have the roof raised. The build is completed with the addition of allteh lights, windscreen wipers, rear view mirrors, a spade and a pair of three piece Jerry cans. Decals The small decal sheet contains registration numbers for four vehicles and along with unit ID insignia. The four vehicles are all painted in the overall tank grey, with Field Grey roof canvas. The vehicles blonged to the following units:- Le.gl.Einheits-Pkw (Kfz-1), 16th Panzer Division, River Don area, June 1942 Le.gl.Einheits-Pkw (Kfz-1), 11th Panzer Division Ukraine, July 1941 Le.gl.Einheits-Pkw (Kfz-1), Panzergruppe 1 Keist, Ukraine, July 1941 Le.gl.Einheits-Pkw (Kfz-1), 1/JG51, Stary Bykhov, Belorussia, July 1941 Conclusion It’s good to see these rather unusual vehicles being released. They may not have had the starring roles, or even a glittering career, but they can be just as interesting. I’d never heard of this vehicle before receiving the review sample. Will look just as great with some troops in a diorama or on its own in a collection. Review sample courtesy of
  13. "Britain’s position is hopeless. The war is won by us. A reversal in the prospects of success is impossible." -- Generaloberst Franz Halder, diary entry for 22 July 1940 Oh, it has its triumphs, but look at its countless defeats, missed blows, and repeat attempts! -- Wislawa Szymborska, "On Death, Without Exaggeration" "My experience over Dunkirk had taught me that when attacked the best counter was to go into a right turn. In this manoeuvre, the Spitfire was infinitely superior to the Messerschmitt, and so long as one remained in the turn, the enemy pilot could not bring his guns to bear. And this I did, as the German pilot flashed past, turning as he did so to get behind me. But it was I who finished astern of him. The rest was easy." -- Flight Lieutenant Al Deere, 54 Squadron As you may know, I have something of an interest in the Battle of Britain, and so I thought for my next build I would try something simple and easy and make it only slightly more complex. It's widely-acknowledged that the ICM 1/72 109E is eerily -- some uncharitable souls might say suspiciously -- similar to the 1/72 Tamiya 109E, but for fuselage halves of the correct length. How similar is it reputed to be? The kit parts have been said to be interchangeable. I decided to test this theory. The fuselage halves sure seem to fit the wings well! I painted the interior Colourcoats RLM02 with RLM66 detail bits (and like an idiot, managed to spill almost all of my brand-new pot of RLM66, which is almost impossible to do with Colourcoats tins unless you're an idiot, and guilty as charged Some speculative test-fitting suggests the Tamiya cockpit interior will fit without difficulty in the ICM fuselage. I'm using Xtradecals from their Battle of Britain 70th sheet (because both Tamiya and ICM decals are crap) to build Bf109E-3 "Yellow 15" of 3./JG52, flown by Unteroffizier Karl Wolff, which crash-landed in Calais on 30 August 1940. Wolff survived, only to be shot down and captured on 30 September 1940, a day of particularly heavy Bf109 losses for the Luftwaffe. The aircraft in question was photographed quite a bit, and as we can see, it received heavy field-applied mottling along the sides of the fuselage, in addition to having a white snout.
  14. As already announced in a ICM general thread ( http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234974439-icm-148-junkers-ju-88a5dornier-do-17z/), the Ukrainian brand is to release a new tool 1/48th Junkers Ju-88A-5 kit in 2015 - ref.48232. Source - ICM 2015 catalogue : http://www.icm.com.ua/katalog/ Box art V.P.
  15. In the framework of the recent toy tradefair Mir Detstva 2017, held at Moscow, ICM is reported having announced a 1/32nd Bücker Bu.131 (.181 ?) kit for 2018. To be followed. Source AlexGRD: http://master194.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=100171&sid=b7252e4ad3d849de8e26c4c009281a81 V.P.
  16. In the framework of the recent toy tradefair Mir Detstva 2017, held at Moscow, ICM is reported having announced a 1/32nd Polikarpov I-153 Chaika kit for 2018. To be followed. Source AlexGRD: http://master194.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=100171&sid=b7252e4ad3d849de8e26c4c009281a81 V.P.
  17. A usually reliable russian source announces ICM is to release in 2017 a 1/32nd Polikarpov I-16 kit. To be followed. Source: http://scalemodels.ru/news/10678-anons-ICM-1-48-He-111H3.html For the record a 1/48th I-16 type 24 kit is expected by ICM in December 2016 (link). V.P.
  18. Confirmed as new tool with ref.48261. Release expected for Q3 2017 https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48261 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Not mentioned in the 2016 catalogue (http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234995418-icm-catalog-2016-programme/), dixit scalemodels.ru ICM is to release in 2017 a new tool 1/48th Heinkel He.111H-3 kit - ref.48261 Source: http://scalemodels.ru/news/10678-anons-ICM-1-48-He-111H3.html A new family of 1/48th He.111 in view? Would make sense after the 1/48th Do.17/Do.215 & Ju-88 ICM kits but wait and see. Scalemodel.ru info also show a box art... Dubious as it's the Revell 1/32nd He.111H-6 one! V.P.
  19. Hannants homepage reveals one of the next ICM 1/48th kit: a Polikarpov Po-2/U-2 "Mule". catalogue ref. 49251 Source: http://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48251 Pics: http://www.plastik-modellbau.org/blog/neuheiten-von-der-spielwarenmesse-heute-icm/2013/ http://www.aeroscale.co.uk/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=13661 For the record ICM has released a 1/72nd kit of the Po-2/U-2 on October 2012 under catalogue ref. 72241 Source: http://www.icm.com.ua/comingsoon/213-u-2po-2vs-wwii-soviet-light-night-bomber.html V.P.
  20. The Beech is back in the new ICM catalogue: 1/48th Beech C-45F/UC-45F Expeditor "WWII USAAF Passenger aircraft" - ref.48181 Source: http://scalemodels.ru/modules/forum/img_974235_1391199687_IMG_0564.jpg.html V.P.
  21. After the 1/72nd kit ( http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234967600-172-polikarpov-i-153-chaika-by-icm-released) ICM is to release in 2015 a 1/48th Polikarpov I-153 Chaika Soviet biplane fighter kit - ref.ICM48095 Sources: http://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48095 and https://www.scalemates.com/products/product.php?id=101557 V.P.
  22. ICM is to release a new tool 1/72nd Polikarpov I-153 Chaika (Russian Чайка, "Seagull") kit - ref. 72074. Source: http://www.icm.com.ua/news/370-i-153-chaika-wwii-soviet-biplane-fighter.html V.P.
  23. After the recce-bomber MiG-25RB/RBT & RBF (link) ICM is to release in Q4 2019 a 1/72nd SEAD MiG-25BM "Foxbat-F" kit - ref. 72174 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM72174 V.P.
  24. After the recce-bomber MiG-25R/RB family (link & link) and interceptor MiG-25PD (link), ICM is to release in Q4 2019 a 1/48th SEAD MiG-25BM "Foxbat-F" kit - ref. 48905 Source: https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/ICM48905 V.P.
  25. Renault Taxi De La Marne (1914) with French Infantry ICM 1:35 (35660) The Renault Taxi de la Marne (Marne Taxi) is an automobile manufactured between 1905 and 1910 by Renault and used as a taxicab. The name Taxi de la Marne was not used until the outbreak of World War I, when the fleet of Paris taxis was requisitioned by the French Army to transport troops from Paris to the First Battle of the Marne in early September 1914. It was the first car produced after Marcel Renault's death in 1903, along with another four models. A car-rental company in Paris ordered 1,500 cars in 1905 as a result of a new invention that automatically calculated how much the passenger had to pay. It was called a taximeter and had been invented in 1891. Soon the Taxi de la Marne was popular for the rest of the decade in Paris and also in London from 1907. The Model The model arrives in the usual sturdy box with a separate top sleeve with a nice artist’s representation of the vehicle on the front. Inside, within a large poly bag, are four sprues of light grey styrene, four vinyl tyres, a small decal sheet and, in a separate poly bag, one clear sprue. On initial inspection the parts are really well moulded, clean, with no sign of flash. There are a number of moulding pips, some of which are on quite fragile looking parts, so care should be taken when removing. The sprue gates attaching items like the exhaust are also quite heavy and I can see these parts breaking if you’re not careful. The build begins with the joining of the two chassis rails, each with the front suspension springs integrally moulded, by two cross members. The single piece mudguards/running board part is then glued to the chassis. The carriage like cabin is then assembled from four parts before being fitted to the chassis too. Two longitudinal rails are then fitted between the forward cross member and front of the engine bay, while the four supports for the running boards are also glued into position. The sump tay is then attached, followed by the two piece front axle. The cute little engine is assembled from seven parts which includes the exhaust, before being glued into the engine bay, followed by the two piece gearbox and two piece radiator, which actually sits behind the engine. The single piece bonnet is then fitted as are the two, two piece rear doors, rear seat base and front bulkhead. The rear seat is fitted, along with the front seat base and front. The front bulkhead of the rear cabin is attached, as are the drivers bench seat and the two, two piece headlights. The rear suspension springs have to be slid into place and twisted for the location pins to fit properly. The two piece rear lamp is attached, as are the silencer and rear section of the exhaust pipe. The rear axle is made up form two parts, which includes the integrally moulded drive shaft. Each wheel is made from the single piece rim and the vinyl tyres, the completed wheels are then fitted to the axles, while the engine under tray, brake leaver and steering column are also fitted. The foot pedals are glued into position, as are the steering wheel, gear and handbrake levers. The front of the main cabin is further detailed with another panel onto which two headrests and fold down seat are attached. The spare wheel consists of a styrene ring and vinyl tyre, this is then glued to the drivers side running board. The rear cabin is fitted with the side and rear panels, while the drivers cabin is fitted with a headrest, armrests and frame for the folding rain cover. The three piece meter is assembled and fitted to the opposite side to the driver and the starting handle attached at the front. Lastly the rear cabin is fitted with its roof and roof hinges, while the drivers position is fitted with its two piece cover and all the doors have the handles glued into position. Figures The thing to note about this set is the figures are not all French Infantry. There are three French Soldiers; one standing, one sitting, and one lying down. The forth figure is a French Taxi Driver. The figures though are well sculpted like all of ICM's recent offerings. The dress for the military figures looks correct and equipment does as well. Decals The small decal sheet (not shown) contains registration numbers for three vehicles and a couple of decals for the taximeter. The three vehicles are all painted in the overall red, with black mudguards and roof sections. Conclusion It’s good to see these rather unusual vehicles being released, particularly for the WWI aficionados and also remembers the role played by them during the Great War. It is also great to see a civilian vehicle of the time, for those who like something different in their collection. Whilst not a complicated kit, certainly by ICM standards, it looks like it will build into a nice little model. The inclusion of the figures makes this an overall great package. Review sample courtesy of
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